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    Google News / 5 min. ago
  • Gun-related cases hit 20-year highs in MinnesotaGun-related cases hit 20-year highs in Minnesota

    More criminals with guns have been sent to prison for gun-related convictions than at any time in at least two decades.

    StarTribune.com / 32 min. ago
  • Long-awaited children's hospice and respite home a 'dream come true'Long-awaited children's hospice and respite home a 'dream come true'

    Crescent Cove is one of only three facilities of its kind of in the country.

    StarTribune.com / 39 min. ago
  • Cities Opting To Give Up 911 Dispatch Services To CountyCities Opting To Give Up 911 Dispatch Services To County

    The city of Minnetonka voted this fall to enter an agreement with the Hennepin County Sheriff's Office to provide emergency dispatch and 911 call services ...

    KSTP / 43 min. ago
  • Firefighters rescue teens trapped 100 feet down in St. Paul caveFirefighters rescue teens trapped 100 feet down in St. Paul cave

    The boys were exploring caverns on the city’s West Side when their adventure went awry. They were not hurt.

    StarTribune.com / 51 min. ago
  • St. Paul Winter Carnival buttons' look for 2018 unveiled - Minneapolis Star TribuneSt. Paul Winter Carnival buttons' look for 2018 unveiled - Minneapolis Star Tribune

    Minneapolis Star TribuneSt. Paul Winter Carnival buttons' look for 2018 unveiledMinneapolis Star TribuneThe buttons, designed by John Kocon of Ham Lake, depict the St. Paul skyline, a festive state image, the Kings of the Winter Carnival and two football helmets in recognition of the Super Bowl coming to Minnesota in February. Button sales constitute the ...

    Google News / 1 h. 31 min. ago more
  • Short-staffed Minneapolis Health Department juggles growing inspection caseloadShort-staffed Minneapolis Health Department juggles growing inspection caseload

    As restaurants boom and regulations grow, Health Department struggles to keep up.

    StarTribune.com / 1 h. 43 min. ago
  • Woman dies in house fire off W. Seventh in St. PaulWoman dies in house fire off W. Seventh in St. Paul

    It was the second fire-related death in St. Paul in 2017.

    StarTribune.com / 1 h. 45 min. ago
  • Overnight gunfire wounds four in north MinneapolisOvernight gunfire wounds four in north Minneapolis

    A 17-year-old boy is in critical condition. No one has been arrested, police said.

    StarTribune.com / 2 h. 2 min. ago
  • Acclaimed Saint John's Bible gets permanent homeAcclaimed Saint John's Bible gets permanent home

    Collegeville now hosts one of the few hand-scripted Bibles created in the past century.

    StarTribune.com / 2 h. 50 min. ago
  • Grassroots effort is sprucing up ChisholmGrassroots effort is sprucing up Chisholm

    Locals brainstormed on making downtown better with grant money.

    StarTribune.com / 3 h. 12 min. ago
  • Northwest Minnesota residents angered by plan to cut back border crossing hoursNorthwest Minnesota residents angered by plan to cut back border crossing hours

    StarTribune.com / 3 h. 13 min. ago
  • St. Paul Firefighters Rescue 2 Teens From CaveSt. Paul Firefighters Rescue 2 Teens From Cave

    (credit: CBS) MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) – Firefighters in St. Paul rescued two teens who were stuck in a cave early Saturday morning. (credit: SPFD) Around 1:30 a.m., a caller reported that two teenagers were exploring the bluffs on the city’s west side and were unable to get back from their position. (credit: SPFD) Upon arrival, crews learned the teens had entered a “tube like opening” to a cave about 100 feet down. The teens were unable to exit through that opening, which the caller said “was too narrow for a grown man to get down.” (credit: CBS) The rescue took two-and-a-half hours and the teens were uninjured, according to the fire department. (credit: CBS) (credit: CBS) (credit: CBS)

    CBS Minnesota / 4 h. 56 min. ago more
  • St. Paul Firefighters Rescue 2 Teens From Cave - CBS Minnesota / WCCOSt. Paul Firefighters Rescue 2 Teens From Cave - CBS Minnesota / WCCO

    CBS Minnesota / WCCOSt. Paul Firefighters Rescue 2 Teens From CaveCBS Minnesota / WCCOMINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) – Firefighters in St. Paul rescued two teens who were stuck in a cave early Saturday morning. Around 1:30 a.m., a caller reported that two teenagers were exploring the bluffs on the city's west side and were unable to get back from ...Firefighters rescue two teenagers stuck in St. Paul caveTwinCities.com-Pioneer Pressall 4 news articles »

    Google News / 4 h. 57 min. ago more
  • Wilco Plays Final Show In St. Paul Ahead Of Hiatus - JamBaseWilco Plays Final Show In St. Paul Ahead Of Hiatus - JamBase

    JamBaseWilco Plays Final Show In St. Paul Ahead Of HiatusJamBaseIt was a bittersweet night for Wilco fans as the band wrapped up a three night run at the Palace Theatre in St. Paul, Minnesota playing their final show of the year, and their last ahead of an announced hiatus that is expected to run through 2018. For ...

    Google News / 5 h. 29 min. ago
  • 1900s Romanian immigrant lifted the lid on St. Paul's wretched poverty - Minneapolis Star Tribune1900s Romanian immigrant lifted the lid on St. Paul's wretched poverty - Minneapolis Star Tribune

    1900s Romanian immigrant lifted the lid on St. Paul's wretched povertyMinneapolis Star TribuneHis brief but influential role in confronting St. Paul poverty a century ago started 5,000 miles away and endured a nasty anti-immigrant backlash. Carol Aronovici was kicked out of his native Romania in his late teens for advocating peasants' rights.

    Google News / 5 h. 48 min. ago more
  • Woman Dead After St. Paul House FireWoman Dead After St. Paul House Fire

    The fire occurred at about 1:15 p.m. at a residence in the 500 block of Jefferson Avenue ...

    KSTP / 6 h. 25 min. ago
  • University of Minnesota Works to Prevent Sexual AssaultUniversity of Minnesota Works to Prevent Sexual Assault

    The University of Minnesota is rolling out a multi-step initiative next year aimed at preventing sexual misconduct by changing campus culture ...

    KSTP / 7 h. 48 min. ago
  • Franken Writes Letter To Woman Who Accused Him Of HarassmentFranken Writes Letter To Woman Who Accused Him Of Harassment

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Sen. Al Franken has written a letter to the woman who accused him of forcibly kissing and groping her, saying he is ashamed of his actions and apologizes. Los Angeles radio host Leeann Tweeden read the letter Friday while appearing on the TV talk show “The View.” In the letter, Franken tells Tweeden that he wants to “apologize to you personally.” He also says there is no excuse for the photo taken of him posing in a joking manner while apparently placing his hands on her chest while she was asleep aboard a transport plane. Tweeden says the unwanted kissing took place during a 2006 USO tour. Franken says he remembers their encounter differently but is “ashamed that my actions ruined that experience for you.” (© Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

    CBS Minnesota / 7 h. 53 min. ago more
  • Free, Fun Things To Do On ThanksgivingFree, Fun Things To Do On Thanksgiving

    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — After your Thanksgiving meal and before your first nap it’s nice to get out for a bit and walk off the bloat. Here are a few free, fun and family friendly things to do that are open on Thursday. Amber Box at Guthrie Theater The Amber Box is located on the ninth floor of the Guthrie. The amber-tinted windows were designed by Jean Nouvel to provide a warm, optimistic view of Minneapolis throughout the year. From the box, you can seee everything from the 35W bridge to the Stone Arch Bridge and the Mississippi River, St. Anthony Falls, the original Pillsbury A Mill and the Mill City Museum. Holidazzle Skating Rink Even though the Twin Cities tradition Holidazzle doesn’t get started until Friday, the skating rink is open every day between now and the end of winter. It’s free, and you can bring your own skates or pick up a complementary pair. Minnehaha Falls There’s just something about Minnehaha Falls, even in the gray, damp weather that’s so relaxing. Rice Park Over in St. Paul, Rice Park is all lit up for the holidays. The trees are coated and the ice is shined up for free skating. Marjorie McNeely Conservatory at the Como Zoo No matter the weather outside, it’s always summery and warm inside the Marjorie McNeely Conservatory at the Como Zoo.But make your plans early, because it’s one of the most popular days of the year and they close at 4 p.m. The fall flower show comes down next weekend, and the Holiday Flower Show begins on Dec. 2.

    CBS Minnesota / 9 h. 39 min. ago more
  • Vandals Strike Heat Lamps at Metro Light Rail StationVandals Strike Heat Lamps at Metro Light Rail Station

    As colder temperatures roll in, Metro Transit officials said they're busy dealing with heat lamps that keep going out at light rail platforms across the Twin Cities ...

    KSTP / 10 h. 8 min. ago
  • 4 Shot In North Minneapolis; Teenager In Critical Condition4 Shot In North Minneapolis; Teenager In Critical Condition

    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — A teenager is in critical condition Saturday morning after being shot in north Minneapolis. It happened on the 3600 block of Emerson Avenue North just before 1:30 a.m. When officers arrived they found two men shot. Both were taken to North Memorial Hospital. (credit: CBS) A 17-year-old male is in critical condition. The other victim, a 33-year-old, is expected to be OK. A third man was found shot in an alley nearby. He’s in stable condition. A fourth victim was dropped off at Hennepin County Medical Center and is expected to be OK. Police believe an argument between the victims and a suspect led to the shooting. No arrests have been made.

    CBS Minnesota / 11 h. 10 min. ago more
  • Pedestrian Killed in Spring Lake Park CollisionPedestrian Killed in Spring Lake Park Collision

    The driver remained at the scene and cooperated with authorities, and police do not believe drugs or alcohol played a role in the crash ...

    KSTP / 11 h. 57 min. ago
  • Young activists look beyond Enbridge pipeline fightYoung activists look beyond Enbridge pipeline fight

    A group of pipeline opponents and Youth Climate Intervenors, including Brent Murcia, center left, and Akilah Sanders-Reed, center right, gather to debrief after a day of hearings regarding the Enbridge Line 3 pipeline in Minnesota in downtown St. Paul. A group of pipeline opponents and Youth Climate Intervenors, including Brent Murcia, center left, and Akilah Sanders-Reed, center right, gather to debrief after a day of hearings regarding the Enbridge Line 3 pipeline in Minnesota in downtown St. Paul.

    St. Paul News / 20 h. 9 min. ago more
  • Pedestrian Fatally Struck By Car In Spring Lake ParkPedestrian Fatally Struck By Car In Spring Lake Park

    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — A man was hit and killed by a car at a busy intersection in Spring Lake Park Friday evening. It happened just before 7:30 p.m. at the intersection of University Ave and 83rd Avenue Northeast. Police say a 35-year-old man was pronounced dead at the scene. (credit: CBS) Investigators say the car was headed north on University Avenue when the driver — who is said to be cooperating with law enforcement — swerved to avoid hitting the man and ended up in the center median near the intersection. No one in the vehicle was injured. Police say there’s no indication the driver of the vehicle was impaired. The identity of the victim is being withheld until family is notified.

    CBS Minnesota / 20 h. 22 min. ago more
  • Salvation Army Holiday Red Kettles Begin Ringing Bells In Twin CitiesSalvation Army Holiday Red Kettles Begin Ringing Bells In Twin Cities

    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — The Salvation Army is kicking off its 2018 Red Kettle campaign outside of Cub Foods and the Mall of America. The mall held the “Big Brass Blast” event Friday night. Brass musicians from around the country performed traditional Christmas songs. Starting Saturday, you will see red kettles at every entrance to the Mall of America and every Cub Foods location in the Twin Cities. After Thanksgiving, Kettles will be spread out at 500 sites in the metro. The Red Kettle campaign is still looking for volunteers — visit their website for more information.

    CBS Minnesota / 20 h. 58 min. ago more
  • Minnesota-bred turkeys head to D.C. for a Thanksgiving pardon from President TrumpMinnesota-bred turkeys head to D.C. for a Thanksgiving pardon from President Trump

    The nation’s top turkey state is taking center stage ahead of Thanksgiving with high-profile events.

    StarTribune.com / 21 h. 15 min. ago
  • Class 4A football: Cloquet stops South St. Paul in state semis - TwinCities.com-Pioneer PressClass 4A football: Cloquet stops South St. Paul in state semis - TwinCities.com-Pioneer Press

    TwinCities.com-Pioneer PressClass 4A football: Cloquet stops South St. Paul in state semisTwinCities.com-Pioneer PressCloquet quarterback Tim Pokornowski is tackled by South St. Paul linebacker Nick Gallegos during the first quarter of the Class 4A State Football Semifinal game between South St. Paul and Cloquet at U.S. Bank Stadium on Friday, Nov. 17, 2017. (Matthew ...and more »

    Google News / 21 h. 23 min. ago more
  • Multiple Students Have Norovirus Symptoms at Cherry View ElementaryMultiple Students Have Norovirus Symptoms at Cherry View Elementary

    Multiple children at Cherry View Elementary School in Lakeville were sick with symptoms of norovirus Friday, according to the Minnesota Department of Health ...

    KSTP / 21 h. 43 min. ago
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  • Woman dies after house fire in St. Paul's West Seventh neighborhood - TwinCities.com-Pioneer PressWoman dies after house fire in St. Paul's West Seventh neighborhood - TwinCities.com-Pioneer Press

    TwinCities.com-Pioneer PressWoman dies after house fire in St. Paul's West Seventh neighborhoodTwinCities.com-Pioneer PressA woman was critically injured in a house fire in the 500 block of Jefferson Avenue A woman died after a house fire in the 500 block of Jefferson Avenue in St. Paul on Friday, Nov. 17, 2017. (Courtesy of Paul Barrett). Firefighters were called to the ...Woman Dead After St. Paul House FireKSTP.comall 5 news articles »

    Google News / 21 h. 49 min. ago more
  • Rally at Minnesota Capitol calls out sexual harassmentRally at Minnesota Capitol calls out sexual harassment

    Cynthia Miller, left wiped away tears as many speakers talked about how they were sexually harassed in the past. She came to the protest with friend Cherste Eidman, center, and Eidman's two daughters Sophie 15, and Martha, 17. ] GLEN STUBBE a glen.stubbe@startribune.com Friday, November 17, 2017 Event billed as "Protest Against Sexual Harassment" planned for Friday from 1-3 p.m. in the Minnesota Capitol Rotunda, in response to recent harassment allegations against several male Minnesota lawmakers.

    St. Paul News / 22 h. 29 min. ago more
  • Apple Valley Man Sentenced in Fatal Minneapolis CollisionApple Valley Man Sentenced in Fatal Minneapolis Collision

    Israel Delos Santos was sentenced to 10 years in prison. He pleaded guilty to one count of criminal vehicular homicide ...

    KSTP / 22 h. 39 min. ago
  • Man Involved in St. Paul Pedestrian Collision Pleads Not GuiltyMan Involved in St. Paul Pedestrian Collision Pleads Not Guilty

    Gary Thomas Schmalz, 63, was charged with two counts of criminal vehicular operation ...

    KSTP / 22 h. 46 min. ago
  • St. Paul Police Rescue Man Who Fell From Parking Ramp - CBS Minnesota / WCCOSt. Paul Police Rescue Man Who Fell From Parking Ramp - CBS Minnesota / WCCO

    CBS Minnesota / WCCOSt. Paul Police Rescue Man Who Fell From Parking RampCBS Minnesota / WCCOST. PAUL, Minn. (WCCO) — A Twin Cities man is lucky to be alive after falling 30 feet from the third floor of a parking ramp. It happened near Fourth and Cedar streets in downtown St. Paul last Saturday, on one of the coldest nights of the year. The ...and more »

    Google News / 1 d. 0 h. 6 min. ago more
  • St. Paul Police Rescue Man Who Fell From Parking RampSt. Paul Police Rescue Man Who Fell From Parking Ramp

    ST. PAUL, Minn. (WCCO) — A Twin Cities man is lucky to be alive after falling 30 feet from the third floor of a parking ramp. It happened near Fourth and Cedar streets in downtown St. Paul last Saturday, on one of the coldest nights of the year. The victim called for help and part of the rescue was caught on a police body camera. Faint calls for help could be heard throughout the parking ramp near Fourth and Cedar in downtown St. Paul. “We pulled up and my partner had his window down and we actually heard somebody calling for help so we got out of our squad car on Fourth Street here and started walking the parking ramp,” said Officer Cody Blanshan. Officers Cody Blanshan and Josh Boone say the closer they got to the sound of calls for help the further away they seemed to be. Their body cameras recorded them making a couple of laps through the ramp before they found him. “I looked down in this little kind of crack in the wall and he was down in a small alley, it’s probably three feet wide and maybe 25 to 30 feet down, a lot of trash down there and he was laying there. I just shined my light and it was the guy we were looking for,” said Officer Josh Boone. (credit: CBS) The man had been down in the hole for quite some time, he was bleeding and it was 14 degrees, the wind chill minus one. “We found the gentleman down in this hole quite a ways down somewhere where we couldn’t reach him, so we knew at that point had to put a ladder down there and immediately get two of our paramedics down there to start rendering aid,” said Fire Cpt. Dennis Hall. They used blankets to keep the man warm as paramedics worked quickly. “We were doing everything with flash lights and head lamps,” said Fire Cpt. Ken Adams. Paramedics used an extendable ground ladder to set up a pulley system to get the man out. “If things wouldn’t have come together, if just one piece would have not happened the guy wouldn’t have lived through the night,” said Adams. The man had a broken leg and was losing blood fast. He is now recovering at home.

    CBS Minnesota / 1 d. 0 h. 8 min. ago more
  • ‘U’ Mechanics Fighting For Better Contract‘U’ Mechanics Fighting For Better Contract

    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — A repair bill at the University of Minnesota is raising eyebrows as college mechanics fight for a better contract. WCCO first reported on the conditions inside the Education Sciences Building last month. Exit signs and emergency lights had dead batteries, and a locked door could have trapped students during a fire. WCCO went to a rally on Friday where some University workers made demands that they say will keep students safer. Brian Aldes is the secretary and treasurer of Teamsters Local 320. He spoke to his fellow union members with a megaphone. “I’ve got a message from over 1,500 teamsters,” Aldes said. “The teamsters will not back down, rain or shine.” Outside the office of the U of M’s president, campus workers called for more. From food service, to maintenance, to lawn care, they consider the college’s offer of a one-year contract with a 1.25-percent raise unfair. Brian Aldes (credit: CBS) “You don’t see what’s happening behind the scenes,” Aldes said. “Our workers perform an essential function and they do a fantastic job.” Bruce Ballentine took us inside the Education Sciences Building last month to point to some problems he said he first flagged years ago. “We want a little respect from the university,” Ballentine said. Nearly half of the exit signs did not have working batteries, and a quarter of all emergency lights were out. In the event of a lasting power outage, he says students wouldn’t know where to go. Since that story, Ballentine showed us the paperwork showing the U paid more than $30,000 to make repairs. “They didn’t like me talking to WCCO, and it’s like who do you go to?” Ballentine said. The school would not comment on the repair bill, but Patti Dion, director of employee relations, issued the following statement: The University continues to negotiate with the Teamsters with the intent to come to an agreement. Our next mediation with the Teamsters is November 27 and 28. There are still several process steps that would need to be taken before a strike would occur. If it did, the University would remain open during a strike and it would continue its important teaching, research and outreach work. The Teamsters head back to the bargaining table later this month. If they can’t reach an agreement with the U, members could strike as soon as next month.

    CBS Minnesota / 1 d. 0 h. 26 min. ago more
  • Megadeth Bassist Heads Home To Minnesota, With CoffeeMegadeth Bassist Heads Home To Minnesota, With Coffee

    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — A heavy-metal rocker in the second act of his career has come home to Minnesota to say thanks. David Ellefson hopes your next cup of Joe will give you an extra jolt. The founding member of Megadeth transitioned into the coffee business with Ellefson Coffee Company. He first sold the brand in his hometown of Jackson in southwestern Minnesota. It’s in Jackson David Ellefson found his rhythm and taught himself to play the bass. “I’m lucky I tapped into that at age 11. By the time I was in my junior or senior year I’d be playing gigs over in Marshal and around the area,” Ellefson said. The 53-year-old who grew up on a farm went on to find success with still-touring heavy metal band Megadeth. He won his first Grammy earlier this year. “Being in the music business and the farming business are similar, it’s feast or famine and when you have a bumper crop you better save some for the rainy season,” Ellefson said. He started drinking coffee on the road, and found a taste for his favorites while touring the world. “We have a lot of great conversations and brainstorming and get the ideas going over a good cup of Joe,” explained Ellefson. So it seemed natural for the coffee connoisseur to branch out with Ellefson Coffee Company. Megadeth fans will understand the play on words with platinum selling album Rust in Peace, with flagship Roast in Peace. It was important for Ellefson to bring the brand back to his hometown. After all Jackson sparked some of the bands most well-known songs: Foreclosure of a Dream, and the town’s cemetery inspired Mary Jane, a song about an urban legend. “You miss a lot of what a town really is when you just drive by on a four-lane interstate. So part of what our venture is here is to partner with the local businesses so we can bring people off the local freeway to bring them in to really get and feel the heart and soul of the people,” Ellefson said. Ellefson will greet friends and fans at Kat’s Hog Heaven in Jackson Saturday, Nov. 18, from 11 a.m. until 3 p.m. There he will introduce his new “Jackson House Blend” coffee.

    CBS Minnesota / 1 d. 0 h. 36 min. ago more
  • Women Rally, Demand Action at Sexual Harassment Protest at State CapitolWomen Rally, Demand Action at Sexual Harassment Protest at State Capitol

    Activists and victims gathered at the Minnesota Capitol protesting against sexual harassment culture ....

    KSTP / 1 d. 0 h. 40 min. ago
  • Sex offender sues West St. Paul over its rule limiting where he can live - TwinCities.com-Pioneer PressSex offender sues West St. Paul over its rule limiting where he can live - TwinCities.com-Pioneer Press

    Sex offender sues West St. Paul over its rule limiting where he can liveTwinCities.com-Pioneer PressWest St. Paul City Attorney Kori Land declined to comment on the lawsuit, other than to say that she believes it is the first of its kind in Minnesota. She referred questions to Attorney Monte Mills of Greene Espel, the Minneapolis law firm handling ...

    Google News / 1 d. 0 h. 43 min. ago more
  • ‘No More Silence’: Sexual Harassment Protest Held At Capitol‘No More Silence’: Sexual Harassment Protest Held At Capitol

    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — Demonstrators took a stand against sexual harassment Friday at the Minnesota State Capitol. Democratic Senator Dan Schoen and Republican Representative Tony Cornish face accusations from various women, including a lawmaker and a lobbyist. Rep. Erin Maye Quade (credit: CBS) Dozens of protesters rallied inside the Capitol Rotunda. Among them was DFL Rep. Erin Maye Quade. She says Schoen made unwanted advances via text message. Maye Quade also says Cornish texted her about her appearance. “There is a lot of work to do, and it’s got to start in the People’s House,” she said. The protest was organized before news broke of Sen. Al Franken’s alleged incident with Leeann Tweeden. Minnesota State Auditor Rebecca Otto called on him to resign. (credit: CBS) “It’s hard. He’s a friend, he’s an ally and he’s very effective,” Otto said. “But we cannot have a double standard.” The speakers also called out Senate Minority Leader Tom Bakk and House Speaker Kurt Daudt to create consequences for sexual harassment. They said they will push to have an equal rights amendment in the constitution next year.

    CBS Minnesota / 1 d. 1 h. 12 min. ago more
  • Hotel Hub Bloomington Prepping For Busy Super Bowl WeekendHotel Hub Bloomington Prepping For Busy Super Bowl Weekend

    BLOOMINGTON, Minn. (WCCO) — When one million visitors make a stop in the Twin Cities for Super Bowl weekend, they’ll need a place to sleep. Bloomington has more hotels than any other city in the state, more than Minneapolis and St. Paul combined. Hotel rooms in Bloomington have been booked for months. But, there are plenty of reasons to visit around that time, whether you’re staying there or not. WCCO shares the work underway to make sure the south metro shines for the Super Bowl. We caught up with Bloomington’s Convention and Visitors Bureau board chair, Jim Saccoman to talk Super Bowl. Saccoman is also General Manager of Embassy Suites. “When you get off the airplane you’ll be in Bloomington.  When you hit your first Super Bowl party, there’s a very good chance you’ll be in Bloomington, and when you tuck yourself in there’s a very good chance you’ll be in Bloomington,” Saccoman said. “Bloomington, as you know, is well known for a very safe and friendly environment and we want to keep it that way while our guests are here,” he added. Close to 10,000 hotel rooms will house visitors for the days-long celebration leading up to Feb. 4. “The largest concentration of hotel rooms is right here in Bloomington and that’s the entire state,” Saccoman said. Jim Saccoman is also the General Manager of Embassy Suites. He says the work started four years ago across the city as soon as the NFL selected Minneapolis to host. To the west on 494, the Sheraton will roll out a special football-focused menu at Lela in January. Karin Jasnoch is Associate Director of Sales at Sheraton. “We’re going to keep celebrating this beforehand and after,”  she said. The hotel may be booked for that weekend but they want people to pop in for dinner or even stay the night in the days leading up to the Super Bowl. Mall of America has its own plans. All public places outside of stores will have a football flare and Nickelodeon Universe will host a huge party for the 5,000 media members expected. Bloomington’s south loop will also offer up something special for football fans. Bonfires, warm drinks and other hospitality all outside come Super Bowl time. Security is also a top priority in Bloomington.  Officers from different departments will be working in the city to provide extra security at Mall of America and hotels. Super Bowl organizers say it’s best to watch for hotel openings that could still be released in the coming weeks.  The best availability for rooms will be the early part of the 10-day celebration.

    CBS Minnesota / 1 d. 1 h. 35 min. ago more
  • What’s The Difference Between Sweet Potatoes & Yams?What’s The Difference Between Sweet Potatoes & Yams?

    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — Every Thanksgiving, Americans buy tons of sweet potatoes. Or are they yams? What’s the difference? Good Question. “In short, they have very little in common and are two completely different plants,” says Tara Smith of the LSU AgCenter. Sweet potatoes are modified roots, while yams are modified stems, often called a tuber. Sweet potatoes tend to be moister, sweeter and have smoother skins than yams. Most sweet potatoes are grown in the U.S.  Most yams are imported from the Caribbean and sold in ethnic grocery stores. It’s likely many Americans have never eaten a true yam. Even though most grocery stores call the plant a yam, there’s a good chance it’s actually a sweet potato.  The USDA requires that any food marketed as a yam must also specify sweet potato on the container. According to Smith, Louisiana sweet potato farmers in the 1930s wanted to differentiate their product from others. They named their sweet potatoes yams and the name just stuck.

    CBS Minnesota / 1 d. 2 h. 4 min. ago more
  • Watertown Man Charged With Killing Girlfriend With TruckWatertown Man Charged With Killing Girlfriend With Truck

    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — A 42-year-old Watertown man is formally accused of killing his girlfriend by running over her with his truck. The Carver County Attorney’s office charged Casey Belden Hoskins Friday with one count of criminal vehicular operation in connection to the death of 33-year-old Jessica Ludenia. The victim had been run over just a few houses down from where she lived on the 800 block of Deerfield Road — a home she shared with Hoskins, his 3-year-son and another person. The criminal complaint says a witness pulled over when they saw Ludenia lying in the middle of the road. Hoskins was standing nearby, and the witness asked him if he had called 911. Hoskins only replied, “She went under my truck.” The witness moved their vehicle in order to block traffic, but said Hoskins started dragging Ludenia off the roadway. The witness than called a nurse they knew, who came to the scene and started accessing the victim’s injuries. Both the witness and the nurse said Hoskins was acting “strange.” His son came out of the truck and approached Ludenia, but the witnesses said Hoskins seemed more concerned with moving his truck back to his nearby driveway. Casey Hoskins (credit: Carver Co. Sheriff’s Office) A Watertown Fire Department captain was the first responder at the scene, and said Hoskins had a beer bottle in the back pocket of his pants. Another bottle was later found in the door of his truck. Deputies interviewed the other person who lived with the victim, the defendant and his child. They said all four went to a movie earlier in the day, and Hoskins and Ludenia argued and screamed at each other on the way to the theater. The housemate said when they arrived back at the residence, Hoskins — with his son in tow — drove away after Ludenia and the witness exited the truck. Witnesses say Ludenia ran after and jumped into the truck bed. The housemate said they heard the truck speed up and brake three times before seeing the victim lying in the road. Ludenia was pronounced dead at Ridgeway Medical Center. The official cause of death was blunt force injuries to her torso Tire tracks were found on her back and her pants, and investigators found hair and tissue in the one of the truck’s wheel wells. Hoskins told investigators Ludenia did not want him to leave, so she jumped in the passenger’s seat, and then jumped out. He is currently in Carver County Jail. The criminal vehicular homicide charge carries a maximum sentence of 10 years in prison.

    CBS Minnesota / 1 d. 2 h. 12 min. ago more
  • Survey: Twin Cities Shoppers More Frugal Than MostSurvey: Twin Cities Shoppers More Frugal Than Most

    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — Twin Cities shoppers are more frugal than other holiday shoppers around the country. That’s according to a new Deloitte survey. We are expected to spend less than the national average this holiday season. We’re also more likely to buy our gifts in stores rather than online. Topping wish lists this year: Clothing, gift cards and electronics. Twin Cities shoppers are also procrastinators. We’re not expected to finish our holiday shopping until late December or even January.

    CBS Minnesota / 1 d. 2 h. 56 min. ago more
  • Governor's Christmas Tree Harvested from General CC Andrews State ForestGovernor's Christmas Tree Harvested from General CC Andrews State Forest

    This year the tree comes from General C.C. Andrews State Forest, near Willow River...

    KSTP / 1 d. 3 h. 1 min. ago
  • Soucheray on bike lanesSoucheray on bike lanes

    It looks like one of the photographs spirited out of North Korea, a road barrier constructed of what appears to be PVC pipe and not at all handsomely installed, splattered paint on the pavement, for example, at the base of each pipe. The two-way bicycle lane the barrier identifies is empty.

    St. Paul News / 1 d. 3 h. 13 min. ago
  • Man Who Died After Minneapolis House Fire IdentifiedMan Who Died After Minneapolis House Fire Identified

    The Hennepin County Medical Examiner's Office said Robert Lawrence Holmberg died Wednesday at Hennepin County Medical Center from injuries suffered in a fire Tuesday ...

    KSTP / 1 d. 4 h. 34 min. ago
  • MSFA Executive Director Stepping DownMSFA Executive Director Stepping Down

    Rick Evans took over for Ted Monday, who resigned in February after ethical questions were raised about the use of U.S. Bank Stadium luxury suites by agency officials for family and friends ...

    KSTP / 1 d. 5 h. 27 min. ago
  • Barrel Theory Beer Company - a new brew on the blockBarrel Theory Beer Company - a new brew on the block

    While it's long been a reflection of the city's river roots, in recent years it's become an art destination and, increasingly, a food and drink lover's paradise. It's not just trendy restaurants and bars with unique cocktails and curated beer lists; the breweries have moved in, including Barrel Theory Beer Company this summer.

    St. Paul News / 1 d. 5 h. 37 min. ago
  • Department of Commerce Commissioner Steps DownDepartment of Commerce Commissioner Steps Down

    The news comes as the Office of the Legislative Auditor confirmed it had been asked to investigate actions taken by various DOC officials in connection to an investigation into an auto glass company a federal judge ruled was 'unjustified.' ...

    KSTP / 1 d. 6 h. 19 min. ago
  • Flashback Friday: Prep Bowl 1 Brought State Title Games Under 1 Roof 35 Years AgoFlashback Friday: Prep Bowl 1 Brought State Title Games Under 1 Roof 35 Years Ago

    The Metrodome has been demolished for several years now, and U.S. Bank Stadium with all its modern bells and whistles has since risen to take its place...

    KSTP / 1 d. 7 h. 25 min. ago
  • Now open: Spyhouse Coffee's first St. Paul cafeNow open: Spyhouse Coffee's first St. Paul cafe

    A new location for Spyhouse Coffee, open as of 6 a.m. today at the intersection of Snelling and Palace Avenues in St. Paul. This is the first St. Paul cafe for the local specialty coffee company, which has been steadily building a mini Minneapolis empire since opening in the Whittier neighborhood in 2000 .

    St. Paul News / 1 d. 10 h. 32 min. ago
  • Twin Cities concerts of the week: St. Vincent, Halsey, Liam Gallagher, Black ViolinTwin Cities concerts of the week: St. Vincent, Halsey, Liam Gallagher, Black Violin

    Black Violin: If you still think a hip-hop/classical hybrid group sounds like a joke, then you should see this Florida duo in action. Violin- and viola-playing partners Kev Marcus and Wil B - who perform over slamming beats and throw in a little rapping, too - are following up some well-received local appearances at the Dakota with a meaningful bump up to St. Paul's renowned performance hall, after hitting both the classical and R&B charts with its Universal Music Classics debut "Stereotypes."

    St. Paul News / 2 d. 0 h. 41 min. ago more
  • Radio anchor says Franken groped, kissed heraRadio anchor says Franken groped, kissed hera

    Minnesota Sen. Al Franken apologized Thursday after a Los Angeles radio anchor accused him of forcibly kissing her during a 2006 USO tour and of posing for a photo with his hands on her breasts as she slept. FILE - In this July 12, 2017 file photo, Senate Judiciary Committee member Sen. Al Franken, D-Minn.

    St. Paul News / 2 d. 5 h. 15 min. ago
  • 'have a Great Life!': Trump To UCLA Basketball Players'have a Great Life!': Trump To UCLA Basketball Players

    TV is part of CBS Television Stations, a division of CBS Corp. and one of the largest network-owned station groups in the country. Click here for WCCO-TV news stories Send us your breaking news tips here Contact WCCO-TV anchors and reporters Check out Good Question Send us your weather and news photos Get information on [] 830 WCCO Welcome to News Radio 830 WCCO on CBSMinnesota.com! WCCO is part of CBS Radio, a division of CBS Corp. and one of the largest network-owned station groups in the country.

    St. Paul News / 2 d. 9 h. 56 min. ago more
  • Traffic Round-Up: Several Metro Area Ramps, Bridges Reopen for Thursday AM CommuteTraffic Round-Up: Several Metro Area Ramps, Bridges Reopen for Thursday AM Commute

    Those who had to plan alternate routes during metro area roadwork may now be able to take their usual routes due to a few wrap-ups by Thursday morning. KSTP Traffic Reporter Josie Smith reported the Portland Avenue bridge over Interstate 94 in Minneapolis, which reopened Wednesday afternoon, was clear and ready for drivers Thursday morning.

    St. Paul News / 2 d. 12 h. 28 min. ago more
  • DMV horror stories: a One employee walked out bawling a " couldna t take it anymoreaDMV horror stories: a One employee walked out bawling a " couldna t take it anymorea

    Minnesota state Sen. John Jasinski, R-Faribault, holds up his personal license plate during a hearing at the Minnesota Capitol on Wednesday, Nov. 15, 2017. Because of problems with a state computer system, such plates cannot be transferred from one vehicle to another right now.

    St. Paul News / 2 d. 21 h. 40 min. ago
  • Supreme Court to issue Minnesota legislative veto opinion ThursdaySupreme Court to issue Minnesota legislative veto opinion Thursday

    Chief Justice Lorie Skjerven Gildea asks questions during oral arguments as the Minnesota Supreme Court meets at the State Capitol in St. Paul on Monday, Aug. 28, 2017. Photo by Leila Navidi The state Supreme Court plans to release an opinion at 10 a.m. Thursday, Nov. 16, on a lawsuit challenging Gov. Mark Dayton's veto of legislative funding.

    St. Paul News / 2 d. 23 h. 56 min. ago more
  • St. Paul holiday glow is a go at Rice Park on Saturday night - TwinCities.com-Pioneer PressSt. Paul holiday glow is a go at Rice Park on Saturday night - TwinCities.com-Pioneer Press

    TwinCities.com-Pioneer PressSt. Paul holiday glow is a go at Rice Park on Saturday nightTwinCities.com-Pioneer PressSt. Paul will hit the on switch for Rice Park's holiday lights on Saturday. (Photo courtesy Visit St. Paul). St. Paul plugs in the magic on Saturday and opens the gate to the ice rink that sits in the shadow of a castle. The grand opening ceremony for ...

    Google News / 3 d. 0 h. 20 min. ago more
  • The week's 27 best concerts: Nov. 15-21The week's 27 best concerts: Nov. 15-21

    Blitzen Trapper Turf Club, Thursday 11.16 Portlandians Blitzen Trapper's spirited new album, Wild and Reckless , is a simmering confederation of Eric Earley's vivid storytelling, radiant electric guitar, juicy Americana hooks, and weathered country-rock peppered with modern influences. Earley has called W&R , which was derived from a rock opera with a dystopian perspective and sci-fi twist, "a cross-eyed stepchild to Furr ," the band's highly regarded 2008 release.

    St. Paul News / 3 d. 4 h. 26 min. ago more
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  • Our View: Creepy, harassing behavior at Capitol is unacceptableOur View: Creepy, harassing behavior at Capitol is unacceptable

    "Just got an anonymous text saying I got busted for staring at you on the House floor ... Haha. I told him it was your fault, of course.

    St. Paul News / 3 d. 9 h. 12 min. ago
  • Stoneburner to succeed Deitner at TKDAStoneburner to succeed Deitner at TKDA

    The Hibbing native has been with the employee-owned engineering, architecture and planning firm for more than 30 years. A graduate of the University of Minnesota, Stoneburner, a civil engineer, has served as vice president of TKDA's largest division, Facilities Engineering, since 2006.

    St. Paul News / 3 d. 14 h. ago
  • Veterans honored at Oakdale Elementary programVeterans honored at Oakdale Elementary program

    By: Aundrea Kinney The event’s guest speaker, Brian Ritchie, showed the audience photos from his time in the 82nd Airborne Division of the U.S. Army and described his experience learning how to parachute out of an airplane. Ritchie served on active duty from 1995 to 1998. Robert Nehotte, the grandfather of an Oakdale Elementary School student, sang the Korean folk song, “Arriang.” He said the song is so popular in Korea that it’s the first thing Korean children learn when they go to school. Nehotte served in the Army from 1950 to 1952 during the Korean War. Children from local Cub Scout and Girl Scout troops participated in the presentation and the Oakdale Choir performed “On Yon Far Mountain,” “You Are Our Heroes” and “Thank You Soldiers." The event’s guest speaker, Brian Ritchie, showed the audience photos from his time in the 82nd Airborne Division of the U.S. Army and described his experience learning how to parachute out of an airplane. Ritchie served on active duty from 1995 to 1998. Oakdale Elementary School held its annual Veterans Day Program Nov.Rate this article:  Select ratingGive it 1/5Give it 2/5Give it 3/5Give it 4/5Give it 5/5 No votes yet

    LillieNews.com / 4 d. 7 h. 57 min. ago more
  • Charges pile up against  alleged gas station robberCharges pile up against alleged gas station robber

    By: Aundrea Kinney Surveillance footage from a SuperAmerica in Maplewood, a Holiday in North St. Paul, The Corner Store in Oakdale and a Holiday in Oakdale shows what appears to be the same man wearing the same clothes robbing each of the four gas stations while holding a silver handgun. • file photo Four gas stations were allegedly robbed at gunpoint by the same man Sept. 28 and 29.  After weeks of investigation, Ronny Porter, Jr., 25, was arrested and is being held at the Ramsey County Jail on charges filed in both Ramsey and Washington counties.Rate this article:  Select ratingGive it 1/5Give it 2/5Give it 3/5Give it 4/5Give it 5/5 No votes yet

    LillieNews.com / 4 d. 8 h. 16 min. ago more
  • Lake Elmo and Oakdale experiencing uptick in residential break-insLake Elmo and Oakdale experiencing uptick in residential break-ins

    By: Aundrea Kinney Oakdale is experiencing an increase in the number of burglaries in the northeast corner of the city, according to police. The Washington County Sheriff’s Office also noted an increase in burglaries in the neighboring portion of Lake Elmo, known as the Tri-Lakes area. • courtesy of Oakdale Police Department Lake Elmo and Oakdale are experiencing an increase in the number of break-ins, especially in instances where doors to vehicles, garages or homes are left unlocked.Rate this article:  Select ratingGive it 1/5Give it 2/5Give it 3/5Give it 4/5Give it 5/5 Average: 5 (1 vote)

    LillieNews.com / 4 d. 8 h. 24 min. ago more
  • Roseville Rep. Becker-Finn calls out sexism and harassment at CapitolRoseville Rep. Becker-Finn calls out sexism and harassment at Capitol

    By: Mike MunzenriderA day after a story was published accusing state Sen. Dan Schoen of sexually harassing women, Rep. Jamie Becker-Finn, DFL-Roseville, issued a statement saying Schoen isn’t the only man in the Legislature who has treated women inappropriately.Rate this article:  Select ratingGive it 1/5Give it 2/5Give it 3/5Give it 4/5Give it 5/5 Average: 5 (1 vote)

    LillieNews.com / 5 d. 8 h. 31 min. ago more
  • Voters choose council newcomers over incumbent in New BrightonVoters choose council newcomers over incumbent in New Brighton

    By: Solomon GustavoELECTION 2017 Incumbent mayor wins second term   New Brighton’s city council race was more heated than others in the area, but it’s not due to a tragedy or a single controversial issue. Rate this article:  Select ratingGive it 1/5Give it 2/5Give it 3/5Give it 4/5Give it 5/5 No votes yet

    LillieNews.com / 5 d. 8 h. 36 min. ago
  • St. Anthony City Council incumbents hold seats in tight raceSt. Anthony City Council incumbents hold seats in tight race

    By: Solomon GustavoELECTION 2017 Challenger calls for recount  Rate this article:  Select ratingGive it 1/5Give it 2/5Give it 3/5Give it 4/5Give it 5/5 No votes yet

    LillieNews.com / 5 d. 8 h. 42 min. ago
  • ‘Arts Roseville’ picking up where former council left off‘Arts Roseville’ picking up where former council left off

    By: Mike Munzenrider The Roseville Arts Council helped launch events like Arts @the OVAL, as seen above. Now with renewed purpose, new leadership and a new name — Arts Roseville — the organization seeks to advance arts, creativity and community in Roseville. • courtesy of City of Roseville After more than a half decade of dormancy, the Roseville Arts Council, an independent nonprofit, is making a renewed push, with new leadership and a new name.Rate this article:  Select ratingGive it 1/5Give it 2/5Give it 3/5Give it 4/5Give it 5/5 No votes yet

    LillieNews.com / 5 d. 8 h. 51 min. ago more
  • New Brighton’s full-service  license bureau is hereNew Brighton’s full-service license bureau is here

    By: Solomon GustavoNew Brighton residents no longer have to venture outside the city to get a new driver’s licence, a driver’s licence renewal or to get an ID card. Rate this article:  Select ratingGive it 1/5Give it 2/5Give it 3/5Give it 4/5Give it 5/5 No votes yet

    LillieNews.com / 5 d. 8 h. 54 min. ago
  • St. Anthony-New Brighton School Board unchanged  after electionSt. Anthony-New Brighton School Board unchanged after election

    By: Solomon GustavoThe St. Anthony-New Brighton School Board race was for three open seats.  The race began with five candidates filing for the election — three of those five were incumbents. Rate this article:  Select ratingGive it 1/5Give it 2/5Give it 3/5Give it 4/5Give it 5/5 No votes yet

    LillieNews.com / 5 d. 8 h. 56 min. ago
  • Johnson High School alumni  donate bench to the schoolJohnson High School alumni donate bench to the school

    By: Marjorie Otto The Denissons spent about 100 hours constructing the bench and donated about $4,000 worth of materials. The bench can seat some 20 people and a commemorative plaque will be added next spring. • submitted photo The Denisson family, which consists of brothers Tim and Corky, at right and middle, and Corky’s son, Kip, constructed the bench this summer. Tim is a part of the 1966 graduating class, Corky graduated from Johnson in 1962 and Kip graduated from Johnson in 1986. • submitted photo A new stone bench, donated by the Johnson High School class of 1966, was constructed where the former J-shaped flower garden had been in the inner courtyard at Johnson High School. • submitted photo As a way to mark their 50-year class reunion, members of the Johnson High School class of 1966 wanted to create or donate something to the school.  They decided on a bench, and not just an ordinary wooden bench, but a big stone “J.”Rate this article:  Select ratingGive it 1/5Give it 2/5Give it 3/5Give it 4/5Give it 5/5 No votes yet

    LillieNews.com / 8 d. 2 h. 11 min. ago more
  • Melvin Carter elected St. Paul's first African-American mayor - TwinCities.com-Pioneer PressMelvin Carter elected St. Paul's first African-American mayor - TwinCities.com-Pioneer Press

    TwinCities.com-Pioneer PressMelvin Carter elected St. Paul's first African-American mayorTwinCities.com-Pioneer PressIn a historic win, former St. Paul City Council member Melvin Carter III was elected mayor Tuesday night, earning more than 50 percent of the vote and overtaking his nearest rival Pat Harris by a wide margin. Carter, 38, will be the first African ...Melvin Carter Elected Mayor Of St. PaulCBS Minnesota / WCCOSt. Paul picks Carter for mayorMinnesota Public Radio NewsMelvin Carter on winning: 'I'm thrilled. I'm elated. I'm humbled.'Minneapolis Star TribuneMinnesota Daily -Grand Forks Heraldall 51 news articles »

    Google News / 10 d. 18 h. 32 min. ago more
  • Federal EPA hopes to wrap up Plating Inc. site in early DecemberFederal EPA hopes to wrap up Plating Inc. site in early December

    Lots of work still to be done as hazardous cleanup tasks and the future of the site passes to state, county, city By JANE MCCLURE All photos courtesy of the US EPA Weeks of hazardous materials cleanup at an abandoned Hamline-Midway metal plating plant reached a turning point as November began. The federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is completing its work at Plating Inc. and is handing off ongoing site monitoring and next steps to city, county, and state officials. While neighbors are glad to hear of progress, they have a message for elected officials. Photo right: Overview of the Plating Inc. exterior at 888 N. Prior Ave.; facing south. “I hope our state and city and county officials don’t forget us and leave us behind,” said Plating Inc. neighbor Dee Schleifer. “You guys don’t live here. Please don’t forget us.” Keeping the community informed is a priority moving ahead, said Ward Four City Council Member Russ Stark. His office will take over community outreach centered on the cleanup. He suggested that officials meet again with neighbors in January. More than 30 people attended an Oct. 26 community meeting at Newell Park to hear from federal, state and local officials about Plating Inc., 888 N. Prior Ave. The property housed plating operations since 1938, but the most recent owners apparently walked away in 2016 for financial reasons. Not only were chemicals left in open vats and trenches, the building was the subject of break-ins and copper theft. Photo left: At the Plating Inc. site, crew members spray water on insulation bricks that contain friable asbestos to reduce the dispersion of the particles during removal. Neighbors are concerned about past waste disposal practices, and whether yards, gardens and a pond along Pierce Butler Route are polluted. They asked for help to pay for soil testing in their yards and gardens. Local and state officials will check into those issues. The EPA went in in late August with a “time critical” removal and cleanup plan. EPA On-Site Coordinator David Morrison described the complex cleanup over the past several weeks. Crews had to deal with more than 80 open vats of chemicals. The building had a blue haze in the air from leaks and chemical interaction with moisture. The building’s plumbing system had frozen. The lack of maintenance meant asbestos pieces had fallen inside. That mess had to be cleaned up before chemical cleanup and removal could begin. Then the most caustic and dangerous chemicals had to be contained. Strong acids were found in vats. Chemicals had to be tested to see what they were, with samples from every vat and drum. Photo right: Pooled, liquid waste was removed from under the waste treatment lines. The EPA secured more than 20,000 gallons of hazardous acids and caustic materials from open vats. About 80 drums of caustic and acidic solids and other industrial sludge were contained from vats and containers. About 9,700 gallons of waste liquids were pumped from open vats into tanker trucks. Lab packs containing 849 pounds of hazardous waste stored in small-volume containers were also shipped off for disposal, along with another 1,400 pounds of non-hazardous waste used metal plating. Overhead lines and processing equipment had to be dismantled and drained. Efforts were made to recycle some of the chemicals. But some were congealed and couldn’t be pumped out. Those materials were removed manually. The building has had 24-hour security. Air monitors were placed in and around the property. By early November the EPA and its contractors were shifting from cleanup to disposal. That means taking bids on items and getting them taken away. Once disposal is set, the remaining hazardous materials will be gone. Metal vats can be cleaned and scrapped out. An underground tank containing about 1,100 gallons of diesel fuel will be pumped out. Photo left: Caustic solution release in floor trench at Plating Inc. The EPA trailer will be gone. The goal is for the work to wrap up by early December. Congresswoman Betty McCollum said that it’s fortunate that the mess was found before the U.S. was hit by hurricanes in late summer and fall. Natural disasters would have meant a slower EPA response. “There’s still a big job ahead,” Morrison said. But part of that job will be shouldered by the state, county, and city. “Once the EPA is done the city, county and state all have roles to play,” Stark said. Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) and Department of Health, and St. Paul-Ramsey County Public Health and St. Paul Department of Safety and Inspections (DSI) workers then step in. The MPCA’s role is remediation, with the property likely going into a state cleanup program. State and county officials’ future work will also include monitoring a 500-foot industrial well in the building basement and determining what to do with a smaller well that is clogged and cannot be checked. Water samples were taken from the deeper well. Photo right: Crew members pumping fluid from a vat into a sealed tote for proper storage and transportation. Stark said the city also has jurisdiction over the property as a vacant structure. DSI Deputy Director Travis Bistodeau said the building is a Category Two—meaning it has property code problems that need correction before it could be sold and reoccupied. Another concern is the fate of the property itself. The current owners are in arrears on property taxes, and over time the site could go into tax forfeiture and eventually be sold to a new owner. Stark and County Commissioner Toni Carter are seeing if that process could be expedited. City officials have heard there is a party interested in buying the property. Officials haven’t said yet what penalties the current property owners face as an investigation is still ongoing.

    Monitor Saint Paul / 11 d. 8 h. 52 min. ago more
  • Truly helping troubled kids starts with educating adultsTruly helping troubled kids starts with educating adults

    Professional says that the public doesn’t understand that libraries have become part of the current safety net By JAN WILLMS Working with adults who work with kids sums up in a few words the career of David Wilmes (photo right by Jaan Willms), a professional trainer, program developer and author. He has over 40 years of experience in the field of early intervention with youth whose behavior puts them at risk for being, in his words, criminalized, pathologized or ostracized from the critical community-based resources that promote healthy youth development. Wilmes began his career in a unique fashion. “I grew up in rural Iowa during the time of the Vietnam conflict,” he recalled. He was Number 47 in the lottery and drafted out of college in Dubuque. “I knew I wasn’t going to be able to do that, so I started working on my conscientious objector status. I got it, but had to find alternative service for two years,” he said. Being a math major, he said he was not equipped to do a lot of traditional kinds of service. But he got to know some nuns and Christian brothers who were going to St. Paul to set up a halfway house. He joined them. “I was a live-in counselor, mostly a handyman,” he said. “I became fascinated with the challenge of working with kids. Being a math major, I probably approached it a lot differently than other staff. I was more interested in how and why things worked, the program structure and design.” Wilmes became very involved with the program he was working in, moving quickly to a leadership position. He finished his degree at Metro State and completed his master’s in human development at St. Mary’s in Winona, focusing mostly on parent education and family systems. At the program he was working with, New Connections, Wilmes said he became fascinated with the kinds of staff he was hiring, and how different staff could get such different responses from kids. “I discovered that many families are not so dysfunctional, but that parents are not prepared to parent the kind of kid they got,” he said. “I started developing a lot of parent education programs.” He said few parent classes were being offered at that time, and he started teaching them in the classroom. “ABC did a special on New Connections, and I started doing a lot of consulting, helping other communities set up programs.” “In the mid-1980s, we started daytime programs. We had found residential programs were successful while the youths were with us, but not after. There was no transfer of learning. So we coupled parent education with the day treatment. I started doing a little bit of in-home family counseling and providing training for other institutions. My theory was that if we could get ahead of this thing, we wouldn’t have to go through all the misery of treatment. “ Wilmes published his first book with Johnson Institute. He became director of training at Johnson Institute in 1988, wrote a few more books and worked more on the national scene, but based out of the Twin Cities. He eventually started his own training organization but spent much of his time on the road. A friend offered him an opportunity with a mobile crisis team, and he took it. “She caught me at the right time,” Wilmes said. Although he had no experience with mobile crisis work, the idea fascinated him. After that work and a three-year stint at Hazelden as director of training and education in the publishing division, Wilmes spent 14 years with St. Paul Youth Services as director of services. “I’ve been retiring for the past three years,” he said. “Retiring is one of the hardest things I have ever had to do.” His “retirement” includes working with libraries in St. Paul, as well as Seattle, assisting their staffs in working with challenging kids. He also works with Youth Intervention Programs Association (YIPA), special education programs, schools, police departments, community activists, tutors, youth organizations and arts media—almost any entity that works with young people. Wilmes said the St. Paul Public Libraries had called him because several libraries were having to call the police on a regular basis to deal with problems they were having with their youthful patrons. “Libraries have become the new safety net in our culture, and no one even really knows about it,” Wilmes said. He has worked extensively with Rondo, Rice Street, and Sun Ray libraries, as well as many others. “I hadn’t worked with libraries before, but I create things as I go—I innovate,” he said. “The first library I worked with had called the police 3-5 times a week. That first summer we worked together they didn’t call the police at all.” Wilmes said he reviewed with the libraries what had helped in de-escalating the problems, which were with kids as young as 9-12, not just teenagers. “We started understanding who the kids were, and we realized we were supposed to be the adults,” he was told. Working with the staff at the libraries, Wilmes said his basic theory is that it is all about the adults who are supposed to be in charge. “That’s where you get change,” he explained. “Kids need relationships with those adults they see every single day.” He said a family bond might be strong, but parents cannot always give kids everything they need. “A lot of parents are dealing with a culture that is foreign to them and not very accepting,” he said. “Personal and historical trauma come together. A lot of families have come from places that were laced with racism, genocide, and all kinds of historical issues that have been passed on and transmitted to kids, on top of personal trauma.” Wilmes said he started developing concepts related to survival orientation. “In the Midwest, we have developed a culture that is extremely stable and singular regarding how it thinks about norms and expectations. We allow hardly any deviation to any of those things,” he said. Wilmes recalled a workshop he had given in a Minnesota community with a large Latino population. The school superintendent had told him that it had taken three generations for the Norwegians and Swedes to communicate. “How long will this take?” he asked. “It has to be a lot quicker,” responded Wilmes. He said that in the past this country had allowed its immigrants incredible amounts of time to resettle. When he was in college in Iowa and went home for a holiday with his roommate, they were still speaking Czech on the streets of the town. “I don’t think our social struc­tures have become adaptive to challenges. We have kids dealing with the aftermath of civil war in Liberia, and parents dealing with genocide and ethnic cleansing. Our fabric of culture in the Midwest is extremely conservative in how we think about what is right and wrong, and very moral­is­tic. We put lots of judgments on folks who don’t think the way we do.” Wilmes has taken a cognitive approach in his work with his professional training for groups and organizations working with youth. “Relationships is where everything starts,” he said. He sees a society where many parents are really struggling, not getting the kind of support they need in their community. He described many who work two to three jobs, and their kids end up looking for places to connect. “I don’t think the kids are that much different from when I was young,” he said. “But adults have a lot more stressors today.” And that fact affects their children. Wilmes emphasized that libraries and Parks and Recreation are places where kids go to connect. “We don’t support rec centers enough, and we either end up criminalizing or medicating kids to get what they need.” “My mission in life has become helping adults to be more effective with kids who aren’t making those connections anywhere else,” Wilmes said. “I am optimistic about our young people,” he said. “They are just asking for a relationship. We have all needed adults in our lives.” Wilmes said he is often asked if he has not gotten burned out or cynical after all these years in his field. “The hardest thing for me is not to do this work….it gives me the chance to be upbeat, spiritual and optimistic in ways that nothing else ever has been for me.”

    Monitor Saint Paul / 11 d. 9 h. 26 min. ago more
  • Neighbors encouraged to remember food shelf in holiday traditionsNeighbors encouraged to remember food shelf in holiday traditions

    Consider donating favorite holiday foods or cost spent on gifts to Midway Food Shelf By TESHA M. CHRISTENSEN This holiday season, consider donating the food you look forward to feasting upon yourself. “The biggest challenge we face during the holiday season is getting the food people want for the holidays,” observed Keystone’s Midway Food Shelf site manager Deb Amacher. “It’s really tough to get.” Just as the general population does, those coming to the food shelf crave ham, turkey, mashed potatoes, sweet potatoes, stuffing, green bean casserole, cranberries, bread and rolls, vegetables and pies. Those who use the food shelf are grateful for what is there, but Amacher can see the disappointment in their eyes when the cherished food items aren’t available. As the clients thank her and say, “God Bless you,” Amacher responds with a thank you of her own. “I’ll take all the blessings I can get,” she explained. Some people have found creative ways to incorporate the Midway Food Shelf into their holiday traditions. “We have a few families who donate the cost of their holiday meals or celebrations to the food shelf, to provide the same for other families,” pointed out Keystone Director of Basic Needs Christine Pulver. “A few other donors give the amount that would have been spent on holiday gifts.” One of the largest food shelves in Minnesota The Midway Food Shelf, 1916 University Ave., is one of three brick and mortar sites in Keystone’s Basic Needs Program, and has been operating for over a decade. The other two are in the North End and Roseville. The program originated at the Merriam Park community center in the 1980s. Photo right: The most popular items include rice, milk, juice, cereal, bread, peanut butter, and produce, according to Midway Food Shelf Site Manager Deb Amacher. “Most people are looking for meat,” she added. “Meat is so expensive.” Keystone aims to give families access to healthy choices and supplemental food sources to keep families on the right track – empowering them to build self-sufficiency and healthy eating habits. (Photo submitted) In all, Keystone reaches more than 30,000 individuals in Ramsey County through a variety of programming and human services. Its name comes from a central wedge-shaped stone of an arch (a keystone) that locks the parts together and supports the whole, a fitting description for the organization as it serves and strengthens the community. In 2015, Keystone also launched the Foodmobile, a mobile food shelf that brings food directly to people with transportation barriers. The Foodmobile offers 23 distributions every month, stocking fresh, frozen, and refrigerated food items. Through its four food shelves, Keystone provides emergency food services to an average of 8,000 individuals each month. Keystone expects to distribute 2.4 million pounds of food in 2017. “This program is one of the largest food shelf programs in the state of Minnesota,” pointed out Pulver. “This program provides critical support to our neighbors in need.” Pulver has served in her role for nearly 11 years and has seen the impact of practical services to stabilize individuals and families and help them move in positive directions. Photo left: Keystone expects to distribute 2.4 million pounds of food in 2017 to an average of 8,000 individuals each month, including folks like Dennis Jacobson. The people who use the Midway Food Shelf most include retirees with limited incomes, disabled veterans, veterans in general, and homeless individuals, according to site manager Deb Amacher. The largest group is single men. Many don’t have access to stoves and instead rely on microwaves at convenience stores to heat up their food. (Photo submitted) At its basic, the Midway Food Shelf serves as a place where people can get food. “It helps people get through the month,” remarked Amacher. “It helps so many people.” To be eligible for food shelf services, one must establish a need; have an income within 200 percent of the federal poverty guidelines; and live in the Keystone service area, which includes downtown St. Paul to Roseville, Little Canada to the Midway and the North End areas of St. Paul. The people who use the Midway Food Shelf most include retirees with limited incomes, disabled veterans, veterans in general, and homeless individuals. The largest group is single men. Many don’t have access to stoves and instead rely on microwaves at convenience stores to heat up their food, observed Amacher. When they arrive, “I think they’re expected to be treated poorly, but they’re not,” said Amacher. The most popular items include rice, milk, juice, cereal, bread, peanut butter, and produce, according to Amacher. “Most people are looking for meat,” she added. “Meat is so expensive.” Keystone aims to give families access to healthy choices and supplemental food sources to keep families on the right track—empowering them to build self-sufficiency and healthy eating habits. Photo left: Volunteers such as Michaela Lauer keep the doors open at the Midway Food Shelf, and welcome clients with a smile on their faces. Neighbors interested in volunteering at Keystone may contact the volunteer coordinator at 651-797-7725. (Photo submitted) The highest need season for food shelf programs is during the summer when children are not receiving free breakfast and lunch programs—which is usually the lowest donation season. The highest donation season is in November and December. Keystone receives much of what it offers through the Second Harvest food bank, but sometimes items available are limited. Recently, the food shelf experienced a few weeks during which some basic items were not available for purchase through the food bank system, including canned vegetables. Food shelf depends on donations “Our program is dependent upon community support through donations of money, food, and volunteer time,” remarked Pulver. “Cash donations allow our program to purchase food at prices far below retail and multiply the impact of donors’ gifts. Gifts of cash and non-perishable food can be brought to any of our food shelf sites.” Donation drop off hours are 9am to 4pm, Monday to Friday. The food shelf is open to clients from 10–11:30am and 1–3:30pm, Monday to Friday. Neighbors interested in volunteering at Keystone may contact the volunteer coordinator at 651-797-7725. “We have a great group of volunteers,” said Amacher. “People leave here smiling.”

    Monitor Saint Paul / 11 d. 9 h. 37 min. ago more
  • PPL to host employment services Open House Nov. 28PPL to host employment services Open House Nov. 28

    By MARGIE O’LOUGHLIN Project for Pride in Living (PPL) will be hosting a community Open House promoting its new Employment Services at Hamline Station on Tues., Nov. 28 from 3–6pm. Located on the ground floor of PPL’s Hamline Station, 1305 University Ave. W., their services are available to the greater community. All of the services provided there are confidential, free of charge, and tailored to fit individual needs. Participants must be 18 years of age or older. Photo right: Employment specialist Addriana Her (left) and employment technology manager Angie Willardson (right) outside the office of PPL’s Hamline Station Employment Services. Their organization provides one-on-one, confidential, coaching-based employment and financial services at no charge. (Photo by Margie O’Loughlin) Regular hours of operation for the Employment Services Center are Mondays from 9am-4pm and Tuesdays from 1-8pm. During those times, employment specialist Addriana Her is available to help clients write or update their resume, learn to conduct a job search, and develop better interviewing skills. Her explained, “We aren’t just about helping you get a job here, we’re about helping you keep a job. We provide retention services for 12 months. That means that at three, six and twelve months, one of us will call or email you to see how your new job is going. We’re able to provide a $10 bus or gas card at the time of hire, and at each of these retention check-ins.” “People have a lot of questions once they’ve been in a job for a while,” Her said. “Questions like, ‘I want more hours, but my employer isn’t giving them to me. What should I do? Or, I’ve gotten enough experience in this line of work. How do I move on?’ We can help with skills assessments and interest inventories whether you’re choosing or changing a career path. We can also assist in finding resources like child care, transportation, work clothing or needed tools through some of our many community connections.” Her can be reached at 612-455-5291 for more information, or to schedule an appointment. Employment specialist Rachel Moran manages the WOIA Adult Program. This program provides funding for short-term training leading to certifications in healthcare, manufacturing, construction, information technology, and administrative jobs. These five areas currently have a high demand for employees. Acceptance into the WOIA Adult Program requires income eligibility and circumstances of being either unemployed or underemployed. Moran can be reached at 612-455-.5314 for more information, or to schedule an appointment. In addition to employment coaching, the Hamline Station Employment Services has a financial coach on-site on Tuesdays from 4-8pm. Dar Sengkhammee can help clients create a personal budget, work on reducing debt, review credit scores, and clarify financial goals. He can be reached at 612-455-5292 for more information or to schedule an appointment. Angie Willardson is the employment technology manager for Hamline Station Employment Services. “There is a docking station here with 12 computers for client use,” she explained. “We have the technology to support a first-class job search, using our ‘Talent Neuron’ database. It can pull from all job-search engines at the same time. We can customize a client’s job-search very specifically and efficiently, but most importantly, we can personalize the process for you. We’re a small staff, and we strive to build rapport with our clients. We want to serve as many people as possible, providing the very best practices of employment and financial coaching.” There are always two people working during the hours that Employment Services is open at PPL’s Hamline Station. Appointments are encouraged, but drop-ins are also welcome. On-street parking is available just east of Hamline and north of University avenues, and the office is easily accessed by bus and train.

    Monitor Saint Paul / 11 d. 10 h. 6 min. ago more
  • Minnehaha soccer coach injured in explosion focuses on recoveryMinnehaha soccer coach injured in explosion focuses on recovery

    Midway residents grateful for community support as they move, seek larger vehicle, and await birth of first baby By TESHA M. CHRISTENSEN After losing his right leg following the Minnehaha Academy gas explosion on Aug. 2, Midway resident Bryan Duffey is focused on walking again and becoming a father in January. Photo right: Jamie (left) and Bryan Duffey. (Photo provided) “Bryan has continued to be forgiving and gracious in all of this, and has been so strong through it all,” observed his wife, Jamie. “There are, of course, frustrations and a great sense of loss, but we work through them together. Right now we are just focused on getting him walking again, and for us to keep moving forward with the changes so that we can focus on the baby when he gets here.” Rescued from under a column and a wall After graduating from high school in Nebraska, Bryan earned his degree from Northwestern College in Orange City, Iowa, where he met his future wife, Jamie, who was originally from Perham, MN. The two got to know each other while working for the non-profit Hope for Opelousas in Louisiana, providing after-school programs for grades 4-12. After a stint in Wisconsin, Bryan took a job as an assistant soccer coach and custodian at Minnehaha Academy a year ago. Jamie works full-time for Midwest Special Services providing day training for adults with disabilities. On Aug. 2, Bryan was working at Minnehaha Academy when the building exploded. He was fortunate to be found by two responding officers and a third off-duty deputy who lives near Minnehaha. They removed a column that landed on top of him first. Then they took apart a wall brick by brick to uncover Bryan’s entire lower body before they could get him to safety. Bryan was transported to Hennepin County Medical Center and was released 27 days later on his two-year wedding anniversary. “I am overwhelmed thinking about how blessed we are to have had these men there and to have Bryan still with us today,” said his wife, Jamie on their CaringBridge page. Bryan underwent several surgeries that left him with his right leg amputated just above the knee and his left leg stabilized by screws and a nail through his tibia. Big purchases needed to help Bryan achieve independence The injury pushed the Duffeys into buying a house earlier than planned. They were renting a home in Minneapolis before the explosion but weren’t able to modify it to suit Bryan’s needs, so they purchased a home in the Midway neighborhood. They were able to move in a week after his release from the hospital, but they are still waiting for workers compensation to approve funding for a bathroom remodel so that Bryan can transfer without pain, and they can have a bathroom door back on. By the beginning of October, Bryan’s neck brace was off, which was a relief for his wife to know that his neck is good and he could sleep a little more comfortably. Bryan was beginning to bear some weight on his left leg, which means he is getting closer to starting the prosthesis process. He also graduated from speech therapy, which mostly worked with his brain injury. “This is exciting because mentally he is able to drive again,” said Jamie via CaringBridge. “Unfortunately, physically he is not able to drive until we get a new vehicle that is higher off the ground and will have hand controls put in. We hope to get him driving soon so that he can gain some of his independence back.” The couple owns two small cars, a Honda Civic and Bryan’s tiny Ford Fiesta. They can’t fit Bryan’s wheelchair and a baby in the Fiesta. And so, they’re on a hunt for a bigger vehicle that is higher off the ground. With his prosthesis, he needs a vehicle that will enable him to keep his knee joint at a 90-degree angle and not have to jump out of, explained Jamie. They also plan to outfit it through worker’s compensation with hand controls so that Bryan can drive independently. The couple wasn’t planning on buying a house, and they weren’t planning to also replace a vehicle right now just before having a new baby. “Financially, it’s going to be really tight,” remarked Jamie. While they considered moving to a place where the cost of living isn’t as high, they decided to stay in the Twin Cities because of the increased opportunity for employment and access to doctors. Fundraiser for larger vehicle Bryan’s in-laws, Wes and Teresa Jeltema have attended Richville United Methodist Church in northern Minnesota where they live for the past ten years. On Oct. 7, the church held spaghetti feed, serving 100 people and raising over $3,500 to date. Fifteen volunteers served, sang, and cleaned up. If you want to participate, but could not get to Richville, consider mailing a check to Richville United Methodist Church, 130 SW 1st Ave., P.O. Box 67, Richville, MN 56576, or wiring a gift of stock, bonds or mutual funds to TY9146536. “This will help Bryan and his wife, Jamie, who is six months pregnant, maintain appropriate housing and secure transportation for the trying months ahead,” remarked Richville United Methodist pastor Rod Turnquist. “Bryan and Jamie have inspired all of us by their honesty, their courage, and their resilience,” added Turnquist. What keeps them going Their faith and the support of family, friends and the Minnehaha community is helping pull the Duffeys through this difficult time. Plus, there’s the excitement of expecting their first child. “I think that having a baby on the way helps to motivate,” observed Jamie. They are grateful for the support they’ve received since the explosion. “We have been supported by so many families, friends, church community, and work communities,” remarked Jamie. “Minnehaha Academy has surrounded us with love and prayers, and families have been bringing us meals.” Their church, Calvary Baptist, has also brought them meals regularly. The Duffeys appreciate all prayers and positive vibes sent their way. Life has become busy once again. “Bryan coached every regular season soccer game, and we are now moving into playoffs,” wrote Jamie on the CaringBridge site Oct. 7. “This has been such a blessing for him as this created some normalcy, and allowed him to continue to do something that he loves.”

    Monitor Saint Paul / 11 d. 10 h. 17 min. ago more
  • You can’t dampen the spirit of the Hamline Elementary Fall FestivalYou can’t dampen the spirit of the Hamline Elementary Fall Festival

    Photos by MARGIE O’LOUGHLIN The fourth annual Hamline Elementary Fall Festival was held indoors on Sat., Oct 7 due to stormy weather. But, spirits still ran high! A partnership between Hamline Elementary, Hamline Midway Coalition, and the Hancock Recreation Center, this free, family-friendly event was a chance to build community and goodwill in and around the Hamline Midway neighborhood. The fund raiser also supports the Hamline Midway Parent Teacher Association, and art education at the school. Funds were raised through event sponsorship, a silent auction, vendor table fees, and individual donations. Photo left: Ronnie Walker (left) learned a little drum technique from West Bank School of Music Director David DeGennaro.            Photo right: Parent Stephen Kellert spent the afternoon selling old fashioned, home made baked goods.             Photo left: Photo left: Caroline Hilk (left) and Kyra Engen of the Hamline Midway Public Art Working Group. More murals are coming to the Snelling Avenue corridor, as neighbors continue to express interest in increasing public art in the neighborhood.           Photo right: Parent Nura Ahmed prepared to bag up a few of her Sudanese pastries called fatyre. She also served hibiscus ice tea, and a sprouted sorghum beverage called abreh. Son Abel stood to her left.            Photo left: Dancers took to the floor while the Cuban band Tres Mundos played. Tres Mundos, which means Three Worlds, is made up of flutist/saxophonist Doug Little, pianist/vocalist Viviana Pintabo, and percussionist Eliezer Freites-Santos.       Photo right: Fifth grader Elias Sikorski.       Photo left: Artist Yuyu Negishi (right) worked on the fence weaving project with two students. The idea was to take the chain link fence that runs along Snelling Ave. and turn it into something vibrant, reflecting the energy of the school and rec center nearby.    Photo right: Photo right: Bei Ruetten has her own small business called, “Be Part of History.” She specializes in playing two costumed characters, and is available to come to girls’ parties to talk about history and period art activities.       Photo left: The St. Paul Chiropractic and Natural Medicine Center offered free chair massage.               Photo right: Students of the Center for Irish Music (located at Celtic Junction) performed traditional Irish tunes on a variety of instruments.          Photo left: Mortgage specialist Gigi Yau has lived in the Hamline-Midway neighborhood for more than 30 years. She said, “I help people buy homes. I do loans for everybody; I think of everybody as my neighbor.”             Photo right: Horses from the St. Paul Mounted Police Unit greeted kids and parents.     Photo left: Photo above: Free play at the enormous LEGO table.      

    Monitor Saint Paul / 22 d. 9 h. 12 min. ago more
  • Supportive services help seniors maintain their own homesSupportive services help seniors maintain their own homes

    By MARGIE O’LOUGHLIN The Living at Home Block Nurse Program of Como Park and Falcon Heights may have a complicated name, but their mission is simple: to provide high quality, affordable care for seniors—allowing them to live safely in the home and community they love. According to executive director Lisa Kane, “Every staff person and volunteer here is committed to these principles.” A former Wisconsin Department of Health program manager, Kane said that, “like most people who work with our program, I live in the neighborhood. I’m lucky to have found this opportunity; this is good work.” Photo left: The fulltime staff of the Living at Home Block Nurse program in Como Park and Falcon Heights is made up of volunteer coordinator Jennifer Grilliot (left), executive director Lisa Kane (center), and RN Maria Duwenhoegger (right). (Photo by Margie O’Loughlin) What exactly is the good work of the Living at Home Block Nurse Program (LAHBNP)? They offer a wealth of services to neighborhood residents aged 65 and better, as they like to say. Free services provided by staff include home safety checks, service coordination, blood pressure monitoring, and help with applications to other social service benefit programs. Maria Duwenhoegger is the registered nurse on staff—something that not all Living at Home Block Nurse Programs have. She said, “I enjoy the one-on-one connection with our seniors, working with them in their own environment rather than in a clinic setting. I get a better sense for what their family support is, or their lack of family support.” Duwenhoegger provides skilled nursing services for people covered by Medicare, Medical Assistance, or private insurance. One of the services in high demand is non-diabetic foot care, a self-supporting program that costs $35 per visit. “I have over 20 of these clients,” she said. ‘Most of them say when they call us the first time, ‘I never thought I would need this!’” Sometimes the first call to LAHBNP can be hard to make, but Kane explained, “We’re here to help. We’re not here to do anything other than support the community. We welcome phone calls from seniors, family members, or neighbors—anyone with a concern about an older person.” She emphasized that all staff and volunteers have passed a rigorous screening process. Jennifer Grilliot is the volunteer coordinator, managing a small but dedicated band of long-term volunteers aged 20–81. “One of the things that’s very satisfying about being a volunteer coordinator,” she said, “is when you put two complete strangers together, and find that they’ve formed a strong connection. I matched an MBA student from China last year with one of our seniors. It turned out that the senior had traveled to China several times in her life, and the two of them really hit it off. The student volunteered because elders are so important in Chinese culture, and he wanted to experience some of that here. At LAHBNP, we believe that the intergenerational connection really helps to stabilize neighborhoods.” Volunteers with this organization serve in a variety of ways like gardening, raking leaves, shoveling snow, driving seniors to medical appointments and back, or to the grocery store or library. Also, friendly visits are an important part of volunteer services. Grilliot said, “Many of our clients are homebound, and that can be very socially isolating.” Grilliot is currently looking for volunteers with a fitness background to lead gentle exercise classes at two senior independent living complexes in the neighborhood. She also offers training to volunteers willing to work with seniors one-on-one, using a training module called “Healthy Moves for Aging Well.” No previous fitness experience is required for this commitment. LAHBNP added a homemaking program three years ago, in response to neighborhood need. The cost for this service is $25/hour, with a minimum of one hour’s time. Services include vacuuming, dusting, deep cleaning of kitchens and bathrooms, doing laundry, changing bed linens, preparing snacks and meals, and more. There are ten Living at Home Block Nurse programs across St. Paul; their shared goal is to keep elders healthy, independent, and connected to their community. Kane explained that each of the programs is a free-standing, nonprofit organization with its own board. Most of the programs are housed in community spaces, and LAHBNP is no exception. Located at 1376 Hoyt Ave. in Como Park Lutheran Church, the staff can be reached at 651-642-1127 or comobnp@mtn.org with questions about services for seniors and their caregivers, or about volunteering. On Sat., Oct. 14, Como Park Lutheran Church will hold a bazaar with a silent auction and meatloaf dinner, with all proceeds going to LAHBNP. ********************** “We had a couple in the neighborhood a few years ago. The husband was caring for his wife, who had pretty advanced dementia. We provided homemaking services like cleaning and decluttering, got Meals on Wheels going, and found some social support for the husband in the form of a male friend who took him out to lunch every few weeks. The husband learned in his late 70’s how to clean house, do laundry, grocery shop, and all the other stuff that goes into maintaining a home. He continued caregiving for a couple of years after we got involved. Our in-home services allowed him more free time to visit his wife in the nursing home, once she moved there. After his wife passed away, he continued to live independently for quite some time.” —Maria Duwenhoegger, RN

    Monitor Saint Paul / 22 d. 9 h. 16 min. ago more
  • Council to vote on proposed parkland north of future stadiumCouncil to vote on proposed parkland north of future stadium

    By JANE MCCLURE St. Paul’s Major League Soccer stadium is taking shape as the St. Paul City Council is set to vote Nov. 15 on the parkland dedication agreement for the property. That follows a St. Paul Parks and Recreation Commission unanimous approval Sept. 14 of a parkland dedication agreement with Minnesota United for property north of Allianz Field. The property is one of two green blocks planned between the stadium and University Ave. The agreement is touted as providing a green space for public use and Minnesota United events, while not adding park maintenance and operations cost to the city. But the advocacy group Friends of the Parks and Trails of St. Paul and Ramsey County is raising questions. Friends Director Shirley Erstad called the agreement “problematic” because the soccer team doesn’t own the Midway Center land. Lead team owner Bill McGuire has a master lease agreement with Midway Center ownership but doesn’t own the shopping center property where the park would be located. The 18-page agreement dedicating the park space indicated that Minnesota United doesn’t yet own the property but that it is seeking title to the land. The Midway Center master plan approved last year by the City Council shows two parks north of the stadium. The agreement moving to City Council is for the Great Lawn just north of the stadium. A similar park is planned further north, just south of University Ave. It will be covered by a separate agreement. Green space and a plaza are also planned at the northeast corner of Snelling and St. Anthony. McGuire said the site will have amenities including sidewalks with trees and plantings. St. Paul requires developers to either dedicate land for park space or pay a fee. When the preliminary plat for the Midway Center site redevelopment was approved last year, one condition called for no less than .63 acres be dedicated to the public for parks purposes. The plans approved Sept. 14 meet that agreement. Minnesota United told city officials it would meet the parkland dedication requirement by entering into a separate agreement to develop and maintain private land for park purposes. This is only the second time in St. Paul that a parkland dedication requirement would be met this way. The first was at Beacon Bluff, a commercial development along Phalen Blvd. St. Paul Department of Parks and Recreation Director Mike Hahm said the complex agreement provides benefits for the city. City officials believe the agreement protects both the city and soccer team’s interests. If the city had to acquire the land, it would cost as much as $2 million. One condition of the 18-page agreement is that Minnesota United must provide a property covenant outlining the property’s park purpose. If the team fails to maintain the land for park purposes, the team would have to pay the city $500,000. Parks commissioners asked that potential challenges to the land ownership issue be specifically addressed when the agreement is presented for a City Council vote. “This is an agreement wrapped in another agreement,” said Commissioner Dan Marckel. Minnesota United will develop, maintain and operate the Great Lawn space. It will be tied into the stormwater drainage system for the area around it and will have amenities including sidewalks, trees, benches, planting, trash receptacles and public art. The team would pay for those features, at a cost that is likely to exceed $250,000. The park could be used for active and passive recreation and public gatherings. Hahm said uses must be consistent with park uses spelled out by city ordinance. He said that it is a “given” that groups could exercise their free speech rights in the park space. But park users would have to follow the rules used in city parks, such as operating hours and prohibitions on activities such as overnight camping. Under the agreement, Minnesota United would have exclusive rights to use the park for its league events, home events, club events, tryouts, and practices. Food and beverages, including liquor, could be sold during those events if the appropriate licenses and insurance are in place. The team would also have the exclusive right to determine park programming on the parcel. Minnesota United would work with the city on a permit process for park uses requiring a permit. Minnesota United would also have park naming rights and would retain all revenues and benefits tied to those naming rights.

    Monitor Saint Paul / 22 d. 9 h. 22 min. ago more