• This RSS feed URL is deprecatedThis RSS feed URL is deprecated

    This RSS feed URL is deprecated, please update. New URLs can be found in the footers at https://news.google.com/news

    Google News / 19.11.2017 04:13
  • Door to Door Organics Shuts Down - NBC 29 NewsDoor to Door Organics Shuts Down - NBC 29 News

    NBC 29 NewsDoor to Door Organics Shuts DownNBC 29 NewsAn online organic grocer that merged with Charlottesville upstart Relay Foods has abruptly closed its doors. Door to Door Organics announced on Friday, November 17, that it's shutting down immediately. In a statement posted online, the Colorado-based ...and more »

    Google News / 22 min. ago
  • PVCC Seeks Nominations for Outstanding and Distinguished Alumni Awards - NBC 29 NewsPVCC Seeks Nominations for Outstanding and Distinguished Alumni Awards - NBC 29 News

    NBC 29 NewsPVCC Seeks Nominations for Outstanding and Distinguished Alumni AwardsNBC 29 News(Charlottesville, Va.) – The Piedmont Virginia Community College Educational Foundation is seeking nominations for its outstanding alumni and distinguished alumni awards for 2018. The PVCC Alumni Association invites alumni to share their professional ...

    Google News / 2 h. 51 min. ago more
  • Staunton to Offer Free Parking During Holiday Season - NBC 29 NewsStaunton to Offer Free Parking During Holiday Season - NBC 29 News

    NBC 29 NewsStaunton to Offer Free Parking During Holiday SeasonNBC 29 NewsTwo-hour free parking in the Johnson Street parking garage and the Wharf parking lot, beginning Friday, Nov. 24 and continuing through Wednesday, Dec. 27. Free parking in all city parking facilities—garages, lots and on-street—Thursday, Dec. 21 ...and more »

    Google News / 3 h. 8 min. ago more
  • Virginia Falls 44-28 at #2 Miami - NBC 29 NewsVirginia Falls 44-28 at #2 Miami - NBC 29 News

    NBC 29 NewsVirginia Falls 44-28 at #2 MiamiNBC 29 NewsThe Virginia football team led #2 Miami 28-14 early in the third quarter but the Hurricanes would storm back to top the 'Hoos 44-28 from Hard Rock Stadium Saturday. UVA is now 6-5 and 3-4 in the ACC, while Miami stayed unbeaten at 10-0, 7-0 ACC.No. 2 Miami set to host home finale against VirginiaDaily Astorian#HoosNotes: UVA focused on turnovers, not Miami's chainThe Charlottesville Newsplexall 293 news articles »

    Google News / 3 h. 34 min. ago more
  • 'Let It Fall' Director John Ridley: Racial Progress Reversing Under Trump'Let It Fall' Director John Ridley: Racial Progress Reversing Under Trump

    In the seven months since John Ridley 's documentary on the LA Riots first hit theaters and then ABC, the nation has taken a turn, the director says - and not for the better. "I ask this as a rhetorical question - why have we regressed that much between April and November? It certainly seems that way," he tells Deadline.

    Charlottesville News / 13 h. 25 min. ago
  • Construction Begins on New Albemarle Transfer Facility for TrashConstruction Begins on New Albemarle Transfer Facility for Trash

    Ground has now been broken on a facility that will change the way people get rid of their trash in Charlottesville and Albemarle County. The ceremony on Friday, November 17, marked the start of construction for the transfer station that will allow people to drive through a covered facility to dispose of their trash and other items like construction materials.

    Charlottesville News / 17 h. 59 min. ago more
  • No injunction for Boston rally; federal judge denies request by...No injunction for Boston rally; federal judge denies request by...

    The City of Boston had already said it would not interfere with the rally. Rinaldo Del Gallo, a scheduled speaker for Saturday's rally, filed a lawsuit in U.S. District Court in Springfield on Nov. 11 alleging that Boston Mayor Martin Walsh, Boston Police Commissioner William B. Evans, Parks and Recreation Department Commissioner Christopher Cook and more than 300 police officers infringed on his constitutional rights at the August "Free Speech Rally" in Boston by not allowing him to enter the Parkman Bandstand to speak, not allowing sufficient amplification for the speakers and preventing members of the press from being close enough to the speakers to sufficiently cover the event.

    Charlottesville News / 22 h. 35 min. ago more
  • Ruckersville School Bus Driver Wins $250K Lottery - NBC 29 NewsRuckersville School Bus Driver Wins $250K Lottery - NBC 29 News

    Ruckersville School Bus Driver Wins $250K LotteryNBC 29 NewsGinger Carter has something in common with the Virginia Lottery: They both work to benefit school children. The Lottery, of course, generates funds for K-12 education in the Commonwealth, and Ms. Carter serves as a school bus driver. Now they have ...

    Google News / 22 h. 56 min. ago
  • Charlottesville Swears in New Postmaster - NBC29 WVIR ... - NBC 29 NewsCharlottesville Swears in New Postmaster - NBC29 WVIR ... - NBC 29 News

    The Charlottesville NewsplexCharlottesville Swears in New Postmaster - NBC29 WVIR ...NBC 29 NewsA new Charlottesville postmaster has officially sworn in amidst mail delivery controversy.New postmaster in Charlottesville wants to improve deliveryThe Charlottesville Newsplexall 2 news articles »

    Google News / 1 d. 1 h. 27 min. ago
  • Christopher Columbus monument slammed by some at NYC hearingChristopher Columbus monument slammed by some at NYC hearing

    The commission appointed by New York's mayor to evaluate statutes and monuments and ensure there are no "symbols of hate" on public property held its first hearing Friday, featuring a mix of citizens who thought some monuments should be taken down and others who lambasted the committee's work as an exercise in political correctness. "This is a country built on freedom and democracy, not bureaucrats telling us what is correct and what is not correct," said Gerald Mattacotta, a 72-year-old teacher at Queensboro Community College.

    Charlottesville News / 1 d. 3 h. 18 min. ago more
  • Gubernatorial grandson: Rape charges certified to grand juryGubernatorial grandson: Rape charges certified to grand jury

    During a preliminary hearing in which the alleged victim burst into tears and ran out of the courtroom, a judge certified rape and forcible sodomy charges against a former UVA student. Stephen Dalton Baril, 20, is accused of pushing another student onto the bed of his Wertland Street apartment, taking her clothes off, performing oral sex on her and raping her while she cried out for help. He’s the grandson of the late John Dalton, a Republican who served as the 63rd governor of Virginia from 1978 to 1982. The alleged victim—identified as M.H. in court—sat in the front row behind prosecutor Areshini Pather, staring straight ahead, and family members with their heads low stroked her back in support. Young women who appeared to be present in support of her lined the rows behind her. Baril’s supporters also filled up several rows, while the defendant stood quietly at the stand. Charlottesville police Detective Regine Wright-Settle testified that between late January 31 and early February 1, M.H. said Baril met up with her at Coupe’s, a popular bar on the Corner, and bought her a drink. She left with Baril, whom she met during a mixer between her sorority and his fraternity, with the intention of him walking her to her nearby apartment. As she and Baril were walking from Coupe’s to her place, the young woman told Wright-Settle that Baril playfully picked her up and redirected her to his apartment. When they got there, she immediately asked to use the restroom, and when she emerged, the Richmond native was standing in nothing but his underwear. Defense attorney Rhonda Quagliana asked the detective to show a surveillance video of the two walking down University Avenue and Wertland Street, which never shows Baril pick her up. When the lawyer noted that her account didn’t match the footage, the woman who brought the charges erupted in tears, turned to the person on her right in disbelief, and crying, she dashed for the door. A deputy followed her out. Wright-Settle read a series of text messages from that night, in which Baril texted the young woman after the reported rape: “Sorry for being over excited,” and “ I hope you’re not mad at me. Let me know if I was being stupid.” The next morning, he allegedly texted, “Haha. My head hurts,” and asked if she was on “the pill.” To that, M.H. replied that it doesn’t matter because she “stopped [him],” and said it was a bad decision. Baril replied, “What was a bad decision? I hope you had fun. I did.” According to the detective, the accuser told her that going to Baril’s apartment was the “bad decision” she was referring to, and that she told him to stop several times. She said as Baril forced himself on her, she called out for help. In cross examination, Wright-Settle said she interviewed Baril’s roommates who were reportedly home, and none of them could attest to hearing someone call for help that night. Defense attorney Quagliana, who also noted that the two appeared to be walking arm-in-arm and hand-in-hand in the video, said after the alleged incident, when M.H. was seen on video walking alone to her own apartment, she looked “neatly dressed” and her hair wasn’t messy. Judge Robert Downer also amended Baril’s bond to allow him to leave his home in the presence of a parent. Baril is scheduled to appear in front of the grand jury in December. The post Gubernatorial grandson: Rape charges certified to grand jury appeared first on C-VILLE Weekly.

    C-VILLE Weekly / 1 d. 5 h. 42 min. ago more
  • Ex-CIA chief explains why Putin is easily 'outsmarting'...Ex-CIA chief explains why Putin is easily 'outsmarting'...

    Trump's relationship with Moscow has stalked the first year of his presidency, with key former aides under a US investigation for alleged collaboration with the Kremlin. Former Acting Director of Central Intelligence John McLaughlin on Friday penned an op-ed for Politico Magazine sharply criticizing Donald Trump's approach to Vladimir Putin, arguing the Russian president is "outsmarting" the president of the United States.

    Charlottesville News / 1 d. 5 h. 43 min. ago more
  • Unite the Right Rally Organizer Loses Twitter Verification - NBC 29 NewsUnite the Right Rally Organizer Loses Twitter Verification - NBC 29 News

    NBC 29 NewsUnite the Right Rally Organizer Loses Twitter VerificationNBC 29 NewsCHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. (AP) - The organizer of the violent white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, has lost his verified status on Twitter, along with several other prominent white nationalists and far-right conservatives. News outlets ...Twitter crackdown sparks free speech concernsThe Hillall 46 news articles »

    Google News / 1 d. 8 h. 14 min. ago more
  • US Forest Service Allowing Atlantic Coast Pipeline Construction - NBC 29 NewsUS Forest Service Allowing Atlantic Coast Pipeline Construction - NBC 29 News

    NBC 29 NewsUS Forest Service Allowing Atlantic Coast Pipeline ConstructionNBC 29 NewsCharlottesville, Va. – The Southern Environmental Law Center strongly opposes today's U.S. Forest Service decision to approve the Atlantic Coast Pipeline Project (ACP), a natural gas pipeline slated to cut through 600-miles of West Virginia, Virginia ...Atlantic Coast Pipeline gets approval from US Forest ServiceThe Charlottesville Newsplexall 26 news articles »

    Google News / 1 d. 8 h. 35 min. ago more
  • Charlottesville, Va., has the most expensive ACA plans in America - Richmond.comCharlottesville, Va., has the most expensive ACA plans in America - Richmond.com

    Richmond.comCharlottesville, Va., has the most expensive ACA plans in AmericaRichmond.comMonthly health-care insurance premiums increased all over America this year, but nowhere as dramatically as in Charlottesville, Virginia, an analysis shows. Residents of the small college city and the surrounding Albemarle County who wish to purchase ...and more »

    Google News / 1 d. 8 h. 35 min. ago more
  • Park design experts start from the ground upPark design experts start from the ground up

    What should a public park contain? Swings and slides, shaded benches, a grassy picnic spot? Should there be gestures toward the region’s history, ecology and culture? Could a park be a place of encounter, of healing? In June, following their decision to remove statues of Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson from park grounds, city councilors issued a Request for Proposals to redesign the recently renamed Emancipation and Justice parks. That RFP was withdrawn on August 25 following the tragic August 12 white nationalist rally, but City Council decided last week to issue a new RFP under a two-phased approach. In the first phase, the city calls for a wide-ranging community discussion about the purpose and character of the downtown public spaces, in an effort to fully incorporate residents’ values and intentions into the process. While an ongoing court challenge delays the removal of the Confederate statues, designers are also tasked with adding elements to the parks that would “reinterpret” the statues while they are still in place, to provide a more complete and honest narrative of Charlottesville’s past. Phase I is slated to take a year to complete. Phase II (under a separate RFP to begin when the statues’ fate has been determined), will create new comprehensive designs for both parks. Back to the drawing board Unlike the landscape surrounding a private residence or office building, “a park is a public space that belongs to everyone, and a lot of meaning is embedded in it because of that,” says Joe Celentano, principal with VMDO Architects, whose offices overlook Emancipation Park. Landscape architects think deeply about the interactions between people and their environment, and are acutely aware of the ways public spaces affect communities. The city’s initial RFP frustrated many local designers with its condensed start-to-finish time frame (18 months), limited financial commitment ($1 million) and scant articulation of vision or values for the project. Some have suggested that a three-year process might be more appropriate, particularly for allowing a collaborative discussion among the city’s residents. “The first months to perhaps a year will be about healing and listening,” says Thomas Woltz, principal with Nelson Byrd Woltz Landscape Architects, “the second year about design and the third year about construction. If you storm in with a design, if the pace is too fast, it will fail.” UVA professor of landscape architecture Elizabeth Meyer, who consulted with city councilors on the new RFP, agrees. “Those sites mean something now that they didn’t last May, and we’re not at a place yet where we know how we want to react to that,” she says. Expert designers—perhaps everywhere, but particularly in Charlottesville—are careful not to presume a vision for the parks. The key, they insist, is the process. “Vision is not made on an island; it’s made on a foundation of values,” says VMDO senior associate Andres Pacheco. “So the first question is, what are the values of the city and its residents?” Though an unambiguous expression of those values in an RFP could be a jumping-off point, Pacheco’s colleague Celentano wonders if the two might have to proceed hand in hand. “Maybe the design of the parks has to be about helping to clarify what are our values.” The city’s plan envisions a public engagement phase run by the design firm that is awarded the contract. The team should include designers with expertise in landscape architecture, the history of the American South, social equity and urban design, as well as a facilitator who is trained to draw out opinions, to weigh the louder and softer voices and make sense of the raw emotions—a sort of community-wide therapist. Vinegar Hill Park. Photo by Skycladaerial.com Eye on the prize When the designers at Bushman Dreyfus Architects decided to launch a public design competition earlier this year, they originally thought that Emancipation Park would be a nice location to start asking some questions about public art and community identity.  “[The park] was our initial site, but then, of course, events overtook us all,” says Principal Jeff Bushman.  “So we shifted our focus to Vinegar Hill Park, a small site at the west end of the downtown pedestrian mall.” The competition, dubbed The BDA Prize, seeks proposals for a work of public art that will “embody the values and aspirations of a diverse community.”  Against the backdrop of the gentrification of neighboring Vinegar Hill fifty years ago, the competition poses questions about how best to express true narratives about our shared history, society, and culture.  Entries are to be submitted on a 30 by 40 inch poster, and BDA welcomes anyone who wishes to participate.  Regardless of material, media, or form, proposals must be focused on finding common ground, and “as such, they are aspirational.” The idea is to generate discussion on several fronts, says Bushman.  “What in the public realm can we somehow agree is representative of us as a community?  We may never all agree, and it would be boring if we did, but what we have to do is be able to talk to each other.”  Another set of questions touches on who is the decider.  “It could be good to have a discussion about who gets to decide what our public monuments are, and how that works,” he says.  “Is it Mr. McIntire?  If so, why him?” The firm plans to host panel discussions and other public events at the Jefferson School in the spring to encourage an open dialogue about the entries.  “We plan to hold this competition every year,” says Bushman, “though it will be harder in future years to identify an issue that is accessible to everybody, like this one is.”  Due by February 2nd, 2018, entries will be judged by a jury of five cultural and design leaders, and monetary prizes will be awarded.  Learn more at bdaprize.bdarchitects.com. Local architectural historian Louis Nelson points to UVA’s Memorial to Enslaved Laborers as an ongoing project whose design team carefully cultivated many different community voices. “That’s an example of an intensive, highly engaged collaborative process that fundamentally changed the design, messaging, content and location of that memorial,” says Nelson. “To try to walk in on the front end with a design already on paper would have been a catastrophe.” Just as important, says Woltz, are the stories of a place. NBW begins its projects with a deep dive into the ecology, history and culture of a site to find what makes it unique. “This is an old earth,” he says, “and so often, stories of oppression or the taking of land go unrecognized or, at worst, hidden under our feet. Landscape is remarkably powerful at hiding and erasing history.” With a deliberate process of discovery, a park’s design can represent unique stories that only its native soil can tell. “The designers can collect the clues and make refinements,” says Pacheco. “But we all as citizens have to figure out whether this is about history or the future, is it about grieving or about celebrating, is it a center or is it a space? It’s going to be challenging. “Maybe the most beautiful thing about the project, then, is actually the process, not the product,” he says. “I can imagine the process being the heart of it.” Ground rules Emancipation Park (formerly Lee Park) sits on one acre of land on a square downtown block, next door to the Central Library. Philanthropist Paul Goodloe McIntire donated the land for the original Lee Park in 1917 (and for the 0.4-acre Jackson Park in 1918), and commissioned large memorial sculptures of Confederate generals to be placed there in honor of his parents. (His father, George, had served as Charlottesville’s mayor during the Civil War.) Other than a few replanted trees and shrubs, not much has changed in the parks since 1920. Far from a blank slate, Charlottesville’s downtown parks are imbued with a history—both remote and recent—that will freight every step of the redesign process. Before work can begin in earnest, several legal and administrative processes will have to play out. Although City Council voted earlier this year to remove the Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson statues from the two parks (at an estimated cost of $300,000 each), their fate is currently in limbo until a court decides whether a Virginia law that prohibits localities from disturbing memorials to war veterans applies in this case. Adding to the set of obstacles for removal is the fact that both statues are listed on the National Register of Historic Places, and, as the first public park established in the city, Emancipation Park is likely eligible for the same honor. These designations mean the sites must undergo a compliance review before they can be changed, explains local landscape architect and historic preservation expert Liz Sargent. “Someone with the Virginia State Historic Preservation Office is going to have to determine whether the existing historic fabric can retain its value if the statue is moved or if the park’s landscape is significantly changed.” 1. Local landscape architect Gregg Bleam worked with Bushman Dreyfus Architects to refresh and beautify Booker T. Washington Park, Charlottesville’s first African-American park. 2. Nelson Byrd Woltz designed Citygarden, a three-acre park in the heart of downtown St. Louis that celebrates the cultural and natural histories of the city and its environs. 3. Charlottesville landscape architect Nancy Takahashi worked in tandem with VMDO to create Scottsville’s Canal Basin Square, an interpretive park that chronicles the inextricable connection of Scottsville to the James River. On top of that, the original donation of the land for Justice Park came with strings attached. McIntire stipulated in the deed transferring the land to the city that it must be named “Jackson Park,” that it remain a park and that no structures other than the Jackson statue be built there, including other monuments. Legal challenges may be posed one after another by groups opposed to altering the parks, further delaying any future design phase. From a purely aesthetic perspective, UVA professor Meyer points out the statues are quite large for such small spaces. “But even if you take the statue out of Emancipation Park, it’s still not a successful space,” she says. “It’s lifted up above the street, which limits visibility across, so just entering may make people feel uncomfortable. Also, instead of buildings on all sides, the open parking lot [on East Market Street] creates a problem of closure.” As well, the park is not currently barrier free, with sets of stairs on three sides limiting universal access. Confederate monuments aside, there is a growing awareness among architects and geographers of a simple and sobering concept called “racialized topography,” evident in the ways cities have historically developed. “The parks are racialized not just because of the statues, but also because of their elevation,” says Meyer. “High places are dry and have good views and tend to be white places in the American South. The parks are in a place where they read as privileged, and those things are not going to be changed by just taking away a statue and putting in a fountain.” Paint me a picture Ever the optimists, landscape architects try to wrap all of these considerations into their quest to create something both beautiful and affecting. Frederick Law Olmsted, father of American landscape architecture and designer of Central Park in New York City, said, “A park is a work of art, designed to produce certain effects upon the minds of men,” an idea that inspires Meyer and her colleagues. “We know from neuroscience that immersion in nature does affect your brain,” she says, “and so parks can become centering places of memory, or of personal experience.” “There are essential human needs that a park can supply—shade, fragrance, prospect (as one looks out across one’s city), places of quiet gathering or larger civic engagement, contact with plants, color, water,” says Woltz. “Beyond these, if we can make the ecologic and cultural histories of a place evident to the public, then the design can help to build a strong bond between people and the place they live.” New way of thinking WHAT IF… like the Freedom of Speech Wall at the end of the mall, one element of the design is nothing until someone does something to engender dialogue, like, for instance, an empty stage.—Jeff Bushman, principal with Bushman Dreyfus Architects Elizabeth Meyer. Courtesy subject WHAT IF… we identified a network, or constellation, of historical and cultural sites all around Charlottesville that told a more interesting, less didactic story, and liberated us from focusing just on the statues.—Elizabeth Meyer, UVA professor of landscape architecture WHAT IF… we were to excavate in Emancipation Park and submerge a portion of the Lee statue underground. …There could be a subterranean museum, and a garden terrace on top, so we would leave the statue on site but reclaim the public space.—Louis Nelson, architectural historian Andres Pacheco. Photo by Eze Amos WHAT IF… the park went from being a hot potato to just a wonderful place for children to play—to encourage children of all races, religions and backgrounds to play together, and they’re going to remember this park because of that.—Andres Pacheco, VMDO senior associate At once down-to-earth and starry-eyed, like visionaries with protractors, landscape designers tend to dream big. “What if you could look four years into the future at the park’s opening ceremony, what would you want to see?” asks Celentano. “People of all races supporting what’s been done, celebrating something that brings people together, right? So, we have to back it up from there.” Meyer sees value in separating the commemoration issues from how to make the park a good social space. “Instead of thinking of it as something empty waiting for a thing to be put there, it could be more of a place of encounter, and that may start with how you design a bench or a seat,” she says. “In Central Park, some of the benches are quite long, so you sit down next to strangers. We could try to imagine this as a place where you could encounter people not like you in a way that’s dignified and comfortable, eye to eye.” Even within the small city block of Emancipation Park, designers’ imaginations take flight. What if the entire space was a children’s playground, inviting kids of all races and backgrounds to simply play together? What if it was a lush garden, planted with native species of flowers, grasses and trees? What if Emancipation Park was linked with Justice Park and other sites along a larger constellation of historic places, forming a trail through the city? “If we could take a vision and actually paint with it—paint with emotions and intent—we would do it,” says Pacheco. “The job of an architect is to fine tune and strengthen the vision with whatever built materials come to this park. If it’s about healing, or playing, or unity, every detail in the park should point to that.” And while the idea of the community arriving at a consensus on a particular design is appealing, the steps along the way may be more important. “The goal,” says Celentano, “is to have a very elaborate and inclusive and complete process so that people agree on what the vision is, and feel that their voices have been heard. Only then can the ultimate design be satisfying, because it honors the vision.”     The post Park design experts start from the ground up appeared first on C-VILLE Weekly.

    C-VILLE Weekly / 1 d. 10 h. 27 min. ago more
  • Charges certified for former UVA student - grandson of Gov. Dalton - accused of rape, sodomyCharges certified for former UVA student - grandson of Gov. Dalton - accused of rape, sodomy

    A former University of Virginia student and grandson of a Virginia governor who was charged in June with the rape and sodomy of another student appeared in court Thursday for a judge to decide if the case should advance to a higher court.

    Charlottesville News / 1 d. 10 h. 37 min. ago
  • Albemarle Supervisors vote to end emergency water restrictionsAlbemarle Supervisors vote to end emergency water restrictions

    Scottsville District Supervisor Richard Randolph is shown in the lobby of the main County Office Building on McIntire Road. The Albemarle Supervisors agreed 5 - 1 Thursday to rescind the emergency water restrictions they approved on October 11th.

    Charlottesville News / 1 d. 15 h. 31 min. ago
  • Stephen Baril case will be considered by Charlottesville grand juryStephen Baril case will be considered by Charlottesville grand jury

    A sexual assault case that involves a grandson of a long ago Virginia governor will be considered by a Charlottesville grand jury. A General District Court judge has certified rape and forcible sodomy charges against 20-year-old Stephen Dalton Baril, who's a former University of Virginia student.

    Charlottesville News / 1 d. 20 h. 9 min. ago
  • UVA Women's Basketball Falls 64-61 to Georgia - NBC 29 NewsUVA Women's Basketball Falls 64-61 to Georgia - NBC 29 News

    NBC 29 NewsUVA Women's Basketball Falls 64-61 to GeorgiaNBC 29 NewsCHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. – The Virginia women's basketball team (1-2) suffered a 64-61 loss to Georgia (2-0) on Thursday (Nov. 16) at John Paul Jones Arena in Charlottesville, Va. The Cavaliers trailed by 14 points early in the fourth quarter, but cut the ...and more »

    Google News / 1 d. 21 h. 10 min. ago more
  • Charlottesville, Va., has the most expensive ACA plans in AmericaCharlottesville, Va., has the most expensive ACA plans in America

    Monthly health-care insurance premiums increased all over America this year, but nowhere as dramatically as in Charlottesville, Virginia, an analysis shows. Residents of the small college city and the surrounding Albemarle County who wish to purchase individual insurance from the federal marketplace will be paying for the most expensive plans in the country, a Kaiser Family Foundation review confirmed.

    Charlottesville News / 2 d. 0 h. 47 min. ago more
  • 'Something weird is going on': Charlottesville has America's...'Something weird is going on': Charlottesville has America's...

    Monthly health-care insurance premiums increased all over America this year, but nowhere as dramatically as in Charlottesville, an analysis shows. Residents of the small college city and the surrounding Albemarle County who wish to purchase individual insurance from the federal marketplace will be paying for the most expensive plans in the country, a Kaiser Family Foundation review confirmed.

    Charlottesville News / 2 d. 0 h. 47 min. ago more
  • Suspect in Bobby Reauveau Murder to Face Grand Jury for ChargesSuspect in Bobby Reauveau Murder to Face Grand Jury for Charges

    The man accused in a Charlottesville murder on Superbowl Sunday of this year will see his case move to a grand jury. Thursday in court, witness testimony unveiled that a drug deal happened moments before Reauveau was shot.

    Charlottesville News / 2 d. 0 h. 47 min. ago
  • Album reviews: Bill MacKay & Ryley Walker, Anna St. Louis, Patrick Cowley and various artistsAlbum reviews: Bill MacKay & Ryley Walker, Anna St. Louis, Patrick Cowley and various artists

    Bill MacKay & Ryley Walker SpiderBeetleBee (Drag City) I came down hard on Ryley Walker’s voice on his last solo record, openly wishing for an instrumental affair—and whoa, I had no idea he had such a project up and running already. SpiderBeetleBee is the second album of acoustic guitar duets by Walker and the insanely versatile Bill MacKay, and though it’s sophisticated, it’s blessedly unpretentious. The baroque Americana of “The Grand Old Trout” sets the general tone, and the closing “Dragonfly” makes for an apt bookend with guitars buoyed by deep cello swells courtesy of the Chicago Symphony’s Katinka Kleijn. In between, the tracks wander agreeably. “Pretty Weeds Revisited” features lovely runs evoking Jerry Garcia circa 1969, while on the more experimental “Naturita,” McKay and Walker follow a spacious, tinkling introduction with a raga-like breakdown (a tabla actually enters—and integrates nicely—on the brief “I Heard Them Singing”). SpiderBeetleBee is an assured, ranging keeper. https://billmackayryleywalker.bandcamp.com/album/spiderbeetlebee Anna St. Louis First Songs (Woodsist) Aptly named, First Songs is the somewhat tentative but enticing debut of Kansas City native Anna St. Louis, who accompanies herself on guitar and keeps things sparse; a faintly humming organ and hushed tambourine are characteristic accents, and the full band that appears on some tracks mostly adds volume rather than sharing the spotlight. Retro gimmicks such as occasional country-honk vocalisms and a tack piano trotted out on “Evermore” are regrettable and unnecessary, since St. Louis’ voice, which lands halfway between Patsy Cline and Hope Sandoval, is charismatic enough to support the songs. The good news is that the songs are mostly worth supporting, and the album gets stronger down the stretch, beginning with the only real curveball, the squiggly keyboard instrumental, “Stray,” which rolls into the wistful “Sun” and the concluding Piedmont blues-styled “Fire.” https://annastlouis.bandcamp.com/album/first-songs Patrick Cowley Afternooners (Dark Entries) Rochester native Patrick Cowley moved to San Francisco to attend college in 1971, studying synthesizers before linking up with Sylvester to produce the latter’s perennial smash, “You Make Me Feel (Mighty Real),” and releasing his own dance floor hits “Menergy” and “Megatron Man.” In 1981, Cowley was misdiagnosed with food poisoning; he had contracted HIV, and succumbed to AIDS the following year. From 1979 to 1982, Cowley had also supplied soundtracks for the gay porn produced by John Coletti at L.A.’s Fox Studio, and Afternooners is the third and final offering in this Dark Entries series of that music. It is gloriously cheesy, steamy electro disco with titles cribbed from the film loops: “Cycle Tuff,” “Hot Beach,” “Big Shot.” Afternooners might provide a bridge from Giorgio Moroder to Human League, but perhaps even better to hear it as a monument to its own moment. https://patrickcowley.bandcamp.com/album/afternooners Various artists Even a Tree Can Shed Tears (Light in the Attic) To call Even a Tree Can Shed Tears the year’s best early-’70s Japanese folk rock compilation is an unkind joke—it’s a thoroughly enchanting collection of songs previously unavailable stateside. Reissue stalwart Light in the Attic provides its usual exquisite packaging—reproducing all 19 original album covers (many are spellbinding); printing lyrics in Japanese and English; and including a pair of helpful, contextualizing essays. There’s a lot of personnel crossover, and the compilation hangs together well; though tracks like “Zeni No Kouryouryoku Ni Tsuite” (“The Power of Money”) dip a toe into acid rock, most songs hew to the hushed side. The lyrics throughout are personal, but instead of solipsistic confessionals, they’re oblique and inventive. Even a Tree Can Shed Tears makes me want to know more about it all, and isn’t that what you want in an introduction? https://lightintheattic.net/releases/3178-even-a-tree-can-shed-tears-japanese-folk-rock-1969-1973 The post Album reviews: Bill MacKay & Ryley Walker, Anna St. Louis, Patrick Cowley and various artists appeared first on C-VILLE Weekly.

    C-VILLE Weekly / 2 d. 3 h. 58 min. ago more
  • Charlottesville Area Transit Announces Bus Lines Poetry ContestCharlottesville Area Transit Announces Bus Lines Poetry Contest

    Charlottesville, Virginia... 11/16/2017... Charlottesville Area Transit and Bus Lines are encouraging area writers to use their imagination with the latest Bus Lines poetry contest. Authors can submit up to three literary works for consideration, and there is no cost to participate.

    Charlottesville News / 2 d. 5 h. 20 min. ago
  • Suspect in Culpeper drive-by shooting arrested Thursday in CharlottesvilleSuspect in Culpeper drive-by shooting arrested Thursday in Charlottesville

    Thank you for reading 10 free articles on Fredericksburg.com. You can come back at the end of your 30-day period for another 10 free articles, or you can purchase a subscription and continue to enjoy valuable local news and information.

    Charlottesville News / 2 d. 7 h. 42 min. ago
  • 2 Charged in Woolen Mills Area Murder Appear in Albemarle Co. Court2 Charged in Woolen Mills Area Murder Appear in Albemarle Co. Court

    Twenty-three-year-old Jose Luis Escobar Umana of Woodbridge and 18-year-old Eduardo Zelaya of Manassas appeared in Albemarle General District Court Thursday, November 16. Zelaya was in the courtroom, while Umana appeared via video conference. Both men - along with 20-year-old Walter Antonio Argueta Amaya of Manassas Park and 18-year-old Juan Carlos Argueta of Charlottesville- are facing a second-degree murder charge in connection to the death of 24-year-old Marvin Rivera-Guevara.

    Charlottesville News / 2 d. 7 h. 42 min. ago more
  • Leading by example: Kids learn to be the changeLeading by example: Kids learn to be the change

    Upon their return from the Women’s March in Washington, D.C., in January of 2017, local moms Kristin Clarens and Amanda Sovik-Johnston felt empowered, but also challenged. “We were just emerging from the super-foggy days of having newborns and realized that we wanted to re-engage in our community,” says Clarens, an attorney. “It felt like a gauntlet had been thrown: Now what?” They recognized that meaningful civic engagement would have to happen at the family level, and Charlottesville Families in Action was born. The two women initially founded their organization by reaching out on Facebook to other families with small children, intending to find local activities where parents and their kids could get together to build, donate, celebrate and fundraise for meaningful causes. The enterprise was motivated not despite having kids in tow, but because of them. “We are making a conscious decision to model the sorts of behaviors that we hope our kids carry forward into the world,” says Clarens. The kids jump in to the planned activities naturally, and with joy. Events are scheduled every other Wednesday, from 4:30 to 6:30pm, and many involve crafts, music, food or all three. From planting starter seeds for the Monticello Avenue gardens with the Urban Agriculture Collective of Charlottesville, to learning about solar power in Virginia while roasting marshmallows in their own personal solar ovens in Washington Park, the activities deftly intertwine the fun with the educational. Some events are fundraisers, such as a sold-out brunch at Mas in support of Dreamers and their families, while others are hands-on helping, like building toolboxes for Habitat for Humanity, or collecting a vanload of supplies (including two chainsaws!) for hurricane aid. Sovik-Johnston, a clinical child psychologist, says a big part of the group’s focus is to make the work part of their kids’ lives so they will grow up as leaders in their communities as well. But just as important is how the sessions can serve as a proactive tool to combat fear. Kristin Clarens and Amanda Sovik-Johnston founded Charlottesville Families in Action following the Women’s March, hoping to create opportunities for parents and their kids to be more actively engaged with their community. The org’s fall event at The Front Porch raised money for kids in the arts. Photo: Eze Amos “My 6-year-old son said to me, ‘Wow, a lot of bad things have happened in Charlottesville this year,’” Sovik-Johnston recalls, “and I said the other side of that is that so many people have come together to help and care. Yes, stuff is scary, but if we sit in it, it becomes overwhelming, so let’s do something and then we’ll all feel better.” Margarita Figueroa has taken her children, ages 7 and 9, to several of the FIA events and appreciates the high level of organization as well as the predictable schedule. “After the election we felt hopeless, but we couldn’t just sit in our houses and mope,” says Figueroa. “This feels good and is good for the community.” After the events of August 11 and 12, FIA quickly put together a panel discussion for parents about how to talk with their children about what had happened. “That came up right away and helped a lot,” says Figueroa. To help parents prepare and reassure their kids, FIA also posts Car Talk on its website, a set of talking points about each event that parents can use as conversation starters about the importance of the activity. “We try to give parents the language to share with their kids about why we are doing this, and how good it feels when we help others,” says Sovik-Johnston. “So hopefully when they grow up, they’ll think of themselves as, ‘I’m the kind of person who helps.’” While FIA is organized around families with younger children, the group also offers an internship program for local teens to help with the events. Sarah Webb, a senior at Renaissance School, has been part of FIA since its inception and was there at the first event at Firefly back in February, a letter-writing campaign. “The kids were writing about saving the polar bears, green energy, love is love, all kinds of issues and policies,” says Webb. “As a kid, I know I was never very aware of much, like, inequality around me, and this is such a vital time for kids to know what’s going on in the world and be aware.” As she nears graduation, Webb is actively recruiting other interns, like Mercedes Goering, a Renaissance 10th-grader. “It’s fun just hanging out with the kids,” says Goering. “I really enjoyed cleaning up the Rivanna River, and building toolboxes for Habitat [for Humanity].” More than ever, local kids inspired by news and events are taking action to make a difference. Shreya Mahadevan, a fourth-grader at Johnson Elementary whose mother, Priya, runs the Desi Dosa stall at the City Market, wanted to do something to help with hurricane relief during the recent spate of destructive storms. “She took it upon herself to set up a collection at our stand for the hurricane victims, and raised almost $300,” says Priya. The family channeled the donations to hands.org, a nonprofit that provides assistance to communities affected by natural disasters. Burley Middle School eighth-grader Eden Radifera was in Jamaica with her family over the weekend of August 12, and followed the day’s disastrous events on her phone. She recalls the feeling of powerlessness, both while away and upon returning to Charlottesville. “It was really bothering me that all this stuff was going on and I couldn’t change it, so I knew I had to do something to reassure myself that I could take part in making a change.” Radifera brainstormed ideas with a few friends, focusing on her most immediate community—her school. “At Burley we are such a diverse school, a melting pot of everybody, and we wanted to make sure everybody felt safe, and they knew we’re a unified school working to fight discrimination,” she says. Radifera helped organize a Unity Day on the first of every month, and she and her friends have arranged an order of blue and white (Burley school colors) bracelets to sell to students during their Friday Blast period. Her group came up with slogans and surveyed the student population, ultimately agreeing on the phrase “Diversity Makes Us Stronger” to be printed on the bracelets. The school plans to donate any proceeds to a local community foundation. “I couldn’t stand the feeling of being so helpless,” says Radifera. “I had to do something.” Schools in action While many schools participate in community aid programs like food drives and shoe collections, a growing number are encouraging more hands-on and project-oriented service learning for their students, with inspiring results. Village School students regularly head out of the building to help in the soup kitchen at Christ Episcopal Church, and they visit Clark Elementary and Barrett Early Learning Center to read and write with the younger kids there. Despite the recent unrest that has taken place near the school’s downtown location, Head of School Eliza O’Connell says the students remain undaunted. “I’ve been amazed by the maturity of the girls.” A math lesson turned into much more at Charlottesville Day School as algebra teacher Tiffany Stauffer helped seventh and eighth graders organize a Friendship Feast in March for refugees from Syria, Iraq, Afghanistan and the Congo. With assistance from Kari Miller, founder of Charlottesville International Neighbors, students designed, budgeted and fundraised a potluck dinner event to host 10 refugee families, including lots of kids. Games like Connect Four helped bridge the language barriers, and each family was given a large soup pot filled with kitchen supplies and spices, as well as a family game night bag to take home. “The students really embraced the idea of making the families feel welcome,” said Stauffer. “And it made them so happy to be doing it.” In an initiative launched this year, Peabody School’s seventh- and eighth-graders are designing year-long projects aimed at researching and addressing a community need or problem. The project phase was jumpstarted with an in-house Leadership Academy, where local community leaders talked to students about how to be change-makers. After learning about humanitarianism, philanthropy and disaster relief from those experts, students designed innovative projects that they’ll complete independently. Goals range from partnering with area nursing homes and the Rainforest Trust, to addressing traffic issues with Albemarle County and teaching life skills to younger kids, all driven by each student’s passion. “We’re encouraging students to think beyond their own experience, and to identify their strengths and limitations,” says Victoria Young, assistant head of school. “Not every project works the first time you try it, but they learn to reflect and make it successful as they go, and that’s just as important.” LM Home work It is, without question, difficult to discern where to begin and what to say to young people when speaking about the intangible cruelties within our society. Eager to shelter our children from hardship, parents can avoid difficult conversations, hopeful tides will turn and moments will pass. The impulse to shield their hearts from hurt and bodies from pain is reasonable, of course. And yet, a desire to maintain and invoke innocence and a discomfort with challenging dialogues beget the crises that plague our communities; they cannot be solved with silence or inaction. We do a disservice to our children when we avoid our crucial obligation: to nurture. The greatest form of activism in our community today could be the swelling of conscious discourse, bold expression and action-oriented love in the form of supported children. No better result could be achieved than an outpouring of kindness, engagement and courage in the face of a daunting tomorrow. The cultivation of such is the work of parents. Young people are watching the way we navigate the world: Violence is on the channels and the streets; bullies lurk behind lockers and the Resolute desk; disharmony and even hate abound in neighborhoods and message boards. Our chief responsibility must be to model empathy, respect and willingness to grow. Here’s how. + Foster and encourage open dialogue. We cannot lift the burden of fears, whether our own or our child’s, until we face the beasts head on. Allow conversations to be ongoing. Accept that there may not always be a solution. Ask questions and share emotions. + Authentically explore the “other.” Reading stories, attending community events and engaging in volunteerism can cultivate empathy. When we interact with people outside of our immediate understanding, our capacity for compassion is amplified and communities are strengthened. + Be seen promoting justice in pursuit of peace. Stand up and get vocal about inequalities, and name them. Use language that is simple and honest. Identify as a family the power you have to make our community more equitable, accepting and representative. Let us teach the next generation that love is a verb. Let us orient them around the most oppressed in our communities, centering progress above tradition. Let us direct their fears into outspoken compassion. Adrienne Oliver Adrienne Oliver is a mother and educator working and writing in Charlottesville. She is a middle school literacy teacher, with a focus on arts-integrated, culturally responsive education. The post Leading by example: Kids learn to be the change appeared first on C-VILLE Weekly.

    C-VILLE Weekly / 2 d. 8 h. 16 min. ago more
  • more news
  • Clothes call: Local teen spearheads free laundry serviceClothes call: Local teen spearheads free laundry service

    Cutter Huston has never had to worry about clean clothes. But it wasn’t until he became involved with The Laundry Project that he realized not everyone takes something so basic for granted. The son of an Amry brigadier general, Huston was living in Tampa, Florida, when his mother, Michelle, saw a news story about people who were unable to find employment because they didn’t have clean clothes to wear to job interviews. “That resonated,” he says, and it occurred to him that something as simple as washing clothes “could change someone else’s life.” And that’s why Huston, now 16 and a junior at Albemarle High School, decided to volunteer with Tampa’s Laundry Project, which allows low-income families to wash clothes and linens free of charge with the help of volunteers, who assist with laundry services, provide child care and turn laundromats into community centers. During his time with the group, Huston grew close to The Laundry Project founder, Jason Sowell, and he says leaving the organization was one of the hardest things about moving when his father was reassigned and the family relocated to Charlottesville last summer. But during a chance encounter with Sowell in Washington, D.C., in June, inspiration struck: Why not start a Laundry Project here? And before you could say “wash, dry, fold and repeat,” Huston had introduced himself to Trey Coe, owner of Express Laundry on Maury Avenue. It didn’t take much convincing to get Coe on board, Huston says, and the area’s inaugural Laundry Project day came off without a hitch at the end of October. Sponsors included Ragged Mountain Running Shop, Whole Foods and Bodo’s Bagels. In addition to washing 242 loads of clothes at no cost (saving customers about $500), Huston served dozens of people a free breakfast, and he was able to send many home from the laundromat with extra food. “Trey and I both want to provide hope to people who have lost it, and help them regain a foothold and get their lives back where they want them to be,” Huston says. A member of the AHS cross country team and the school’s Math, Engineering & Science Academy, Huston says a date hasn’t been set for the next free laundry day, but he’s hoping to do three or four in 2018. “I have been very lucky to be in a family where I don’t need to worry about clean clothes or having enough to eat,” he says. “And it’s my duty to give back and spread the love to everybody who deserves it.” The post Clothes call: Local teen spearheads free laundry service appeared first on C-VILLE Weekly.

    C-VILLE Weekly / 2 d. 8 h. 16 min. ago more
  • A lighter touch: Sensory-friendly theater relieves those on the spectrumA lighter touch: Sensory-friendly theater relieves those on the spectrum

    Holly Regan sat with her son in a lightened theater last year, watching a Four County Players production of A Charlie Brown Christmas. It was a special performance, and not just because of the time of year; it was a sensory-friendly production put on for people like Regan’s son, Jimmy Seidl, who’s autistic. The show was in partnership with the Autism Theatre Project, an effort of the University of Virginia. While the name is very specific, Executive Administrator Jaclyn Lund emphasizes the program supports sensory-friendly theater in a nonjudgmental environment that is geared toward anyone with special needs. These productions are performed as written, but with special accommodations. “We work with area theater groups to make the performances more accessible by doing things like shortening performance length, adjusting light and volume levels so they’re not overwhelming and providing a sensory-friendly break room for anyone who needs a quiet room during the show,” Lund says. Regan says these types of modifications make all the difference for her family. At a traditional performance, she worries about her son’s potential outbursts disturbing others. Her choices are to leave him out of family outings, or take her chances and hope for the best. “We usually bring two cars, in case one of us has to leave with Jimmy,” she says. “I invest a lot of money in live performances, and I worry about what’s going to happen if he starts acting out.” For that very reason, performances in conjunction with the Autism Theatre Project are free for any family attending with someone who has special needs. “A lot of families can’t go to the theater because of social and financial pressure. We offer a judgment-free environment, and we reduce the financial stress,” Lund says. “By offering free tickets, if someone’s having a bad day, there’s no pressure to attend. They haven’t lost anything.” Most local groups have worked with the Autism Theatre Project to put on sensory-friendly productions, whether by adding an additional performance night, or by tweaking a matinee to accomodate special needs patrons. Regan says she hopes area theater groups might offer a sensory-friendly dress rehearsal, which she says would be a “win-win” for all involved. “It gives the performers a chance to work in front of an appreciative audience, and it gives my family an opportunity to attend a show without worrying that my son will disturb a paying crowd.” The post A lighter touch: Sensory-friendly theater relieves those on the spectrum appeared first on C-VILLE Weekly.

    C-VILLE Weekly / 2 d. 8 h. 16 min. ago more
  • Please and thank you: Every season is the right season for practicing mannersPlease and thank you: Every season is the right season for practicing manners

    While it’s true that proper manners can take a lifetime to learn (or is that just us?), Etiquette Empowerment founder Patty Hughson teaches a local four-week course in the foundations of table manners and polite interaction to young adults. But because attention spans are fickle things, we asked her to distill it down even further and provide us with some basics for kids to practice this holiday season. As Hughson says, “Etiquette isn’t about rules. It’s about getting along in the world with kindness, grace, generosity and gratitude.” That’s a good reminder at any age. Dining At dinnertime, kids should practice these guidelines: Begin and end meal with the napkin. Chew with your mouth closed. Say please and thank you. Salt and pepper are passed together. Say thank you to the cook. Before leaving table ask to be excused. No slouching, no squirming, no elbows on the table. Clear the table. Conversation Have your child come up with 10 open-ended questions for dinner or social events on topics such as school, movies, sports, TV, etc. Teach her how an inside voice sounds versus the outside one, and which is appropriate. Show by example how to engage your child in conversation to make sure no one is ignored. Don’t forget eye contact; it is extremely important. Giving and receiving Ask your child what gift he would like to give from the heart and to whom, so that it would make someone’s life better or easier. It’s all about kindness and helping out others in need. This is the special time of year to give back. Ship-shape shakes The art of handshaking, says Patty Hughson, can be practiced daily. Here are a few tips to give to your kids (or to brush up on). Right hand to right hand. Firm grip: “Not a bone-crusher, not a limp fish,” Hughson says. Two to three pumps is all it takes. The post Please and thank you: Every season is the right season for practicing manners appeared first on C-VILLE Weekly.

    C-VILLE Weekly / 2 d. 8 h. 16 min. ago more
  • Dose of the future: Cale Elementary’s dual language program leads students into the 21st centuryDose of the future: Cale Elementary’s dual language program leads students into the 21st century

    Five years ago, Cale Elementary School principal Lisa Jones instituted a Foreign Language in the Elementary Schools program for her incoming class of kindergarteners and rising first- and second-graders. For three years, offerings featured typical FLES programming—that is, 120 minutes a week of instruction in Spanish. However, as Jones saw it, that wasn’t enough. “By the time they reach fifth grade, on average, children who’ve participated in a FLES program will have a good working proficiency of the second language,” she says. “And we were proud that our students had gained access to that resource. But research shows, it’s immersion that produces true fluency.” Thus, two years ago, with the backing of the Albemarle County School Board, Jones introduced a voluntary Two-Way Immersion Dual Language program. Families of children in grades K through three were given the option of having their children be involved. Meanwhile, participating students spent half the day studying in Spanish, the other half in English. “The dual language program uses two languages for literacy and content instruction,” explains Jones. “It provides the same academic content and addresses the same standards as other educational curriculum, only, instruction is in the partner language 50 percent of the time.” In other words, for half the day, students spend their classroom hours reading, writing, learning and conversing in Spanish. While students can opt out of the program, the idea is for them to stick with it through at least fifth grade, and preferably beyond. “This approach produces students that are fluent in two languages,” says Jones. “When they graduate from fifth grade and enter middle school, they’ll be equipped with a skill-set—they will be able to read, write, listen and speak in two languages.” Approaching its third year, Cale’s dual immersion program is growing. Expanded to include fourth- and fifth-graders, enrollment has increased to 60 students. In third to fourth grade, four classrooms are devoted to the program, while in fourth to fifth grade, there are two. Each classroom features two teachers—one managing Spanish instruction, the other English. Of the participating students, about half speak Spanish as their native language. According to Jones, everyone benefits. “Research shows that, for non-native English speakers, partial instruction in the native language helps them learn the new one faster and more efficiently,” she says. “Meanwhile, for English-speaking students, learning the second language early on increases their ability to master it.” Furthermore, having access to peers who are native speakers of the desired second language means students can practice their skills beyond the classroom. Citing bilingualism as the global norm, and monolingualism as the new illiteracy for the 21st century, Jones says Cale’s program falls on the right side of progress. “On the one hand, research shows studying a second language aids children’s cognitive development,” she says. “On the other, if students can speak fluent Spanish and English, they can communicate with around 80 percent of the world’s population, or 5.7 billion people. In both cases, we believe that’s a win.” Budding trend Immersive, two-way dual language education in the U.S. was developed nearly 40 years ago. Since then, its popularity has grown immensely. During the first two decades of implementation, the number of programs remained relatively low—in the mid-’80s, just 30 were known to be in existence. However, in the last 15 years, that number has risen dramatically. In a recent study conducted by the Center for Applied Linguistics, 315 programs were documented, most of them Spanish/English programs in public elementary schools. EW The post Dose of the future: Cale Elementary’s dual language program leads students into the 21st century appeared first on C-VILLE Weekly.

    C-VILLE Weekly / 2 d. 8 h. 17 min. ago more
  • Adventure underground: Winter is prime time for spelunkingAdventure underground: Winter is prime time for spelunking

    As winter sets in caves offer surprisingly balmy family adventures. With temperatures hovering around 53 degrees, a subterranean visit provides hours of active outdoor fun sans the cold. From paved walking tours to rigorous guided explorations through wild caverns, the following resources will help you take advantage of the region’s many spelunking opportunities. Luray Caverns (Luray) Discovered in 1878, Luray has the largest series of caverns on the East Coast and is the granddaddy of American grottos. Featuring massive cave formations like stalactites, stalagmites, columns, mudflows, flowstone and mirrored pools, a 1.5-mile hike through the caves offers eye candy galore. Don’t miss the Great Stalactite Organ—a lithophone that taps stalactites of various sizes to produce tones similar to those of xylophones, tuning forks and bells. Adults $27, children $14. luraycaverns.com Outdoor Adventure Experiences (Dayton) In addition to rafting, fishing, hiking, canoeing and climbing, OAE offers guided tours of various wild caves throughout the Shenandoah Valley. Options vary in intensity and tend to include some degree of crawling, squeezing through narrow passages, rappelling and climbing into and/or out of pits. Tours are scheduled both day and night, with the most intense experiences featuring wading or even swimming through underground streams and lakes. Adventures are open to everyone over 4 feet tall. Starts at $160 for groups of two to four. outdooradventureexperiences.com Skyline Caverns (Front Royal) Opened to the public in 1939, Skyline Caverns is one of the only caves in the world where you can view anthodites. Made of calcite, the rare clusters of perfect, six-sided crystals blossom like sea urchins from the cave’s ceiling. Tours are offered daily, and feature about 1.8 miles of subterranean walking. Adults $22, children $11. skylinecaverns.com Lost World Caverns (Lewisburg, West Virginia) Offering both standard walking tours and wild caving experiences, LWC is great for families with wide age gaps. The walking tour is just more than a half-mile long, with the highlight being the 30-ton Snowy Chandelier, one of the nation’s largest compound stalactites. Meanwhile, wild tours take four to five hours to complete, feature a picnic lunch and carry visitors through more than a mile of fantastic chambers and passageways. Gear is provided and participants should be prepared to get muddy. Walking tours are $6 for kids under 6 years old, $12 for anyone over 13. Wild excursions run $79 a person. lostworldcaverns.com The post Adventure underground: Winter is prime time for spelunking appeared first on C-VILLE Weekly.

    C-VILLE Weekly / 2 d. 8 h. 17 min. ago more
  • Warm wishes: A local teen celebrates his birthday with coats—lots of coatsWarm wishes: A local teen celebrates his birthday with coats—lots of coats

    Most teenagers have pretty predictable birthday wish lists … video games, iTunes cards, maybe money to use toward buying a car. Charlottesville’s Ashton Ryan is different. He wants coats. Lots and lots of coats. It all started six years ago, just before his 12th birthday. “I saw a kid in school without a coat and I wanted to give him mine,” Ashton says. “When my mom picked me up from school that day, I told her I wanted to have a huge birthday party and invite the whole town, but everyone had to donate a coat as my present.” Each year since, Ashton and his mom, Kim, have organized Ashton’s Wish. He celebrates his November 11 birthday by collecting and then distributing donated jackets. “We sort them all by size, and then we make sure they’re clean and the zippers work, and then we give them away” to those in need. Recipients have come from schools, churches, Region Ten, Jefferson Area Children’s Health Improvement Program and other local organizations. To date, he’s distributed more than 7,000 coats to those who need one. He’s a kid with a big heart—one that has been through a lot. When Ashton was a baby, he was diagnosed with Kawasaki disease—an illness that can cause long-term damage to the heart. Fortunately, doctors caught it early. Ashton’s donations extend beyond Charlottesville; he’s given coats to those in need in Harrisonburg, Lexington and Richmond, too. He wants to expand his program across Virginia and then nationwide, ultimately to start a nonprofit organization to continue the mission. But first, there’s college and studying computers—right after his next coat drive. “I guess I just hope that other kids will hear about it and maybe they’ll want to do it too,” Ashton says. The post Warm wishes: A local teen celebrates his birthday with coats—lots of coats appeared first on C-VILLE Weekly.

    C-VILLE Weekly / 2 d. 8 h. 17 min. ago more
  • Businessman sentenced for pillaging nest egg of best friend’s widowBusinessman sentenced for pillaging nest egg of best friend’s widow

    RICHMOND, Va. — Despite testimony from his family, friends and priest, a Charlottesville businessman was sentenced Thursday in Richmond to seven years in federal prison for pillaging the nest egg of his best friend’s widow, defrauding a Virginia bank and stealing from his fraternity, reported RichmondBizSense.com. Victor M. Dandridge III received an 84-month sentence from Judge Henry Hudson after pleading guilty to two counts of wire fraud and one count of bank fraud, charges stemming from a 10-year scheme that bilked Richmonder Lynne Kinder and her family of at least $3 million. Dandridge also admitted to federal investigators that he defrauded Blue Ridge Bank in Luray, Virginia, and the Virginia Omnicron Chapter House in Charlottesville, associated with the Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity. Dandridge, 53, is a UVA alum and was a member of that fraternity. The sentence was in line with the 87 months requested by federal prosecutors, but far heavier than the 12 months in prison and 11 years of supervised released argued for by Dandridge and his attorneys. They argued that less prison time would allow him to work and earn income for restitution. Dandridge began managing Kinder’s money shortly after the 2005 death of her husband Trey, who left more than $6 million for his wife and two daughters. Dandridge and Mr. Kinder were lifelong friends, having grown up together in Roanoke. Kinder took the stand at Thursday’s hearing, describing the emotions of suddenly becoming a widow and Dandridge’s offer to manage the family’s money because he “owed it to Trey.” “It makes me sick to my stomach that he wakes up every day knowing he was ruining me financially,” said Kinder, alleging that Dandridge stole more than $6 million from her, differing from the $3.1 million calculated by the feds. She said she believes Dandridge’s actions were premeditated. “I constantly have to relive my husband’s death, confounded by the betrayal of his best friend,” she said. Continue reading on RichmondBizSense.com. 

    WTVR / 8 d. 9 h. 33 min. ago more
  • Charlottesville Police want information on 10 people seen at August rallyCharlottesville Police want information on 10 people seen at August rally

    Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Missing Attachment CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. — Charlottesville Police released photos of 10 people as part of an investigation into an assault during the August “Unite the Right” rally near the downtown mall. “[The] department is investigating an assault that occurred on the downtown mall in the area of the 4th Street crossover during the ‘Unite the Right’ rally held on August 12, 2017,” a Charlottesville Police spokesperson said. “We are asking for the public assistance in identifying the following individuals in relation to the assault.” Police have not gone into detail into the nature of the assault nor who was assaulted. Anyone with information about the people in the photos was asked to call Detective Kirby at 434-970-3604 or Crime Stoppers at 434-977-4000. Man beaten by white supremacists in Charlottesville is arrested In an incident captured on video and widely shared online, DeAndre Harris was beaten by several attackers in a parking garage during the white supremacists rally. Harris, it was alleged, also injured a white supremacist that day. Harris, 20, turned himself in earlier this month and was released on an unsecured bond after being served a warrant charging him with unlawful wounding, the Charlottesville Police Department said. It happened after an alleged victim, Harold Ray Crews, went to the local magistrate’s office and asked for a warrant for Harris’ arrest, police said. A detective verified the facts and issued a warrant, police said. No further details about the warrant or the incident that precipitated it have been made public. According to its website Crews is chairman of the North Carolina League of the South, a neo-Confederate organization. It has been classified as a hate group by the Southern Poverty Law Center. Muddying the waters? In an interview on CNN, Harris’ attorney said the warrant was an attempt to muddy the waters of who was to blame for the violent protests at the August 12 “Unite the Right” rally. “The city of Charlottesville is allowing these same white supremacists to re-victimize my client DeAndre Harris on the word of a single extremist,” said S. Lee Merritt. “His word alone, without any additional evidence, allowed for a warrant to go forward.” Merritt said Crews was injured in a different incident that day that took place after Harris was already in the hospital. “If Mr. Crews was injured that day it was during this attack and had nothing to do with DeAndre Harris,” he said. A woman who answered Crews’ phone Wednesday said he didn’t want to comment. Vonzz Long, a friend of Harris’, told CNN the two of them were part of a group of people staging counterprotests that day against neo-Nazis and white supremacists. He said they got into an argument with people from hate groups who threw things and shouted racial slurs at them, and he and Harris got separated during the ensuing chaos. When he eventually found him, Harris was surrounded by neo-Nazis in the garage and being beaten bloody, Long said. Harris works for the Charlottesville educational system and has no criminal history, Merritt said. “Based on the exception to the system, the word of one white supremacist, he’s being called a felon and he’s being (dragged) back through the system,” Merritt said. Two men who were allegedly involved in the assault on Harris appeared in court Thursday via closed circuit TV. The men, who are charged with malicious wounding, saw their cases postponed until December. City files lawsuit Meanwhile, the city of Charlottesville and a group of local business owners filed a lawsuit this month that they hope will prevent another event like the white supremacist rally two months ago. The suit targets what they call “private militia” groups by relying on state laws that prohibit “unlawful paramilitary activity” and private citizens from posing as law enforcement. The lawsuit was filed against more than 20 individuals, self-described militia groups and white nationalist organizations, and it includes several leaders of the rally in August. “Whatever their stated intentions, these groups terrified local residents and caused attendees to mistake them for authorized military personnel,” attorneys for the city wrote in the complaint. “It was in Charlottesville that an online clique of ethno-statists became a movement with real destructive force.” In addition, 11 unnamed plaintiffs filed a separate lawsuit Wednesday claiming they were injured, harassed, intimidated and assaulted by white supremacist groups during the August rally. The lawsuit, filed in federal district court in Virginia, alleges that 25 individuals and groups, including several white supremacist leaders, terrorized residents of the city and caused emotional distress. At the rally, which was held to protest the planned removal of a statue of Confederate general Robert E. Lee, scores of people were injured amid fistfights and screaming matches between white supremacist groups and counterprotesters. One man drove his car into a crowd of counterprotesters, killing 32-year-old Heather Heyer and injuring 19 others.

    WTVR / 26 d. 6 h. 29 min. ago more
  • National Geographic names Charlottesville one of the happiest cities in the U.S.National Geographic names Charlottesville one of the happiest cities in the U.S.

    Regular dental checkups and vacation time may not seem related, but according to a survey measuring happiness in U.S. cities, they are both good indicators of overall well-being. A study compiled by National Geographic, author Dan Buettner and Gallup used 15 factors that also include quality of diet, financial security, and daily learning, among others. The findings are based on 250,000 interviews done across the country from 2014 to 2015 as part of the National Geographic Gallup Special/Blue Zones Index. Boulder, Colorado topped the list thanks to its proximity to nature, a strong feeling of community, a largely active lifestyle and sustainable development, among other qualities. Half a million adults across the United States reveal who's happy and who's not https://t.co/0RFXT5HBon — National Geographic (@NatGeo) October 18, 2017 Cities from other states included San Diego, Minneapolis-St. Paul, and Washington D.C. Santa Cruz-Watsonville, California; Charlottesville, Virginia; and San Luis Obispo-Paso, California; were also in the top 5. Charlottesville is ranked third on the National Geographic list: “Along the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains, Charlottesville, Virginia, has ample opportunities for getting outdoors between visits to Monticello and the University of Virginia—both listed as World Heritage sites.” Other cities that did not make the list and ranked at the very bottom of the happiness scale were Charleston, West Virginia; Fort Smith, Arkansas; and Hickory-Lenoir-Morganton, North Carolina. In general, Buettner found that people living in happy cities socialize more during the day, laugh and smile more often, feel financially secure and have access to green spaces. After conducting 250,000 interviews across the country, these just might be the happiest places in the U.S. https://t.co/6ctcjHVAvM — National Geographic (@NatGeo) October 18, 2017 Here is the full list: Boulder, Colorado Santa Cruz-Watsonville, California Charlottesville, Virginia Fort Collins, Colorado San Luis Obispo-Paso Robles-Arroyo Grande, California San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, California Provo-Orem, Utah Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk, Connecticut Barnstable Town, Massachussetts Anchorage, Alaska Naples-Immokalee-Marco Island, Florida Santa Maria-Santa Barbara, California Salinas, California North Port-Sarasota-Bradenton, Florida Urban Honolulu, Hawaii Ann Arbor, Michigan San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward, California Colorado Springs, Colorado Manchester-Nashua Oxnard-Thousand Oaks-Ventura, California Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, DC Metro Area Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, Minnesota San Diego-Carlsbad, California Portland-South Portland, Maine Austin-Round Rock, Texas  

    WTVR / 31 d. 3 h. 8 min. ago more
  • KKK leader denied bail for firing weapon at Charlottesville rallyKKK leader denied bail for firing weapon at Charlottesville rally

    CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. — A Ku Klux Klan leader charged with firing a gun during the “Unite the Right” rally in Charlottesville in August has been denied bail. Richard Wilson Preston, 52, was arrested following the release of a video, filmed by the ACLU of Virginia, that allegedly shows him in a verbal altercation with counterprotesters. In the video, counterprotesters appear to throw objects at right-wing marchers. Richard Wilson Preston After several seconds, the man in the video, who is wearing a load-bearing vest, with a pistol on one leg and extra magazines on the other, turns away from the argument and walks away. Before reaching the edge of the frame, he turns back, drawing a pistol and shouting “Hey, n****r.” The man then fired a shot, before turning around, holstering his weapon, and rejoining the march. Preston was charged with discharging a firearm within 1,000 feet of a school. The Baltimore man told a Charlottesville judge that he acted in self-defense. He said that he fired the shot after a friend was threatened by someone holding a makeshift flamethrower, the Daily Progress reports. Preston will remain in the Albemarle Charlottesville Regional Jail pending a December hearing. The CNN Wire contributed to this article. 

    WTVR / 36 d. 2 h. 28 min. ago more
  • Man beaten by white supremacists in Charlottesville is arrestedMan beaten by white supremacists in Charlottesville is arrested

    Watch Video CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. — In an incident captured on video and widely shared online, a black man was beaten by several white attackers in a parking garage during August’s rally by white supremacists in Charlottesville, Virginia. Now the man, DeAndre Harris, is facing an allegation that he injured a white supremacist that day. Harris, 20, turned himself in Thursday morning and was released on an unsecured bond after being served a warrant charging him with unlawful wounding, the Charlottesville Police Department said. It happened after an alleged victim, Harold Ray Crews, went to the local magistrate’s office and asked for a warrant for Harris’ arrest, police said. A detective verified the facts and issued a warrant, police said. No further details about the warrant or the incident that precipitated it have been made public. According to its website Crews is chairman of the North Carolina League of the South, a neo-Confederate organization. It has been classified as a hate group by the Southern Poverty Law Center. Deandre Harris Muddying the waters? In an interview with CNN’s Don Lemon on Wednesday, Harris’ attorney said the warrant was an attempt to muddy the waters of who was to blame for the violent protests at the August 12 “Unite the Right” rally. “The city of Charlottesville is allowing these same white supremacists to re-victimize my client DeAndre Harris on the word of a single extremist,” said S. Lee Merritt. “His word alone, without any additional evidence, allowed for a warrant to go forward.” Merritt said Crews was injured in a different incident that day that took place after Harris was already in the hospital. “If Mr. Crews was injured that day it was during this attack and had nothing to do with DeAndre Harris,” he said. A woman who answered Crews’ phone Wednesday said he didn’t want to comment. Vonzz Long, a friend of Harris’, told CNN the two of them were part of a group of people staging counterprotests that day against neo-Nazis and white supremacists. He said they got into an argument with people from hate groups who threw things and shouted racial slurs at them, and he and Harris got separated during the ensuing chaos. When he eventually found him, Harris was surrounded by neo-Nazis in the garage and being beaten bloody, Long said. Harris works for the Charlottesville educational system and has no criminal history, Merritt said. “Based on the exception to the system, the word of one white supremacist, he’s being called a felon and he’s being (dragged) back through the system,” Merritt said. Two men who were allegedly involved in the assault on Harris appeared in court Thursday via closed circuit TV. The men, who are charged with malicious wounding, saw their cases postponed until December. City files lawsuit Meanwhile, the city of Charlottesville and a group of local business owners filed a lawsuit Thursday that they hope will prevent another event like the white supremacist rally two months ago. The suit targets what they call “private militia” groups by relying on state laws that prohibit “unlawful paramilitary activity” and private citizens from posing as law enforcement. The lawsuit was filed against more than 20 individuals, self-described militia groups and white nationalist organizations, and it includes several leaders of the rally in August. “Whatever their stated intentions, these groups terrified local residents and caused attendees to mistake them for authorized military personnel,” attorneys for the city wrote in the complaint. “It was in Charlottesville that an online clique of ethno-statists became a movement with real destructive force.” In addition, 11 unnamed plaintiffs filed a separate lawsuit Wednesday claiming they were injured, harassed, intimidated and assaulted by white supremacist groups during the August rally. The lawsuit, filed in federal district court in Virginia, alleges that 25 individuals and groups, including several white supremacist leaders, terrorized residents of the city and caused emotional distress. At the rally, which was held to protest the planned removal of a statue of Confederate general Robert E. Lee, scores of people were injured amid fistfights and screaming matches between white supremacist groups and counterprotesters. One man drove his car into a crowd of counterprotesters, killing 32-year-old Heather Heyer and injuring 19 others.

    WTVR / 37 d. 5 h. 4 min. ago more
  • Charlottesville suing to stop private militias at future ralliesCharlottesville suing to stop private militias at future rallies

    Watch Video CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. — Two months after the deadly white supremacist rallies in Charlottesville, Virginia, the city and a group of local business owners headed to court Thursday to file a novel lawsuit to prevent what they call “private militia” groups from wreaking havoc on the town once again. Using state laws prohibiting “unlawful paramilitary activity” and private citizens from falsely posing as law enforcement, the new lawsuit was filed against more than more than 20 individuals, self-described militia groups, and white nationalist organizations, including several leaders of the “Unite the Right” rally back in August. The Charlottesville City Council voted in open session Thursday morning to join the suit, now alongside dozens of local businesses and neighborhood associations. Hours of video footage captured men at a Friday night rally in August with Tiki torches marching onto the University of Virginia’s campus screaming, “Jews will not replace us!” Later Saturday, men with firearms, batons and riot shields wearing combat boots, military-grade body armor, and camouflage uniforms descended upon the city. Heather Heyer, 32, was killed and dozens more were injured after a man plowed his car into a crowd of counter-protesters. Virginia governor to white nationalists: ‘Go home … shame on you’ “We thought the law should have a response to this and it does,” said Mary McCord, a longtime federal prosecutor who is now part of the newly formed Georgetown Law Institute for Constitutional Advocacy and Protection leading Thursday’s lawsuit. “This was a conscious strategy of ‘provoke and invoke,'” said Joshua Geltzer, a former national security lawyer at the Justice Department and now executive director of the institute. “Those who came to Charlottesville looking for a fight planned to use paramilitary tactics to provoke violence on the part of counter-protestors and bystanders, then to invoke self-defense as an excuse for the violence they intended all along.” McCord emphasized to the city council that the lawsuit is not aimed at infringing upon free speech rights to protest or second amendment rights to self-defense. The suit is also not seeking any money damages, but rather only a court order to stop future private military action. Attorney General Jeff Sessions vowed that the Justice Department will “take the most vigorous action” to protect Americans against “racism and bigotry” in the aftermath of the tragedy in Charlottesville, but legal experts have noted the challenges of using federal civil rights statutes in this case given the burden of proof.

    WTVR / 37 d. 11 h. 22 min. ago more
  • Charlottesville schools on lock down after FBI warns of threatCharlottesville schools on lock down after FBI warns of threat

    CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. — The Charlottesville City Schools division is on a modified lockdown Wednesday,  after the FBI notified leaders of a social media threat. Local officials were notified by the FBI about information from a post made on a social media message board which expressed discontent with recent events in Charlottesville, according to the Charlottesville Police Department. In the message sent to parents, a city schools spokesperson said the post specifically addressed warrants that have been issued for the arrest of Deandre Harris, who is wanted on a felony arrest warrant for an alleged assault that occurred on Aug. 12 during the Unite the Right rally, reported CBS 19. Police said the person or persons who posted the message also referenced the deadly mass shooting in Las Vegas and said they admired the shooter. The post also said that Charlottesville, specifically schools within the city, should be the next target. At this time, there is no information on the identity of the poster, and police officers have been posted at all city schools and many of the area’s private schools.

    WTVR / 38 d. 10 h. 11 min. ago more
  • Charlottesville City Council drafts plan to handle white nationalistsCharlottesville City Council drafts plan to handle white nationalists

    CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. – The Charlottesville City Council released a statement Sunday after approximately 40 people associated with white nationalist philosophy held an unannounced torchlit rally in Emancipation Park Former UVA student Richard Spencer led the group and promised to return yet again, after calling the brief rally, “Charlottesville 3.0.” Spencer was referencing a spring rally and then the August 12 rally which turned violent and left one civilian dead. The statement said that the City’s police department is conferring with the Commonwealth’s Attorney’s Office “to pursue any legal mechanisms necessary to bring about justice” for the community. “It is unconscionable that Mr. Spencer and his allies would return to our City to intimidate and spread fear, especially after their morally reprehensible invasion of the city on August 12th,” leaders wrote in the statement. They said they have been consulting with outside sources, to develop changes to the code and procedures in an effort to address the events of the last four months. City Council requested the creation of an internal task force between City departments, who would collectively develop proactive strategies “regarding the law, policing, regulations, communications, intelligence-gathering, and community outreach to vulnerable populations regarding white nationalist events in Charlottesville.” The Office of the City Manager would guide the task force. The City outlined the work they have been doing to help prevent future incidents like the ones experienced in recent months; including an independent review of the events of May 13, July 8 and August 12 that should be done by the end of November. Other actions include designating a community group to address some of the issues raised by the public at council meetings. The group will weave these issues into its path to recovery vision and workplan for the city. The City has already provided updates to the Council and the public on a couple of those issues including affordable housing and equity issues such as workforce and business development. The City is seeking additional authority to control the conditions under which a group or organization can hold a rally or demonstration. It is expected that the Council will receive a report on this issue at its regularly scheduled meeting on October 16. City Council members will also go before the General Assembly to possibly seek sanctions against certain types of guns in certain public places and gatherings and laws granting localities the authority to remove their own memorials and monuments. City Council is also exploring various steps to equip the police department with the capacity to sustain the monitoring and gathering of intelligence. Statements from City Councilmembers are below: “Charlottesville is one of the world’s great cities. Our progressive and welcoming policies and our belief in telling the truth about race in our history are all key to our success,” said Mayor Mike Signer. “The so-called ‘alt-right’ believes intimidation and intolerance will stop us from our work.  They could not be more wrong.  We must marshal all our resources, legal and otherwise, to protect our public and support our values of inclusion and diversity in the future.” “As a city, it’s important that we stand up to and reject every notion of White Supremacy, the kind that is both overt and covert. As a city council, I firmly believe that my colleagues and I are committed to addressing these issues, and showing the community that we hear them,” said Vice Mayor Wes Bellamy. “I look forward to hearing from our Commonwealth’s Attorney about different ways in which we can, not only enforce the laws and ordinances that we currently have, but also possibly creating new parameters to stop hate groups from feeling so welcome here. I want to be clear – for all who believe that bigotry, racism, hate, and any other form oppression is welcome in our city, you are wrong. The Charlottesville that I love is not defined by White Supremacy. Our New Charlottesville stands together and for each other. Let’s continue to do so.” “We know that Charlottesville has become a target for white nationalists, and we must be prepared to meet their messages of hate and violence in the strongest possible terms,” said City Council Kristin Szakos. “There must be consequences for behavior that is intended to terrorize our community, and we need all our departments working together to make sure our response is clear and well-prepared.  Charlottesville must demonstrate in word and deed that we reject the messages of white supremacy.” “The only way to counter the irrational and despicable motives and methods of a Richard Spencer and his alt-right confederation is with a comprehensive, rational course of action that thwarts every white supremacist incursion, at every turn, and from every angle,” said City Councilor Kathy Galvin. “That is what City Council has tasked the city manager to do and we will keep the public informed, every step of the way.” City Councilor Bob Fenwick will offer comments later this evening. The City Manager’s Office will be providing regular updates to the Council and the public on these and other actions the City is taking to protect the public.  

    WTVR / 40 d. 23 h. 50 min. ago more
  • ‘We refuse to be dragged backwards;’ Va. leaders rebuke white nationalists‘We refuse to be dragged backwards;’ Va. leaders rebuke white nationalists

    CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. – Several city and state leaders responded to Saturday's torchlit rally with strong words against the message and the group, led by white nationalist Richard Spencer who called the event “Charlottesville 3.0.” On Saturday around 7:40 p.m., a group of about 40 to 50 people, including Spencer, gathered at Emancipation Park, where the statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee stands, Charlottesville police said. The group held a brief rally that police estimated took about five to 10 minutes. They dressed similarly in white shirts and some wore sunglasses in the dark while chanting, "You will not replace us. You will not erase us." "Hello, Charlottesville. We have a message. We're back and we're going to keep coming back," one speaker said. Spencer and his supporters alleged that Charlottesville was suppressing their speech and said that its residents should "get used to the alt-right. You're going to have to get used to white identity." Charlottesville leadership made it clear that the city did not want to accommodate more actions from white supremacists, and Democratic leadership was quick to rebuke the event. "Another despicable visit by neo-Nazi cowards," Charlottesville Mayor Mike Signer said in a tweet. "You're not welcome here. Signer also hinted at seeking legal action against the group by saying the city is examining the legality of the rally. "It's clear that these white supremacists are using torches, fire, and hate speech to intimidate our citizens," Charlottesville Vice Mayor Wes Bellamy said in a tweet. "That's a crime." Bellamy also called on Charlottesville Commonwealth's Attorney Dave Chapman to take legal action against the group of white supremacists, Newsplex reported. Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe tweeted: "We are monitoring this situation as we continue to oppose these racists and their message of hate." Senator Tim Kaine (D-Virginia) said “Don’t come back. Virginia is for lovers, not haters. We refuse to be dragged backwards.” Senator Mark Warner (D-Virginia) had not issued a statement or tweeted at the time of publication. Virginia Lieutenant Governor Ralph Northam, also the Democratic gubernatorial candidate, spoke out against the rally in Charlottesville. “There is no home, no place, and no safe harbor in the country I pledged to defend for the ugly hatred we saw in Charlottesville tonight," said Northam. His opponent, Ed Gillespie (R-Virginia), was initially silent about Saturday’s event, but released a statement Sunday night. "Last night’s torch rally was a disgusting, craven play for publicity by white supremacists whose twisted mindset represents the presence of evil in our world, hoping to generate media attention they believe furthers their reprehensible organizational goals," Gillespie said. Charlottesville was rocked by violence nearly two months ago during clashes between white supremacists and counterprotesters. Heather Heyer, 32, was killed in the event August 12 when a car plowed into a crowd of counterprotesters. In August, there was a strong bi-partisan message condemning the violence, from leadership and candidates. After the Saturday rally, the group left the park, boarded a tour bus and departed from the city, Charlottesville police said. Police cars followed the tour bus to make sure the group was leaving the city. "Our department is conferring with city leadership and the Commonwealth Attorney's office to determine what legal action may be taken in response to this event," police said in a statement. Spencer has now held three torch rallies in his former college town. The first event occurred in May, also at Emancipation Park where they protested the city's plans to remove the Lee statue. The second event was in August at the University of Virginia. **CNN Wire contributed to this report***

    WTVR / 41 d. 3 h. 8 min. ago more
  • ‘Go home!’ Mayor tweets after white nationalist tiki torch ‘flash mob’‘Go home!’ Mayor tweets after white nationalist tiki torch ‘flash mob’

    CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. -- Officials in Virginia denounced white supremacist Richard Spencer and dozens of his supporters who held another rally holding tiki torches in Charlottesville on Saturday night. The city's mayor, Mike Signer had a blunt message for them: "Another despicable visit by neo-Nazi cowards. You're not welcome here! Go home!" Charlottesville was rocked by violence nearly two months ago during clashes between white supremacists and counterprotesters. Heather Heyer, 32, was killed in the event August 12 when a car plowed into a crowd of counterprotesters. On Saturday around 7:40 p.m., a group of about 40 to 50 people, including Spencer, gathered at Emancipation Park, where the statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee stands, Charlottesville police said. The group held a brief rally that police estimated took about five to 10 minutes. They dressed similarly in white shirts and some wore sunglasses in the dark while chanting, "You will not replace us. You will not erase us." "Hello, Charlottesville. We have a message. We're back and we're going to keep coming back," one speaker said. Spencer and his supporters alleged that Charlottesville was suppressing their speech and said that its residents should "get used to the alt-right. You're going to have to get used to white identity." After the rally, they left the park, boarded a tour bus and departed from the city, Charlottesville police said. Police cars followed the tour bus to make sure the group was leaving the city. "Our department is conferring with city leadership and the Commonwealth Attorney's office to determine what legal action may be taken in response to this event," police said in a statement. Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe tweeted: "We are monitoring this situation as we continue to oppose these racists and their message of hate." Spencer has now held three torch rallies in his former college town. The first event occurred in May, also at Emancipation Park where they protested the city's plans to remove the Lee statue. The second event was in August at the University of Virginia. HAPPENING NOW: @RichardBSpencer & white nationalist supporters are back with their torches in front of Lee statue in #Charlottesville. pic.twitter.com/CwVhxpN7r8 — Matt Talhelm (@MattTalhelm) October 7, 2017 White nationalists now chanting - “We will be back”. About 3 dozen supporters in Emancipation Park. Plenty of police on standby in park. pic.twitter.com/LuJEsAgxQy — Matt Talhelm (@MattTalhelm) October 7, 2017 UPDATE: After short torchlit protest in front of the tarp-covered Lee monument in #Charlottesville, white nationalists have left the park. — Matt Talhelm (@MattTalhelm) October 8, 2017

    WTVR / 42 d. 0 h. 48 min. ago more
  • Charlottesville renames street Heather Heyer WayCharlottesville renames street Heather Heyer Way

    Watch Video CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. — A section of 4th Street in downtown Charlottesville will be renamed Heather Heyer Way. Charlottesville City Council voted in favor of the renaming during a Monday night meeting. Heyer, 32, was killed in August while protesting the white nationalists’ “Unite the Right” rally in Charlottesville. Heyer died after a man drove his car into a crowd of protesters. Flowers surround a photo of 32-year-old Heather Heyer, who was killed when a car plowed into a crowd of people protesting against the white supremacist Unite the Right rally, August 13, 2017 in Charlottesville, Virginia. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images) “For me that spot is the site of my daughters murder. It was the site where she did her last selfless act,” Heyer’s mother Susan Bro told NBC29. Alex Fields Jr., of Ohio, was charged with second-degree murder in connection to Heyer’s death.

    WTVR / 46 d. 13 h. 30 min. ago more
  • ‘He was on his death bed when he came home to us’ – UVA student’s father‘He was on his death bed when he came home to us’ – UVA student’s father

    Watch Video It has taken nearly three months for Cindy and Fred Warmbier to reveal specific details surrounding their son’s final days in the United States. But having begun the grieving process, Otto Warmbier’s parents are now ready to talk. And they are not mincing words. “We’re here to tell you, as witnesses to the terror of their regime, North Korea is not a victim. We felt it was time to tell the truth about the condition that Otto was in.” Fred Warmbier’s statement came during a live interview with Brooke Baldwin, one that — for the first time — helped answer many questions. For starters, in what condition did the Warmbiers find their son when the family was reunited upon his return from North Korea? “Using the term coma for Otto’s condition is completely unfair,” said Fred Warmbier. “Otto had severe brain damage. Otto was systematically tortured and intentionally injured by Kim Jong [Un] … Kim, and his regime. This was no accident.” Otto Warmbier The North Korean government initially attributed Warmbier’s condition to botulism. However, when they met Otto at the airport in Ohio, the Warmbiers found their child suffering from something inconsistent with a toxin-fueled illness. “Halfway up the stairs [to Otto’s airplane] we hear this loud, guttural, howling, inhuman sound,” Fred Warmbier said, as his wife sat to his right, hanging on each word. Cindy Warmbier said she initially hoped a return to the United States and treatment via “good, American health care,” might help improve her son’s condition. But such optimism was crushed upon hearing Otto’s wails, and upon first laying eyes on his sickly figure. She had to retreat down the steps. “He’s strapped to the stretcher,” recalled Fred Warmbier, who continued into the aircraft. “He’s moving around, and jerking violently, making these howling and inhuman sounds.” Otto Warmbier Admitting that they simply weren’t prepared to find their son this way, the Warmbiers shared further details with a stunned Baldwin. “He has a shaved head. His eyes are darting around … they’re as big as saucers,” Fred Warmbier continued. “He’s blind, he’s deaf, he’s got a feeding tube.” Fred Warmbier was joined by his other son, Austin, during this first visit with Otto, and the pair desperately tried to connect with the family member who’d been missing from their lives for 17 months. But it was a lost cause. “He’s a complete vegetable,” Fred Warmbier explained. “There was no comforting Otto.” Two days after his return to the United States, Otto Warmbier’s fever spiked, and four days after that, he was gone. Further complicating the situation was a collection of peculiar injuries, all of which remain a mystery: Bottom teeth that appeared “rearranged” A large scar running the length of Otto’s right foot Hands and legs best described as “totally deformed” “He was on his death bed when he came home to us,” Fred Warmbier told the “CNN Newsroom” host. “That’s why they released him,” added Cindy Warmbier. “They didn’t want him to die on their soil.” Despite such a breadth of medical inconsistencies, and so many inexplicable details regarding Otto’s condition, the Warmbiers opted not to have an autopsy done. For them, their son had already been through too much. “Otto was abandoned by his family, his country, and the rest of the world,” Fred Warmbier said. “Ultimately when Kim [Jong Un] made the decision, Otto was tortured, and essentially murdered. Enough. Enough.” Cindy Warmbier’s reason for refusing an autopsy: “I wasn’t going to let him out of my sight,” she told Baldwin, adding “and I didn’t.” The Warmbiers have received no information from the US government, but they say “we don’t need it.” Their message is directed entirely at North Korea. “This is solely the responsibility of the Kim [Jong Un] regime,” said Fred Warmbier. “Nobody should go there, ever,” Cindy Warmbier said of North Korea. “I don’t want to see anyone else hurt or taken.” Cindy Warmbier told Baldwin she’s growing stronger by the day, aided in part by the relationship she had with her son for more than two decades. It’s a bond, she pledged, that continues even as she mourns his death. “Almost every minute of every day, I think of Otto. He’s always going to be with me. It’s a wonderful memory,” said Cindy Warmbier. “I don’t want to remember Otto in North Korea, or in the hospital. I have enough fantastic memories of the 21 years we had together.”

    WTVR / 53 d. 1 h. 29 min. ago more
  • Charlottesville Police spent nearly $70,000 on Unite the Right rallyCharlottesville Police spent nearly $70,000 on Unite the Right rally

    CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. – The Charlottesville Police Department spent nearly $70,000 in expenses for the Unite the Right rally on August 12. The department said its response to the rally cost the city more than $50,000 in salaries, $14,000 in logistics, and $5,000 for quartermaster costs. The salaries figure includes nearly $44,000 in overtime for Charlottesville police officers, $3,300 worth of salaries for deputies from the Albemarle County Sheriff’s Office, and $2,300 of salaries for Albemarle Charlottesville Regional Jail staff. White nationalists, neo-Nazis and members of the 'alt-right' clash with police as they are forced out of Emancipation Park after the 'Unite the Right' rally was declared an unlawful gathering August 12, 2017 in Charlottesville, Virginia. Logistics costs include more than $2,000 for hotel and lodging, $700 in food expenses, and more than $1,600 for IT Equipment. The near $70,000 worth of expenses does not include the cost for Virginia State Troopers who responded. View this document on Scribd White nationalists gathered for the Unite the Right rally and clashed with counterprotesters in downtown Charlottesville. Heather Heyer, 32, was killed when police said a man drove his car into a crowd. The driver, James Alex Fields Jr., 20, has been charged with second-degree murder and other offenses. Two Virginia state troopers were killed in a helicopter crash nearby after monitoring events during the rally.

    WTVR / 54 d. 1 h. 14 min. ago more
  • Father, killed on I-64, was driving home to see his babyFather, killed on I-64, was driving home to see his baby

    CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. -- A father was driving home to his girlfriend and their infant son when he was killed in a wrong-way crash, according to friends and Virginia State Police. Kevin L. Grace, 23, of Petersburg, was driving east on Interstate 64 in Louisa, the night of September 21, when a Honda CR-V headed west in the eastbound lanes, hit Grace's Nissan Sentra. Grace was returning home from visiting family in Charlottesville, where he was born and raised. "He was a family man," Kevin's mom Wenona Messner said. "He was very overprotecting of me, his girlfriend, and their baby." Kevin and his girlfriend Adilene Coreas had recently moved to Petersburg to be closer to her parents. "I think what hurts the most is that before our little one was born, he promised to be the father he never had," Adilene said, "It just breaks my heart to a million pieces because he wanted to be a father. He was so looking forward to being a family and father." Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Missing Attachment His mother said Kevin would travel to Charlottesville frequently to deliver and fulfill orders people made off the website he created for his brand -- Laced Up Grace. "He was passionate about his brand," his mom said. "He would come to Charlottesville while working on his clothing line. He would ship shoes, shirts, and hats to his customers." "He was a very happy young man. He cared about his family," Messner added. "He had so much love for his girlfriend and his baby." Friends have set up a GoFundMe account to help Kevin's family pay funeral expenses and support his girlfriend and four-month-old son Sincere. "I will miss his smile. I will miss him walking through the door," his mother said. "I keep checking my phone. I keep waiting for him to text." The man who struck Grace's car also died as a result of the crash. He was identified as Edward A. Jordan, 41, of Littleton, N.C. The cause of the crash remained under investigation, according to Virginia State Police.

    WTVR / 54 d. 5 h. 6 min. ago more
  • Reupholstering the game
Reupholstering the game

    While Meléndez enjoys the performance aspect of the game he most appreciates that the Globetrotters take the opportunity to give back.

    The Cavalier Daily
  • Medical Center limits visitation, cites flu prevalence Medical Center limits visitation, cites flu prevalence

    Last Wednesday, the University Medical Center announced additional patient visitation limits due to the increase in flu cases.

    The Cavalier Daily
  • University faculty respond to Rolling Stone article released WednesdayUniversity faculty respond to Rolling Stone article released Wednesday

    Amid a sea of protests, University faculty have been active participants in the dialogue permeating Grounds which critically analyzes the University's culture and policies surrounding sexual assault. In addition to organizing a rally Saturday night on Beta Bridge, faculty from a swath of departments have issued statements and held discussions to help promote constructive change on Grounds, after a Rolling Stone article published last week thrust the University community into the national spotlight over the administration's handling of sexual assault cases.

    The Cavalier Daily more
  • Sexual Assault Resource Agency holds annual award celebrationSexual Assault Resource Agency holds annual award celebration

    The Sexual Assault Resource Agency (SARA), a Charlottesville-based nonprofit that aims to support survivors of sexual assault, held its sixth annual Annette DeGregoria Grimm Award Celebration last Friday at the Darden School of Business. This year’s award went to Ron and Lorelei Pulliam of the Gallastar Equine Center in Afton.

    The Cavalier Daily
  • Miller Center releases Clinton Project interviewsMiller Center releases Clinton Project interviews

    The University’s Miller Center released the first installment of interviews for the Clinton Presidential History Project Friday at the end of a symposium on the Clinton administration.

    The Cavalier Daily
  • Charlottesville Health Department investigating first-year gastrointestinal illnessesCharlottesville Health Department investigating first-year gastrointestinal illnesses

    The Charlottesville Health Department is investigating the cause of a gastrointestinal illness which sent about 15 students, mostly first years, to University Emergency Services during the weekend.

    The Cavalier Daily
  • Albemarle Sheriff Chip Harding calls for change in DNA collection proceduresAlbemarle Sheriff Chip Harding calls for change in DNA collection procedures

    Albemarle County Sheriff Chip Harding said he wants to see an expansion of the Virginia DNA databanks. Harding said he believes that if Jesse Matthew had his DNA collected in 2010 when he was charged with a misdemeanor, the DNA would have matched the 2005 sexual assault case.

    The Cavalier Daily
  • Hackathon to be held in honor of Connor CormierHackathon to be held in honor of Connor Cormier

    Several University students are organizing a hackathon in honor of late second-year Engineering student Connor Cormier, who committed suicide in October, to be held Nov. 15-16.

    The Cavalier Daily
  • Police issue tickets, summons at train tracks crossingPolice issue tickets, summons at train tracks crossing

    Despite continued patrolling of the fence by police, students and other Charlottesville residents continue to risk tickets and the issuance of a summons as they illegally cut across the railroad tracks.

    The Cavalier Daily
  • University Hall precinct finalizes in midterm election resultsUniversity Hall precinct finalizes in midterm election results

    University Hall was the last precinct in the state of Virginia to report their final vote tally to the state Electoral Board on Monday after a voting machine broke during Tuesday’s election.

    The Cavalier Daily
  • University representatives discuss building projects around grounds at Student Council's "Breaking Grounds"University representatives discuss building projects around grounds at Student Council's "Breaking Grounds"

    Representatives from the UVa Facilities Management and the Office of the Architect spoke about the state of construction projects occurring around Grounds Monday night at a talk called “Breaking Grounds.” Student Council’s Building and Grounds Committee hosted the presentations.

    The Cavalier Daily
  • more news
  • Professor Larry Sabato hosts Crystal Ball, releases midterm election predictionsProfessor Larry Sabato hosts Crystal Ball, releases midterm election predictions

    Politics Prof. Larry Sabato hosted his annual Crystal Ball predictions Monday night, predicting Republican gains in Tuesday’s congressional and state elections. Sabato and his team said they predict the Republican Party would gain a total of eight seats in the Senate to gain a 53-47 majority as well as nine seats in the House of Representatives, which which would give them a 243-192 majority.

    The Cavalier Daily more
  • Local counties receive grants to improve emergency preparednessLocal counties receive grants to improve emergency preparedness

    Agencies in Albemarle, Buckingham, and Greene counties will receive grants totalling nearly a quarter of a million dollars to improve emergency preparedness .

    The Cavalier Daily
  • Governor McAuliffe holds summit addressing sexual violence on  college campusesGovernor McAuliffe holds summit addressing sexual violence on college campuses

    At a summit held to address sexual violence on college campuses in Virginia on Thursday and Friday, Governor Terry McAuliffe said he intends to lead an effort that changes the sexual assault culture at Virginia schools.

    The Cavalier Daily