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    Google News / 17.01.2018 03:55
  • California couple's ordinary home held torture chamberCalifornia couple's ordinary home held torture chamber

    A 17-year-old girl called police after escaping from her family's home where she and her 12 brothers and sisters were locked up in filthy conditions, some so malnourished officers at first believed all were children even though seven are adults.

    WDRB / 1 min. ago
  • Man shot and killed by his father in Hikes Point, LMPD saysMan shot and killed by his father in Hikes Point, LMPD says

    LMPD says it happened just before 3 a.m. Tuesday at a home on Laurelwood Avenue, near Breckenridge Lane and I-264.

    WDRB / 3 min. ago
  • While other departments drop out, Jeffersonville Police say 'LIVE PD' show is a good fitWhile other departments drop out, Jeffersonville Police say 'LIVE PD' show is a good fit

    "LIVE PD" on A&E provides an unfiltered look at law enforcement in action, but not everyone is happy with the results.

    WDRB / 21 min. ago
  • Ex-Navy commanders face negligent homicide charges over deadly collisionsEx-Navy commanders face negligent homicide charges over deadly collisions

    Court-martial proceedings will be convened to review evidence supporting possible criminal charges against several members of the USS Fitzgerald, according to the service.

    WLKY / 27 min. ago
  • Flurries possible, very coldFlurries possible, very cold

    Flurries possible, very cold

    WLKY / 32 min. ago
  • Papa John's CFO to leave for Jack in the BoxPapa John's CFO to leave for Jack in the Box

    Lance Tucker, the chief financial officer of Papa John’s International, is leaving the company to take the same position with San Diego-based Jack in the Box Inc. It’s another shakeup in the executive ranks at Louisville-based Papa John’s.

    WDRB / 32 min. ago
  • Mother gives birth on Gene Snyder during snowstormMother gives birth on Gene Snyder during snowstorm

    Mother gives birth on Gene Snyder during snowstorm

    WLKY / 43 min. ago
  • WATCH: Gov. Matt Bevin delivers State of the Commonwealth addressWATCH: Gov. Matt Bevin delivers State of the Commonwealth address

    Gov. Matt Bevin will deliver his 2018 State of the Commonwealth and Budget Addressto members of the General Assembly and fellow Kentuckians.

    WLKY / 55 min. ago
  • Teams shift schedules to finish LIT basketball tournamentTeams shift schedules to finish LIT basketball tournament

    Teams shift schedules to finish LIT basketball tournament

    WLKY / 57 min. ago
  • WATCH LIVE | Gov. Bevin delivers State of the Commonwealth address in FrankfortWATCH LIVE | Gov. Bevin delivers State of the Commonwealth address in Frankfort

    Pensions and the budget are expected to be at the top of the list Tuesday night when Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin delivers his State of the Commonwealth address. 

    WDRB / 1 h. 11 min. ago
  • Healing Place expansion underway, 200 additional beds to be addedHealing Place expansion underway, 200 additional beds to be added

    The expansion of a shelter for people seeking help for addiction will be marked with a celebration.

    WLKY / 1 h. 12 min. ago
  • Gov. Bevin to deliver State of Commonwealth addressGov. Bevin to deliver State of Commonwealth address

    Gov. Matt Bevin will deliver his State of the Commonwealth address Tuesday.

    WLKY / 1 h. 16 min. ago
  • Kids enjoy snow day in Hardin CountyKids enjoy snow day in Hardin County

    Kids enjoyed sledding in Elizabethtown.

    WLKY / 1 h. 19 min. ago
  • Harrison County road conditions improve TuesdayHarrison County road conditions improve Tuesday

    Travel advisory lifted as snow stops

    WLKY / 1 h. 22 min. ago
  • Officials: Dryer malfunction cause of fire on Carpenter DriveOfficials: Dryer malfunction cause of fire on Carpenter Drive

    Firefighters are investigating the cause of a fire in south Louisville.

    WLKY / 1 h. 24 min. ago
  • Los Angeles County deputy charged after drug stingLos Angeles County deputy charged after drug sting

    On Tuesday FBI agents arrested a Los Angeles County deputy and others who allegedly arranged to help transport cocaine, methamphetamine and cash, according to U.S. officials.

    WLKY / 1 h. 29 min. ago
  • 22 state attorneys general fight back against repeal of net neutrality laws22 state attorneys general fight back against repeal of net neutrality laws

    So far, 22 attorneys general have banded together in an effort to block the Federal Communications Commission’s repeal of regulations that were put in place to ensure all of the internet is equal and open.

    WLKY / 1 h. 43 min. ago
  • 3 arrested in Charlestown drug bust3 arrested in Charlestown drug bust

    Adrian May was charged with possession of at least two ounces of methamphetamine, marijuana and drug paraphernalia.

    WLKY / 1 h. 49 min. ago
  • Winter weather adds stress to firefighters and puts pedestrians in dangerWinter weather adds stress to firefighters and puts pedestrians in danger

    Thirty firefighters were forced to show up to battle the flames and the temperatures Tuesday morning. It was 14 degrees. 

    WDRB / 2 h. ago
  • 7 of the most shocking moments in Winter Olympics history 7 of the most shocking moments in Winter Olympics history

    Ahead of PyeongChang, check out some of the most defining moments of past Winter Olympics.

    WLKY / 2 h. 6 min. ago
  • Several people hospitalized after wreck involving Greyhound bus, semi trucksSeveral people hospitalized after wreck involving Greyhound bus, semi trucks

    A crash involving a Greyhound bus and two semi trucks on I-65 South near Bonnieville, Kentucky sent several people to the hospital early Tuesday. 

    WDRB / 2 h. 13 min. ago
  • Paoli Peaks could see long season with lots of fresh snow on the groundPaoli Peaks could see long season with lots of fresh snow on the ground

    Snow is on the ground, and while schools might struggle to open, Paoli Peaks doesn't have that problem.

    WDRB / 2 h. 52 min. ago
  • White House doctor has 'no concerns' about Trump's cognitive ability after examWhite House doctor has 'no concerns' about Trump's cognitive ability after exam

    Later, Trump attempted to clarify matters by tweeting he was a "very stable genius."

    WDRB / 3 h. 5 min. ago
  • Kentucky event signals release of Trump investigation into aluminum importsKentucky event signals release of Trump investigation into aluminum imports

    Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin is scheduled to appear at one of the state’s biggest aluminum plants on Thursday to “discuss the impact” of an investigation by the Trump administration into whether rising imports of aluminum from China and elsewhere present a threat to U.S. national security.

    WDRB / 3 h. 14 min. ago
  • Several area hospitals help victims of Hart Co. crashSeveral area hospitals help victims of Hart Co. crash

    Multiple people were taken to area hospitals after a major crash on I-65 Tuesday.

    WAVE 3 / 3 h. 15 min. ago
  • Kentucky event signals release of Trump investigation into aluminum imports - WDRBKentucky event signals release of Trump investigation into aluminum imports - WDRB

    WDRBKentucky event signals release of Trump investigation into aluminum importsWDRBLOUISVILLE, Ky. (WDRB) -- Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin is scheduled to appear at one of the state's biggest aluminum facilities on Thursday to “discuss the impact” of an investigation by the Trump administration into whether rising imports of aluminum from ...and more »

    Google News / 3 h. 15 min. ago more
  • POLICE: Louisville man exchanged gunfire with off-duty LMPD officerPOLICE: Louisville man exchanged gunfire with off-duty LMPD officer

    The suspect is charged with two counts of wanton endangerment.

    WDRB / 3 h. 22 min. ago
  • Kentucky Humane Society asking for blankets, other pet care suppliesKentucky Humane Society asking for blankets, other pet care supplies

    The Kentucky Humane Society is asking for the public's help to care for its animals in the cold weather.

    WAVE 3 / 3 h. 26 min. ago
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  • IMAGES | Winter storm dumps several inches of snow on Louisville, surrounding areasIMAGES | Winter storm dumps several inches of snow on Louisville, surrounding areas

    A winter storm moved through Kentuckiana overnight dumping several inches of snow on Louisville and surrounding areas. 

    WDRB / 3 h. 36 min. ago
  • Snow Fox pre-school, business and government closings and delays -- Tuesday, Jan. 16Snow Fox pre-school, business and government closings and delays -- Tuesday, Jan. 16

    We have additional closings, delays and dismissals coming into the newsroom because of the weather. 

    WDRB / 3 h. 37 min. ago
  • Crews battle house fire in Shelby Park neighborhoodCrews battle house fire in Shelby Park neighborhood

    Firefighters are on the scene of a residential structure fire in the Shelby Park neighborhood.

    WAVE 3 / 3 h. 45 min. ago
  • LMPD say father shot and killed son in Hikes Point - WDRBLMPD say father shot and killed son in Hikes Point - WDRB

    WDRBLMPD say father shot and killed son in Hikes PointWDRBLOUISVILLE, Ky. (WDRB) - A man is dead after a shooting early Tuesday in Hikes Point -- and police say the victim's father pulled the trigger. LMPD says they responded to reports of a shooting just before 3 a.m. on Jan. 16 at the home on Laurelwood ...and more »

    Google News / 4 h. 18 min. ago
  • IMAGES | Sledding at Louisville's Cherokee ParkIMAGES | Sledding at Louisville's Cherokee Park

    Even as the hills are bringing fun times for the young ones, doctors are still cautioning children to protect themselves when they hit the slopes.

    WDRB / 4 h. 18 min. ago
  • IMAGES | Winter storm dumps several inches of snow on Louisville, surrounding areas - WDRBIMAGES | Winter storm dumps several inches of snow on Louisville, surrounding areas - WDRB

    WDRBIMAGES | Winter storm dumps several inches of snow on Louisville, surrounding areasWDRBLOUISVILLE, Ky. (WDRB) -- A winter storm moved through Kentuckiana overnight dumping several inches of snow on Louisville and surrounding areas. Road conditions were hazardous early Tuesday on secondary streets as well as main roads. Schools ...

    Google News / 4 h. 24 min. ago
  • Hoover, other lawmakers waive preliminary hearing in ethics investigationHoover, other lawmakers waive preliminary hearing in ethics investigation

    Four Republican lawmakers facing sexual harassment allegations waived a preliminary hearing before the Kentucky Ethics Commission Tuesday setting up a public hearing on the charges sometime before mid-April.

    WAVE 3 / 4 h. 33 min. ago
  • Observance recalls life, witness of KingObservance recalls life, witness of King

    The Office of Multicultural Ministry Archdiocesan Gospel Choir sang prior to the start of the 33rd annual Archdiocesan Community Wide Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration Jan. 15 at the Cathedral of the Assumption, 433 S. Fifth Street. (Record Photo by Jessica Able) By Jessica Able, Record Staff Writer The faith community of the Archdiocese of Louisville gathered on the snowy afternoon of Jan. 15 to honor the life and work of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. at the Cathedral of the Assumption in downtown Louisville. The 150 or so congregants who braved icy roads and snow flurries were called to “Break Every Chain,” the theme of the 33rd annual celebration hosted by the Office of Multicultural Ministry. It coincided with the federal holiday designated as a national day of service. Archbishop Joseph E. Kurtz, who served as the celebrant and keynote speaker, highlighted the day’s theme by quoting a 1958 essay in which King wrote: “Along the way of life, someone might have the sense enough and the morality enough to cut off the chain of hate. This can only be done by projecting the ethics of love to the center of our lives.” The service began with the “Call to Worship,” delivered by William Mathis, a parishioner of St. Martin de Porres Church. “We come to affirm the actions taken by our forefathers and mothers in being stewards of this church and our nation,” he said. “We come to remind ourselves that nonviolence is the only way.” Mathis said the day was an opportunity to pray for unity and peace. “We come to celebrate that we are still working to overcome the injustices, economic depravations and racist prejudices in our society today,” he said. During his speech, Archbishop Kurtz said the day’s celebration “is deeply personal, but it is not private.” “We come to stand for something important that’s at the depth of your heart and that is the dignity of every human person. Regardless of the color of your skin, your economic circumstance we stand together. We stand in prayer,” he said. Archbishop Kurtz also discussed the life and witness of Sister Mary Antona Ebo, a Franciscan Sister of Mary. Sister Ebo was the first African American woman religious to march with King in Selma, Ala., in 1965. She is remembered for saying: “I’m here because I’m a Negro, a nun, a Catholic, and because I want to bear witness.” She passed away on Nov. 11 last year at age 93. “She was a witness. And perhaps she never realized that going that day would change her own life as she spoke on the behalf of others. And, so we remember her witness and the witness of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.,” he said. At the conclusion of his homily, the archbishop read an excerpt of King’s 17-minute “I Have a Dream” speech, which the civil rights leader delivered on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial on Aug. 28, 1963. In a statement released by the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB), Cardinal Daniel DiNardo, USCCB president, said even with the progress the U.S. has made, racism remains a “living reality.” “As our nation celebrates the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., we are given an important time to recommit ourselves to the Gospel message he preached, that the sin of racism can be defeated by active love and the light of faith.” The challenge of the faithful, he said, is to bring King’s message into the present moment in a way that “inspires lasting change.” The congregation sang the opening hymn “Every Praise” at the 33rd annual Archdiocesan Community Wide Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration Jan. 15 at the Cathedral of the Assumption, 433 S. Fifth St. (Record Photo by Jessica Able) The post Observance recalls life, witness of King appeared first on The Record.

    The Record / 5 h. 9 min. ago more
  • Growing Louisville company sold to private-equity firm; more deals in the worksGrowing Louisville company sold to private-equity firm; more deals in the works

    The company expects to grow both organically and through bolt-on acquisitions.

    Bizjournals.com / 5 h. 12 min. ago
  • Suspects sought in E'town White Castle armed robberySuspects sought in E'town White Castle armed robbery

    The robbery happened just after 5 a.m. January 14 at the White Castle at 2006 North Mulberry Street.

    WAVE 3 / 5 h. 34 min. ago
  • Louisville sees dip in airfares, but rates remain higher than in peer citiesLouisville sees dip in airfares, but rates remain higher than in peer cities

    Louisville International Airport recorded a significant decline in its average airfare during the third quarter of 2017, but the rates still remain higher than in peer cities in the region. The Bureau of Transportation Statistics, part of the U.S. Department of Transportation, released its quarterly airfares report this week, showing Louisville's average airfare was $394.99 during the third quarter. That number is down significantly from an average airfare of $434.34 in the second quarter and…

    Bizjournals.com / 5 h. 35 min. ago more
  • Dad helps deliver daughter on side of Gene Snyder FreewayDad helps deliver daughter on side of Gene Snyder Freeway

    The due date of the Stanley's fourth child wasn't supposed to be for another two weeks. But baby Stella had other plans.

    WAVE 3 / 5 h. 39 min. ago
  • Elizabethtown Police looking for 2 suspects in restaurant armed robbery - WDRBElizabethtown Police looking for 2 suspects in restaurant armed robbery - WDRB

    WDRBElizabethtown Police looking for 2 suspects in restaurant armed robberyWDRBLOUISVILLE, Ky. (WDRB) -- Elizabethtown Police are looking two male suspects authorities say are wanted in connection with the armed robbery of a fast food restaurant. Police say the robbery happened Sunday at the White Castle, located at 2006 North ...Dozens of car windows shot out in Elizabethtown, police sayWHAS 11.comSuspects sought in E'town White Castle armed robberyWAVE 3all 5 news articles »

    Google News / 6 h. 6 min. ago more
  • Luxury subdivision proposed next to Lake Forest Country ClubLuxury subdivision proposed next to Lake Forest Country Club

    It will offer 46 lots in one cul-de-sac.

    Bizjournals.com / 6 h. 20 min. ago
  • POLICE: Louisville man arrested after 10 pounds of marijuana found in ceiling tilesPOLICE: Louisville man arrested after 10 pounds of marijuana found in ceiling tiles

    A Louisville man has been arrested after police say they found at least 10 pounds of marijuana hidden behind his ceiling tiles. According to an arrest report, police executed a search warrant Friday morning at a residence near the intersection of Southside Drive and South Arbor Park, where 32-year-old Carlos Garcia-De La Paz was staying.

    Louisville News / 6 h. 24 min. ago
  • At least 7 on Greyhound bus hurt in Hart County I-65 multi-vehicle crashAt least 7 on Greyhound bus hurt in Hart County I-65 multi-vehicle crash

    According to Chris Jessie, spokesman for the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet District 4, three commercial vehicles and a passenger bus were involved in the crash. Multiple emergency crews were sent to the scene to treat the injured.

    Louisville News / 6 h. 24 min. ago
  • Major bank ups its stake in Kindred HealthcareMajor bank ups its stake in Kindred Healthcare

    A major bank that raised its stake in Papa John's International Inc. also increased its holdings in Louisville-based Kindred Healthcare Inc. by more than 50 percent. A filing with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission reveals that New York City-based JPMorgan Chase & Co. (NYSE: JPM) now owns about 5.58 million shares, or roughly 6.4 percent, of Kindred's (NYSE: KND) outstanding shares. As of Sept. 29, JPMorgan Chase held about 3.57 million shares, or about 4.11 percent of shares, according…

    Bizjournals.com / 6 h. 26 min. ago more
  • Coroner seeking next of kin for man found dead in tentCoroner seeking next of kin for man found dead in tent

    Haywood Robinson, 49, was found around noon on Jan. 13, according to Jefferson County Deputy Coroner Eddie Robinson.

    WAVE 3 / 6 h. 50 min. ago
  • Home catches fire in Prestonia neighborhoodHome catches fire in Prestonia neighborhood

    The fire was reported at 11:40 a.m. in the 1200 block of Bourbon Avenue, according to MetroSafe.

    WAVE 3 / 7 h. 33 min. ago
  • JCPS Transportation to hold job fair WednesdayJCPS Transportation to hold job fair Wednesday

    Jefferson County Public Schools are looking to hire bus drivers, bus monitors and special needs assistance.

    WAVE 3 / 7 h. 54 min. ago
  • Thinking about retiring in Kentucky? Think againThinking about retiring in Kentucky? Think again

    If you're thinking about retiring in Kentucky, you might want to consider Plan B. A new study from WalletHub, a personal-finance website, ranks the state dead last among the best states to retire. The analysis looked 41 key indicators of retirement friendliness in three areas: affordability, health-related factors and overall quality of life.  Kentucky, with its No. 50 overall ranking, comes in at No. 38 for affordability and No. 47 for quality of life and health care. Indiana is ranked No.…

    Bizjournals.com / 8 h. 33 min. ago more
  • USPS asking residents to clear snowUSPS asking residents to clear snow

    The snow and ice have become a safety hazard.

    WAVE 3 / 8 h. 45 min. ago
  • Louisville Metro under winter storm warning, expect hazardous driving conditionsLouisville Metro under winter storm warning, expect hazardous driving conditions

    A winter storm warning has been issued for the Louisville Metro area, and driving conditions for the morning commute have been hazardous. WDRB's Jude Redfield says the snow is tapering off from north to south , so improvements are expected during the day.

    Louisville News / 8 h. 51 min. ago
  • GUEST COMMENT: Louisville businesses need to prepare for 5G technologyGUEST COMMENT: Louisville businesses need to prepare for 5G technology

    Louisville’s business community has pushed hard for a first-class fiber broadband infrastructure, and we’re having success in this effort. But if there’s one takeaway from last week’s 2018 CES show, it’s that our city cannot rest. If we want to stay competitive in the global economy, we must use the success of our fiber broadband efforts to surmount the next hurdle — making Louisville a 5G-enabled city.  5G is shorthand for the next (fifth) generation of mobile broadband that will…

    Bizjournals.com / 9 h. 16 min. ago more
  • I-65 Crash: Strangers help strangers stay warm during traffic standstillI-65 Crash: Strangers help strangers stay warm during traffic standstill

    The crash involved two commercial vehicles, two passenger vehicles, and a Greyhound bus.

    WAVE 3 / 9 h. 45 min. ago
  • Deacon James R. Plummer, 99, diesDeacon James R. Plummer, 99, dies

    Record Staff Report Deacon James R. Plummer died Jan. 4 at Nazareth Home in Louisville. He was 99. Deacon Plummer was ordained a deacon Aug. 18, 1984, and served at the former St. Barnabas Church (now St. John Paul II Church). He retired as the district transportation manager for Reynolds Metal Co. He was also a veteran of World War II and received the Purple Heart Medal. Deacon Plummer is survived by four children: James, Mark, Judie and Teri; 12 grandchildren and 22 great-grandchildren. The Funeral Mass was celebrated Jan. 10 at St. John Paul II. The post Deacon James R. Plummer, 99, dies appeared first on The Record.

    The Record / 10 h. 20 min. ago more
  • Deacon Vincent G. Stanley, 80, diesDeacon Vincent G. Stanley, 80, dies

    Record Staff Report Deacon Vincent G. (Jim) Stanley died Jan. 13 at University Hospital in Louisville, He was 80 years old. Deacon Stanley, who grew up in Chicago, was ordained a deacon Aug. 17, 1996. He served at St. Albert the Great Church. He ministered at Catholic Charities of Louisville and visited individuals at Brownsboro Park Retirement Community and Nazareth Home Clifton. Deacon Stanley worked in sales for the Wallace Computer Services, and after retirement worked part-time for Sears. He also served two years in the U.S. Army including a tour in Korea. He is survived by his three daughters, Kathryn Kennedy, Pamala Collins (Aaron) and Wendy Lott (Tim); and five grandchildren. The Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated today, Jan. 18, at 11:30 a.m. at St. Albert the Great, 1395 Girard Drive, with entombment at Calvary Cemetery. Visitation will be Jan. 17 from 4 to 7 p.m. at Ratterman Funeral Home, 3711 Lexington Road. Memorial gifts in Deacon Stanley’s memory may be made to his church. The post Deacon Vincent G. Stanley, 80, dies appeared first on The Record.

    The Record / 10 h. 21 min. ago more
  • VIEWER PHOTOS: Snow falls around WAVE CountryVIEWER PHOTOS: Snow falls around WAVE Country

    Take a look at some photos our viewers are sharing of the snow around WAVE Country today.

    WAVE 3 / 10 h. 35 min. ago
  • Kentucky's ag commissioner to discuss anti-hunger effortsKentucky's ag commissioner to discuss anti-hunger efforts

    The McConnell Center at the University of Louisville is starting its latest lecture series with a discussion about hunger in Kentucky. The center says state Agriculture Commissioner Ryan Quarles will give a free, public talk on the subject on Jan. 24 at the Ekstrom Library's Chao Auditorium on the UofL campus.

    Louisville News / 11 h. 4 min. ago
  • Louisville Metro under winter storm warning, expect hazardous driving conditions - WDRBLouisville Metro under winter storm warning, expect hazardous driving conditions - WDRB

    WDRBLouisville Metro under winter storm warning, expect hazardous driving conditionsWDRBLOUISVILLE, Ky. (WDRB) -- A winter storm warning has been issued for the Louisville Metro area, and driving conditions for the morning commute have been hazardous. The warning remains in effect until 1 p.m.. WDRB's Jude Redfield says the snow is ...and more »

    Google News / 11 h. 11 min. ago more
  • Louisville philanthropist scoops up Republic BuildingLouisville philanthropist scoops up Republic Building

    The building had been owned by Florida developer Hudson Holdings.

    Bizjournals.com / 12 h. 28 min. ago
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  • Ford brings back Ranger and new take on 1968 MustangFord brings back Ranger and new take on 1968 Mustang

    DETROIT – Ford Motor Co. is reviving more than just the Ranger. For the second year in a row at the 2018 North American International Auto Show, the Dearborn-based automaker grabbed headlines with plans to bring back a brand classic. Last year, Ford announced the return of the Ranger mid-size truck and the Ford Bronco sport-utility vehicle. This year, it showed off that reborn Ranger, while also rolling out the 2019 Ford Mustang Bullitt. That Mustang variation is a new take on the 1968 Mustang…

    Bizjournals.com / 12 h. 40 min. ago more
  • More workers likely to change jobs in 2018 — why that’s a good thingMore workers likely to change jobs in 2018 — why that’s a good thing

    Employers might want to brace themselves for an uptick in resignation letters as they settle into the new year. And while those departures might cause some short-term hiring headaches, economists say an increase in the number of people quitting their jobs is actually a good thing. More workers quitting is a sign that they feel confident another decent job will be waiting for them, said Gary Burtless, an economist and senior fellow at the Brookings Institution.  “That is, they gain confidence…

    Bizjournals.com / 13 h. ago more
  • Nike shows off gear that Team USA athletes will wear on the 2018 Olympics medal podium (Photos)Nike shows off gear that Team USA athletes will wear on the 2018 Olympics medal podium (Photos)

    Nike Inc. will make a prominent showing at the 2018 Olympic Winter Games in South Korea next month, as it is outfitting every Team USA athlete who makes it to the medal podium. All of the medal ceremonies at the Games except for hockey will be held outside, so Nike designed uniforms to help the athletes withstand the elements. The collection is designed for layering, with a lightweight Gore-Tex shell jacket to block wind and rain, and a removable, puffed bomber that zips into it. The pant, built…

    Bizjournals.com / 13 h. 7 min. ago more
  • Man shot, killed in Hikes Point identifiedMan shot, killed in Hikes Point identified

    The man shot and killed in Hikes Point Tuesday has been identified.

    WAVE 3 / 14 h. 20 min. ago
  • IN Louisville KY Zone Forecast - The Bryan TimesIN Louisville KY Zone Forecast - The Bryan Times

    IN Louisville KY Zone ForecastThe Bryan TimesIN Louisville KY Zone Forecast. Story · Comments. ShareShare; Print: Create a hardcopy of this page; Font Size: Default font size: Larger font size. Posted: Tuesday, January 16, 2018 9:36 am | Updated: 10:07 am, Tue Jan 16, 2018. IN Louisville KY Zone ...and more »

    Google News / 15 h. 14 min. ago
  • LMPD investigating fatal shooting in Hikes PointLMPD investigating fatal shooting in Hikes Point

    Dozens of flu-related deaths have been reported in Kentucky and Indiana, and doctors are noticing the drastic spike in flu cases over the past two or three weeks. Dozens of flu-related deaths have been reported in Kentucky and Indiana, and doctors are noticing the drastic spike in flu cases over the past two or three weeks.

    Louisville News / 15 h. 39 min. ago
  • Great-Day-Live 53 mins ago 12:20 p.m.Can 15 minutes of movement make the difference for students?Great-Day-Live 53 mins ago 12:20 p.m.Can 15 minutes of movement make the difference for students?

    Over-energized kids can be a distraction in schools but UofL researchers believe just 15 minutes of exercise a day could change that. Mark Hebert shares the story of how UofL researchers and Hawthorne Elementary School students are working together to find out.

    Louisville News / 17 h. 45 min. ago
  • Snow emergency, travel warning canceled in Harrison CountySnow emergency, travel warning canceled in Harrison County

    Travel is restricted to emergency personnel and other essential workers only.

    WAVE 3 / 20 h. 13 min. ago
  • Louisville attorney Larry Franklin diesLouisville attorney Larry Franklin dies

    Franklin was a graduate of Valley High-school. Following high-school, he was selected to attend the United States Naval Academy where he graduated with the honor of having the highest aptitude in his graduating class.

    Louisville News / 22 h. 8 min. ago
  • Flu complications likely cause of Owensboro MS student's deathFlu complications likely cause of Owensboro MS student's death

    Family members say 12-year-old Brookelynne Shannon died Monday at Norton's Hospital in Louisville. She came down with the flu at the end of December and after several trips to the ER, she was taken to Norton's on New Year's Eve.

    Louisville News / 22 h. 8 min. ago
  • Freezing temps stall East End Tunnel constructionFreezing temps stall East End Tunnel construction

    LOUISVILLE, KY The bright lettering leading into the East End Tunnel can't be missed. It explains that vehicles carrying hazardous materials cannot go through.

    Louisville News / 22 h. 8 min. ago
  • Crews continue to treat roads for winter weatherCrews continue to treat roads for winter weather

    LOUISVILLE, KY (WAVE) - Road crews have been busy treating the roads for this additional round of snow to hit the area.There wasn't the usual amount of traffic on the roads on Monday because it w

    Big News Network.com / 23 h. 43 min. ago
  • Amazon Prime Air gets closer to takeoff in Northern KentuckyAmazon Prime Air gets closer to takeoff in Northern Kentucky

    CINCINNATI, OH (WAVE) - Amazon.com Inc. has added 210 acres of land to it's planned air hub at the Cincinnati-Northern Kentucky International Airport.According to a tweet by senior Amazon officia

    Big News Network.com / 23 h. 43 min. ago
  • Travel trailer hangs over concrete overpassTravel trailer hangs over concrete overpass

    COLUMBUS, IN (WAVE) - Crews in Columbus, Indiana had to shut part of I-65 southbound down on Monday.The interstate was shut down at the 68 mile marker due to a travel trailer that was hanging over the

    Big News Network.com / 23 h. 43 min. ago
  • Several children taken to hospital for sledding injuriesSeveral children taken to hospital for sledding injuries

    LOUISVILLE, KY (WAVE) - A lot of folks taking the Monday holiday and heading out sledding. Dog Hill at Cherokee Park was full of kids and adults having some fun. Skyler Bluechel, 7, was out with his b

    Big News Network.com / 23 h. 43 min. ago
  • Shoveling snow? How it could be potentially fatalShoveling snow? How it could be potentially fatal

    LOUISVILLE, KY (WAVE) - Shoveling snow is not just another household chore. You really have to be careful.According to the National Safety Council nationwide, snow shoveling is responsible for thousan

    Big News Network.com / 23 h. 43 min. ago
  • Driver arrested after sledding death of Evansville HS studentDriver arrested after sledding death of Evansville HS student

    NEWBURGH, IN (WFIE) - The Castle High School community in Evansville is grieving the loss of another student.We're told 16-year-old Davis Collier, of Newburgh, was killed on Saturday s

    Big News Network.com / 23 h. 43 min. ago
  • Current & former Louisville residents in Hawaii reflect on missile scareCurrent & former Louisville residents in Hawaii reflect on missile scare

    LOUISVILLE, KY For the past 48 hours, people all over the world have been asking themselves what would they do if they got a missile alert like the false alarm that went out in Hawaii Saturday. Some people from Louisville know the answer to that question all too well because they lived it.

    Louisville News / 1 d. 0 h. 23 min. ago
  • As wind chills near zero degrees await, Kentuckiana schools work to ensure student safetyAs wind chills near zero degrees await, Kentuckiana schools work to ensure student safety

    Five teams from the Atlantic Coast Conference and Big 12, four from the Big Ten and three from the SEC headline Rick Bozich's weekly AP college basketball Top 25 ballot. Five teams from the Atlantic Coast Conference and Big 12, four from the Big Ten and three from the SEC headline Rick Bozich's weekly AP college basketball Top 25 ballot.

    Louisville News / 1 d. 0 h. 23 min. ago
  • Deadly flu outbreak hits Kentucky and Indiana - WDRBDeadly flu outbreak hits Kentucky and Indiana - WDRB

    WDRBDeadly flu outbreak hits Kentucky and IndianaWDRBMIDDLETOWN, Ky. (WDRB) -- The Center for Disease Control and Prevention is reporting widespread flu activity in every state except Hawaii. Dozens of flu-related deaths have been reported in Kentucky and Indiana, and doctors are noticing the drastic ...

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  • Photos from the 2018 Girls Rock Louisville album release partyPhotos from the 2018 Girls Rock Louisville album release party

    Girls Rock Louisville — a summer camp that “empowers girls and gender non-conforming youth from all backgrounds by exploring music creation in a supportive, inclusive environment” — released its second compilation album at Guestroom Records on Sunday. The album features bands formed at the 2017 rock camp, and was recorded at La La Land Studios in Louisville. CDs are available at Guestroom while supplies last, and a digital version will soon be available on the Girls Rock Louisville website. “Camp was tons of fun, but, when it came to actually recording the music, it was really real, and you didn’t want to mess up,” said 13-year-old Lucy Campbell, who performed on the record. “Still doing it was tons of fun.” Girls Rock Girls Rock Girls Rock Girls Rock Girls Rock Girls Rock Girls Rock Girls Rock Girls Rock Girls Rock Girls Rock Girls Rock The post Photos from the 2018 Girls Rock Louisville album release party appeared first on LEO Weekly.

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  • 10 things to do under $5 this week in Louisville (1/15)10 things to do under $5 this week in Louisville (1/15)

    MONDAY Game Knights Kaiju Free  |  7 p.m. Test your board-gaming skills (under the influence of beer or bourbon) at Game Knights. This weekly event, hosted by Nerd Louisville and “Squire,” of Book & Music Exchange (The Highlands), provides a choice selection of board games for you to play with friends. Come early to ensure a spot at the table, and feel free to bring your own board games. Lactobacillus in Kentucky Common Goodwood Brewing Co. No cover  |  7-10 p.m. Dibbs Harding of the Lagers Homebrew Club, which bills itself as the Louisville area’s grain and extract research society, is presenting new research on a strain of Lactobacillus from the ale Kentucky Common. So if you’re a hops-head and interested in the history of this local style of beer (and want to try a few samples), come with any and all questions. Movie Monday: ‘Selma’ Old Louisville Brewery No cover  |  7 p.m. In honor of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, Old Louisville Brewery is screening the Academy Award-winning film “Selma” for this week’s taco and movie night. The film chronicles King’s campaign to win equal voting rights for African-Americans via a march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, in 1965. The movie is two hours long, so settle in with a beer and a taco special for $6, or three tacos for $6, provided by Sabor Latino. TUESDAY Vinyl Night (Album Cover Costume Party) Galaxie Free  |  8 p.m. Get creative on this vinyl night where attendees are encouraged to dress as an album cover of their choice. So not only can you play your favorite record, but you can look the part as well. Toward the end of the night, a “Best Costume” winner will be chosen and receive concert tickets, vinyl records and more. Taco Tuesday Tin Roof Louisville Prices vary  |  11 a.m. Let me set the scene: It’s Tuesday, and you’re depressed because it’s fucking Tuesday. What better time to indulge in some drink and food specials at Tin Roof. Drink specials include $3 Landsharks and Coronas; $3 Modelos or Tecates; $2 glass sangrias and $6 pitcher sangrias and $5 El Jimador margaritas. And food specials include $2 chicken tacos; $2.5 steak tacos and $3 steak tacos. And if you’re fancy, the regular taco menu will still be available. WEDNESDAY ‘Broad City’ Trivia Old Louisville Brewery Free  |  7 p.m. If you don’t know about the comedy show “Broad City” by now, then you need to catch up immediately. And after you’ve binged on all three seasons, you should attend this “Broad City” trivia night! Best friends Aubrey and Brittany will be hosting, as well as curating a few of their favorite episodes following trivia. Social Cinema Presents: ‘Heists Gone Wrong’ The Butchertown Social Free  |  9 p.m. What’s better than a violent, crime-noir film about well-planned heists going terribly wrong? Two. First up is Quentin Tarantino’s classic “Reservoir Dogs,” followed by Stanley Kubrick’s “The Killing.”  Books & Brews 502 with LFPL HopCat Louisville No cover  |  6 p.m. This is the final pop-up library, during which Louisville Free Public Library will register people for its adult winter reading program “Books and Brews 502.” The concept is simple: Read books and attend LFPL events to earn points, which go toward winning weekly prizes that include gift cards to local shops and eateries, tickets to shows and more! But that’s not all that will be happening — there will also be custom book and beer pairings, book giveaways and plenty of library material on beer and brewing. THURSDAY Half Gringa, Bea Troxel, Much Obliged, Rosetint Collective The Cure Lounge $5  |  9 p.m. Rock out at this concert with the rowdy, and wordy, rock band Half Gringa; the folk band with a little twang, Bea Troxel; the pop-rock band with a heavy emphasis on ambiance, Much Obliged; and the Southern jam-rock group, Rosetint Collective. Gruñona by Half Gringa FRIDAY Tycoon$ of Teens, DUD, GRLwood The Cure Lounge $5  |  9 p.m. And as if Thursday concert at The Cure Lounge wasn’t enough, the bar is hosting another show on Friday with fuzz, power pop band Tycoon$ of Teen, lo-fi punk band DUD and scream pop band GRLwood. Dad’s Angry Again by Tycoons of Teen The post 10 things to do under $5 this week in Louisville (1/15) appeared first on LEO Weekly.

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  • Coroner looking for next of kin of elderly manCoroner looking for next of kin of elderly man

    LOUISVILLE, KY (WAVE) - The Jefferson County Coroner is asking for the public's help finding the next of kin for an elderly Louisville man.The coroner's office released Monday it's tryi

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  • LMPD recounts getting children out of home where triple homicide occurredLMPD recounts getting children out of home where triple homicide occurred

    LOUISVILLE, KY (WAVE) - LMPD Lieutenant Emily McKinley spoke Monday on the developments of a triple homicide in PRP.Among the updates provided, McKinley confirmed that two children, ages two and four,

    Big News Network.com / 1 d. 5 h. 43 min. ago
  • A look at every band formed at the Louisville Rock Lottery 2A look at every band formed at the Louisville Rock Lottery 2

    At 10 a.m. on Saturday,  25 Louisville musicians came together for the second-annual Rock Lottery. Divided randomly into five bands, musicians in each group had been tasked with writing three to four songs in just a few hours for a one-time performance at a crowded Headliners Music Hall on Saturday night. The results highlighted not only the specific skills of each member, but the amount of talent that the Louisville music scene holds. Here is a breakdown of each band from the show: Frozen Streets was a dense, hypnotic start to the show. Constant quarter notes and chants ran through the songs, making them the Gregorian monks of the night. Frozen Streets consisted of Joe Seidt (L&N), Evan Patterson (Jaye Jayle), Chris Higdon (Frontier(s), Elliott), Andy Killmeier (Seluah) and Josh Hawkins (Los Dolores). Frozen Streets Frozen Streets Frozen Streets Frozen Streets B Sharp lightened the show with a jazzy, psychedelic sound. Playing around with time signatures and call-and-response techniques, the band ended with a wildly enthusiastic ’50s doo-wop ballad. B Sharp members were William Carpenter (Anwar Sadat), Jecorey Arthur (1200), Tyler Lance Walker Gill, Dave Bird (bird/trooper) and Todd Hildreth (Squeeze-bot, Big Momma Thorazine). B Sharp B Sharp B Sharp B Sharp Shithole Country Band filled the third slot with a rockier country vibe. Falling somewhere between the first two bands, they were the first to introduce an acoustic guitar. Joan Shelley also showed she can do a flawless Steve Nicks rendition during a cover. Shithole Country Band consisted of Joey Yates (Twin Sister Radio, Shedding), Scott Carney (Wax Fang), Mark Palgy (VHS or BETA), Joan Shelley and Greg Sheppard (Family Dog). Shithole Country Band Shithole Country Band Shithole Country Band Shithole Country Band The Completely Indispensables came out with the widest sonic spectrum of the night. They pulled out plenty of guitar-filled jams supported by a saxophone and keyboards. Then, they ended up pivoting into dance-pop, with a cover of Cameo’s “Word Up.” The Completely Indispensables members were Patrick Hallahan (My Morning Jacket), Laura Quimby (Twenty First Century Fox), Kyle Peters (The Pass), Chris Rodahaffer (Roadie) and Graeme Gardiner (Curio Key Club, Houndmouth). Completely Indispensables Completely Indispensables Completely Indispensables Completely Indispensables JFKFC leaned toward straight-forward punk. One of the smoothest bands that seemed to connect really well, they had the hardest spot, following everyone else, but it was a top way to end the night. JFKFC consisted of JC Dennison (Brenda, Exacta Cube), Cheyenne Mize (Maiden Radio, YAPA), Mark Charles Heidinger (Vandaveer), Jeremy Irvin (Second Story Man, Whistle Peak) and Danny Cash (Dirt One). JFKFC JFKFC JFKFC JFKFC   The post A look at every band formed at the Louisville Rock Lottery 2 appeared first on LEO Weekly.

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  • BOZICH | Monday Muse: Louisville, Kentucky, WKU in one NCAA regional? - WDRBBOZICH | Monday Muse: Louisville, Kentucky, WKU in one NCAA regional? - WDRB

    BOZICH | Monday Muse: Louisville, Kentucky, WKU in one NCAA regional?WDRBLouisville has an easier trip but tougher destination. Look for the Cardinals to play Florida in Pittsburgh — and then a home game against Bob Huggins and West Virginia in the second round. If you're a major believer in Lunardi or simply like to plan ...and more »

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  • Could Kentucky basketball assistant Kenny Payne return to coach the Louisville Cardinals? - The Courier-JournalCould Kentucky basketball assistant Kenny Payne return to coach the Louisville Cardinals? - The Courier-Journal

    The Courier-JournalCould Kentucky basketball assistant Kenny Payne return to coach the Louisville Cardinals?The Courier-JournalLEXINGTON, Ky. — Until recently, players on the Kentucky basketball team didn't know assistant Kenny Payne went to college at Louisville. "And when they did find out they thought I was a football player," Payne said Monday. Payne, in his eighth season ...Kentucky basketball: Kenny Payne addresses Louisville coaching jobSECcountry.comall 65 news articles »

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  • App lets you find your doppelganger in the art worldApp lets you find your doppelganger in the art world

    LOUISVILLE, KY (WAVE) - Did you ever wonder if you have a lookalike in a museum somewhere?Now you can find out. Download the Google Arts and Culture app, which lets you take a selfie to find out if yo

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  • Stranger Things actor steals the show in high school student's senior picturesStranger Things actor steals the show in high school student's senior pictures

    LOUISVILLE, KY (WAVE) - Stranger Things actor David Harbour got an invitation that he just couldn't turn down. Back in October, 17-year-old Damaris E. Fregoso tweeted Harbour and asked '@Dav

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  • MLK Day events in Louisville - WDRBMLK Day events in Louisville - WDRB

    WDRBMLK Day events in LouisvilleWDRBLOUISVILLE, Ky. (WDRB) - The country, including Louisville, honors Doctor Martin Luther King Junior on Monday, January 15, 2018. The Alpha Lambda Education Foundation is hosing its 2018 Hope Breakfast Monday in memory of Doctor King. It's at 7 a.m. at ...

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  • Mass celebrates Bishop-elect SpaldingMass celebrates Bishop-elect Spalding

    Archbishop Joseph E. Kurtz receives the gifts from Bishop-elect Spalding’s nephew Brady Spalding during the Mass of Thanksgiving Jan. 11 at the Cathedral of the Assumption. Other members of Bishop-elect Spalding’s family looked on. (Record Photo by Ruby Thomas) By Ruby Thomas, Record Staff Writer In one of his last homilies in the Archdiocese of Louisville, Bishop-elect J. Mark Spalding shared with the hundreds who’d filled the Cathedral of the Assumption the evening of Jan. 11 that “God is always calling us to a great destiny.” Archbishop Joseph E. Kurtz celebrated the Mass of Thanksgiving for Bishop-elect Spalding who was appointed the 12th bishop of Nashville, Tenn., in November. His consecration and installation will take place Feb. 2 in Nashville. Among those who gathered to give thanks for Bishop-elect Spalding were his family, his parishioners, dozens of members of the clergy and his good friends Archbishop Charles C. Thompson of Indianapolis and Bishop William Medley of Owensboro. During his homily, the bishop-elect shared that people are always curious about the “call” that first lead him to the priesthood and the “call” that would later lead him to be the next bishop of Nashville. People always ask “what was it like, how did you feel and after you responded what did you believe was going to happen?” said Bishop-elect Spalding. It was the summer between his junior and senior year of high school when the calling to be a priest heightened, he said. “ ‘What was I going to do with this haunting feeling that God somehow was calling me?’ ” he asked. “I need to respond to this feeling, this whispering voice that keeps telling me  ‘you need to look at priesthood.’ ” He knew the feeling wouldn’t go away until he decided to discern, he said.  He enrolled at St. Meinrad Seminary and School of Theology and never looked back. The very first night there, he prayed “God you got me into this. Help me,” said Bishop-elect Spalding. He prayed for God’s help throughout his journey as a priest, he said. One thing is for certain, Bishop-elect Spalding said to the congregation, “God has been alongside me every step of the way.” The day he received the call from Archbishop Christophe Pierre, apostolic nuncio to the United States — telling him of his appointment as bishop — he made a pilgrimage to the three places that “was significant for my call as a priest,” said Bishop-elect Spalding. He went to his mother’s grave, to Holy Trinity Church in Fredericktown, Ky., where he grew up and to Calvary Cemetery’s priest’s section. There he prayed “Pray for me, intercede for me make me a bishop that will have the love of Jesus in my heart,” said Bishop-elect Spalding. Life, he said to his listeners is “all about the call and responding. God is always calling us to a great destiny through and in his son Jesus Christ,” said Bishop-elect Spalding. That calling, however, should always be about “service to others,”  said the bishop-elect. “When we turn in ourselves we’ve turned the wrong way.” Turning out towards others and responding to “the love God has placed in our hearts is when we respond to the most intimate call” which is to love like Christ, said Bishop-elect Spalding. The message of the calling to love and serve like Christ is the “gift” he will take with him to Nashville, he said. “I love to preach that God has loved us so much that he gave us the greatest gift of his son Jesus Christ and he still calls us together in the spirit so we’re reminded of that calling through Jesus Christ,” said Bishop-elect Spalding. “Once we have it we go out into the world and make it a better place.” The call from the nuncio changed his life said, Bishop-elect Spalding. “It started with a call and a simple response of yes.” The post Mass celebrates Bishop-elect Spalding appeared first on The Record.

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  • 5 things to do this weekend in Louisville (1/12)5 things to do this weekend in Louisville (1/12)

    FRIDAY Catch a show! Mag Bar and Kaiju Both $5  |  Times vary Mag Bar is hosting a night of punk and pop music with performances (starting at 10 p.m.) by the post-punk band On The Bang, Milwaukee’s own power-pop fuzz band Faux Fiction and a punk band with a dash of new wave pop — The Feedback. Or you could join Kaiju for a night of local music (starting at 9 p.m.) with alternative band Bruised Fruit, singer-songwriter Zack Stefanski and improv noise, krautrock band droneroom. SATURDAY Louisville Rock Lottery 2 Headliners Music Hall $15  |  10 p.m. The concept is crazy — like a fox! The Louisville Rock Lottery takes 25 musicians, randomly divides them into five bands at the beginning of the day, and asks them to come back with a new song, ready to perform, 12 hours later. Last year’s inaugural show resulted in an enormous creative outburst. So it was a no-brainer to continue it this year. See an all-new lineup perform their musical creations at 10 p.m. this Saturday at Headliners Music Hall. To read more about the event click here. Bierhalle German American Club No cover  |  6-10 p.m. It’s that time again! Join the German American Club in its bierhalle (think indoor biergarten) for a night of authentic German cuisine and live music by The Rheingold Band, a German-themed polka, waltz and Rheinlander band. Foods for sale include schnitzel, jägerschnitzel, zigeunerschnitzle, spätzle, bratwurst, sauerkraut, German potato salad, sauerkraut balls and, of course, pretzels and beer cheese. The Dark Market At Radio Arcane: Winterfeirer Art Sanctuary No cover  |  7 p.m.-midnight The Dark Market, your place for curated, nighttime oddities and art, is teaming up with Radio Arcane for a Winterfeirer (aka winter celebration). Expect to find art and oddities by over 15 local artists including Yoko Molotov, Dandelion and Ryan Case; and live music provided by DJs Thulsa Goon and Talamasca. SUNDAY Girls Rock Louisville 2017 Album Release Party Guestroom Records No cover  |  11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Girls Rock Louisville teaches girls, trans and gender-nonconforming youth how to rock through a week-long summer camp. The camp ends in a showcase with all of the bands formed during the camp, a live concert and a compilation album. And you can buy the CD this Sunday at Guestroom Records at the official release party. At the party you will also find snacks and a cake made by Sweet Surrender Bakery. The post 5 things to do this weekend in Louisville (1/12) appeared first on LEO Weekly.

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  • Panel to discuss care for creation in terms of foodPanel to discuss care for creation in terms of food

    Holy Trinity Church, 501 Cherrywood Road, is beginning a year-long focus on Pope Francis’ call to care for creation with a panel discussion called “Living Laudato Si’: Food.” The program’s title comes from the Holy Father’s encyclical on creation, “Laudato Si’: On Care for Our Common Home.” The event is set for Jan. 17 at 7 p.m. in the parish multipurpose building. The discussion will center on food’s meaning, preservation, storage and disposal. Practical ideas for individuals and families will be shared. Panelists are: Tim Darst of Kentucky Interfaith Power and Light will discuss reducing food waste as a sacred act. Hank Levitt, a chef at the Catholic Charities’ Common Table culinary training program, will discuss purchasing and storing food to reduce waste. Bethany Pratt of the Jefferson County Cooperative Extension Office will discuss composting. There is no cost to participate, but those interested in attending are asked to RSVP by Jan. 15 by contacting Therese Caruso at tcaruso @htparish.org or 897-5207. The post Panel to discuss care for creation in terms of food appeared first on The Record.

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  • Share the Journey – Welcome One AnotherShare the Journey – Welcome One Another

    Deacon Lucio Caruso One of my favorite Bible verses is Romans 15:7. It says, “Therefore welcome one another as Christ has welcomed you, for the glory of God.” I believe it truly captures the wonderment that occurs with welcoming another and accepting a stranger as someone who is deeply connected to us through Christ. The more people I meet through my job at Catholic Charities and my parish, Epiphany Church, the more I realize the importance of welcoming. Thankfully, Louisville is home to a very inviting community. We have an abundance of beautiful places of worship in this city that are always willing to offer an embrace to newcomers, and we have a vibrant immigrant and refugee culture full of people simply waiting to be welcomed. In my opinion, it ends up being a perfect relationship because people in this city have hearts that are willing to help carry the cross of a new friend. Somewhere I consistently see a willingness to welcome others is at Catholic Charities Immigration Legal Services. I admit, I may be the slightest bit biased, but I believe that our legal services department employs people that encapsulate Romans 15:7 to their very core. Dozens of special people and loving families go through the doors of Catholic Charities every day, but there was something about a particular asylum seeker, a woman who arrived a few years ago, that truly touched the whole department. They felt that as they began to open their hearts and minds to welcome her, she fully reciprocated the same love. Asylum is the legal protection afforded by the United States government to a person who can demonstrate a “well-founded fear of persecution” based on race, religion, nationality, political opinion or membership in a particular social group. Asylees are distinguished from refugees. Asylees apply for this status while in the United States unlike refugees, who apply for this status in a foreign country. This asylee traveled to the U.S. in 2013 from her home country of Jordan. Our client went on to describe that she found the safe place she was searching for in Louisville, specifically at Catholic Charities Immigration Legal Services. “I will never forget Ms. Rebecca,” she said about our program director and attorney Rebecca Sim. Louisville is welcoming and kind to her, she said, adding, “I like everything about Louisville, I feel like this is my country.” It is hard for many Americans to realize how comfortable we can become. We do not face religious or cultural persecution on a regular basis, and many of us will never find ourselves in situations similar to immigrants and refugees like her. However, that does not mean we must confine our hearts and minds to blissful comfort by assuming that everyone else in this world is offered the same life as we are. We as brothers and sisters of Christ must find the richness in getting to know another’s story, whether it is something we can relate to or not. When we listen to another’s stories, we are essentially inviting their experiences to touch our hearts and minds. Through this exchange, we too can embody Romans 15:7. Over the coming weeks as we welcome in a new year, I hope that we find ourselves called to also welcome a new friend into our lives. It is my hope that we each find a deeper joy for life, and a more intimate connection to our brothers and sisters. Deacon Lucio Caruso is director of mission integration for Catholic Charities of Louisville. The post Share the Journey – Welcome One Another appeared first on The Record.

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  • Catholic groups decry end of protected status for SalvadoransCatholic groups decry end of protected status for Salvadorans

    Catholic News Service WASHINGTON — As the Catholic Church in the U.S. began observing National Migration Week, a time to reflect on the circumstances confronting migrants, immigrants, refugees, and human trafficking victims, the administration of President Donald Trump announced that it would end an immigration program for thousands of Salvadorans, one of the largest groups of modern-day immigrants in the country and one that includes many Catholics. More than 200,000 Salvadorans, living under a special immigration status in the U.S., now face the prospect of staying in the country illegally or returning to a nation designated as one of the most dangerous in the world not at war, after the U.S. Department of Homeland Security announced Jan. 8 that it was ending a provision called Temporary Protected Status after Sept. 9, 2019. “The decision to terminate TPS for El Salvador was made after a review of the disaster-related conditions upon which the country’s original designation was based,” DHS said in a statement. Salvadorans affected can apply to stay under a different program, if they qualify, or make plans to return to their home country, the statement continued. Citizens of El Salvador were able to apply for TPS in 2001 after the Central American nation experienced a series of major earthquakes. TPS grants a work permit and a reprieve from deportation to certain people whose countries have experienced natural disasters, armed conflicts or exceptional situations, to remain temporarily in the United States. El Salvador had previously received the designation in 1990 after thousands of Salvadorans fled to the U.S. seeking refuge from a brutal civil war. Supporters of the Salvadorans said current TPS recipients should be allowed to stay because they have built families and are firmly rooted in the U.S.and local faith communities. The post Catholic groups decry end of protected status for Salvadorans appeared first on The Record.

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  • Catholics @ The Capitol planned Feb. 13Catholics @ The Capitol planned Feb. 13

    By Marnie McAllister, Record Editor Catholics concerned about Kentucky policy are invited to attend this year’s Catholics @ The Capitol conference on Feb. 13 in Frankfort, Ky. The Catholic Conference of Kentucky (CCK) — which represents Kentucky’s four bishops in matters of public policy — is sponsoring the day-long gathering. Archbishop Joseph E. Kurtz will open the meeting with prayer at the Capital Plaza Hotel, 405 Wilkinson Blvd. CCK staff members will discuss issues they’ve identified as priorities during the 2018 session of the Kentucky General Assembly, which convened Jan. 2. After the morning presentations, participants who choose to will travel to the capitol to meet with lawmakers and have lunch in the Capitol Annex Cafeteria. The CCK will set up appointments for participants to meet with their lawmakers. “It’s a great way to make contact with your legislator,” said Jason Hall, executive director of the CCK. “It’s also great to be in a room with other engaged Catholics. It’s a great day. “For people who want to get involved on these issues, we do the heavy lifting,” he added. This year’s priority issues include: Scholarship tax credits Senate Bill 36 and its companion House Bill 134 seek to create tax credits for businesses and individuals that donate to certain scholarship-granting organizations, such as the Catholic Education Foundation, to provide need-based tuition assistance for non-public schools. Workplace protections for mothers The CCK also supports Senate Bill 38, which would require employers to make “reasonable accommodation” for women during pregnancy, childbirth or related medical conditions. The CCK sees the measure as a companion to two bills passed into law in 2017. “This is a great bill to complement some of the legislation passed last year for life protections,” Hall said. Last year, the governor signed into law a late-term abortion ban and a bill requiring an ultrasound prior to an abortion, which has been struck down by a federal judge. Hall said that workplace protections for women have “a broad coalition of support, bipartisan support.” Criminal justice reform Hall hopes to see criminal justice reform measures proposed during the session. The CCK has sought reforms in past sessions that would help those who have fulfilled their sentences to re-enter society. A failed measure supported by the CCK last year sought to remove barriers for ex-felons seeking professional licenses. The bill also prevented people from being imprisoned when they can’t pay a court-related cost. Death penalty The CCK is supporting Senate Bill 54 and House Bill 155, bipartisan proposals to abolish the death penalty. “I’m hearing several members saying things like, ‘The time is getting ripe to do something about that,’ ” Hall said. “A lot of freshman House Republicans are interested in it.” State budget Hall said the CCK will be watching closely as legislators strive to pass a budget. “We want to make sure we don’t solve the state’s budget problems on the backs of the poor — those who can least afford it,” he said. Hall added that in addition to these issues, the CCK will also be on the lookout for any proposals that “might be hostile to immigrants and refugees.” Catholics who attend the Catholics @ The Capitol event will hear presentations on these issues and how they relate to church teaching. Participants will also receive written materials on the issues. To register for the event, visit ccky.org. For more information, contact Karen Chambers at the CCK at 502-875-4345 or kchambers@ccky.org. Registration deadline is Feb. 6. The post Catholics @ The Capitol planned Feb. 13 appeared first on The Record.

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  • CSA topples record-breaking goalCSA topples record-breaking goal

    Married couples renewed their wedding vows at the annual Wedding Anniversary Mass Oct. 22 at the Cathedral of the Assumption, 433 S. Fifth Street. The Mass was sponsored by the Family Ministries Office which is one of dozens of archdiocesan agencies to receive support from the Catholic Services Appeal. (Record File Photo by Jessica Able) By Jessica Able, Record Staff Writer As the 2017 calendar year drew to a close, staff of the Archdiocese of Louisville’s Office of Advancement celebrated more than the start of a new year. Gifts and pledges to the 2018 Catholic Services Appeal — the archdiocese’s largest free-will offering — topped the $3,750,000 goal. This is the third consecutive year the CSA has hit its target before year’s end. As of Jan. 9, parishioners pledged $3,954,346, which represents 105 percent of this year’s goal. The appeal began Oct. 1, 2017. This is the largest amount ever to be pledged to the CSA. “Our totals show that the ministries and services supported by the CSA really spoke to people across the archdiocese. The impact of their gifts will be felt throughout the archdiocese,” said Sarah Wunderlin, director of annual giving. Wunderlin also credited the successful campaign in large part to pastors and parish administrators who, she said, “are on the frontlines encouraging parishioners to participate.” The CSA provides funding to more than 110 ministries and services throughout the archdiocese, which is comprised of 110 parishes in 24 counties. “The purpose of the CSA is to bring Christ to others through the support of the ministries. With the successful appeal, we are able to provide that support to the entire community through the work of Catholic Charities and their outreach ministries,” she said. Among other services and ministries supported by the CSA are the Family Ministries Office, Office for Youth and Young Adults and the Office of Faith Formation. So far, about 13,900 donors have contributed to the total, which is a few hundred short of last year’s totals around this same time. Advancement staff said four disaster collections this summer and fall — which totaled nearly $400,000 from 3,000 donors — may have contributed to the slower pace of donor numbers. The four collections benefited victims of Hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria as well as those affected by earthquakes in Mexico. Important to this year’s success, Wunderlin said, was an added momentum from young donors. A new matching gift program offered to match dollar-for-dollar gifts made by individuals under 40 years of age up to $50,000. “The matching gift program was able to engage young donors. To know that your gift was doubled was very appealing, especially to new donors,” she said. In addition, matching gifts were made to any new members of the Salt & Light Society, a giving society that recognizes members who give at least $500 to the appeal. Matching gifts were equal to the difference of the donor’s gift last year and the gift that qualified them for the Salt & Light Society this year. The CSA mailing also included separate pledge cards to benefit the Seminarian Education Fund. The average cost to educate one seminarian per year is $45,000. Parishioners were able to elect to donate specifically to this fund. To date, pledges to that fund total $228,773. “This is a great indication that shows parishioners support our future priests. It’s really telling that donors made the choice to add an additional gift to men in formation to become priests,” Wunderlin said. The 2018 campaign officially concludes at the end of June and advancement staff said it’s not too late to participate. “Participation is a big part of this. It’s not too late to have an impact. Every gift is important. Every gift makes an impact to the ministries and services supported by the appeal,” Wunderlin added. The post CSA topples record-breaking goal appeared first on The Record.

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  • Prayer service welcomes the ‘stranger’Prayer service welcomes the ‘stranger’

    Darko Mihaylovich, director of programs at Catholic Charities of Louisville, left, stood with men who are members of the refugee community during the Migration Week Prayer Service at the Cathedral of the Assumption, 433 S. Fifth St., Jan. 6. Archbishop Joseph E. Kurtz told the gathering that each was created with “inalienable dignity” in God’s image. (Record Photo by Ruby Thomas) By Ruby Thomas, Record Staff Writer In an outward expression of the Gospel teaching to welcome the stranger, the Archdiocese of Louisville held a prayer service at the Cathedral of the Assumption Jan. 6 — the feast of the Epiphany — in celebration of National Migration Week observed Jan. 7-13. The gathering of about 200 — black and white parishioners, and members of the immigrant and refugee communities — heard that each, regardless of racial and cultural differences, was created with “inalienable dignity” in the image of God. Archbishop Joseph E. Kurtz, who presided, said to those gathered on the sunny, cold day that the faithful must “journey” with the millions of people around the world looking for safety. Every stranger who knocks on one’s door, said the archbishop, is an opportunity to encounter Jesus Christ. Migrants and refugees, he said, come from different parts of the world, but come together to form “one community under one God.” The archbishop said to his listeners that each was created by God with “inalienable dignity.” But dignity, he noted, cannot be given to anyone until “you’ve looked into the face” of that person. He drew the congregation’s attention to the parable of the Good Samaritan found in the Gospel reading from St. Luke. In Jesus’ day, Samaritans were a group who were looked down upon. The Good Samaritan, “would have every reason not to help a person in need, but he looked into the face of that man who’d been attacked by robbers and left to die,” said Archbishop Kurtz. On the feast of the Epiphany, the three wise men are remembered for journeying from the east “to look into the face of the person who would save them,” said the archbishop. “They look into his (Jesus’) face and they were never the same.” On the other hand, noted Archbishop Kurtz, King Herod didn’t look into the face of Jesus. Instead, he ordered every male child killed. “When you don’t look into the face of someone, you can do great violence to that person,” said Archbishop Kurtz. In September of last year, Pope Francis launched a two-year campaign called “Share the Journey.” The initiative — sponsored by Caritas Internationalis — is meant to promote encounters between people on the move and people living in the countries they are leaving, passing through or arriving in. Pope Francis has called the church to look into the face of another, said Archbishop Kurtz. The Holy Father said that “ ‘to encounter another means not just to see, but to look; not just to hear, but to listen; not just to meet and pass by, but to stop. Don’t just say what a shame, poor people, but allow yourself to be moved by pity,’ ” said the archbishop. Archbishop Kurtz shared with the gathering that the Jan. 6 prayer service was the first of five events in the “Days of Human Dignity” initiative being observed in the archdiocese. The remaining events are: Jan. 15 — 1:30 p.m. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Day prayer service celebrated by Archbishop Kurtz at the Cathedral. Jan. 19 — 4:30 p.m. Walk for Life. Participants will gather in the undercroft of the Cathedral. Jan. 21 — 3 p.m. Annual Pro-life Memorial Mass celebrated by Archbishop Kurtz at St. Martin of Tours Church, 639 S. Shelby St. Feb. 8 — 10:30 a.m. Catholic Relief Services Rice Bowl Luncheon at Presentation Academy, 861 S. Fourth St. Archbishop Kurtz shared with his listeners that the Holy Father calls the faithful to act in four ways on behalf of migrant and refugee families: To welcome — Welcoming is not solely the job of Catholic Charities of Louisville, but is each person’s responsibility. “We as a church are called to welcome those in movement.” To protect — “Protect people who can be defenseless. Protect people who want to protect their own families and bring unification to their families.” To promote — The church desires to “use and bring forth the gifts” of each immigrant family, “so they can contribute to the life of our community.” To integrate — “To become one family in our community and in our church, one family in Christ.” Among those who attended the prayer service was Jesus Molina, a native of Cuba, and Siddeq Samadi, a native of Afghanistan both resettled by Catholic Charities. Both men said they’ve felt the church’s presence in their journey. Samadi said the event was a meaningful one for him. It made him recall the kindness of others which helped him and his family survive in a new country. “When I arrived the Catholic Charities made it possible for me,” he said. He was assisted in finding work and housing. Samadi now works as an employment specialist at Catholic Charities Migration and Refugee Services Office, he said. Molina and his wife Mercedes, have lived in the U.S. for three years. Molina said he’s “grateful for the welcome” he’s received in this country. “The church has helped me to integrate into the community,” he said in his native Spanish. He’s now a catechist at St. Joseph Church and his wife sings in the choir, he said. “I’m moved to see that though we’re from other nationalities, we’re one.” The post Prayer service welcomes the ‘stranger’ appeared first on The Record.

    The Record / 5 d. 9 h. 44 min. ago more
  • The Voice-Tribune Current IssueThe Voice-Tribune Current Issue

    The post The Voice-Tribune Current Issue appeared first on The Voice-Tribune.

    The Voice-Tribune / 5 d. 18 h. 55 min. ago
  • LEO’s Sobriety Issue: Seven stories of sobriety for the new yearLEO’s Sobriety Issue: Seven stories of sobriety for the new year

    Done with holiday drinking? Then read LEO’s package of stories on sobriety: You know you have asked yourself: do I drink or smoke too much? Five stories of why and how people have sought sobriety God and flossing — an alcoholic’s dilemma Minda Honey of Ask MInda Honey finds “it’s a whole lot easier to say no to one than it is to say no to one more.” …And also read sobriety takes from LEO columnists Shane Peabody Powell and Pip Pullen and Andrew Dewson, the Two Brits in the Lou LEO’s Sobriety Issue: We love to drink, smoke but… put down that glass, 
blunt for a moment of 
self-reflection It seems ironically subversive, maybe even canonically wrong, for LEO to write about sobriety, given our love of all things alcohol and all advertisers who sell alcohol on our pages. But who among us hasn’t thought at least once about how much they drink, or taken a break from the sauce (Dry January), or thought about slowing down? Especially with the new year. And that is just the legal stuff. Opioids. Meth. Weed… We are a species prone to addiction, and only we can decide for ourselves when enough is too much. Let’s consider alcohol, the most prevalent way to get loose. We know it isn’t good for you: the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says it causes about 88,000 deaths a year. But we also know that as with all things human, there are nuances and gradations overlaid on context when it comes to how we handle drinking. For instance, some studies also say light or moderate drinking may even be healthful. But what does that mean exactly? Not every drinker is an alcoholic. And not every drinker who is not an alcoholic should continue drinking. Among the ways of figuring out where you are on the spectrum is to compare your… er, habits with the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-5 definition of Alcohol Abuse Disorder. It says you have AAD if, in at least two instances in the past year, you: — Had times when you ended up drinking more, or longer, than you intended? — More than once wanted to cut down or stop drinking, or tried to, but couldn’t? — Spent a lot of time drinking? Or being sick or getting over the aftereffects? — Wanted a drink so badly you couldn’t think of anything else? — Found that drinking — or being sick from drinking — often interfered with taking care of your home or family? Or caused job troubles? Or school problems? — Continued drinking even though it was causing trouble with your family or friends? — Given up or cut back on activities that were important or interesting to you, or gave you pleasure, in order to drink? — More than once gotten into situations while or after drinking that increased your chances of getting hurt (such as driving, swimming, using machinery, walking in a dangerous area or having unsafe sex)? — Continued to drink even though it was making you feel depressed or anxious or adding to another health problem? Or after having had a memory blackout? — Had to drink much more than you once did to get the effect you want? Or found that your usual number of drinks had much less effect than before? — Found that when the effects of alcohol were wearing off, you had withdrawal symptoms, such as trouble sleeping, shakiness, restlessness, nausea, sweating, racing heart or a seizure? Or sensed things that were not there? Mild Alcohol Abuse Disorder is defined as two to three symptoms. Moderate covers four to five, and severe is six or more. Should you quit or cut back? That is for you to decide. The above list provides some insight into alcohol use. The stories below are of people who answered the question for themselves about drinking and a few other, popular ways to lose sobriety. Check yo self. Five stories of why and how people have sought sobriety What follows are interviews with four Louisvillians who struggled with how they were living and whom they wanted to be. They are presented with minimal comment from me, but each story is pulled from much longer interviews, so they have been editing for length and clarity. Places of employment have been edited out, and full names are not always used. Some struggled with alcohol, and some with other substances. The harder stuff may not be advertised in the back of LEO, but that doesn’t stop us from becoming addicted to it. I guess I should say there actually are five people in the following article…. because, if there’s enough room, I’ll tell you a little bit of my story too. My name is Eli. I’m an alcoholic. With the help of my higher power, good sponsorship and the love of my wife and my puppies, I have been sober for eight years, three months and 10 days. M.A. is a 41-year-old small business owner. He didn’t have any problems with drugs. He quit drinking four years ago. When did you start drinking? I remember the first time I had alcohol I was like 6 years old, and it was kind of like the traditional sip of dad’s beer. In my family, my father never drank a lot. He’d have a drink with a meal. My grandmother would have a glass of wine, but I’ve never seen either one of them drunk. Drinking wasn’t a big deal. When did it start being a problem? I did the usual drinking in college, and then, after that, I’d kind of been seeing the same girl for a long time, and things went really bad, and I fell into a depression and started drinking just to. I was sort of…It was a crutch. Like, I’ll drink now so I don’t have to deal with reality. But as I got older, I kind of got hold of myself. But then, it started coming back? How so? The year before I decided to quit drinking, I had had a pretty major setback work-wise, to the point where I was potentially gonna lose my business. And we had a fair amount of financial stress. My grandmother had passed away. There had been a major falling out between my wife and my father. Just a lot of little things were not going well, and there wasn’t a place for me that I felt wasn’t stressful. And I noticed that I was using alcohol more and more as a crutch. And every night it was: Well, let me have one more so I can go to sleep, let me have one more so I can relax, and it was becoming a habit. It wasn’t: “Oh, I’ll have a glass of wine with dinner.” It was: “I’m going to have a few drinks so I can make this all go away.” Did you think of yourself as an alcoholic? No. I don’t think… That word gets thrown around a lot, and I don’t necessarily feel like I had ever had a physical dependency on alcohol, which in my mind is what an alcoholic is. But I realized I had an unhealthy mental dependency. Was there a moment when you knew you had to stop? Yeah, yeah there was. It was one of those things where alcohol stopped me from thinking of other people — how they felt, how it affected people around me. I clipped a signpost pulling out of a parking lot, and all of a sudden I realized, I saw outside of myself for a second. I realized that that could have been somebody, that could have been, you know — I could have had the kids in the car. I didn’t, but I realized everything I wasn’t thinking about. Did you do anything to help you quit? I did go to a counselor and talk about some of my depression issues, and got on a medication. I was on a medication that wasn’t working, so we switched up my medication, and my depression got better. I started reading some, I guess, self-help books about relationships and how to listen to other people, learning to communicate with your partner. So, I came around from the other end. Let’s fix the things that make me want to drink. Eli: I’m bipolar. It’s hard to say it out loud. For a long time, I ran from that diagnosis, first by drinking it away, then by focusing on dealing with my alcoholism. But the truth is, in my opinion, people don’t start drinking because everything is OK. They start drinking because they are hurting. Maybe it’s social anxiety. Maybe it’s a chemical imbalance. Maybe it’s a response to abuse or violence. But getting sober and staying sober, for me, has had to include getting my underlying issues under control. Erica Denise is a 35-year-old, successful, local theater practitioner, who also teaches theater. She has been sober for five years. So let’s talk about your addiction. I actually went away for 30 days, about five years ago, to a rehab facility. I got the same kind of confused, why are you here looks and stares of judgment. Like, was I really there for marijuana? You know, people were like, “That can’t be — marijuana is not bad for you,” or, “Why’d you come all the way to California to get clean off of that. You’re lying.” No, it was just marijuana that I was highly addicted to. How’d you get started with weed? When I was 16. It was social, and then I realized if I started to buy my own, I could get a lot higher, and I didn’t have to share. When I found that out, I started to seclude myself, and I became a recluse. How old were you when you became reclusive? I was around 21. I was 29 when I realized it was a problem. You just get so exhausted pretending. I was in the closest. No one knew. I like to think no one knew. Your rehab used the 12-step program. Did you interact with the program after you got out of rehab? I did. I even — I was going to start [the first] M.A, Marijuana Anonymous. I kept in contact with the counselor I met there, for a few months. And then I used journaling and tracking my thoughts to keep clean and sober. What was it like after you got out? For a long time, I felt like I wasn’t going to be able to reach my dreams, or become the person I knew I should be unless I was able to get clean. For years, that would be my New Year’s resolution: stop smoking, stop smoking, stop smoking. I felt like once I was able to do that, everything would fall into place. And sure enough, not even four or five months after I got back from California, I started [working at a summer camp], and from that opportunity landed at my [current job in arts education]. I never thought I’d be able to work in the performing arts — never thought I’d be able to do a career that I love. You recently performed a one-woman show about your struggles. Can you tell us about that? I was hospitalized at age 21, and when I came out of that I just kept thinking, “I got to tell my story, I got to tell my story.” But I never had the outlet, never had the resources. Last January — I have this box that I put things that I want to happen in, like a manifestation box — last January I wrote down that I was going to do it. And then I put it out on Facebook. “Hey, if I did this show, would you wanna come to it?” It was over 200 people that said they would. So the very next day I went and got pictures made, and then I got a flyer done. I thought, “OK, this is going to hold my feet to the fire. I’ve gotta do it now. There’s a flyer out there now.” A month later, I was on stage doing my one-woman show. Anything you really want to get on the record before we finish up? It’s a daily process. I don’t believe that you’re ever fully recovered. Eli: It took me over a year to get back on stage after I quit drinking, and it was a couple years before I started writing again. All my ego and self-hatred — it was all perfectly tied up in the arts. I knew I needed the arts in my life, but also knew I had to be stronger before I could tackle that challenge, but once I did, it came to mean everything to me. In my life, sobriety isn’t about taking away alcohol — it’s about all the wonderful things I can fit in now that my addiction is out of the way. Chelsea is a 27-year-old part-time fitness instructor and part-time mom. She was addicted to pills and meth, but has been clean for five years. She occasionally has a beer or a glass of wine. How did you get started with drugs? I had a couple of surgeries in high school. They gave me Percocet 10 for that. My mom dispensed them to me as needed, but once I got to a point where I was good without them, she didn’t even think about it, and they sat in the cabinet, the rest of them. Because I got, like two full bottles. So then I was like, well, those made me feel good. It was probably a year or so after that that I got into the hard stuff. And as with anything it started off relatively slow. Like Loretabs, pain pills here and there. Then I got introduced to, what was it? I think, Oxycontin. Started using that, and then it got to a point where I became dependent on it. Once you get to that point your tolerance skyrockets. So that became a daily thing. Then, I found Xanax, and that was my drug of choice, especially when you have anxiety. I didn’t have to worry. I could go out and live in the world. It’s perfect. Were you a pill popper or did you crush it an snort it? Crush and snort. I had to. That was part of the whole ritual of it all. How did college go? I dropped out. Because of my anxiety. It wasn’t the drug use. I think that contributed to my drug use — it catapulted me further. You said anxiety: Is that something you’ve been treated for? I started seeing a therapist when I was 12 or 13 for anxiety and depression and stuff. I was given different medications and stuff that didn’t seem to work for me. Which is when I found the Xanax and stuff. I was like, well, this is what I need, not the bullshit Zoloft or whatever. What made you want to stop? Like most addicts, you go through recovery and then relapse. I think most addicts are going to have a period of relapse. My husband and I were living downtown and had really become secluded. And your husband was using too, right? He was an addict too, or is an addict, recovering. My husband was worse off than I was back then. And he had started stealing shit from friends and family. Just seeing him that way and knowing I’m gonna end up there made me quit. And I sort of did it cold turkey — moved out, went back home. My family still didn’t know. I started working at a pizza place. And this girl there could get Oxycontin. And I thought, just for old-times sake. That time it got way worse. I was like 22? And those people had access to meth. Then, I started stealing shit, just because I had a kid to support. All the money I made working had to go to her, so to get money to pay for my shit… I would take money from my parents. Steal from stores. You had moved out of your parents’ and back in with your husband? He was clean at the time. And we got back together. I hadn’t gotten to the meth by the time he came back. So he had no idea. Eventually, he found some shit in my purse. Like a Xanax. And he put it together. So the bomb dropped. And that’s when I was like: Fuck it. I can’t do this anymore. Again, I did it cold turkey. And that’s when I got into fitness. But you drink sometimes? Drinking was never an issue. When I stopped everything, I wasn’t drinking. I don’t know. One day I was like, I want a beer. And had one. And I didn’t need another one. Ever since then, I’ll have a glass of wine, or a beer or two. It never turned into an issue. How long ago did you start drinking occasionally? It’s probably been three years. How big a part of your sobriety is the fitness stuff? It’s way better than any medication. I did go to a psychiatrist for a while. Eventually, I got to the point where he was like, come see me in six months, and I’ll check up on you. Eli: When I quit smoking, I started running. I thought it was for my physical health. But when I don’t run, or workout, I get weird. I get crazier. The natural endorphins I release fight my depression and slow down my whirling thoughts. It’s become integral to my happiness, but it’s still just one tool. To stay sober I need as many tools as I can get. Damon Thompson is a 39-year-old artist. He’s an alcoholic and has been sober for six years. You went to college and then discovered booze? Yeah [laughs]. It doesn’t always happen in that order, but it did for me. I went, for one semester, to the Art Institute of Atlanta. I had a full scholarship, but took out loans, less to pay for books and more to pay for booze. I could come up with a lot of reasons I lost my scholarship, but it was a direct result of my staying up all night drinking and partying. I traveled the Earth, just hitchhiking for two years. Surprisingly, the drinking was… I wouldn’t have said I had a drinking problem at the time. It was just wanderlust. It was a roller-coaster life. So you moved back to Louisville. When did your drinking start getting out of control? It’s hard to pinpoint. It’s way before the most recent sobriety date I have. I had like… well… this is… it’s sort of hard to put on the record. I sort of had my called-out-by-friends, Weinstein moment for behaving like a total creep at a party. And the situation was, I had blacked out. I don’t remember it, but I have memories of others times I behaved badly. So yeah. I realized then, and I made stumbling attempts. I think that time I made it a year and half. I stopped drinking. But as I went on through my 20s, the times I was drinking heavily outweighed the times I was sober. I collected a stack of chips [from AA] and big books. And eventually threw it away and said, I’m going to go straight to drinking as heavily as I can and blot out existence. I started hitting heavier stimulants, so I could keep drinking longer. And 2011 is when I finally got to the point I knew I had to really give it a try, or get busy dying. And did you go back to AA? It’s hard to go on the record, because of… The 11th tradition? Yeah. And also I’ve seen other people only do half and do fine. I’ve seen people in the “marijuana treatment plan.” I’ve seen people go to a counselor and get their shit sorted out. I can’t diagnose somebody else, and I can’t tell you AA is gonna work for you, but, for me, it was the marching orders I needed, the simple plan I needed. And I went to counseling, which helped. Was there anything that finally made you quit? Right at the beginning of 2010, I found out from a girl I’d been on a couple dates with that she was pregnant. And I had been dating this other girl, and she calls me up, and she’s pregnant. So that happens. The first Christmas that comes along, I’m barely getting by, and this $170 I saved up to buy them presents, I spent it on cocaine and whiskey. And I wake up, looking at myself after this bender, and I’m like: This is not going to happen again. I can destroy myself. I can burn every bridge possible. But these babies are innocent and it just can’t happen like this. Eli: The 11th tradition basically says AA members should stay quiet when it comes to the media. I got sober with AA, and I respect it more than I can say. The idea of the 11th tradition, and the feeling behind it, says that we stay quiet because we don’t want our personalities to keep anyone away from the program. I’ve struggled with it, and eventually came to the decision that a rule — not even a rule, a suggestion — written before computers, social media, cable TV, handheld phones, etc. can’t rule the way I engage with my addiction. In some ways it boils down to this: If you think you need help, but you think I’m a prattling asshole, don’t let it keep you away from the program. But it’s also that I’m afraid I can’t ever capture in words how much sobriety means to me. I’ve added a couple of thoughts about my sobriety, just riffing on what the people here are talking about. But if I can’t really capture sobriety importance, am I betraying it by writing about it? Am I betraying other people who need to get sober? Betraying them by not finding the right words? Here’s the thing: Every person in this story had a moment when they knew, for themselves, that they had to get sober. It wasn’t a court order. It wasn’t an intervention. They realized they had to pick between hope and death, and they picked hope. If you need help, get it — in whatever form works for you. • God and Flossing Many don’t realize it’s hard work being an alcoholic. Trying to remember all the stories you tell and the creative perspectives can be tough. Why did I withdraw that cash? Why was I late? Where did I leave my phone this time? Why did I neglect that responsibility? There are so many unwanted opinions to share and judgments to pass. For me, I was lucky. I wasn’t burdened with a relationship with God. Although I did have the responsibility of removing myself from pesky tasks that didn’t apply to me. Like flossing. Weird as it may seem, much of my drinking life revolved around God and flossing, stuck in the orbit of one deeply-rooted emotion — fear. Raw, often unfounded, debilitating fear. While unique, much like every other alcoholic, I would drink because I didn’t know how to cope with inconsequential things such as life or family. But eventually I drank for so long I became terrified to stop. I lived in fear of consequences. So I invented a mindset that created loopholes for me to operate outside of the rules. Take flossing — a normal person would just do it. An alcoholic like me — well I would put it off until my next cleaning. Then, I would obsess about not doing it. Are my teeth going to fall out? Is there a disease such as teeth cancer or something? There’s no doubt I have it. I bet my drinking caused it. What if I have to cut back or even stop drinking? Oh God, please let me still be able to drink. This is where spirituality would appear in my life. It was right where I left it — in the waiting room of the dentist office. Cue the scat prayer negotiation: God, if you cure me (from my still-undiagnosed tooth lupus) I’ll start flossing again. I’ll stop drinking. Wait, no I won’t. I want to be genuine with my sacrifice. I won’t drink today. Wait, yes I will. I deserve to celebrate if I do recover. I’ve been through a lot, you know. How about I pray a lot, or some? More, I’ll pray more. Negotiations would begrudgingly continue. This clumsy dance would happen a couple times a year, usually in the waiting room. And just like any self-created crisis, it was totally avoidable. Just floss. Easy enough, right? No. I was special. Different. Things were much harder for me. You wouldn’t understand. And that’s the story I told myself. For 14 long years. It wasn’t until I started to get sober did I realize I couldn’t do things on my own, and there were things I didn’t have to do on my own. I invited my spirituality to finally escape the waiting room. Flossing works only if you floss. Spirituality only works if you try. I no longer had to make things so complicated. I accepted the fact it wasn’t a weakness to ask God for help. I no longer had to wait for something as silly as flossing to try to form a relationship with my understanding with God. One of the biggest misunderstandings I have as an alcoholic is the misconception that I’m in control. There’s a burden and responsibility there that for some reason I have to fix, manage and control all the details around me. Once I came to the realization this show was not mine — I could finally enjoy how beautiful this life can really be. Cheesy, I know. Hopefully, you’re not lactose intolerant. As of today, I’m 382 days sober. This has been the happiest I’ve been in ages. I’m not perfect. But the life I live is so much easier now that I don’t have to keep up with the burden of hangovers, whom did I piss off, or what did I forget to do this time. Believe it or not, I even occasionally floss today. I no longer know what the big deal was about. All I had to do was try it. One day at a time. Holier Than Thou To start my Jesus Year — 33 y’all! — off in a place of serenity, I decided to temporarily step back from the bottle this past holiday season. I don’t weather my feelings well any time of year, but I’m particularly bad at it in the winter when everything is dark and gray and cold. Booze then becomes a conduit for my emotions in the form of public crying and drunk dialing. This is an aspect of my personality that I haven’t necessarily embraced, but I have come to terms with it over the years. Or, at least, I thought I had. Finally, in my 30s, I’ve begun getting hangovers. And something about suffering through the physical manifestation of a night of excess was giving me what Dr. Google diagnosed as “Hangover Anxiety.” Fun. While the headaches and nausea only stayed a day, the anxiety kept me awake for several nights in a row and made me feel embarrassed about my behavior, even if I hadn’t behaved in a particularly embarrassing manner. It was just the fact that I’d done it again: drank too much. My six-week stint in sobriety, gave me some peace from all the self-reprimanding I’d been doing. And I’ve found, at least in my social circles, that people don’t care as much when you’re in your 30s if you’re not getting shit-faced along with them. Peer pressure now comes in the form of people wanting you to go on trips together none of you can really afford. My self-imposed booze ban ends now, but I won’t be headed into 2018 acting all sanctified because the biggest lesson I learned while drying out, is that it’s a whole lot easier to say no to one than it is to say no to one more. The post LEO’s Sobriety Issue: Seven stories of sobriety for the new year appeared first on LEO Weekly.

    LEO Weekly / 6 d. 8 h. 2 min. ago more
  • Lawmakers fiddling around while Kentucky burnsLawmakers fiddling around while Kentucky burns

    …And they are off! The 2018 legislative session has opened, and in the next two months or so lawmakers will focus mostly on how to find the millions of dollars needed to fix our state pension mess. Expect deep budget cuts, because the Republican-controlled legislature will resist raising taxes. Or legalizing gambling. Or legalizing pot… But that won’t stop Democrats from trying. Unlike the last session, there are no immediate culture war bills, like the right-to-work and antiabortion bills that passed quickly. Below are synopses of a few prefiled bills that would, among other things: Legalize casinos BR 149 — Rep. Dennis Keene, D-Wilder  |  @DennisKeene Remove the prohibition against casino gaming; require a local option election in any precinct wanting a casino; establish initial licensing fees for full casinos at $50 million with an initial licensing period of 10 years and annual renewal thereafter at $6 million per year; permit limited casino gaming at horse racing tracks; establish requirements for limited casinos; establish a gaming tax of 31 percent and use that money for the state retirement systems for the first 10 years; and create an admission tax of $3 per person per day. BR 197 — D. Keene; Rep. Rick Rand, D-Bedford  |  Rick.Rand@lrc.ky.gov Amend the state Constitution to authorize the General Assembly to define and permit casino gaming; prior to July 1, 2029, require that proceeds be used to pay for oversight of casino gaming, and mandate that 100 percent of proceeds in excess of oversight costs go to retirement systems; and after July 1, 2029, allow the General Assembly to allocate proceeds. Legalize sports betting BR 155 — Sen. Julian M. Carroll, D-Frankfort Julian.Carroll@lrc.ky.gov Require the Kentucky Horse Racing Commission to institute a sports wagering system; declare it the policy of the Commonwealth to encourage the conduct of wagering on sporting events, when allowed by federal law, and to vest forceful control over sports wagering in the racing commission; include consideration of members of professional and collegiate sports organizations in the governor’s appointments to the commission. Helmets for kids BR 363 — Rep. Regina Huff, R-Williamsburg Regina.Huff@lrc.ky.gov | @BunchGina Require bicycle helmets for operators and passengers under the age of 12. Teach human sexuality BR 106 — Rep. Tom Burch, D-Louisville  |  Tom.Burch@lrc.ky.gov Require the state to establish a plan for school districts to provide human sexuality education in grades four through 12. It shall include age-appropriate information in: the prevention of sexually transmitted diseases including HIV and any other virus linked to AIDS, chlamydia, syphilis, gonorrhea and 13 relevant types of hepatitis, as well as any other sexually-transmitted 14 infections; personal body safety; human growth and development; human sexuality and development; development of relationship and communication skills needed to form healthy relationships free of violence, coercion and intimidation; and responsible sexual behavior, including but not limited to discussion of: self-esteem, self-discipline and premarital abstinence. Each local school board shall establish a procedure so a parent or legal guardian can list the areas of human sexuality education in conflict with their moral or religious beliefs, excusing their child. Medical cannabidiol BR 163 — J. Carroll Permit a physician to recommend the use of cannabidiol or cannabidiol products. Drug test welfare recipients BR 173 — Rep. C. Wesley Morgan, R-Richmond 564-8100, ext. 607 Create a substance abuse screening program for adult recipients of public assistance, food stamps and state medical assistance. Hot dogs (and cats) BR 271 — Sen. Danny Carroll, R-Paducah  |  @dannycarrollky Provide civil immunity for damaging a vehicle if a person enters the vehicle with the reasonable, good-faith belief that a dog or cat is in immediate danger of death if not removed. Give bicyclists more room BR 1 — Rep. Jerry T. Miller, R-Louisville  |  @JerryTMiller Require vehicles overtaking bicycles to pass at a distance of at least three feet; provide that if there not a minimum distance of three feet available, the passing vehicle is to use reasonable caution; and specify when a motor vehicle may pass a bicycle to the left of the center of a roadway. Drivers license expiration notification BR 187 — Sen. Dorsey Ridley, D-Henderson  |  564-2470 Require the state to notify holders of operators’ licenses, instruction permits and personal ID cards of the impending expiration of these documents 45 days prior to their expiration; and allow notice by electronic or postal mail. Raise minimum wages BR 65 — Sen. Reginald Thomas, D-Lexington  |  @ReggieThomasKY Raise the state minimum wage to $8.20 per hour on July 1, 2018, to $9.15 per hour on July 1, 2019, to $10.10 per hour on July 1, 2020, to $11.00 per hour on July 1, 2021, to $12.05 per hour on July 1, 2022, to $13.10 per hour on July 1, 2023, to $13.95 per hour on July 1, 2024, and to $15.00 per hour on July 1, 2025, and to raise the state minimum wage for tipped employees to $2.13 per hour on the effective date of the Act, to $3.05 per hour on July 1, 2019, to $3.95 per hour on July 1, 2020, and to $4.90 per hour on July 1, 2021; and allow local governments to establish minimum wage ordinances in excess of the state minimum wage. The post Lawmakers fiddling around while Kentucky burns appeared first on LEO Weekly.

    LEO Weekly / 6 d. 8 h. 23 min. ago more
  • Thorns & Roses: The Worst, Best & Most AbsurdThorns & Roses: The Worst, Best & Most Absurd

    Hoover sucks…  |  Thorn Jeff Hoover finally quit as state House speaker after reports of a sex harassment settlement. In a petulant speech, he said his inappropriate texting with a female staffer was not sexual harassment. He claimed he is a victim of a conspiracy. Bullshit. We are conflicted: His resignation may quell chaos in the GOP and allow it to continue to exploit its supermajority to maim the state further (Hoover had stood up to the governor), but the lech needed to go. We are good with that  |  Rose U.S. Sen. Rand Paul said it has been a “living hell” recovering from a mysterious attack by a neighbor that left him with broken ribs. And you expected what?  |  Rose The ACLU earns a rose for monitoring the state’s push to bring the Bible into classrooms. A new law allows this, under the guise of “Bible literacy.” But the ACLU found some teachers “are using the Bible to impart religious life lessons and actively inculcate Christianity,” it said in a letter to the state. Courier Journal reported that the ACLU claims some students were asked to memorize Bible verses, or assigned to “do your best to develop close relationships with other Christians.” We like you, we really like you!  |  Rose A rose bouquet goes to our Dear Leader and LEO founder, U.S. Rep. John Yarmuth, who announced he will seek reelection and then pressed a campaign to prove Our Stable Genius Leader is anything but. Global harming  |  Thorn We wanted this to be no-Gov. Matt Bevin January, for sake of our liver, but… The Gateway Fascist declared in a tweet that “Trump has been in office 1 year & has already fixed global warming,” next to a map of the nation under deep freeze. Later, he said it was a joke, but then doubled down as a global warming denier, telling a radio station: “ … this idea that we all need to be held hostage to a handful of people who contribute nothing to the wealth of this nation, who then will, in turn, shut us down, led by puppeteers like Al Gore, for the lining of their own pockets, in order to make us jump through various regulatory hoops, as if somehow, we, mankind, is solely responsible and is solely going to be the solution, is ludicrous.” The post Thorns & Roses: The Worst, Best & Most Absurd appeared first on LEO Weekly.

    LEO Weekly / 6 d. 8 h. 35 min. ago more
  • Come for the socialism, stay for inclusivityCome for the socialism, stay for inclusivity

    Facts, common decency and intelligent discourse were all casualties of the 2016 election. We also said goodbye to the idea that credentialed experts should shape policy. Anything perceived by the right as a threat to freedom had to go — societal safety nets, protections for the environment and the much-maligned concept of identity politics. I was surprised by the scope of the bandwagon set on demolishing identity politics. The more Columbia Professor Mark Lilla jerked off on his keyboard about the dangers of identity politics — the more mainstream Democrats latched on to his ideas. It should scare us, how easily liberals embraced the idea that we ended up with Donald Trump because women, people of color and queer folks just can’t sit down and shut up. The Democratic Party claims it’s the logical place for us, but when things get tough, we’re the first ones tossed overboard. Never mind that we’re reacting to a system and legislation that specifically targets us. Disillusioned but not disengaged, I started more actively seeking out groups that share my values — specifically, intersectionality and anti-capitalist values. I’d had my eye on the Democratic Socialists of America for awhile and decided to try out a meeting, with reservations. The problem with political groups that ultimately want a viable, third party (or Log Cabin Republicans, God bless) is that they tend to be largely male and unable to see the machinations of the world through any lens but their own. It’s easy for libertarians to believe individual liberty would be fully realized when the government has less power, despite the co-requisite blind belief that racism, sexism and homophobia play no role in a citizen’s ability to succeed. What a train wreck of failed logic, selfishness and fancy. For this reason, I was there only to see if there was a place for me at the table and here is what I saw: When name tags were distributed, everyone was reminded to include their preferred pronouns. Later, a member announced a need for manpower at an event. In the same breath, he corrected, “…sorry, people-power,” and carried on. The stylebook I use in the classroom has a chapter on “avoiding sexist language,” and it’s always met with groans and laughter. But language matters, representation matters and this group takes both seriously. Democratic Socialists, on the other hand, outline their values in their official prospectus: “We are socialists because we reject an international economic order sustained by private profit, alienated labor, race and gender discrimination, environmental destruction and brutality and violence in defense of the status quo. We are socialists because we share a vision of a humane international social order based both on democratic planning and market mechanisms to achieve equitable distribution of resources, meaningful work, a healthy environment, sustainable growth, gender and racial equality and non-oppressive relationships.” These are ideals so suited to women and queer folks that I can’t believe we aren’t flocking to DSA in droves. Or are we? Between summer 2016 and 2017, national DSA membership quadrupled and the growth continues. Nationally, DSA members had 15 wins in the 2017 elections, and, earlier this year, Dissent magazine’s Maxine Phillips wrote that August’s biannual DSA convention was “as close as DSA has come to being [as] representative as the country. Even though the membership is still disproportionately white and male, there were more women and people of color than I’d ever seen at any DSA gathering.” Amy Lee, active in the Louisville chapter, told me that “the space is majority cishet-men but the vast majority of them know how to make space for queer femme folks, or are at least trying really hard.” When I asked her about how “Bernie bros” fit into the DSA equation, she said they’re “a real thing, but that kind of toxic masculine behavior isn’t tolerated in this space. It happens, but it’s quickly addressed.” DSA isn’t attracting a more representative demographic by accident. The DSA constitution requires that eight positions on the national leadership committee be reserved for women and that at least five positions be reserved for people of color. This step is an important and logical ingredient for an egalitarian organization, but I was even more impressed by what I saw at my second meeting. If you grew up in a conservative, fundamentalist church, you will understand my astonishment when the childcare was literally “manned” so that women who arrived with children could attend the meeting. When I asked Nick Conder, vice-chair of the Louisville chapter, about it, he explained that the leadership had asked women what they needed and childcare was the top need. Conder hails from Grayson County, where the queer experience is vastly different from Louisville’s. Explaining his path to the DSA, he said, “Being queer in Kentucky radicalized me. The system is stacked against people like me and socialism offers a comprehensive approach to oppression. To be socialist is to talk about tangible ways oppression manifests.” If you’ve developed an allergy to identity politics, you won’t want to participate in these discussions, but the DSA of Louisville is concerned with the machinations of capitalism and how it affects all people, so these discussions are inevitable. The agenda is based on the needs of the people: protect the vulnerable; push for a single-payer health care system; support workers’ rights and fair housing; offer bodies to support the work organizations such as KY Health Justice, Mijente and Black Lives Matter are doing. I asked Lee what she wanted people to know about DSA and she said this: “Locally speaking at least, it’s a community … We’re radically open to criticism that is levied in good faith. We try not to navel-gaze too much, though it’s good to find a balance between establishing radical democracy, doing outreach and actually getting shit done. We fuck up but we keep moving. We love you. Come do good things with us. Or, if you’re already doing good things and need support, hit us up and we’ll back you.” The post Come for the socialism, stay for inclusivity appeared first on LEO Weekly.

    LEO Weekly / 6 d. 8 h. 37 min. ago more
  • Louisville Rock Lottery, a second year of scene buildingLouisville Rock Lottery, a second year of scene building

    Taking 25 musicians and randomly dividing them into five bands at the beginning of the day, and asking them to come back with three original songs 12 hours later, seems like an insane concept, but last year’s inaugural Louisville Rock Lottery resulted in an enormous creative outburst. There was a three-part politically-themed rock opera, and a band that sounded like The Velvet Underground and Slint had a baby, as well as a group called Synth Party, a spaced-out ride that tipped its hat to new-wave. “All I saw all night was a bunch of people saying, ‘holy fuck,’” organizer Craig Pfunder, also of the band VHS or Beta, said. “If I could say anything, it’s a true testament to what you could do in a day.” It was a no-brainer to continue it this year, so this Saturday, at Louisville Rock Lottery 2, an all-new lineup — including Joan Shelley, Jecorey “1200” Arthur, Scott Carney and Evan Patterson — will be organized into bands by chance at 10 a.m., and at 10 p.m. they’ll all perform at Headliners Music Hall. The Rock Lottery concept started in Denton, Texas, in 1996 as a scene-building exercise and then spawned iterations in cities nationwide. Louisville’s was spearheaded by Pfunder, who came across the idea in New York City. He was initially skeptical, but My Morning Jacket bassist Tom Blankenship urged him to go to the Rock Lottery in NYC. “I had just come off a full U.S. tour,” Pfunder said. “I went to this thing super hungover. I was like how am I going to make it through this day, and it was such a good day. When he established the Louisville Rock Lottery last year, he had to ensure that each hypothetical band had the necessary core constituency — enough string instruments, a drummer and a singer, at the very least. On a broader level, Pfunder had to consider talent and personality to foster a fun, creative environment. Having lived outside of town for eight years, Pfunder spent time reacquainting himself with old faces and learning new faces. He opted to choose only one person per band, to limit the odds of bandmates working together, ending up with a member from Twenty First Century Fox, Twin Limb, Second Story Man and Frederick The Younger, to name a few. “It went really well,” recalled White Reaper drummer Nick Wilkerson, a participant last year. “I think it was a little harder than everyone anticipated. Not harder to endure, but challenging.” Finding your rhythm in a new project takes time, a scarce resource for the Rock Lottery. Every player has strengths and weaknesses, from how they collaborate with others, to how they keep peace and interact with their bandmates, something typically distilled over time. Gone is time to deliberate or stall, making for an intensely focused, and often liberating experience. “I’ve tried to be a better and better listener throughout the course of my musical career,” said My Morning Jacket drummer Patrick Hallahan, who will participate this year. “I feel like I’m good about sitting back and seeing how things are forming and then putting in my two cents as opposed to letting it be ego driven so to speak. When you’re collaborating, I’m not a songwriter as much as I am an editor. I take someone’s idea and hopefully make it better.” “With four people you don’t know, you definitely want to stand down,” Wilkerson added. “Like Patrick said, definitely relax. Simply play the drums and try to write the songs. Maybe throughout the process, gently make it yours.” Wilkerson and Pfunder share fond memories of the first Rock Lottery. For Pfunder, it was that newfound language between short-term partners, coming together in a flurry of creativity. For Wilkerson, it was finding his own angle in playing with different musicians, a rarity in his time as a player. “Kevin Ratterman’s band, did this three song rock opera,” Pfunder said. “It was insane.” “That’s the band that I was thinking about,” Wilkerson added. “That was something else. If anyone won, it was them. It was a rock opera with Trump.” With last year a success, Hallahan and his fellow musicians look forward  to playing outside of their comfort zones. “One of the elements that I’m looking forward to is the lack of control for who you’re creating with,” Hallahan said. “My favorite parts of making music is joining hands at the edge of the cliff and jumping off. It’s a trust exercise. It brings out all these different parts of yourself.” • The 2018 Louisville Rock Lottery participants Joey Yates — Twin Sister Radio, Shedding Patrick Hallahan — My Morning Jacket JC Dennison — Brenda, Exacta Cube William Carpenter — Anwar Sadat Joe Seidt — L&N Evan Patterson — Jaye Jayle Mark Palgy — VHS or Beta Cheyenne Mize — Maiden Radio, YAPA Scott Carney — Wax Fang Chris Higdon — Frontier(s), Elliott Mark Charles Heidinger — Vandaveer Josh Hawkins — Los Dolores Andrew Killmeier — Seluah Jecorey “1200” Arthur Joan Shelley Greg Sheppard — Family Dog Laura Quimby — Twenty First Century Fox Chris Rodahaffer — Roadie Kyle Peters — The Pass Dave Bird — Bird/Trooper Danny Cash — Dirt One Jeremy Irvin — Second Story Man, Whistle Peak Todd Hildreth — Squeeze-bot, Big Momma Thorazine Tyler Lance Walker Gill Graeme Gardiner — Curio Key Club, Houndmouth The post Louisville Rock Lottery, a second year of scene building appeared first on LEO Weekly.

    LEO Weekly / 6 d. 8 h. 39 min. ago more
  • Girls Rock Louisville is set to release second camper compilationGirls Rock Louisville is set to release second camper compilation

    Girls Rock Louisville is a collective of musicians, instructors and volunteers dedicated to teaching girls and trans and gender-nonconforming youth how to rock through a week-long summer camp. In a broader sense, the word “rock” implies freedom of self-expression, energy and confidence — where music is the means of empowerment. That is the mission of Girls Rock Louisville. As part of the International Girls Rock Camp Alliance, GRL is new among the other 80-plus camps across globe, but the community impact resonates year-round. A big part of that is an all-inclusive emphasis, as well as showcasing all of the bands formed each year with a live concert and a compilation album, which will be available Sunday at Guestroom Records for the official CD release party. The camp goes beyond teaching how to write, perform and record music to “introducing them to intersectional feminism, approaches to wellness and self-care, and learning how they can claim their own power,” said Carrie Neumayer, executive director and founder of Girls Rock Louisville (who also plays guitar in Second Story Man and guitar/vocal duties in Julie of the Wolves). “We discourage competition and isolation and encourage our campers to build each other up, rather than putting each other down.” A few days after their first concert, the campers head over to La La Land studio to record their chosen songs for the album. This past summer formed the nine bands included on the CD and the result is as exuberant as you’d expect. “Each band’s coach and band manager help the campers through the strange experience of hearing themselves and each other through headphones, while playing their song in the tracking room for the first time,” said Neumayer. “The band Star Kats sampled an actual kitten meowing to include in their song. I crack up every time I hear it.” The official release party is Sunday, Jan. 14 at Guestroom Records from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Visit girlsrocklouisville.org to learn more about getting involved. The post Girls Rock Louisville is set to release second camper compilation appeared first on LEO Weekly.

    LEO Weekly / 6 d. 8 h. 41 min. ago more
  • ObituariesObituaries

    Obituaries The post Obituaries appeared first on The Voice-Tribune.

    The Voice-Tribune / 6 d. 9 h. 14 min. ago
  • Business BriefsBusiness Briefs

    Business Briefs The post Business Briefs appeared first on The Voice-Tribune.

    The Voice-Tribune / 6 d. 9 h. 32 min. ago
  • Menish Auction Group Helps Change the WorldMenish Auction Group Helps Change the World

    As regular a fixture on the society scene as designer dresses and rare jewelry is Bill Menish, the owner of Menish Auction Group, a nationwide fundraising consulting and auction firm headquartered in Louisville. The post Menish Auction Group Helps Change the World appeared first on The Voice-Tribune.

    The Voice-Tribune / 13 d. 9 h. 38 min. ago
  • There’s Magic in BelievingThere’s Magic in Believing

    One in four people will experience some form of mental illness in their lifetime. The post There’s Magic in Believing appeared first on The Voice-Tribune.

    The Voice-Tribune / 27 d. 9 h. 44 min. ago
  • Engagement AnnouncementEngagement Announcement

    Michael and Mary Craig Czerwonka are pleased to announce the engagement of their daughter, Kate Czerwonka of Louisville, Kentucky to Jacob Huff, son of Michael and Dorothy Huff and Shay and Brett Odom of Lebanon, Kentucky. The post Engagement Announcement appeared first on The Voice-Tribune.

    The Voice-Tribune / 34 d. 8 h. 27 min. ago