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    WLKY / 01.01.2018 07:55
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  • Man reunited with woman who helped get him on path to recovery Man reunited with woman who helped get him on path to recovery

    "I know I can make it this time. I got everybody's support, your support, Kaitlyn's support, I got all the people who donated, and I got my family back."

    WLKY / 8 min. ago
  • CRAWFORD | Jackson's (likely) last Louisville home game a perfect storm for SyracuseCRAWFORD | Jackson's (likely) last Louisville home game a perfect storm for Syracuse

    Lamar Jackson threw for a pair of touchdowns and passed for two more as Louisville dominated Syracuse in a rainy Saturday rout, 56-10.

    WDRB / 8 min. ago
  • Jackson, Louisville roll in the rain past Syracuse 56-10 - WTOPJackson, Louisville roll in the rain past Syracuse 56-10 - WTOP

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    Google News / 20 min. ago more
  • WATCH LIVE | Bobby Petrino talks about U of L's 56-10 win over SyracuseWATCH LIVE | Bobby Petrino talks about U of L's 56-10 win over Syracuse

    The Cards won 56-10 over Syracuse in their last home game of the season on Saturday. 

    WDRB / 26 min. ago
  • Ex-state Sen. Ralph Shortey to plead guilty to child sex trafficking charge, lawyer saysEx-state Sen. Ralph Shortey to plead guilty to child sex trafficking charge, lawyer says

    Former Oklahoma state Sen. Ralph Shortey has agreed to plead guilty to one count of child sex trafficking in exchange for three other charges to be dismissed, Shortey's lawyer confirmed.

    WLKY / 52 min. ago
  • BOZICH | Kentucky will be solid underdog against Louisville after blowout Georgia lossBOZICH | Kentucky will be solid underdog against Louisville after blowout Georgia loss

    After losing to Georgia, 42-13, Saturday in Athens, Kentucky must upset Louisville Saturday in Lexington to climb to the eight-win total this season.

    WDRB / 1 h. ago
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    WLKY / 1 h. 2 min. ago
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    Google News / 1 h. 10 min. ago more
  • Father left sitting in own feces for weeks, police sayFather left sitting in own feces for weeks, police say

    A Florida man was arrested after police say he left his father in a chair for so long, his skin began to rot.

    WLKY / 1 h. 33 min. ago
  • Severe thunderstorm warning issued for WLKY viewing areaSevere thunderstorm warning issued for WLKY viewing area

    A severe thunderstorm warning has been issued for the WLKY viewing area

    WLKY / 2 h. 30 min. ago
  • Animal welfare group seeks to halt rifle rule in IndianaAnimal welfare group seeks to halt rifle rule in Indiana

    The ethics group argues that the ban is a "clear legislative mandate."

    WDRB / 3 h. 42 min. ago
  • Months after clashes, free speech rally held in BostonMonths after clashes, free speech rally held in Boston

    The rally moved from the Boston Common to the steps of the State House, chanting "USA" and "All Lives Matter."

    WLKY / 3 h. 52 min. ago
  • Victory Park reopened, community hopeful for fresh startVictory Park reopened, community hopeful for fresh start

    Renovations to Victory Park began on Saturday with a tree planting. 

    WAVE 3 / 4 h. 15 min. ago
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    WDRB / 4 h. 29 min. ago
  • Teen rocks out with KISS front man Gene Simmons Teen rocks out with KISS front man Gene Simmons

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    WLKY / 4 h. 33 min. ago
  • 3-person Metro Council panel removes Dan Johnson from office3-person Metro Council panel removes Dan Johnson from office

    A 3-person Louisville Metro Council panel has determined that Dan Johnson violated an agreement that would have allowed him to keep his seat and has removed Johnson from office.

    WDRB / 4 h. 47 min. ago
  • What's the secret to living to 100? For this veteran, it’s Skyline ChiliWhat's the secret to living to 100? For this veteran, it’s Skyline Chili

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    WLKY / 5 h. 16 min. ago
  • 2 arrested in connection with Kroger shooting2 arrested in connection with Kroger shooting

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    WAVE 3 / 5 h. 35 min. ago
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    Google News / 8 h. 35 min. ago more
  • Louisville company offering pop-up classes to connect businesses with people wanting to learn new skills - WDRBLouisville company offering pop-up classes to connect businesses with people wanting to learn new skills - WDRB

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    Google News / 8 h. 55 min. ago more
  • Louisville company offering pop-up classes to connect businesses with people wanting to learn new skillsLouisville company offering pop-up classes to connect businesses with people wanting to learn new skills

    "Level Up" is a Louisville start up that offers 15 to 20 pop-up classes a month on subjects ranging from cooking to photography to mixology.

    WDRB / 9 h. 1 min. ago
  • Card March ahead of Syracuse game canceledCard March ahead of Syracuse game canceled

    UofL said StreetFest will remain open. 

    WAVE 3 / 9 h. 6 min. ago
  • LMPD investigating after 1 person shot twiceLMPD investigating after 1 person shot twice

    A MetroSafe supervisor says a call was received Saturday at 5:12 a.m.

    WDRB / 9 h. 11 min. ago
  • UPDATE: LMPD: Officers investigating after victim assaulted near Iroquois High SchoolUPDATE: LMPD: Officers investigating after victim assaulted near Iroquois High School

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    WDRB / 9 h. 22 min. ago
  • $1 million grant helps Louisville program take education nationwide$1 million grant helps Louisville program take education nationwide

    Changing the game in education. In four years, Global Game Changers has touched thousands of local, under privileged kids. Now, it's taking its mission nationwide. 

    WDRB / 10 h. 34 min. ago
  • CRAWFORD | Louisville hangs on to beat Omaha despite 'embarrassing' second halfCRAWFORD | Louisville hangs on to beat Omaha despite 'embarrassing' second half

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    WDRB / 10 h. 36 min. ago
  • Police: Reported shooting in Iroquois neighborhood unfoundedPolice: Reported shooting in Iroquois neighborhood unfounded

    No word on if an incident actually occurred in that area Saturday morning. 

    WAVE 3 / 10 h. 40 min. ago
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    The University of Louisville has refunded the donations and ticket costs for 315 season tickets (controlled by 126 individuals and businesses), but potentially lower ticket sales for college hoops around the city may be more complicated than that. 

    WDRB / 10 h. 47 min. ago
  • 1 shot in Taylor Berry Neighborhood1 shot in Taylor Berry Neighborhood

    MetroSafe confirmed that the victim was shot twice.

    WAVE 3 / 12 h. 17 min. ago
  • Financial expert offers Black Friday Survival GuideFinancial expert offers Black Friday Survival Guide

    Door busting deals this Black Friday can also lead to emotional and financial stress. A local financial expert has six ways to avoid overspending.

    WDRB / 14 h. 15 min. ago
  • I-64 West back open as crews clear 4-car crash near I-264I-64 West back open as crews clear 4-car crash near I-264

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    Louisville News / 16 h. 46 min. ago
  • Kentucky Association of Counties inaugurates first president from Jefferson County - WDRBKentucky Association of Counties inaugurates first president from Jefferson County - WDRB

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    Google News / 16 h. 59 min. ago more
  • Best Plays of the Week -- Week 14Best Plays of the Week -- Week 14

    Week 14 of First Down Friday is in the books, and now it's time to vote on your favorite play of the night.

    WDRB / 20 h. 50 min. ago
  • Companies compete to hire thousands of local holiday workersCompanies compete to hire thousands of local holiday workers

    Louisville-based employers UPS and Amazon are planning to hire seasonal workers for the holidays. 

    WAVE 3 / 22 h. 32 min. ago
  • Binet School hosts deeper learning Exposition DayBinet School hosts deeper learning Exposition Day

    Binet School students showcased deeper learning initiative during exposition day. 

    WAVE 3 / 22 h. 40 min. ago
  • No. 18 Louisville hangs on over Omaha 87-78 - USA TODAYNo. 18 Louisville hangs on over Omaha 87-78 - USA TODAY

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    Google News / 22 h. 54 min. ago more
  • JCPS settles retroactive pay lawsuitJCPS settles retroactive pay lawsuit

    Former JCPS employee Walter Logan has settled a dispute with the district regarding overdue pay.

    WAVE 3 / 1 d. 1 h. 35 min. ago
  • New app helps detect gas pump skimmersNew app helps detect gas pump skimmers

    Smartphones can serve as powerful tools to protect users from skimmers at gas pumps.

    WAVE 3 / 1 d. 1 h. 39 min. ago
  • NYC Monuments Undergo Public Scrutiny at First Commission HearingNYC Monuments Undergo Public Scrutiny at First Commission Hearing

    Mayor Bill de Blasio's statues and monuments commission held its first public hearing in Queens on Friday morning, where residents, advocates, historians and elected officials expressed mixed views on statues and monuments named after divisive historic figures - and whether or not they should remain in place. In September, de Blasio announced the 18 members of the commission, which is co-chaired by Darren Walker, president of the Ford Foundation, and Tom Finkelpearl, commissioner of the city's Department of Cultural Affairs.

    Louisville News / 1 d. 1 h. 45 min. ago more
  • Credit card skimming at gas pumps is a problem in Louisville and the FBI is cracking down - The Courier-JournalCredit card skimming at gas pumps is a problem in Louisville and the FBI is cracking down - The Courier-Journal

    The Courier-JournalCredit card skimming at gas pumps is a problem in Louisville and the FBI is cracking downThe Courier-JournalLOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — Federal authorities pointed Friday to multiple arrests and convictions in Kentucky as just the start of a crackdown on credit card skimmers who target gas pumps to steal personal information. Six cases in the Louisville area ...Feds combating credit card skimming at Kentucky gas pumpsWPSD Local 6all 11 news articles »

    Google News / 1 d. 2 h. 14 min. ago more
  • LEO Presents: Soft Self Portraits, live in studioLEO Presents: Soft Self Portraits, live in studio

    For the latest LEO Presents, our video series where we ask local musicians to stop by our studio to play three songs, Soft Self Portraits brings dreamy, melancholy indie that’s reminiscent of the layered, atmospheric music from the mid-‘00s. Watch every past episode of the series here. The post LEO Presents: Soft Self Portraits, live in studio appeared first on LEO Weekly.

    LEO Weekly / 1 d. 2 h. 51 min. ago more
  • Listen to the Zach Longoria Project’s new single, ‘Space’Listen to the Zach Longoria Project’s new single, ‘Space’

    “Space,” the first single from a forthcoming album, sees the Zach Longoria Project turning to a big, dark, atmospheric track that clocks in at just under seven minutes. Listen to the song below. The post Listen to the Zach Longoria Project’s new single, ‘Space’ appeared first on LEO Weekly.

    LEO Weekly / 1 d. 3 h. 59 min. ago
  • Metro Council removes Dan Johnson amid harassment claimsMetro Council removes Dan Johnson amid harassment claims

    The Louisville Metro Council removed embattled member Dan Johnson from his seat Friday, ending -- for now -- a hectic several months of uncertainty that followed accusations of sexual harassment by several of his colleagues.

    WAVE 3 / 1 d. 4 h. 1 min. ago
  • 10 great hiking trails within an hour drive of Louisville10 great hiking trails within an hour drive of Louisville

    As a resident of Louisville for more than 26 years, I got bored with city attractions like Churchill Downs a long time ago. What does keep my interest in the region is all of the hiking available within an hour drive from Louisville. So as a self-appointed expert in local, nature-based escapism, I’m going to share with you a few of my go-to trails. I picked the following trails because of the variety of scenery they offer (I’m not a fan of flat trails through wooded areas) and because they are far enough away from Louisville to feel like a mini-vacation. My medium-sized hound dog was able to tackle all of these trails with ease, so unless you own a lap dog, I would declare all of these trails as dog friendly. And the majority of these trails are rated as moderate difficulty, meaning, they should be OK for anyone in “moderate” health who is wearing proper footwear. The following trails are listed from shortest drive to longest drive using downtown Louisville as a starting point. Charlestown Trail No. 2, 3 and 6  |  Charlestown State Park, Indiana Drive – 34 minutes Park hours: Open seven days a week; 7 a.m.-11 p.m. Price: $7 for Indiana residents; $9 for everyone else Once an undeveloped portion of the 15,000-acre Indiana Army Ammunition plant, Charlestown State Park is now a prime destination for hiking in Southern Indiana with trails that feature rugged hills, deep ravines, rivers with Devonian fossil outcrops and creeks with occasional waterfalls. I suggest hiking these three trails in particular: Trail Nos. 2, 3 and 6. Trail No. 2 is a 1.3-mile loop that takes you through an open woodland before dropping into some hilly terrain that runs parallel to a creek which, water levels permitting, has a few, small waterfalls. Trail No. 3 is a 2.2-mile loop that takes you down a cliffside and runs alongside Fourteenmile Creek as it empties into the Ohio River. The highlight of Trail No. 3, is that it comes up to the abandoned 1920’s amusement park, Rose Island. According to the Charlestown Park’s website, The amusement park used to be home to “a small zoo, pony rides, merry-go round, Ferris wheel, roller coaster, shooting gallery, cafeteria, swimming pool and more,” but after the 1937 flood, the park was damaged beyond repair. Just cross the wooden bridge over Fourteenmile Creek and follow the small, loop trail encircling the park. Trail No. 6 is a 2.3-mile loop that runs parallel to the Ohio River. Because of this trail’s proximity to water, it gives you a higher chance of seeing wildlife in the area, particularly birds. According to Charlestown Park’s website, the park hosts “72 species of birds, including bluebirds, black vultures and an occasional bald eagle.” Cull Hollow Trail and Elm Lick Trail  |  Bernheim Arboretum and Research Forest Drive – 35 minutes Park hours: Open seven days a week; 7 a.m.-7 p.m. Price: Free Monday-Friday; $5 per car or $10 per van Saturday, Sunday and Holidays Purchased by German immigrant Isaac W. Bernheim in 1929, the 14,000-acre nature preserve was “dedicated as a gift to the people of his new homeland.” Even though the public is only allowed on 2,000 acres of the property, there is still plenty to see in this hilly terrain, including these two beautiful trails: Elm Lick Trail is a five-mile loop that has an elevation gain of 728 feet. And with elevation gains, you get a better chance at catching sweeping views of the surrounding area. There is also plenty of dense forest, a large field and a river on this trail, so plenty of variety to keep your interest. Cull Hollow Trail is a 1.2 mile that takes you through a rocky hillside and hardwood forest to find a waterfall. The area surrounding the trail is covered in rocky outcrops and large stones, but the trail itself is easy enough with a gradual incline and an elevation gain of only 265 feet. This trail is also known for its frequent deer and turkey sightings. Tioga Falls Trail and Bridges To The Past  |  West Point, Kentucky Drive – 38 minutes Park hours: Open 24/7 (barring any military exercises) Price: Free Way down Dixie Highway, between the Ohio River and Fort Knox, you will find West Point, Kentucky. And hidden in West Point, are two trails that illustrate the beauty and history of the area. Because these trails are so close to Fort Knox, and sometimes the sight of military exercises, contact the Fort Knox Environmental Management Division, Cultural Resource Office at (502) 624-7431 for information on potential closures. Tioga Falls is a 1.9-mile, out-and-back trail that features a majestic series of waterfalls. The trail runs parallel to an active railroad track (so be careful and stay off the track) and also passes the remnants of a 19th-century house before you reach the falls. The falls themselves, from top to bottom, are about 130 feet high. Bridges to the Past is a 2.4-mile, out-and-back paved trail. The trail follows the old L&N Turnpike, which was chartered in 1837 and in use until 1919. Along the trails are three stone bridges that are over 150 years old (hence the name of the trail). Sieboldt Cave is also visible from the trail, but you are not allowed to approach the caves. Otter Creek Trail  |  Otter Creek Park Drive – 48 minutes Park hours: Open Wednesday-Sunday from dawn to dusk; Closed on Mondays and Tuesdays Price: $3 for daily permit, $30 for annual permit Just south of West Point, Kentucky, is another bit of natural beauty wedged between Fort Knox and the Ohio River, Otter Creek Outdoor Recreation Area. Otter Creek is a recreational area for a number of outdoor activities: fishing, hunting, mountain biking, horseback riding, archery and, most importantly for us, hiking. To get a true sense of the area, I suggest hiking this trail in particular. Otter Creek Trail is a four-mile loop with an elevation gain 603 feet. This trail covers the majority of the area, so expect lots of variety in your hike as you will encounter plenty of heavily wooded areas, fields, streams, rivers and even a few small caves. Hemlock Cliffs National Scenic Trail  |  Hoosier National Forest, Indiana Drive – 56 minutes Open: 24/7 Price: Free Hoosier National Forest is a massive — 203,000-acre — piece of land defined mostly by its hilly terrain and thick woodlands. And with over 260 miles of trails, you could easily pick a random trail and find plenty to enjoy in this area. But since I am offering hikes within an hour of Louisville, I think you’d be best off narrowing your travels to this one trail in particular. Hemlock Cliffs National Scenic Trail is a 1.2-mile loop, and as you probably already guessed from the name, the highlight of this trail is the Hemlock Cliffs. The cliffs are the result of sandstone rock formations which have created a sort of box canyon in the middle of these Indiana woods. A few creeks also runs through the area, so depending on water levels, you may also find a few waterfalls on the trail. Clifty Falls State Park Loop Trail and Clifty Falls Trails 8 and 2  |  Clifty Falls, Indiana Drive – 59 minutes Price: $7 for Indiana residents; $9 for everyone else Park hours: 7 a.m.-11 p.m. Clifty Falls State Park, simply put, is a stunning canyon with sheer cliffs that are covered in waterfalls. If you are looking for a bit of landscape to feed your escapism, this is the place to be, since it feels nothing like the rolling hills of Kentucky or the wooded plains of Indiana. But I do have one nitpick. Across the street from the entrance of the park are three giant smokestacks, courtesy of the Indiana-Kentucky Electric Corp. Once you are deep into the park, you mostly lose sight of them, but still, it is a harsh juxtaposition while driving in. But nevertheless, this nitpick shouldn’t stop you from exploring these two trails. Clifty Falls State Park Loop Trail is a five-mile loop that circles the rim of the entire Clifty Canyon. The trail is perfect to get a sense of the entire park, and filled with picturesque views that look down into the waterfall filled canyon. A word of advice, though: set aside an extra hour of hiking into your timetable since the elevation gain on this trail is about 1,000 feet. Clifty Falls Trails No. 8 and No. 2 combine to make a 4.8-mile loop, and like the Clifty Falls State Park Loop, this trail also has an large elevation change of about 862 feet. That’s because this trail will actually take you down into the canyon. While you are there, be sure to explore the Clifty Creek’s stony bed which, according to the state park’s website, is “littered with fossil remnants telling of a long vanished marine ecosystem that teemed with life that included ancient corals, ancestral squids, brachiopods and more.” Just be sure to leave the fossils where you found them, since fossil collecting within the park is prohibited. The post 10 great hiking trails within an hour drive of Louisville appeared first on LEO Weekly.

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  • Almost Family president: 'We're not going anywhere'Almost Family president: 'We're not going anywhere'

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    Bizjournals.com / 1 d. 5 h. 33 min. ago
  • Hotel proposed for downtown Louisville office buildingHotel proposed for downtown Louisville office building

    The property is the former headquarters of Seven Counties Services.

    Bizjournals.com / 1 d. 5 h. 58 min. ago
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    The Record / 1 d. 6 h. 14 min. ago more
  • Louisville's like a startup — it's scrappy and exciting, but it needs moneyLouisville's like a startup — it's scrappy and exciting, but it needs money

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    Bizjournals.com / 1 d. 6 h. 19 min. ago
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    WAVE 3 / 1 d. 6 h. 26 min. ago
  • Mayor's office: Feds are being 'petty' about fundingMayor's office: Feds are being 'petty' about funding

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  • Louisville lady donates prized pine to city's tree tradition Read Story Sara WagnerLouisville lady donates prized pine to city's tree tradition Read Story Sara Wagner

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    Louisville News / 1 d. 6 h. 34 min. ago
  • Sacred Heart Schools hold 22nd annual gift drive for AppalachiaSacred Heart Schools hold 22nd annual gift drive for Appalachia

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    The Record / 1 d. 7 h. 14 min. ago more
  • This Louisville company will buy back up to $1.5 billion of its stockThis Louisville company will buy back up to $1.5 billion of its stock

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  • 5 Things To Do This Weekend in Louisville (11/17)5 Things To Do This Weekend in Louisville (11/17)

    FRIDAY An Evening for the People’s Acupuncture Clinic Kaiju Suggested donation $7  |  6 p.m. To raise financial support and awareness for the Healing Team of Black Lives Matter and the People’s Acupuncture Clinic, Kaiju is hosting one hell of a show with music, food and general bizarreness. Live music will be provided by The Human Project, GRLwood, SCZ and Bird Zoo. Food will be available for purchase from El Lobo Bailando, and general craziness can be expected from Octo Claw’s Bizarre Bazaar. Proceeds will help fund Healing Sundays at People’s Acupuncture Clinic, which provides a sliding scale of treatments in conjunction with BLM Louisville. —Ethan Smith Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets (Nov. 17–18) The Kentucky Center $35 and up  |  7:30 p.m. “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone” was published over 20 years ago. That’s right, this classic children’s book and movie series is entering its second generation of child fans. The Louisville Orchestra brings the second story, “The Chamber of Secrets,” to you on a 40-foot screen while the Orchestra performs the score throughout the movie. So whether it’s your child who wants to go, or your inner-child who wants to relive the magic, this will be a unique Harry Potter experience. —Aaron Yarmuth SATURDAY NerdLouvia 2017 (Nov. 18–19) Tim Faulkner Gallery Prices vary  |  Sat. 12 p.m.-1 a.m.; Sun. 12 p.m.-6 p.m. “Nerrrrrrrrrds!” —Ogre, “Revenge of the Nerds” (1984). As we learned from this movie, when nerds come together, society wins. NerdLouvia is Louisville’s only tabletop gaming convention, and the main fundraising event for Nerd Louisville. (…Look it up. They do a lot for nerds across the city, including for at-risk youths.) You can play in casual or tournament games of your favorite, classic board, role-playing and card games, such as Dungeons & Dragons, Call of Cthulhu, Pathfinder and more. This is a 21-and-over nerds event only, and will offer a cash bar and food trucks. —LEO Surface Noise One-Year Anniversary Bash Surface Noise Free  |  7 p.m. With the intent of being a place to find gems and to act as a cultural nerve center for hanging out and talking about music, Surface Noise opened on Baxter Avenue a year ago. Situated directly across the street from Magnetic Tape Co., Surface Noise helped fill in a block that’s seen a few interesting additions lately. On Saturday, the store celebrates its one-year anniversary, with guest DJs, gift card raffles and refreshments. —Scott Recker SUNDAY Owsley Sundays at the Speed Speed Museum Prices vary  |  12-5 p.m. In case you forgot, Sundays at the Speed Museum are free! So why not spend your lazy Sunday exploring the vast collection of world-renowned art housed in this magnificent museum. And while you’re there, you could  check out a percussion performance by the UofL Percussion Department from 1-3 p.m. in the Music Gallery. Guests will be encouraged to walk around the instruments and performers during the performance to get an up-close look at marimbas, timpani, vibraphones, steel drums and multi-percussion sets. The post 5 Things To Do This Weekend in Louisville (11/17) appeared first on LEO Weekly.

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  • Six students selected to learn first-hand about fair tradeSix students selected to learn first-hand about fair trade

    Record Staff Report Just Creations, a boutique that carries only fair-trade items, announced the names of six students selected to participate in its Fair Trade Ambassador Program this school year. The Frankfort Avenue store selected the following high school juniors: Abi Prewitt of Presentation Academy, Jonathan Eng of Trinity High School and Mercy Academy students Anna Disselkamp, Lindsey Hahn, Katie Kimerly and Macey Pearl. They will receive in-store training, take course-work and complete reading assignments related to fair-trade practices. Fair trade is designed to empower people in the developing world — from coffee growers to artists — by paying them a fair wage for their work. The ambassador program began in 2007 as a way to educate young people about the business of fair trade and foster new advocates for its practices. Fifty-seven students have taken part in the program so far, according to a news release from the store. Just Creations is a non-profit that was started by St. William Church. It is governed by a board of directors and led by an executive director. It has a small paid staff and a team of more than 80 volunteers, according to its website. The post Six students selected to learn first-hand about fair trade appeared first on The Record.

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  • Assumption hosts first ‘Alumnae Career Day’Assumption hosts first ‘Alumnae Career Day’

    Jefferson County Clerk Bobbie Holsclaw, above left, and U.S. District Court Judge Annette Crox Karem spoke to a group of girls about their careers in government during Assumption High School’s first annual Alumnae Career Day Nov. 2. (Photo Special to The Record) Record Staff Report Assumption High School held the first “Alumnae Career Day” Nov. 2 on the school’s campus, 2170 Tyler Lane. Jefferson County Clerk Bobby Holsclaw, a graduate of the class of 1962 and U.S. District Court Judge Annette Karem, who graduated in 1983, were among close to 60 alumnae who participated.  The women presented their professional experience and perspective to more than 400 Assumption juniors and seniors who are exploring career options, said a press release from the high school. Christina Guelda Gnadinger — who graduated in 1989 and serves as registered nurse director at the Kentucky Health Care Training Institute — spoke at the event. “I am honored to be able to speak to a new generation of young women about their possible career choices,” said Gnadinger. “While my career is a good fit for me I wish I had been able to attend a similar program during my high school years.” The women represented more than 20 career specialties including medicine, engineering, law, finance, technology, government and social work. “This event helps high school girls see how women who were once in their shoes can be successful in a variety of careers,” said Abby Blandford, a graduate of the class of 2011 who serves as Assumption’s manager of annual giving and alumnae relations. Other alumnae who attended the career day was Catherine Rene Whelan While, a graduate of the class of 1992 who works as a veterinarian in Kyrgyzstan. The post Assumption hosts first ‘Alumnae Career Day’ appeared first on The Record.

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  • Feds arrest 8 in multi-million dollar credit card skimming operationFeds arrest 8 in multi-million dollar credit card skimming operation

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  • St. Xavier High School wins state championshipSt. Xavier High School wins state championship

    St. Xavier High School won two state championships Nov. 4.  The soccer team won the Kentucky High School Athletic Association (KHSAA) state championship during a tournament at Lafayette High School. Soccer player Conner George was named the tournament Most Valuable Player. Players Bennett Moorman and Case Cox were named to the All-Tournament team.  The cross country team won the KHSAA state championship during an event at the Kentucky Horse Park. Runner Patrick Schafer placed second overall. This is the school’s third consecutive state title. The post St. Xavier High School wins state championship appeared first on The Record.

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  • Top of The List: These are Louisville's largest hospitalsTop of The List: These are Louisville's largest hospitals

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  • CEC will host college  readiness class in DecemberCEC will host college readiness class in December

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  • Louisville Metro spends $6.7M on final soccer stadium parcelLouisville Metro spends $6.7M on final soccer stadium parcel

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  • Longtime Louisville company is moving downtown from the suburbsLongtime Louisville company is moving downtown from the suburbs

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  • Central Kentucky highway worker killed in Louisville - WKYTCentral Kentucky highway worker killed in Louisville - WKYT

    WKYTCentral Kentucky highway worker killed in LouisvilleWKYTState highway officials say Bland was a former Kentucky Transportation Cabinet employee and was working for a local contractor. "Typically, it's very rare to see it affect a highway worker. The majority of people impacted by work zone crashes are the ...Versailles Man Killed While Working On Louisville Road ConstructionLEX18 Lexington KY Newsall 5 news articles »

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  • Allegiant starts non-stop flights to VegasAllegiant starts non-stop flights to Vegas

    The inaugural flight from Louisville International Airport to Las Vegas' McCarran International Airport took off Thursday afternoon in Louisville.

    Louisville News / 1 d. 14 h. 4 min. ago
  • Feds threaten Louisville over immigration lawFeds threaten Louisville over immigration law

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  • Party City robbed of $500 in merchandise, general manager says - WDRB 41 Louisville News - WDRBParty City robbed of $500 in merchandise, general manager says - WDRB 41 Louisville News - WDRB

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  • Kentucky State University students, researchers bring shrimp from the blue sea to the bluegrassKentucky State University students, researchers bring shrimp from the blue sea to the bluegrass

    A Louisville woman is facing several serious charges after police say she shot a man in the groin after she kidnapped, assaulted and robbed a woman Wednesday evening. A Louisville woman is facing several serious charges after police say she shot a man in the groin after she kidnapped, assaulted and robbed a woman Wednesday evening.

    Louisville News / 1 d. 23 h. 9 min. ago
  • Leadership Louisville plans grand opening ceremony at new homeLeadership Louisville plans grand opening ceremony at new home

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    Louisville News / 2 d. 3 h. 52 min. ago
  • US industrial output climbed a healthy 0.9 pct. in OctoberUS industrial output climbed a healthy 0.9 pct. in October

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    Louisville News / 2 d. 8 h. 33 min. ago
  • Mercy Academy to present ‘Wizard of Oz’Mercy Academy to present ‘Wizard of Oz’

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  • Trinity High School to present fall playTrinity High School to present fall play

    Trinity High School’s Department of Theatre Arts will present “The Complete Works of William Shakespeare Abridged” in Trinity Auditorium,115 N. Sherrin Avenue, Nov. 16 and 18 at 7 p.m. Tickets are $12 for adults and $10 for seniors and students. For more information, call Joy Durbin at 736-2188 or email durbin@trinity rocks.com. The post Trinity High School to present fall play appeared first on The Record.

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  • Seniors sign letters of intent to play college athleticsSeniors sign letters of intent to play college athletics

    Twenty-one high school seniors in the Archdiocese of Louisville have signed letters of intent for college athletics. They are: Sacred Heart Academy golfer Ryan Bender, University of Kentucky; volleyball player Abigail Westenhofer, Saint Louis University; field hockey players Mary Kate Kesler, Indiana University; Sujin Kang, LeHigh University; Courtney Klein, Ohio University; and Elizabeth Solomon, Centre College; swimmers Tonner DeBeer, Vanderbilt University; Ellie Masterson, University of South Carolina; Elizabeth Schrenger, Bellarmine University; Madelynn Hall, Centre College; and basketball players Grace Berger, Indiana University; Kia Sivils, Marshall University; Cierra Scott, Mercer University; and Natalie Fichter, Indiana University Southeast. Mercy Academy basketball player Danielle Feldkamp, Bellarmine University; volleyball players Neci Harris, Furman University; and Lauren Tharp, University of Kentucky; softball player Lexi Ray, University of Tennessee at Martin; and field hockey player Brenna Schoenbachler, Appalachian State University. Presentation Academy volleyball players Peyton McClinton, University of North Carolina Ashville; and Jenna Story, Wright State University The post Seniors sign letters of intent to play college athletics appeared first on The Record.

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  • Spalding receives grant to serve clinicsSpalding receives grant to serve clinics

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    Louisville News / 3 d. 0 h. 40 min. ago
  • The Humana Festival of New American Plays, a leader in playwright diversityThe Humana Festival of New American Plays, a leader in playwright diversity

    [Only in LEO, read below about how the 42nd Humana Festival of New American Plays has long sought equality and diversity, and also check out the entire list of new plays and summaries here.] Look closely at the newly-released lineup of the 2018 Humana Festival of New American Plays from Actors Theatre of Louisville. You’ll notice something… astonishing. The list of playwrights includes six female writers and three male writers. Of the nine writers, four are people of color (incidentally, you’ll also note that the list of directors is quite diverse). In the broad context of American culture, in which women and people of color are systematically marginalized, the statistical diversity of this lineup is downright astonishing. Even within the relatively progressive world of American theater, it’s a significant anomaly. But the real surprise is that it’s not really a surprise at all… if you look at the history of the Humana Festival. Using 10 years of Festival lineups (2007-2017), I did a quick and dirty calculation. What I found was that Humana playwrights make up a markedly more diverse group than is found on the American stage overall. Women and self-identified transgender writers account for more than 45 percent of all the Festival’s playwright credits during that period. And, in the aggregate, writers who are women, transsexual or people of color account for roughly two-thirds of all the writing credits. Below, we’ll discuss how that compares with national trends. In a narrow sense, the impact of the Humana Festival on American stages is easily measured; just search a national newspaper database, and you will find hundreds of references to works that premiered here. But by amplifying new and diverse voices that go on to shape American storytelling in theater, film and TV, the Festival exerts a profound impact on American culture and life. According to Meredith McDonough, ATL’s associate artistic director (who has worked alongside all three of the company’s artistic leaders, Jon Jory, Marc Masterson and Les Waters), the Humana Festival has always valued inclusivity. Invoking the name of Pulitzer Prize winning Marsha Norman, whose early works are indelibly connected to ATL, McDonough said, “From jump, Actors has always been asked the question, ‘How do we include as many different voices as we can?’” This year, one of the answers to that question is a 30-something playwright named Leah Nanako Winkler, who was born in Kamakura, Japan, and raised in Lexington, Kentucky. Next February, Winkler’s new play, “God Said This,” directed by Morgan Gould, will be the opening production in the 2018 Humana Festival of New American Plays. “The Humana Festival is like the theater’s version of the Sundance Film Festival,” Winkler told me in a telephone interview. “It’s a place where you get amazing productions. But it’s also a place where so many theaters and casting directors from TV and film go to scout, so it’s definitely a breakthrough.” For any playwright, regardless of gender, race or ethnicity, it’s a tremendous achievement to see a new play produced on any stage. It’s one of the most anticipated and closely-watched events of the year. It’s the big reveal, a moment when emerging playwrights join well-established names at the center of the American stage and become part of a four-decade tradition of answering one fundamental question: What is new in American theater? ATL receives well over 1,000 submissions each year, from which only a handful get produced. Across the country, the numbers are even more formidable — and new plays compete not only with other new plays but with an existing repertoire of scripts from authors with names such as Shakespeare and Arthur Miller. American theater, Mostly white and male Nationally, study after study shows that for women and people of color, the odds against getting a play from page to stage are appalling — and have been for a very long time. In 2009, for instance, a comparative study showed that over the course of a century, the percentage of Broadway productions written by women had barely budged — and not in the right direction: 12.8 percent in 1908-09, and 12.6 percent in 2008-09. In 2014, The Kilroys, a group of Los Angeles-based writers and producers who advocate for gender parity in theater, started publishing “Kilroys List,” an annual survey of “excellent un- and under-produced new plays by female and trans playwrights” to draw attention to quality works that are not getting produced. Joy Meads, a founding member of The Kilroys, told me in a phone interview that the problem extends beyond Broadway: Across the country, the share of professional productions authored by women tends to hover between 17 and 23 percent. And the rate of progress has been slow. “If we continue progressing at the rate we’re going, it will take another 60 or 70 years before we achieve parity,” said Meads, literary associate and artistic engagement strategist at Center Theatre Group in LA. Writing in American Theatre magazine in 2015, Meads looked at a host of scholarly and scientific evidence (including a study in which she herself had participated). Meads concluded that unconscious bias accounts for the relative lack of stage productions by women and people of color. And, it’s important to note, said Meads, that unconscious bias affects both men and women. In 2009, an economics student at Princeton University wrote a thesis that looked at how perceived gender affected the way readers evaluated plays. Using 10 pages of a script supplied by Pulitzer Prize-winning Lynn Nottage (whose work has appeared in two Humana Festivals, 1993 and 2002), she sent copies to 250 literary managers around the country. Half were sent with male pen names, half with female pen names. Readers assigned lower ratings to those under female pen names — not necessarily in terms of artistic quality, but in dimensions related to a play’s likely success. And much of that disparity was attributable not to male, but to female reviewers. Meads said that increasing diversity on the theater stage isn’t just a matter of professional equity. It’s also a challenge for our society. “The stories we watch and consume feed our unconscious imagination,” she said. “They’re a source from which we create the schemas, rules and assumptions about people we encounter in life.” For instance, said Meads, pervasive images of black men as dangerous and violent rather than as, say, nurturing fathers, makes people more likely to fear black men in real life and has a tangible impact on our culture. Saying yes to the unknown ATL — and its Louisville audience — have long emphasized the importance of offering a rich assortment of stories and voices, said McDonough, who was a directing intern at ATL from 1998 to 2001 and with the company in her current role for six seasons. “It’s an enormous responsibility for a company to decide that it’s going to run the largest new play festival in the country. To say, ‘We’ve read for months and months and months, and these are the six plays that we think are most representative of that’s happening right now.’” “And the amazing thing about the Louisville audience is that they’re not afraid. They have said yes to six unknown things every season for 40-odd years. That’s amazing.” McDonough said she believes that American theater is on the cusp of change, and she is optimistic it will become more inclusive. At this moment, more than 20 theaters are looking for new leadership (ATL is among them, since Artistic Director Les Waters has announced he will depart at the end of this season). An upcoming generation of new leaders will lead to change, says McDonough. ”Over the next 10 years, I think we’ll see that everyone finds a place at the table,” she said. In an interview, Waters observed that the American theater community has become increasingly mindful of equity, diversity and inclusion. If Actors plays a distinctive role, he said, it’s because of the nature of the company’s collaborative team over the years, and because ATL doesn’t simply focus on productions — it has a tradition of building strong, enduring relationships with writers and directors. “It’s the passion of the people in the room who make the Festival,” he said. “If you read a play in June, and it’s still on your mind in September, then that’s an important play — and then the question becomes how do you fit it into the jigsaw puzzle in the spring.” How plays are chosen At ATL, it’s a four-person literary team (Amy Wegener, Hannah Rae Montgomery, Jenni Page-White and Jessica Reese) that gives each play its first reading. Asked whether there’s a mindful attempt to achieve diversity during the play selection process, Wegener, the literary director, said, “Not in the sense of checking boxes. The process is really driven by our values. We don’t know what the Festival will look like when we start out, but we know that we want to explore as many experiences and perspectives as we can.” Page-White added, “I don’t think we’re ever trying to make a statement or choosing a play because of its identity. But we value diversity in the context of creating a whole festival with as many different kinds of stories as possible.” For Reese, it’s the excitement of exploring new worlds that makes a play exciting. And, Montgomery added, part of the appeal of Leah Nanako Winkler’s play is its very familiarity. “It speaks to the experience of this community with specific Kentucky humor and jokes, and it speaks to this community and local themes,” she said. ‘Suddenly everyone was talking about the Humana Festival’ Before her play “God Said This” was chosen, Leah Nanako Winkler, said she never imagined that her work would be produced at a theater such as Actors. “My entire career people have told me my writing is funny, but a little strange and off-kilter. So being in Humana — it was a complete surprise. It gives me hope.” Her long and winding voyage from Lexington to Louisville started at Lexington’s Tates Creek High School. “We had this amazing drama teacher, Lisa Osterman,” Winkler recalled. “I didn’t even realize at the time how special it was and what I was learning — but it gave me a life. If it hadn’t been for doing high school theater in a public school in Kentucky, I would never have found my way.” After high school, Winkler moved to Indianapolis, where she found a flourishing experimental theater community and started writing, producing and directing her own plays. Then, about 10 years ago, Winkler arrived in New York City by Greyhound bus. By donating her eggs, she had raised $4,500 — enough to get to the city, pay a security deposit and rent a place while she tried to get a foothold in the city’s theater scene. It was only then, she recalled, that she discovered the Humana Festival’s importance. “I got there and suddenly everyone was talking about the Humana Festival — who’s in Humana. And on Industry Weekend, everybody was going to Louisville and posting bourbon selfies.” In New York, she started her own company, built a network of friends and started self-producing her plays — so many Offs from Broadway that Broadway wasn’t even part of the equation. “We started out doing plays for audiences of, like six and we were, like, ‘Oh, my God! There are six people here!’ And that was great,” said Winkler. Then, Winkler connected with Morgan Gould, another entrepreneurial, self-producing playwright and director, and they started collaborating. Over the last decade, they’ve built impressive bodies of work, both individually and in partnership. And still Winkler never found her way to Actors — until this past spring, when she returned home to Lexington and drove over to see a friend’s play in the Humana Festival. “When I was living in Lexington, Louisville seemed so far away,” she said. Unlike Winkler, Gould, who will direct “God Said This,” has been attending the Festival for years, knows the city well enough to lament the closing of Freddie’s Bar (a longtime hangout for ATL folks), and understands the relationship of the ATL with its Louisville audience. “Some theaters assume that their audience wants to see the same things over and over,” said Gould. “I think audiences want new stories. I think Actors knows that their audience is willing to be freaked out, challenged and delighted by something that is strange and new and challenging.” And it’s true. The Festival has been freaking people out by bringing new voices to the stage for more than 40 years. • The post The Humana Festival of New American Plays, a leader in playwright diversity appeared first on LEO Weekly.

    LEO Weekly / 3 d. 8 h. 26 min. ago more
  • Only in LEO: The 2018 Humana Festival of New American Plays lineupOnly in LEO: The 2018 Humana Festival of New American Plays lineup

    Only in LEO, check out the entire list of new plays and summaries below, plus read how the 42nd Humana Festival of New American Plays has long sought equality and diversity here.  “God Said This” “God Said This” by Leah Nanako Winkler Directed by Morgan Gould Feb. 28 – April 8 Bingham Theatre With her mom undergoing chemotherapy, New York transplant Hiro returns home to Lexington, Kentucky after years away. Sophie, her born-again Christian sister, fights to maintain her faith amid adversity. James, their recovering alcoholic father, wants to repair his fractured relationship with his daughters, but redemption isn’t easy. And John, an old classmate and single dad, worries about his legacy. Wry and bittersweet, “God Said This” is a portrait of five people confronting mortality in very different ways — and unexpectedly finding that their struggles bring them together. Leah Nanako Winkler wrote “Kentucky” (2015 Kilroys List; Ensemble Studio Theatre/Page 73/Radio Drama Network), “Two Mile Hollow” (2017 Kilroys List; Artists at Play, Mixed Blood Theatre/Mu Performing Arts, First Floor Theater, Ferocious Lotus Theatre Company) and more. She won the inaugural Mark O’Donnell Prize from The Actors Fund and Playwrights Horizons, and received a 2017 Audible commission. “Marginal Loss” “Marginal Loss” by Deborah Stein directed by Meredith McDonough March 7 – April 8 Pamela Brown Auditorium Days after 9/11, the few surviving employees of an investment firm based near the top of the Twin Towers gather in a New Jersey warehouse. Shell-shocked and grief-stricken, they work around the clock to reconstruct what’s left of their company with determination, pen and paper and a temp who just wants to help. But as they struggle to recoup their losses, they wonder: What does getting “back to normal” really mean? Deborah Stein’s plays have been produced and developed at Actors Theatre (2009 and 2010 Humana Festivals), ArtsEmerson, Center Theatre Group, La Jolla Playhouse, Z Space, Playwrights Horizons, Clubbed Thumb, The Theatre @ Boston Court, Live Girls! Theater, Workhaus Collective and The Gate in London.  An alumna of New Dramatists, she is originally from New York and currently teaches at the University of California, San Diego. “Do You Feel Anger?” “Do You Feel Anger?” by Mara Nelson-Greenberg directed by Margot Bordelon March 10 – April 8 Bingham Theatre Sofia was recently hired as an empathy coach at a debt collection agency — and clearly, she has her work cut out for her. These employees can barely identify what an emotion is, much less practice deep, radical compassion for others. And while they painstakingly stumble toward enlightenment, someone keeps mugging Eva in the kitchen. An outrageous comedy about the absurdity — and the danger — of a world where some people’s feelings matter more than others. Mara Nelson-Greenberg’s work has been developed at Clubbed Thumb, Playwrights Horizons, Ensemble Studio Theatre and WildWind Performance Lab, among others. She is a member of EST/Youngblood and an alumna of Clubbed Thumb’s Early Career Writers’ Group. She is currently pursuing an M.F.A. at the University of California, San Diego, under Naomi Iizuka. “Evocation to Visible Appearance” “Evocation to Visible Appearance” by Mark Schultz directed by Les Waters March 17 – April 8 Pamela Brown Auditorium You wanna know what the future looks like? Samantha, 17 and possibly pregnant, longs for solid ground — but she’s haunted by the sense that nothing will last. Her college-bound boyfriend wants to go sing on The Voice, her dad’s asleep on the couch, and her older sister’s in treatment. When Sam befriends a tattooed musician, has she found someone who understands this fallen world? With black humor and black metal, this gripping new play gives form to a gathering darkness. Mark Schultz’s plays include “The Blackest Shore,” “The Gingerbread House,” “Ceremony, Deathbed” and “Everything Will Be Different: A Brief History of Helen of Troy,” for which he received the Oppenheimer Award and the Kesselring Prize. He is a resident playwright at New Dramatists and a member of Rising Phoenix Repertory “You Across From Me” “You Across from Me” by Jaclyn Backhaus, Dipika Guha, Brian Otaño and Jason Gray Platt directed by Jessica Fisch performed by the actors of the 2017-2018 Professional Training Company commissioned by Actors Theatre of Louisville March 23 – April 8 in the Bingham Theatre We gather at tables on good days and bad, for ordinary rituals and once-in-a-lifetime encounters. But in polarizing times, what does it really mean to come to the table? Does it bring us together, or reveal just how far apart we truly are? With electric wit and fierce imagination, four writers explore this surprisingly complicated act, and the many ways we connect, confront and compromise. Jaclyn Backhaus is a playwright and co-founder of Fresh Ground Pepper. Her plays include “Men on Boats” (Clubbed Thumb, Playwrights Horizons), “Folk Wandering” (Pipeline Theatre Company) and “You on the Moors Now” (Theater Reconstruction Ensemble, The Hypocrites). Backhaus was the 2016 Tow Foundation Playwright-in-Residence at Clubbed Thumb and is currently in residence at Lincoln Center Theater. Dipika Guha’s plays include “Yoga Play” (South Coast Repertory) and “The Art of Gaman” (Ground Floor at Berkeley Repertory Theatre). She received her M.F.A. from Yale School of Drama. Guha is under commission at Manhattan Theatre Club, South Coast Repertory and Oregon Shakespeare Festival, among others. She currently writes for the series “American Gods” on Starz. Brian Otaño’s plays include “Tara,” “Zero Feet Away,” “The Ocean at Your Door,” “What We Told the Neighbors” and “Between the Sandbar and the Shore.” Residencies and Fellowships: New Dramatists Van Lier Playwriting Fellowship, Interstate 73, New York Theatre Workshop 2050 Fellowship and Ars Nova’s Play Group. Education: Otaño received his B.F.A. in dramatic writing from SUNY Purchase. Jason Gray Platt’s plays include “Empire Travel Agency,” “The There There” and “Some Prepared Remarks.” He is a Core Writer at the Playwrights’ Center and a member of Woodshed Collective. He received his B.A. from Vassar College and his M.F.A. from Columbia University. “we, the invisibles” “we, the invisibles” by Susan Soon He Stanton directed by TBD March 23 – April 8 Victor Jory Theatre Stirred by a controversial case in which a West African maid’s accusation against a powerful man is dismissed, Susan, a playwright working a survival job at a luxury hotel, starts interviewing fellow employees from around the world. She feels compelled to give voice to other hotel workers’ rarely heard stories — but as her investigation deepens, this documentary project becomes an unexpectedly personal journey. Funny, poignant and brutally honest, “we, the invisibles” explores the complicated relationship between the movers and shakers and the people who change their sheets. Susan Soon He Stanton’s plays include “Today Is My Birthday” (Page 73), “Takarazuka!!!” (Clubbed Thumb and East West Players) and “Solstice Party” (Live Source Theatre Group). She is a two-time Sundance Theatre Lab Resident Playwright and was recently awarded the inaugural Venturous Playwright Fellowship at The Lark. Most recently, she worked in London as a staff writer for HBO’s “Succession.” The post Only in LEO: The 2018 Humana Festival of New American Plays lineup appeared first on LEO Weekly.

    LEO Weekly / 3 d. 8 h. 29 min. ago more
  • Can Bardstown Road be fixed?Can Bardstown Road be fixed?

    Bardstown Road is a lovable mess, isn’t it? I remember first moving to the city and being utterly bamboozled by the lane lights, unsure of when they would light up and why. Even though I live a block off Bardstown, I avoided driving it for a while. Turns out it is unique in the country as the only road with both lane lights and on-street parking, according to a recent study. It all may be changing. Here are some of the ideas floated during a recent public forum on the newly-launched “Bardstown Road Corridor Safety Study.” Eliminate parking entirely. No left turns. No right turns on red. Create a ZeroBus-type transit for the corridor. Resident parking permits for side streets. Wider sidewalks. Synchronized stop lights. Landscape bumpers on sidewalks. Make the lane lights more visible. Garages. A road diet like on Lexington Road and Grinstead Drive. Tom Springer of engineering firm Qk4, hired for the study, said that the traffic lights on the corridor run off 1970s technology; that kind of improvement is a no-brainer. Councilman Brandon Coan calls the study his top budget priority for District 8’s fiscal year 2018. As such, he’s shelled out $90,000 for the study — $50,000 in special funds from the district and $40,000 in additional funds. “The goal is to come up with a list of feasible improvements,” said Coan. The study examines four miles of Bardstown Road, from where Baxter meets Broadway to Interstate 264. The corridor sees anywhere from 20,000 to 25,000 vehicles a day. It is AAA rated for trucks up to 80,000 pounds. According to the study there have been only two fatal crashes on the corridor since 2012 and none since 2013, but in general crashes are on the rise. It is state owned and maintained. That last bit is important because no matter what the study turns up, there’s not much Louisville can do without the blessing (and hopefully bucks) from the state. The team conducting this study is led by Qk4, the lead engineer for the most-recently designed sections of the Parklands of Floyd’s Fork. When asked about why the city or state couldn’t do the work, Coan told LEO that they “don’t have the staff and resources that are big enough without involving a third party vendor.” He said that he’s happy with the cost. Also on the team are Develop Louisville, Public Works, the director of transportation in the Mayor’s Office, state, TARC and PARC. “This plan isn’t about moving cars,” said Springer. “This plan is about the vitality of Bardstown Road, our premier road.” Coan said that he felt like he couldn’t wait for the state to recognize the need to study this stretch of road. The study has a long runway. The second public meeting won’t be held until the spring of 2018 with the first improvements made in the fall. What about bike lanes? If you read the comments on any Louisville media posts online, you’ve learned by now that “bike lanes” is Louisville’s equivalent to “snowflakes.” Any social media post on transit inevitably is trolled by conservatives who think liberals, specifically the mayor, have ruined the city by spending money on and installing bike lanes in the city. Trolls, rest easy for now. Coan said that he doubts that one of the solutions will be an addition of bike lanes to Bardstown Road. What’s not really being floated? Enforcement of laws that are already on the books, such as towing illegally-parked vehicles and ticketing unsafe driving. Coan said he doesn’t like the “stick” approach to solving this problem. Coan launched an education campaign earlier this year targeting rush hour scofflaws who ignore the no parking signs. It was complete with a clever “Big Lebowski”-themed poster and door-to-door campaigning with business owners on Baxter and Bardstown. That campaign has wrapped up and details will be released soon, Coen said. Still, he and many of the people who attended the public meeting agree that there’s a significant lack of understanding of vehicular, bike and pedestrian laws. Kentucky’s drivers manual, for example, has zero mentions of zebra crossings — those striped crosswalks where cars are legally bound to yield to a pedestrian. And when was the last time you saw a bicyclist signal a turn for 50 feet before making the turn? Them’s the laws, folks. And Traffic Code 72.035.N Limitations Of Stopping And Parking states that cars are not allowed to be parked “on each corner and all eight sides of an intersection, within 30 feet from the beginning and/or ending of any intersection, flashing beacon, stop sign, or traffic control signal located at the side of a roadway.” Thirty feet? Is that really a thing? I was so surprised I called Coan to double check, and we read through the code together. He too seemed surprised and agreed that it’s not something that’s enforced. He said if he had his way every intersection would be marked to show the no-parking zones. Maybe we all need to go back to drivers’ ed. In the meantime, expect Qk4 to be collecting data with cameras and start counting pedestrians at crosswalks to get a better sense of the pain points of Bardstown Road. You read more about the study and see the results of an online survey circulated earlier by searching for Bardstown Road on the city’s website: louisvilleky.gov. • The post Can Bardstown Road be fixed? appeared first on LEO Weekly.

    LEO Weekly / 3 d. 8 h. 32 min. ago more
  • Thorns & Roses: The Worst, Best & Most AbsurdThorns & Roses: The Worst, Best & Most Absurd

    We agree?  |  Absurd It pains us to say, but we agree with U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell and senatorial candidate Roy Moore, who each say the other should step down. Conflict and contradiction  |  Thorn Metro Council President David Yates led the botching of the Councilman Dan Johnson debacle. Meanwhile, Yates, a lawyer, is suing the city (the city he represents as a councilman) on behalf of former police Explorer Scouts who allege sexual abuse. As local activist Jaison Ashley Gardner wrote: “Do you expect us to ignore the contradiction and irony of your own lawsuit against the city for young people who were victimized, while you fail to pursue justice with that same fervor for your colleague who was also victimized?” Don’t tread on rand…  |  Absurd Everyone remembers Aqua Buddha… And those dangerously wacky, Libertarian-posing-as-Republican views from Kentucky’s junior senator Rand Paul. In his personal life, he also has made enemies, like the neighbor who is accused of tackling him, breaking six ribs. Gotham weeps  |  Rose We will miss Democratic state Rep. Jim Wayne, who says he is not seeking reelection, ending nearly three decades of fighting for The Highlands and South Louisville. He is a strong, progressive voice against an increasingly right-wing, petulant chorus in the House. Calling a Fowler  |  Thorn One big take away from ace environmental reporter James Bruggers’ piece on the Metro Council’s failure to pass a tree ordinance a year after it was introduced is… the ordinance has been stalled all year in the public works committee, led by Councilwoman Cindy Fowler. And Fowler wouldn’t comment for the Courier Journal story. Cindy, don’t we have a right to know what is holding up the ordinance?​ The right-wing ingredients  |  Thorn Papa John Schnatter and the Charles Koch Foundation are giving UK $12 million for the John H. Schnatter Institute for the Study of Free Enterprise and naming rights for an atrium. UofL got money for a similar purpose earlier. Free enterprise? Like blaming poor sales of his shitty pizza on people who support footballers who kneel for justice. Vote with your $$$! The post Thorns & Roses: The Worst, Best & Most Absurd appeared first on LEO Weekly.

    LEO Weekly / 3 d. 8 h. 33 min. ago more
  • ‘My life is power chords’: Rej Forester of GRLwood‘My life is power chords’: Rej Forester of GRLwood

    Self-identifying as a “gay-ass duo,” GRLwood, a guitar-and-drums garage-rock band, is as unflinching as you’d imagine. At a recent show in Cincinnati, the pair were confronted with a battery of ugliness, starting with a male crowd member repeatedly trying to grope a female attendee, and ending with an angry neo Nazi shouting bigoted epithets. GRLwood is fronted by Rej Forester, who took matters into her own hands when she realized that the woman in the crowd continued to receive the unwanted attention. Forester invited the crowd to stand behind her if they felt uncomfortable, looking for a way to give everyone in attendance the opportunity for a good time. “If you ever come to see GRLwood play, and they make you feel uncomfortable, I will deal with it,” said Forester, who started GRLwood as a solo project, before the band recently became a two-piece, releasing an EP, 2 Fags Demo, together. “That shit is unacceptable. I remember the guy when it was happening: The guy kept saying, ‘I haven’t done anything wrong.’ For real, this dude has probably done shit like this his entire life. He probably really genuinely thought he did nothing wrong. Maybe 10 years ago, that kind of thing would happen, but you would just write it off.” It only escalated from there, with that man leaving and a self-identified neo Nazi showing up and making homophobic comments thereafter, when the band was loading up their equipment. It went as well as you can imagine, with a flicked cigarette inciting the neo Nazi to throw punches, landing one on a bartender, before being removed. For Forester, it’s part and parcel with the new sociopolitical climate. While Forester is prepared to stand up for the people around her, she isn’t inherently violent, looking at music as a positive, community-building experience that she can help share in. But she doesn’t shy away from the language of struggle either. “There was a girl saying, ‘This is so terrible. This is what he wanted,’” Forester said. “And what’s wrong with him giving him what he wants? I get the whole pacifist, peaceful ideology. There’s a big difference between ideology and reality. People like that, I don’t want to say that not all violence is bad, but it is a way of communicating.” On the Road Picking up her first guitar at the age of 10, Forester has used music as a vehicle to explore the world around her. She spent time on the road as a hitchhiker and busking, landing in Guatemala for a brief time. It was there that Forester met Iza Noren, a Swedish immigrant who initially lived next door, before the two became partners. They spent time together traveling, forming the folk band Ink Elk along the way. “I pretty much lived as a homeless hobo on the street in 22 different countries, just hitchhiking, living out of a tent,” Forester said about busking around the globe from 2011 to 2015. “Had my dog. Had my guitar. It really carved the person I am. How can I separate from me right now? There is not too much left over from before that.” After moving back to Louisville, her hometown, and eventually separating from Noren, Forester explored parts of her musical interests that were previously untapped. “I came back to Louisville in 2015,” Forester said. “We split up in October 2016. It was probably January 2017, that following winter, where I was able to explore musical parts of myself that I had been holding myself back from developing. In screaming, or high-pitched operatic. My partner was quiet, and she saw that as me standing over her, and guitar as well. When she left, I just exploded. It was folky, kinda pretty, Tom Waits-ish material. I finally started getting comfortable writing music that she wasn’t into. I wrote a lot of things in power chords. My life is power chords.” Homefront At first, Forester was content playing solo, with just a guitar and a suitcase drum, a one-person band full of bristling punk fury. After furtive practices with Twenty First Century Fox drummer Greg Ward, Forester met Karen Ledford, who took over as drummer. “I was playing something a little heavier than the traditional folk pop, and I was feeling a little empty,” she said. “I played and she was like, ‘you’re awesome.’ I was walking around with her, and she was like, ‘by the way, I play drums.’ And I was like, ‘what? It’s on!’ Let’s go rehearse somewhere. Sometimes people just don’t vibe together. But we jammed together and we went really well together.” “It was really great,” Forester added. “I was extremely excited. Dude, I feel like I manifested her. No knock on Greg, but I really wanted to play with another femme musician. I was afraid at first, but when I told him about Karen, he was like, ‘I’m really happy for you.’” The pair recorded and released the 2 Fags Demo — angry and punk-inflected rock with a mighty pop hook. “I love Karen a lot, since she’s the integration of a friend and musician, and a total light in my life,” Forester said. “I love that she has dedicated so much time to GRLwood. I’m not super open and trusting. I wasn’t expecting anything. I was open to it, but we’ll see. This is real and really exciting.” • 2 FAGS DEMO by GRLwood The post ‘My life is power chords’: Rej Forester of GRLwood appeared first on LEO Weekly.

    LEO Weekly / 3 d. 8 h. 36 min. ago more
  • The Black Heart Procession revisits their first albumThe Black Heart Procession revisits their first album

    For more than two decades, The Black Heart Procession has leaned into a tender, yet angst-ridden darkness, and now, they’re reaching back to the beginning, touring in celebration of their first album, 1. “Somehow the album has stood the test of time,” Pall Jenkins, who founded the band with Tobias Nathaniel in 1997, said. “Usually, I’m weird about playing some older songs like that. It’s kind of where we found what The Black Heart Procession was. It’s always held a certain kind of fondness for when we invented the band.” Nathaniel and Jenkins, both members of the ‘90s San Diego indie rock back Three Mile Pilot, bonded during their formative years back then, eventually pursuing the first Black Heart Procession album as an opportunity to explore new sonic boundaries, devoid of expectation. “We were living together,” Jenkins said. “We were both freshly out of a relationship. We were drinking whiskey and playing music together and started building these songs together.” So, they assembled a band, with a process that remains modular to this day, finding a who’s who of available talent that can help realize their music. The result, 1, was something much more sparse and bleak than the duo’s previous band, diving down the rabbit hole of experimental, brooding indie. Several albums and almost 20 years later, it’s still working for them. “We make underground music,” Jenkins said. “Underground sounds like you’re dead. We are totally fine with that. We’ve been doing that a long time. I would love to make a lot of money off of music,” he says adding the caveat that, “I can’t play music that I don’t like much.” The Black Heart Procession will perform 1 in its entirety, plus more songs from their other albums, at Headliners Music Hall on Monday, Nov. 20. $15. The post The Black Heart Procession revisits their first album appeared first on LEO Weekly.

    LEO Weekly / 3 d. 8 h. 42 min. ago more
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