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    Google News / 19.11.2017 09:45
  • Vincent loves computer science and pizzaVincent loves computer science and pizza

    RICHMOND, Va. — Vincent is a young teenaged male full of energy, intelligence, and curiosity. He loves creating worlds in Minecraft, playing video games, and learning new things. Vincent also has a passion for Legos and other tools, which allow him to exercise his powerful imagination. He has tremendous academic potential, earning all As in seventh grade and easily passing his standardized tests! Vincent’s favorite subjects in school are math, science, and history. Though English is not his favorite subject, he often reads for pleasure. He has expressed interest in studying computer science. His favorite meal is pizza. His favorite snack is a bowl of grapes. Vincent has enjoyed participating in many and varied activities, ranging from martial arts and basketball to robotics camps and Boy Scouts. Vincent’s ideal forever family will help him make and keep friends and provide unwavering support as he heals from many past disappointments. Vincent will benefit from a structured, nurturing family setting with dedicated and patient caregivers. In Virginia, we have hundreds of children who are ready for foster to adoption. In other words, these children are ready to find their permanent and loving forever families. As Connecting Hearts –A Deborah J Johnston Charity, celebrates National Adoption Month, our “30 Kids in 30 Days” initiative is to bring awareness to 30 kids or sibling who are available for forever homes, but also to shed light on the other almost 700 children who may not be seen. Our kids are all ages and races, they were put in foster care due to no fault of their own. To learn more and becoming a foster to adoption parent(s) click here.

    WTVR / 45 min. ago more
  • The policy that the US porn industry has and Facebook needsThe policy that the US porn industry has and Facebook needs

    “Revenge porn” is sexual abuse in a new digital form. A recent study shows that 10% of women under 30 years old in the United States have been victimized by the misuse of their intimate images. Facebook is one of many platforms that host this kind of abuse despite its efforts to tinker with the ways users can report unauthorized content. This spring, Facebook rolled out a feature allowing users to request that Facebook take down any unauthorized intimate images that are being shared on the platform. And last week, Facebook announced a pilot program for users in Australia to upload nude images of themselves they suspected were being shared without their permission. Facebook would then generate a digital fingerprint of each image so that it couldn’t be shared on the platform. A better solution would be to give users the power to prevent any images that depict them from ever being posted on the platform. In the press release about the Australian program, Facebook explains: “We don’t want Facebook to be a place where people fear their intimate images will be shared without their consent.” The company said the program would involve “specially trained” employees who would review the photos to ensure that claims were legitimate. Understandably, some people were skeptical about Facebook’s ability to adequately protect the privacy of these photos. One headline, for example, called it “Facebook’s latest ‘horrible idea'” another joked, “Send n00dz” and Stephen Colbert ridiculed the idea as “fighting fire with fire.” Although some people might find a bit of relief from this program — and I applaud it for that — there are many others who could be traumatized by having to send their photos to Facebook employees, even if they are “specially trained.” Training doesn’t always equate to professionalism, as we saw with reports of TSA agents “laughing” at passengers’ body scans. Further, many victims don’t know that their images are being shared until after it happens — if they ever find out. Some victims are depicted in images they didn’t even know were being produced — abusers get images from hidden cameras, hacked webcams, and stolen passwords. Surprisingly, performers in the legal US pornography industry have more control over their nude images than Facebook users. Facebook’s general policy is to post photos first and then deal with illegal content or requests for the image to be taken down later. In contrast, porn performers need to provide written consent—by signing a “model release”—before their images are ever published and distributed. Internet companies like Facebook are not considered publishers, so they are usually not legally liable for violations of individuals’ privacy, personality, or publicity rights—the “sponsored stories” class action lawsuit against Facebook was a notable exception. Online privacy doesn’t have to be such a free-for-all. Imagine this: I could get a request for permission every time you try to post a photo of me—you’d have to tag everyone in your photo and facial recognition could help too. Right now, I can get a notification if you tag me, but the photos have already been posted. Maybe you could post a photo with my face blurred out until you have my permission to show the full image. Maybe a setting could let me always (or never) trust you to post photos of me without asking each time. Unfortunately, it’s unlikely that Facebook will do this because more photos generate more user engagement and thus more profit. Even if some of those “engagements” are sexual violations, they still generate revenue. Preventing misuses of a permission-based system would be costly. They’d need to invest in a creative combination of human and machine decision-makers to reject fraudulent tags on photos and to protect newsworthy images. The “free speech” argument against this system is a red herring. Facebook is a private company that can, should, and does, restrict the speech that circulates on its platform. There is some speech they are compelled to restrict because of local laws, and Facebook also has its own “community standards” for restricting users’ speech on the platform. And why should social media always allow your free speech rights to trump my privacy rights? Inevitably, getting permission to post everyone’s photos would slow things down and probably result in fewer personal images shared on the platform. People might have to wait minutes, hours or longer for their complete un-blurred group photo to post publicly. It’s worth it because it could prevent people from being victimized by nonconsensual intimate image distribution, and it’s worth it for Facebook if they want to earn back users’ trust and genuinely help protect their autonomy and safety on the platform. Requiring consent for posting photos of other people might have prevented incidents like “Marines United.” In this case, US Marines engaged in nonconsensual sharing of thousands of nude images of their female coworkers and other women in a secret Facebook group. With a permission-based system, Facebook’s facial recognition probably could have identified at least some of the people depicted and alerted them, preventing their photos from ever being shared and probably exposing the group much sooner. Social media allows people to commit sexual abuse with a click of a button. So, rather than reacting after the damage is done, Facebook should invest in more preventative measures by letting users decide if images that depict them should ever be posted in the first place.

    WTVR / 1 h. 30 min. ago more
  • Mom who survived hit-and-run completes first race since recoveryMom who survived hit-and-run completes first race since recovery

    ROCKVILLE, Va. --The Hanover runner critically injured by a hit-and-run driver in June of 2016 competed her first 5K race Saturday since the accident. Dr. Denise Gorondy took part in the Lloyd Family Farms Fall 5K Run in Rockville. The mother of two and local veterinarian was left for dead the morning of June 5, 2016 after heading out for her morning run. A cyclist found Gorondy lying on the side of Dunns Chapel Road a little before 7:15 a.m. She was taken to VCU Medical Center with serious injuries. She spent 40 days in the hospital for a traumatic brain injury and fractures throughout her body. “I had a broken neck, broken back, broken ribs, lacerated spleen, hematoma on my liver, severe brachial plexus injury to my right arm and open fractures in my right leg,” Gorondy previously told reporter Laura French. Gorondy crossed the finish with her husband by her side and her family cheering. “It was amazing to have so many friends and family come out to support me,” Gorondy said. “It was a beautiful day for a running and we all just had a great time.” The race benefited Gorondy's recovery fund. Click here for more information or if you would like to make a donation.

    WTVR / 1 h. 35 min. ago more
  • Spiders win Capital Cup; VSU’s season ends in 1st round of playoffsSpiders win Capital Cup; VSU’s season ends in 1st round of playoffs

    A look back at Saturday's slate of College Football games around the state, Virginia Tech beat Pittsburgh 20-14 on Senior Day at Lane Stadium.  Senior Cam Phillips had eight catches for 117 yards and a touchdown in the win. UVA fell at Miami 44-28.  Cavaliers quarterback Kurt Benkert threw for 384 yards and four touchdowns but also threw a pick six as the Cavs blew two 14 point leads in the game. The Richmond Spiders reclaimed the Capital Cup after they beat William & Mary 27-20.  Spiders quarterback Kyle Lauletta scored two touchdowns in his final regular season game as Richmond's quarterback.  Former Henrico standout Xavier Goodall rushed for a career high 180 yards and two touchdowns in the win. JMU won the outright CAA regular season title for the second year in a row after they beat Elon 31-3.  Dukes quarterback Bryan Schor scored three touchdowns in JMU's 23rd straight win. Virginia State's run in the NCAA Division II playoffs ended in the first round as they fell to West Georgia 34-9.  Trojans running back Trent Cannon was held to a season low 65 yards rushing as VSU ended their year at 10-1.

    WTVR / 1 h. 49 min. ago more
  • Bridging RVA group gives beds to 150 kidsBridging RVA group gives beds to 150 kids

    RICHMOND, Va. -- Dozens of Richmond children will be sleeping more soundly thanks to a non-profit organization whose mission is to provide a better sleeping environment for kids. Volunteers turned out for Bridging RVA's annual 150 Beds for 150 Kids event to help load mattresses and pillows into trucks and deliver them to children in need. Cheryl Flynn, a three-time volunteer, said the event is a reminder not to take basic things for granted. "We don’t always think about how other people live and things they don’t have and how fortunate we are to have stuff,” Flynn said. “So the kids you just bring such joy into family and the faces of the children.” Some toys were also donated along with the 150 new beds. Officials said the donated supplies totaled nearly $2500.

    WTVR / 1 h. 54 min. ago more
  • ‘Regardless of how strong you are, it breaks a part of your spirit’‘Regardless of how strong you are, it breaks a part of your spirit’

    RICHMOND, Va. -- Jeffrey Gunn remembers why he was sent to jail when he was in his twenties. "I began hanging out with a bad group," he said. "Somebody was like, 'Jeff, you need to keep a firearm with you.' So, I made a purchase on the street illegally, and that was how I went." Jeffrey Gunn Richmond Police caught Gunn with an illegal firearm during a roadblock at the height of Project Exile. It was the program in the 1990s where judges gave gun offenders mandatory prison sentences. Gunn spent 13 months in a jail cell away from his friends and family. "One thing that I've learned of incarceration is regardless of how strong you are, it breaks a part of your spirit," Gunn admitted. "It's easy to go back." University of Michigan study A University of Michigan study showed that receiving prison time in the first place, as opposed to a probation sentence, increases your chances of returning to jail. It's called the revolving door. Nationwide, about 30 percent of all prison re-admissions were for technical violations of parole, like committing another crime, missing court or an appointment with your probation officer. Organizations like OAR of Richmond (Opportunity Alliance Reentry) help offenders keep out from behind bars a second time. Since 1971, employees don't refer to their 4,000 clients as ex-offenders or felons, but instead as returning citizens. Dawn Jones The receptionist, Dawn Jones, help clients gets an ID, find a job and transportation. "This is people’s lifelines when nobody has someone who cares," Jones said. Jones knows the hardships of leaving prison first hand, since she is a returning citizen. "When I got locked up I lost everything," she remembered. "My family, friends, everything. I was disconnected to the world." Jones admitted she's seen her clients return to prison. "It’s a struggle financially to be able to keep up with all of the court fines and fees, they’re astronomical," Jones said. OAR However, Virginians have better odds starting over in the Commonwealth than any other state in the nation. Governor Terry McAuliffe announced November 3 that Virginia's re-incarceration rate was the lowest for the second year in a row. Virginia’s re-incarceration rate is the lowest in the country among states for which data was available, at 22.4 percent. The Department of Corrections counted programs like OAR for helping keep people out of prison. Gunn is now a dishwasher at a Carytown restaurant, rents his own apartment and regularly sees his family. He thanked OAR for helping him get his life back. "It’s so easy to get caught up with a group of people that don’t care about you," he said. "I didn’t go back because one experience was enough for me." Click here to learn more about the OAR of Richmond program.

    WTVR / 2 h. 39 min. ago more
  • Police: Couple shot in church were discussing gun safetyPolice: Couple shot in church were discussing gun safety

    Watch Video A call to police about “shots fired” at a church in eastern Tennessee turned out to be an accidental shooting during a discussion on using weapons to protect the congregation, police say. Tellico Plains Police Chief Russ Parks told CNN affiliate WVLT that the initial call on Thursday reported two people shot outside the First United Methodist Church and that an “active shooter situation” was underway. Nearby schools were placed on lockdown according to the police Facebook page. When police arrived, they found two people with minor gunshot wounds inside a fellowship hall at the church. Chief Parks said Wayne Reid, 81, was showing his unloaded handgun to other members of the church during a luncheon where the conversation turned to “bringing guns to church and protecting themselves.” Reid apparently reloaded the gun and put it in a holster, then was asked again to show the weapon. When he pulled it out the gun went off in his lap, according to police. Reid and his wife Kathy were injured in the incident. The family told WVLT that “the bullet only grazed (Kathy’s) stomach,” and that she suffered a broken arm. Wayne Reid was injured in the hand. Police ruled the shooting accidental. It comes less than two weeks after a gunman killed 25 people and an unborn child at the First Baptist Church of Sutherland Springs, Texas.

    WTVR / 3 h. 23 min. ago more
  • VA-Rep's 'Mary Poppins: The Broadway Musical' is fantastic fun - Richmond.comVA-Rep's 'Mary Poppins: The Broadway Musical' is fantastic fun - Richmond.com

    Richmond.comVA-Rep's 'Mary Poppins: The Broadway Musical' is fantastic funRichmond.comThe Va-Rep production of Disney and Cameron Mackintosh's “Mary Poppins: The Broadway Musical” is the most fun I've had in a theater in a long time. I see a lot of theater, and this is no exaggeration. “Mary Poppins” encourages you to be a kid, to sing ...

    Google News / 4 h. ago more
  • Restaurant owner: GRTC Pulse project partly to blame for closureRestaurant owner: GRTC Pulse project partly to blame for closure

    RICHMOND, Va. -- The Pig and Pearl restaurant located in the Fan District is closing its doors on November 30. The owners are partly blaming the large West Broad Street construction project underway right outside their door. "It’s definitely impacted the business and about 50 percent of the gross revenue we lost since we opened in 2014," Owner Mathew Appleget said. The GRTC Pulse (Bus Rapid Transit) project broke ground in August 2016. GRTC Pulse Project Construction crews narrowed the three lane road to two lanes at various spots on West Broad Street and moved traffic patterns over the 7.6 mile route stretching from Rockett’s Landing to Willow Lawn. A lane designated for parking outside of The Pig and Pearl at West Broad and North Allison Streets was restricted to driving only. "Folks weren’t coming in, and the folks that did drive in to come to the restaurant weren’t coming anymore because they wanted to avoid the traffic and avoid the project," Appleget explained. "We think it definitely contributed a significant percentage to the loss in gross revenue that we had." The Pig and Pearl A kitchen manager and employee at the Savory Grain next door also admitted that business has slowed since the project started. "Everybody in the restaurant talks about how business has gone down because the project is inconvenient for people," Quincy Smick said. "Now people have to park on the side streets." Customers and employees often park at the former Pleasants Hardware parking lot across the street, but fences now block a majority of the lot due to the potential construction of a new grocery store. Appleget said other business owners on West Broad Street were considering taking legal action over the project. Quincy Smick "There was some discussion we had heard of a potential class action lawsuit," he said. "We aren’t interested in participating in something like that, but yes we’ve heard it’s affecting other businesses." The original goal was for the project to be completed by 2017. GRTC won’t give a forecasted completion date at this time. Ten new 40-foot buses running on compressed natural gas will operate along the route when it is complete. They will have 38 seats as well as rooms for 15 standees. Bike capacity in the front will be slightly increased to hold three. Lane Construction won the bid for the project. The federal government is contributing close to $25 million, the city will cover $7.6 million, state funding equals $32 million and Henrico County will contribute $400,000. A GRTC spokesperson sent this statement: During construction, the public will continue to have access to businesses, organizations and services located along the Project route. A construction hotline is active at 804-980-0084, providing updates on construction and expected impacts. For updates online, please visit the Pulse Construction Updates page at PulseRVA.com. As work progresses, frequent updates will be provided. Lane Construction will proactively minimize disruption to businesses and residents during construction. Any activity that would impact parking, loading zones, access, utilities and other business-related functions must receive approval from VDOT who will ensure that continuous access will be provided to all businesses at all times. All Project team members are committed to providing prompt information to ensure a smooth construction phase for businesses, residents and patrons of the region as part of the overall success of the Project. For the City of Richmond Pulse Business Support Initiative, please visit PulseRVA.com. As always, work is weather and progress-dependent. GRTC Pulse is a modern, high quality, high capacity rapid transit system that will serve a 7.6-mile route along Broad Street and Main Street, from Rocketts Landing in the City of Richmond to Willow Lawn in Henrico County. The Pulse will link the public to many exciting destinations, businesses, services and restaurants.

    WTVR / 4 h. 10 min. ago more
  • Restaurant owner: GRTC Pulse project partly to blame for closure - wtvr.comRestaurant owner: GRTC Pulse project partly to blame for closure - wtvr.com

    wtvr.comRestaurant owner: GRTC Pulse project partly to blame for closurewtvr.comRICHMOND, Va. -- The Pig and Pearl restaurant located in the Fan District is closing its doors on November 30. The owners are partly blaming the large West Broad Street construction project underway right outside their door. "It's definitely impacted ...

    Google News / 4 h. 11 min. ago more
  • Crime Insider: Mother, son killed in shooting; man arrested after I-64 chase - wtvr.comCrime Insider: Mother, son killed in shooting; man arrested after I-64 chase - wtvr.com

    wtvr.comCrime Insider: Mother, son killed in shooting; man arrested after I-64 chasewtvr.comVirginia State Police arrested a 33-year-old Derrell Williams of Richmond during a traffic stop on I-64 Eastbound in New Kent County. Troopers said Williams was driving erratically and swerving across the center line in the highway at 1:22 a.m. when ...Second person dies in Henrico shooting; one victim identifiedWWBT NBC12 NewsSaturday morning death investigation is third this week in eastern HenricoRichmond.comall 5 news articles »

    Google News / 5 h. 15 min. ago more
  • Crime Insider: Mother, son killed in shooting; man arrested after I-64 chaseCrime Insider: Mother, son killed in shooting; man arrested after I-64 chase

    HENRICO COUNTY, Va. -- A suspect was arrested after a police pursuit on I-64 after a woman and her son were shot during a domestic dispute in an eastern Henrico County neighborhood early Saturday morning, according to Crime Insider sources. When officers responded to a 911 call in the 4200 block of Fayette Circle just after 12:50 a.m., Henrico police found two people "suffering from obvious signs of trauma." Officials said 32-year-old Renita Shantel Williams was pronounced dead at the scene. The other person, a juvenile, was transported to a area hospital where he later died of his injuries. The Office of the Chief Medical Examiner will determine the specific cause of their deaths, according to police. Derrell Williams Crime Insider: Mother killed, son wounded  Crime Insider sources said the deadly shooting stemmed from a domestic situation. Those sources said that Renita Shantel Williams was fatally shot and that her son, a Varina High School student, was wounded while protecting his mother. Sources said the suspect in the double shooting is Derrell Williams. Virginia State Police arrested a 33-year-old Derrell Williams of Richmond during a traffic stop on I-64 Eastbound in New Kent County. Troopers said Williams was driving erratically and swerving across the center line in the highway at 1:22 a.m. when officials said he attempted to elude police, he lost control, spun out on the highway and ran away on foot. The troopers later caught him and found cocaine and a handgun inside of Williams' vehicle. Williams faces a list of charges including, felony eluding, driving with a suspended and revoked license, drug possession and gun charges, but he had not yet been charged in connection with the double shooting. Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Neighbor: 'I'm like shocked' Neighbors were stunned when officers converged on the street following a 911 call for a double shooting. "I'm like shocked,” said one man who owns a home in the neighborhood. "Of course, you really want to know where it's located.” "When you find it so close to the neighborhood that you grew up in and then say, 'Well, I saw this coming,'” the man said. "It was so many different people in and out of the house. It was hard to get to know one or two people." He said he can't stop thinking about the victims' family. "My prayers are with them,” the neighbor said. "Somebody's got to standup. Somebody's got to come out here and say, 'No, enough is enough." "While detectives continue to investigate the circumstances surrounding this incident, Henrico Police are not seeking the public’s assistance in locating a suspect," officials said. Police are asking anyone with information to contact the Metro Richmond Crime Stoppers at 804-780-1000. This is a developing story, so anyone with more information can submit a news tip here. Stay with WTVR.com and watch CBS 6 News at 11 p.m. for updates.

    WTVR / 5 h. 24 min. ago more
  • Trump puts decision on hold on importing heads of hunted African elephantsTrump puts decision on hold on importing heads of hunted African elephants

    Watch Video President Donald Trump said Friday that he has decided to put a decision about big-game trophies on hold. “Put big game trophy decision on hold until such time as I review all conservation facts,” Trump said on Twitter. “Under study for years. Will update soon with Secretary Zinke. Thank you!” Trump was referencing his administration’s decision to remove restrictions on importing African elephant trophies from Zimbabwe and Zambia. His tweet came on the same day that a notice allowing elephant trophies from Zimbabwe appeared in the Federal Register. The decision meant Americans would be able to hunt the endangered big game and now bring trophies home. Big game hunting is an activity that garnered worldwide attention in 2015 when a Minnesota dentist took Cecil, perhaps the world’s most famous lion, near a wildlife park in Zimbabwe. A US Fish and Wildlife Service spokesman said the move would allow the two African countries to include US sport hunting as part of their management plans for the elephants and allow them to put “much-needed revenue back into conservation.” Critics, however, note the restrictions were created by the Obama administration in 2014 because the African elephant population had dropped. The animals are listed in the Endangered Species Act, which requires the US government to protect endangered species in other countries. “We can’t control what happens in foreign countries, but what we can control is a restriction on imports on parts of the animals,” Wayne Pacelle, president and CEO of the Humane Society of the United States, said earlier this week. On Friday, Pacelle said, “Grateful to President Trump for reassessing elephant and lion trophy hunting imports. This is the kind of trade we don’t need.” Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke issued a statement Friday night about putting the decision on hold: “President Trump and I have talked and both believe that conservation and healthy herds are critical. As a result, in a manner compliant with all applicable laws, rules, and regulations, the issuing of permits is being put on hold as the decision is being reviewed.” Trump’s sons Donald Jr. and Eric are themselves big game hunters. Photos posted in 2012 by the website Gothamist show Donald Jr. holding an elephant tail. The website says the photos were from a 2011 hunt in Zimbabwe.

    WTVR / 5 h. 30 min. ago more
  • Former President Barack Obama speaks at The Richmond Forum - wtvr.comFormer President Barack Obama speaks at The Richmond Forum - wtvr.com

    wtvr.comFormer President Barack Obama speaks at The Richmond Forumwtvr.comRICHMOND, Va. -- Former President Barack Obama spoke at The Richmond Forum when the series kicked off its 32nd season Saturday night. "President Obama is, by far, the speaker most requested by our subscribers for next season," Forum Executive ...and more »

    Google News / 6 h. 14 min. ago more
  • Former President Barack Obama speaks at The Richmond ForumFormer President Barack Obama speaks at The Richmond Forum

    RICHMOND, Va. -- Former President Barack Obama spoke at The Richmond Forum when the series kicked off its 32nd season Saturday night. "President Obama is, by far, the speaker most requested by our subscribers for next season," Forum Executive Director Bill Chapman said in a post in April on The Richmond Forum website. In addition to his remarks, Mr. Obama answered questions from the audience at the Altria Theater. Shela Dean attended the forum. "It was a breath of fresh air to once again hear intelligent, thoughtful and articulate ideas about both a national and a global society that works for all people," Dean wrote. "I have long believed that 'citizen' is a verb and I was reminded tonight how important it is to participate in our democracy if it is to survive the challenges it faces today." Former presidents George H.W. Bush, Bill Clinton, and George W. Bush, have all participated in The Richmond Forum, according to the organization's website. Other 2017-2018 Richmond Forum speakers include actress Glenn Close, entrepreneur Peter Diamandis, former U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Samantha Power, and MSNBC Morning Joe host Joe Scarborough. If you saw President Obama in Richmond, share your story by uploading photos to the WTVR CBS 6  Facebook page or email pics@wtvr.com from your phone. Anyone with more information can submit a news tip here.

    WTVR / 6 h. 15 min. ago more
  • VA becomes first to mandate computer science educationVA becomes first to mandate computer science education

    RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — Virginia has become the first state to adopt mandatory standards for computer-science education. The Richmond Times-Dispatch reports that the state Board of Education unanimously approved the new standards this week. Board member Anne Holton supported the standards but voiced concerns that the standards might be too ambitious, given that they must now be implemented across the board. While other states have advisory standards, Virginia is the first with mandatory standards. The board’s vote follows legislation passed in 2016 requiring that computer-science education be integrated into the state’s Standards of Learning. ___

    WFIR / 6 h. 50 min. ago more
  • Man arrested after taking photo in VT restroomMan arrested after taking photo in VT restroom

    BLACKSBURG, Va. (AP) — A 34-year-old man is facing multiple charges after police say he took photos of a college student in a restroom on the Virginia Tech campus. The Roanoke Times reports that Aldron Adams of Pulaski is facing a March 1 court appearance on charges including filming a non-consenting nude person, marijuana possession and fleeing from law enforcement. According to court records, a student using the restroom in Tech’s McComas Hall on Nov. 8 noticed a hand reaching under the stall with a phone in a “glittery pink case.” The court records state the student followed Adams out of the restroom and called police, who arrested Adams and found drugs on his person and in his car. The paper reports that Adams’ lawyer declined comment.

    WFIR / 7 h. 7 min. ago more
  • Cool and dry Thanksgiving for Richmond, but December is fair game for foul weather - Richmond.comCool and dry Thanksgiving for Richmond, but December is fair game for foul weather - Richmond.com

    Richmond.comCool and dry Thanksgiving for Richmond, but December is fair game for foul weatherRichmond.comThere hasn't been any measurable snow at Richmond International Airport during December since 2010, though 2013 brought a glaze of ice and a trace of flakes to the metro area. That easily makes this the longest stretch of snowstorm-free Decembers for ...and more »

    Google News / 11 h. 47 min. ago more
  • Miami comes back to beat VirginiaMiami comes back to beat Virginia

    UPDATE: Miami still undfeated winning 44-28 over Virginia Touchdown Hurricanes. Miami extends its lead to 44-28 with 1:16 remaining. #UVAvsMIA — Virginia Football (@UVa_Football) November 18, 2017 Touchdown Miami. QB scramble puts the Hurricanes up 37-28 4:03 remains. Miami misses the extra point. #UVAvsMIA — Virginia Football (@UVa_Football) November 18, 2017 Virginia calls timeout before a 3rd & 3 play with 6:55 remaining Miami leading 31-28 — Canes Football (@CanesFootball) November 18, 2017 That last reception by Zaccheaus gives him 76 for the season, which passes Taquan Mizzell (75) for No. 2 on UVA's single-season ledger. — Virginia Football (@UVa_Football) November 18, 2017 We have played three full quarters and Miami leads, 31-28. #UVAvsMIA pic.twitter.com/cLzBZ5XiPP — Virginia Football (@UVa_Football) November 18, 2017 Miami drive stalls and they boot a 44-yard field goal. Hurricanes lead for the first time, 31-28. #UVAvsMIA — Virginia Football (@UVa_Football) November 18, 2017 Pick-6 by Miami and we are tied, 28-28. #UVAvsMIA — Virginia Football (@UVa_Football) November 18, 2017 Miami bounces back. Goes 63 yards and scores a touchdown. UVA's lead is cut to seven points, 28-21. #UVAvsMIA — Virginia Football (@UVa_Football) November 18, 2017   UPDATE: Virginia 28 Miami 14 11:24 left in the 3rd quarter Daniel Hamm is the recipient of Benkert’s 4th TD pass! #UVAvsMIA pic.twitter.com/dCeKGA8Ntk — Virginia Football (@UVa_Football) November 18, 2017 Benkert finds HAMM!!! 26 yards on the touchdown. UVA leads, 28-14. #UVAvsMIA — Virginia Football (@UVa_Football) November 18, 2017 MIAMI, Fl. (WRIC) — University of Virginia is leading undefeated University of Miami at halftime 21-14. Tune into 8News now to watch the big game. We have reached the intermission here in Miami Gardens. UVA leads Miami, 21-14. #UVAvsMIA pic.twitter.com/wvrgAKkCe2 — Virginia Football (@UVa_Football) November 18, 2017

    WRIC / 11 h. 54 min. ago more
  • Man arrested after pursuit in New KentMan arrested after pursuit in New Kent

    NEW KENT, Va. (WRIC) — Virginia State police are pursuing charges of a Richmond man after a pursuit early Saturday. VSP saw a black Lincoln sedan driving erratically and swerving across the center line on I-64 EB in New Kent. A traffic stop was initiated and the car immediately accelerated up to 130 miles per hour to elude police. The Sedan turned of his headlights and approached another car, serving to miss an upcoming vehicle and then lost control. Once the car came to a stop police say 33 year-old Derrell Keith Williams of Richmond ran of foot leaving his car in drive, forcing it into an embankment. A short foot pursuit happened and Williams was taken into custody without incident. When Williams was placed under arrest, is is believed he had cocaine in his possession, a handgun was also recovered from the car. VSP are pursuing charges for Felony eluding, driving without headlights, driving with a suspended and revoked license, DUID, refusal of a blood tes, possession schedule II drug, possession with intent to distribute, felony possession of a firearm, possession of a firearm while in possession of a controlled substance, and Felon possession of ammunition. Click here to check on crime in your area. This is a developing story. Stay with 8News online and on air for the latest updates. Never miss another Facebook post from 8News Find 8News on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram; send your news tips toiReport8@wric.com.  

    WRIC / 12 h. 27 min. ago more
  • Virginia becomes first to mandate computer science education - Seattle TimesVirginia becomes first to mandate computer science education - Seattle Times

    Virginia becomes first to mandate computer science educationSeattle TimesRICHMOND, Va. (AP) — Virginia has become the first state to adopt mandatory standards for computer-science education. The Richmond Times-Dispatch reports (http://bit.ly/2zLOnqh ) that the state Board of Education unanimously approved the new ...and more »

    Google News / 13 h. 5 min. ago more
  • Police shoot suspect involved in Fairfax chase - WWBT NBC12 NewsPolice shoot suspect involved in Fairfax chase - WWBT NBC12 News

    Police shoot suspect involved in Fairfax chaseWWBT NBC12 NewsU.S. Park police officers shot a pursuit suspect in Fairfax on Friday, according to NBC affiliate WRC. MOREAdditional LinksPoll. Around 7:42 p.m., officers were pursuing a man wanted in connection with a crash on George Washington Parkway, which led to ...and more »

    Google News / 13 h. 35 min. ago
  • EX-Richmond School Board chairman to carry facilities referendum decIsion through HouseEX-Richmond School Board chairman to carry facilities referendum decIsion through House

    You have reached the limit of 5 free articles per 30 days. To continue, log in now or sign up for a digital Richmond Times-Dispatch subscription for only $8.99 per month.

    Richmond News / 14 h. 41 min. ago
  • Police ID woman killed in Henrico double shootingPolice ID woman killed in Henrico double shooting

    HENRICO COUNTY, Va. -- A suspect was arrested after a police pursuit on I-64 after a woman and her son were shot during a domestic dispute in an eastern Henrico County neighborhood early Saturday morning, according to Crime Insider sources. When officers responded to a 911 call in the 4200 block of Fayette Circle just after 12:50 a.m., Henrico police found two people "suffering from obvious signs of trauma." Officials said 32-year-old Renita Shantel Williams was pronounced dead at the scene. The other person, a juvenile, was transported to a area hospital where he later died of his injuries. The Office of the Chief Medical Examiner will determine the specific cause of their deaths, according to police. Derrell Williams Crime Insider: Mother killed, son wounded  Crime Insider sources said the deadly shooting stemmed from a domestic situation. Those sources said that Renita Shantel Williams was fatally shot and that her son, a Varina High School student, was wounded while protecting his mother. Sources said the suspect in the double shooting is Derrell Williams. Virginia State Police arrested a 33-year-old Derrell Williams of Richmond during a traffic stop on I-64 Eastbound in New Kent County. Troopers said Williams was driving erratically and swerving across the center line in the highway at 1:22 a.m. when officials said he attempted to elude police, he lost control, spun out on the highway and ran away on foot. The troopers later caught him and found cocaine and a handgun inside of Williams' vehicle. Williams faces a list of charges including, felony eluding, driving with a suspended and revoked license, drug possession and gun charges, but he had not yet been charged in connection with the double shooting. Neighbor: 'I'm like shocked' Neighbors were stunned when officers converged on the street following a 911 call for a double shooting. "I'm like shocked,” said one man who owns a home in the neighborhood. "Of course, you really want to know where it's located.” "When you find it so close to the neighborhood that you grew up in and then say, 'Well, I saw this coming,'” the man said. "It was so many different people in and out of the house. It was hard to get to know one or two people." He said he can't stop thinking about the victims' family. "My prayers are with them,” the neighbor said. "Somebody's got to standup. Somebody's got to come out here and say, 'No, enough is enough." "While detectives continue to investigate the circumstances surrounding this incident, Henrico Police are not seeking the public’s assistance in locating a suspect," officials said. Police are asking anyone with information to contact the Metro Richmond Crime Stoppers at 804-780-1000. This is a developing story, so anyone with more information can submit a news tip here. Stay with WTVR.com and watch CBS 6 News at 11 p.m. for updates.

    WTVR / 16 h. 35 min. ago more
  • New childhood mental health facility with $56 million in state funding prepares to open in Richmond this springNew childhood mental health facility with $56 million in state funding prepares to open in Richmond this spring

    Dr. Marsha D. Rappley, MD, Vice president, VCU Health Sciences and CEO, VCU Health System, speaks at the dedication ceremony of the new Virginia Treatment Center for Children in Richmond, VA Friday, Nov. 17, 2017.

    Richmond News / 19 h. 20 min. ago
  • Two people die in overnight double shooting in HenricoTwo people die in overnight double shooting in Henrico

    HENRICO COUNTY, Va. (WRIC) — Two people are dead after an overnight double shooting in Henrico. Henrico Police were called to the 4200 block of Fayette Circle around 1 a.m. Saturday. Officers pronounced one victim dead at the scene and transported the victim with life-threatening injuries to a local hospital where he later died. Police have identified 32-year-old Renita Shantel Williams as the first victim. The second victim has only been identified as a juvenile, but neighbors tell 8News it was a 14-year-old male. The 8News crew on the scene said they heard people screaming as police investigated the crime scene. Henrico Police say this investigation is ongoing, but they are not looking for the public’s assistance in identifying a suspect. Click here to check on crime in your area. This is a developing story. Stay with 8News online and on air for the latest updates. Never miss another Facebook post from 8News Find 8News on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram; send your news tips to iReport8@wric.com.

    WRIC / 21 h. 4 min. ago more
  • Statue of Edgar Allen Poe in Richmond is being movedStatue of Edgar Allen Poe in Richmond is being moved

    The statue is being relocated because of construction of the "Mantle", the Virginia Indian Tribute, and the planed Virginia Women's Monument, "Voices from the Garden." The Capitol Square Preservation Council supports the move because the new monuments are much larger than the Poe statue and change the context of that portion of Capitol Square.

    Richmond News / 23 h. 51 min. ago more
  • #8SportsBlitz Band of the Week for Playoffs Week 2: Thomas Jefferson#8SportsBlitz Band of the Week for Playoffs Week 2: Thomas Jefferson

    RICHMOND, Va. (WRIC) — Thomas Jefferson High School Marching Band

    WRIC / 1 d. 1 h. 11 min. ago
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  • #8SportsBlitz Playoffs Week 2: Roanoke Catholic repeats as state champs with 51-36 win over Fuqua#8SportsBlitz Playoffs Week 2: Roanoke Catholic repeats as state champs with 51-36 win over Fuqua

    RICHMOND, Va. (WRIC) — VISAA DIVISION III STATE CHAMPIONSHIP GAME #2 Fuqua School 36 #1 ROANOKE CATHOLIC 51 F

    WRIC / 1 d. 1 h. 14 min. ago
  • #8SportsBlitz Playoffs Week 2: Hermitage holds off Varina 21-7#8SportsBlitz Playoffs Week 2: Hermitage holds off Varina 21-7

    RICHMOND, Va. (WRIC) — CLASS 5, REGION B #5 Varina 7 #1 HERMITAGE 21 F

    WRIC / 1 d. 1 h. 16 min. ago
  • #8SportsBlitz Playoffs Week 2: Louisa storms back to beat Monacan 35-28#8SportsBlitz Playoffs Week 2: Louisa storms back to beat Monacan 35-28

    RICHMOND, Va. (WRIC) — CLASS 4, REGION B #3 LOUISA CO. 35 #2 Monacan 28 F

    WRIC / 1 d. 1 h. 19 min. ago
  • #8SportsBlitz Playoffs Week 2: Culpeper ends TJ’s dream season 14-7#8SportsBlitz Playoffs Week 2: Culpeper ends TJ’s dream season 14-7

    RICHMOND, Va. (WRIC) — CLASS 3, REGION B #5 CULPEPER 14 #1 Thomas Jefferson 7 F

    WRIC / 1 d. 1 h. 21 min. ago
  • #8SportsBlitz Playoffs Week 2: Essex runs over Northumberland 41-20#8SportsBlitz Playoffs Week 2: Essex runs over Northumberland 41-20

    RICHMOND, Va. (WRIC) — CLASS 1, REGION A #5 Northumberland 20 #1 ESSEX 41 F

    WRIC / 1 d. 1 h. 24 min. ago
  • #8SportsBlitz Playoffs Week 2: Highland Springs takes down rival Henrico 28-14#8SportsBlitz Playoffs Week 2: Highland Springs takes down rival Henrico 28-14

    RICHMOND, Va. (WRIC) — CLASS 5, REGION B #3 Henrico 14 #2 HIGHLAND SPRINGS 28 F

    WRIC / 1 d. 1 h. 27 min. ago
  • #8SportsBlitz Playoffs Week 2: Manchester dominates Dale in 2nd half to win 41-7#8SportsBlitz Playoffs Week 2: Manchester dominates Dale in 2nd half to win 41-7

    RICHMOND, Va. (WRIC) — CLASS 6, REGION B #3 Thomas Dale 7 #2 MANCHESTER 41 F

    WRIC / 1 d. 1 h. 27 min. ago
  • Hopewell teen shot during attempted drug-related robberyHopewell teen shot during attempted drug-related robbery

    HOPEWELL, Va. (WRIC) — A Hopewell teenager is in stable condition Friday night after he was shot in what police are describing as a drug-related robbery. Police said the teen was shot in his arms and torso shortly after 7 p.m. and was med-flighted to VCU Medical Center. His injuries are considered non-life threatening. Hopewell authorities said the investigation revealed that the victim was with two companions in the area of New York Avenue and Waverly Street when an offender attempted to rob them at gunpoint. During the robbery, the suspect shot the teen. The juvenile’s companions were not injured and are cooperating with detectives. If you have any information about the incident, police ask that you contact lead Detective Mark Poumbo at (804) 54102284. Anybody with information on this or any other crime may also contact the Hopewell/Prince George Crime Solvers hotline in Hopewell at 541-2202 or provide a tip via the new P3tips app. Never miss another Facebook post from 8News Find 8News on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram; send your news tips to iReport8@wric.com.

    WRIC / 1 d. 2 h. 37 min. ago more
  • Miss Universe 2017: Here are the favorites to win this yearMiss Universe 2017: Here are the favorites to win this year

    LAS VEGAS – A new Miss Universe will be crowned on November 26, as the annual international beauty pageant comes to The Axis theater at Planet Hollywood Las Vegas. And since Sin City is playing host, it’s only natural to break down the betting odds on who will be crowned Miss Universe 2017. At the top of the board is “Miss South Africa” Demi-Leigh Nel-Peters at +250, followed closely by “Miss Thailand” Maria Poonlertlarp at +300, according to sister site Covers.com. Miss South Africa won her title under controversy, after fellow contestants stated that she had a “special relationship” with two judges and received preferential treatment during the national competition. While she is the betting favorite, it’s always nice to have a bad guy to root against. Behind those frontrunners are Miss Philippines at +600, Miss Colombia at +800, and Miss Venezuela and Miss USA, both at +1,100 odds. Could the home-field advantage give current “Miss USA” Kára McCullough an edge? That last Miss USA to win Miss Universe was Olivia Culpo, who won the 2012 crown at The Axis in Las Vegas – the same venue for this year’s pageant. The United States does claim the most Miss Universe titles at eight, followed by Venezuela with five. Rounding out the notables are Miss France at +1,400, Miss Mexico, Miss Brazil, Australia, Indonesia and Miss India all at +1,600, Miss Jamaica at +2,000, and Miss Canada – Lauren Howe – at +2,200. Miss Puerto Rico, Danna Hernández, presents good value at +3,300 odds to win Miss Universe. Not only would a Puerto Rico win be a rare bright spot for the Hurricane-ravaged country, but Puerto Rico has a history of Miss Universe success, boasting five winners– the last coming in 2006. Looking for a live long shot? How about “Miss Iraq” Sarah Idan, who will be the first Miss Iraq to compete in the Miss Universe pageant since 1972. The musician from Bagdad, priced at +10,000, was actually the runner-up for her national crown. But when it was discovered that original winner was married and divorced, which is against the Miss Iraq pageant rules, she was stripped of her title and Idan was crowned the new Miss Iraq. Seems like beauty pageants are all a little crazy no matter the county. Editor’s note: This piece was originally published on Covers.com, a site also owned by Tribune. You can follow @Covers on Twitter.

    WTVR / 1 d. 2 h. 45 min. ago more
  • After series of crashes, Richmond plans to install new light at problem intersectionAfter series of crashes, Richmond plans to install new light at problem intersection

    Since it was reopened just last month, there have been several crashes at the intersection of Williamsburg Road and Main Street.

    Richmond News / 1 d. 4 h. 19 min. ago
  • Witness in disbelief after road rage incident at Chesapeake shopping centerWitness in disbelief after road rage incident at Chesapeake shopping center

    CHESAPEAKE, Va. (WAVY) — Outside The School Box, in the Greenbrier Market Center, Laura Ellis still can’t believe what she saw at the shopping center’s three-way stop. “I just thought, what is this world coming to?” she said. It was a scene of brutal violence, started by confusion at the intersection. “This car was coming (through the intersection) and he couldn’t go straight because a van had come too far into the road,” she explained. Thursday afternoon, Ellis didn’t see the disagreement, but she heard it. “It was screaming,” she remembered. “It was a lot of foul language going on and my first thought was road rage.” In the roadway, she saw two men wrestling on the ground. It was a middle-aged man and a young man out of their vehicles. It looked bad. It got worse. “I had no idea there was a knife in there,” she said. The younger man got up and ran to his car. He drove away. The older man stood there holding up his arm. “It was full of blood. I mean you could see part of his skin,” she said. “It was just hanging down.” Ellis and others called police immediately. “A witness actually caught the tag number, so that helps us out a lot,” said Ofc. Kelly Elliott with Chespeake Police. Minutes later, officers arrested 20-year-old Kyle Parker nearby. He is charged with malicious wounding. On Friday, Laura Ellis stood outside near the intersection replaying everything she saw. She expected tempers to get heated at the intersection, but she never expected this kind of violence at a stop sign. Never miss another Facebook post from 8News Find 8News on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram; send your news tips to iReport8@wric.com.

    WRIC / 1 d. 5 h. 55 min. ago more
  • Edgar Allan Poe monument to be relocated on Capitol SquareEdgar Allan Poe monument to be relocated on Capitol Square

    RICHMOND, Va. (WRIC) — If you’ve been by the Virginia State Capitol lately, you’ve likely noticed all the construction and demolition. Several projects are underway. Right now, the Capitol building is surrounded by metal. The bleachers and barricades are already in place for the Jan. 13 inauguration. Not far from there, the General Assembly building is still in the process of being demolished. Crews are working to get rid of it while preserving the historic facade. But the most recent change to come to the Square was announced Friday. The Edgar Allan Poe monument is being moved to the northwest corner of the Square, close to the General Assembly Building. Currently, it’s near the Bell Tower. The monument, dedicated to the writer and poet who grew up in Richmond, has been on display for nearly six decades. George Edward Barksdale, a retired physician who greatly admired Poe, approached Governor Thomas Stanley in 1956 with the idea of erecting a monument to Poe and offered to pay for the statue if the Commonwealth would fund a pedestal and installation. The General Assembly accepted the gift, and the Poe monument was unveiled on Oct. 7, 1959. The tribute to Poe will be relocated due to the construction of two new monuments. The first is Mantle, the Virginia Indian Tribute. That project should be complete by the end of December. The other project is the planned Virginia Women’s Monument, Voices from the Garden. Groundbreaking is expected in early December and the plaza should be finished by 2019.Justin Gunther, an architectural historian with the Capitol Square Preservation Council, said it didn’t make sense to keep Poe where he was. “We were concerned about Poe because the scale of these two new monuments is quite large in comparison to the smaller size of Poe,” said Gunther. Gunther said, in its new spot, Poe will stand out. The move will be completed by Fine Arts Specialists. The company specializes in art relocation and has worked on other projects on Capitol Square, including the mounting of the Thomas Jefferson statue inside the Virginia Capitol extension. Gunther said all of the monuments on Capitol Square — new or old — help expand the dialogue on important Virginians and their past. “We have this wonderful collection of outdoor sculpture here on the Square to appreciate and to learn about all of Virginia’s 400 years of exceptional history,” he said. The Poe monument will be moved Monday or Tuesday. Watch the video above to learn the romantic reason historians believe the Poe monument was placed in its current location. Never miss another Facebook post from 8News. Find 8News on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram; send your news tips to iReport8@wric.com.  

    WRIC / 1 d. 6 h. 28 min. ago more
  • Suspect flees empty-handed after attempted bank robbery in Church HillSuspect flees empty-handed after attempted bank robbery in Church Hill

    Detectives in Richmond are asking for the public's help identifying a suspect in an attempted bank robbery in Church Hill on Tuesday, November 14. The incident occurred shortly before 1:30 p.m. at the Suntrust Bank located at 2500 E. Broad Street. Police say the suspect approached the teller, said he needed to cash a check and then passed a note to the bank teller demanding money.

    Richmond News / 1 d. 9 h. 6 min. ago more
  • Rosen is now Salem District CTB memberRosen is now Salem District CTB member

    Court Rosen Former Roanoke City Council member Court Rosen has been appointed by Governor McAuliffe as the new Salem District representative on the Commonwealth Transportation Board. Rosen had been an at large CTB board member. William Fralin was not reappointed to the Salem CTB position. The board makes final determinations on which projects road/rail/airport projects will receive funding.  

    WFIR / 1 d. 9 h. 11 min. ago more
  • Amtrak holiday tix going fastAmtrak holiday tix going fast

    WFIR/Evan Jones Local train travelers from Roanoke need to act fast to buy tickets for the holidays. WFIR’s Bob Clark has more on this story 11-17 Amtrak Tickest Wrap #1-WEB

    WFIR / 1 d. 10 h. 32 min. ago
  • Kroger donates truck to Feeding AmericaKroger donates truck to Feeding America

    Feeding America-Southwest Virginia needed a new refrigerated truck – and Kroger wanted to roll out its new “Zero Hunger, Zero Waste” program. So this morning the supermarket chain donated a new truck worth $133,000 to the Salem-based food bank, where Pamela Irvine is the CEO. The new truck will be used to pick up unsold food from Kroger stores and other locations, for transport to the Feeding America-Southwest Virginia warehouse. 11-17 Kroger-Feeding America#1-WEB

    WFIR / 1 d. 10 h. 42 min. ago more
  • Reframing Native American FilmReframing Native American Film

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    Richmond Magazine / 1 d. 13 h. 41 min. ago
  • Grove Avenue Groper: Woman fondled walking her dogGrove Avenue Groper: Woman fondled walking her dog

    A woman walking her dog was groped Thursday evening in Richmond, according to an alert sent out by VCU Police. The reported sexual battery took place just off the VCU main campus along the 1400 block of Grove Avenue, near Harvie Street, at about 8:12 p.m. "A victim was walking their dog west bound in the 1400 block of Grove Avenue when a male that was approaching from the opposite direction groped her.

    Richmond News / 1 d. 14 h. 5 min. ago more
  • Pita Pit celebrates 2 years in downtown RoanokePita Pit celebrates 2 years in downtown Roanoke

    Photo: Facebook Event Page A restaurant chain in downtown Roanoke is celebrating its 2nd anniversary today with discounts all day long. WFIR’s Ian Price has more: 11-17 Pita Pit WEB-WRAP

    WFIR / 1 d. 14 h. 25 min. ago
  • May a Local Stout Bring Light to a Dark Winter NightMay a Local Stout Bring Light to a Dark Winter Night

    Perhaps no style hits as many notes and pleases as many palates as the inimitable, iconic and historic stout. Though quaffable year-round, breweries tend to tap their richest stouts this time of year. If you’re one who quickly proclaims, “I don’t like dark beers,” please hear me out. The dark color of a stout doesn’t mean that it’s stronger, more bitter or even higher in calories than a yellow beer. In fact, a 12-ounce serving of Guinness only sets you back 125 calories — 15 calories more than 12 ounces of Bud Light — and 4.2 percent alcohol content. A stout presents with a dark color only because the malted barley used to make it has been kilned, toasted or roasted longer than malts used to make a lighter beer. The chemistry of kilning, known as the Maillard effect, creates flavors like coffee, chocolate and toasted marshmallow, even if those ingredients aren’t added separately. And since stouts tend to celebrate the flavors of the malts, hops are not a prominent player. Nor can you judge a beer by its color. Though not typically quite as dark as a stout, other styles that pour dark, such as a Belgian dark strong ale or a black IPA, are distinguished by other potent flavor ingredients, such as yeast or hops. The usage of the word “stout” to describe a beer goes back to the 17th century, when it described a stout butt beer, like the once-popular term “phat,” but not really. The British style sprang from porters, which also have deep roots and questionable heritage. Since its shady birth, the style has parented —and grandparented — a multitude of offspring, most of which can be found around Richmond. An early offspring, an Irish dry stout — think the beer that Arthur Guinness introduced to Dublin in 1759 — uses roasted barley instead of malted barley. By skipping the malting process, breweries saved on taxes. Clearly, tax dodging is not confined to the modern world. The ploy resulted in a smooth, roasty, coffee-like taste and a lower alcohol content. Dry stouts play well with nitro pours, which mixes draft beer with nitrogen as well as carbon dioxide, for a dramatic presentation and fluffy mouthfeel. Around the same time, British foreign export stouts were more heavily hopped to take advantage of hops’ preservative value and thus were more bitter than an Irish dry stout. As an example, try Final Gravity Irish Goodbye — and don’t let the Irish moniker fool you. A milk stout has a sweet origin story as a drink for invalids and pregnant women. The non-fermentable lactose sugar leaves more sweetness in the final beer. Milk stouts make a tasty base for flavor additions such as chocolate and vanilla. More on that later. Early oatmeal stouts flaunted truth in advertising, adding oats merely to claim that the beer was healthy. Brewers later realized that oats can impart a soft, rich, creamy texture and a hint of nuttiness. Two to try in Richmond include Castleburg Oatmeal with hints of chocolate, coffee or fruits and Twisted Ales Déjà Voodoo that evokes sweet cherries, Madagascar vanilla beans and subtle chocolate notes. Imperial implies bigger and stronger, and imperial and Russian imperial stouts do pack a punch with a higher alcohol content. Its heritage springs from tales of strong English porters that became popular with Russian imperial court in the 1700s. Try Lickinghole Creek Craft Brewery Virginia Black Bear. This Russian imperial stout includes high-alpha American hops. There’s also Ardent Dark Rye, an American imperial stout with spicy notes from rye in the grain bill. The dark malts in stouts make friends with a diversity of partners, resulting in a multitude of offspring with added ingredients and/or aging in spirit barrels. As milk stouts make ideal partners for dessert-like ingredients, imperial stouts gravitate towards spirit barrels. Besides the ever-popular, trending Hardywood Gingerbread Stout and its variants, here are others to look for locally: Isley Choosy Mother Peanut Butter Porter: There’s too much overlap between stouts and porters not to include this local favorite, made with oats and PB2. 7 Hills Fantasme De Chocolat: Milk stout with cocoa powder and raw cocoa nibs. Poured on nitro for a fluffy mouthfeel. Kindred Spirit Belgian Stout: A specialty beer rather than an official style, the Belgian stout adds the fruity, spicy notes of Belgian yeast. Center of the Universe Brewing Co. Orange Is the New Stout: An imperial chocolate stout crafted with oranges and sea salt (releasing Dec. 2nd). Triple Crossing Long Bright Dark: Imperial Stout brewed with coffee and vanilla beans. Andalls at the Answer Brewpub: Stouts are regularly infused with a variety of creative complementary flavors, such as coconut, maple syrup, nuts and more. Väsen Walrus series: The base stout imparts flavors of rich milk chocolate, roasted malt and figs. Variants include the Crimson Walrus with red raspberries, the Sour Walrus with a touch of tart and the Wired Walrus with Blanchard coffee beans. Blue Mountain Dark Hollow: My all-time favorite barrel-aged imperial stout comes in a smaller 375-mililiter bottle, unlike most big beers, which typically come only in large-format bottles. Starr Hill Box of Chocolates: Starting with the Double Bass stout with cocoa additions, the series includes peppermint, chipotle and mocha.

    Style Weekly / 1 d. 16 h. 15 min. ago more
  • Man in the BreachMan in the Breach

    John Mercer Langston rose to political prominence during and after Reconstruction.

    Richmond Magazine / 1 d. 16 h. 32 min. ago
  • Virginia death row inmate gets hearing on witness statementsVirginia death row inmate gets hearing on witness statements

    RICHMOND, Va. (AP) – A federal appeals court has ordered a lower court to hold a hearing on a Virginia death row inmate’s claim that prosecutors failed to turn over evidence favorable to him. Anthony Juniper was sentenced to death for the 2004 murders of his former girlfriend, her two children and her brother in Norfolk. The 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on Thursday sent the case back to U.S. District Court, finding that a judge was wrong to dismiss Juniper’s claim without holding a hearing. Juniper’s lawyers allege that a witness gave an account to police that  contradicted the prosecution’s timeline of the killings and failed to identify Juniper from a photo array. A judge stayed Juniper’s execution in 2011 and allowed him to pursue appeals in federal court.

    WFIR / 1 d. 17 h. 53 min. ago more
  • Dead man found on Richmond driveway - wtvr.comDead man found on Richmond driveway - wtvr.com

    wtvr.comDead man found on Richmond drivewaywtvr.comRICHMOND, Va. -- A death investigation is underway after a man was found dead in a Richmond neighborhood. Police were called to the 2100 block of South Kinsley Avenue, off Broad Rock Boulevard, after the man's body was discovered on the driveway of ...Man found dead in driveway on Richmond's SouthsideWRICall 2 news articles »

    Google News / 1 d. 18 h. 26 min. ago more
  • Sweet Leanne's Mint Bailey's FudgeSweet Leanne's Mint Bailey's Fudge

    RICHMOND, Va.- Sweet Leanne Fletcher, baker extraordinaire, visits our kitchen to whip up a Mint Bailey's Fudge. This delicious and chocolatey dessert is simple to prepare and fun to embellish with your favorite candy treats.

    Richmond News / 1 d. 19 h. 16 min. ago
  • Richmond Food News: Week of Nov. 20-24Richmond Food News: Week of Nov. 20-24

    Turkey, drinks and wood-smoked wonderfulness are the culinary themes of the week. Vegan options complement the bounty of autumn and usher in the holiday season.

    Richmond Magazine / 1 d. 19 h. 55 min. ago
  • Kaine offers his take on tax reformKaine offers his take on tax reform

    The House voted to approve their tax reform bill yesterday; now the U.S. Senate is hashing out its version in Washington. Democratic Senator Tim Kaine has thoughts on that process. More from WFIR’s Gene Marrano: 11-17 Kaine-Tax Reform Wrap#1-WEB

    WFIR / 1 d. 20 h. 35 min. ago
  • AAA: Thanksgiving holiday travel will be busiest in ten yearsAAA: Thanksgiving holiday travel will be busiest in ten years

    Thanksgiving is still six days away, but for many people, the holiday travel season begins today. And AAA says if you are on the move in coming days, you can expect plenty of company. The agency expects the busiest highway travel in Virginia since 2007. WFIR’s Evan Jones has the story: 11-17 Holiday Travel Wrap1-WEB

    WFIR / 1 d. 20 h. 45 min. ago
  • Councilwoman proposes VDOT reimburse Broad Street businesses for lost revenueCouncilwoman proposes VDOT reimburse Broad Street businesses for lost revenue

    A city councilwoman in Richmond says that the construction delays on the GRTC "Pulse" project are causing Broad Street businesses to lose money. "Being here, near VCU is helpful, there's a lot of foot traffic, it's a cool destination location, I think," King said.

    Richmond News / 1 d. 23 h. 52 min. ago
  • House fire in Cave Spring area, no injuriesHouse fire in Cave Spring area, no injuries

    From News Release: Roanoke County Fire and Rescue responded at about 6:05 p.m., on Thursday, November 16, 2017 to the 3500 block of Forester Road in the Cave Spring area for the report of a structure fire. First arriving crews did find smoke showing from the front of the house. Crews from Cave Spring, Clearbrook, and Back Creek responded to the fire. There are no injuries. There are 5 adult occupants of the home and three of them were at home at the time of the fire. One cat was rescued from inside the house, a dog was also found safe. The fire was mostly confined to the kitchen, however there is smoke damage throughout the home. The fire marshal’s office is on scene to investigate a cause. The Red Cross is assisting the family.

    WFIR / 2 d. 0 h. 9 min. ago more
  • Richmond Police Officer critically injured on vacationRichmond Police Officer critically injured on vacation

    Veteran Richmond Police Officer Adam Sheer was critically injured November 3 while on vacation in southern Thailand with other police officers, according to a GoFundMe page set-up by relatives. "He was involved in a serious accident on a motor bike," his uncle David Sheer said.

    Richmond News / 2 d. 4 h. 32 min. ago
  • A Different Russian Doping Scandal Hits Richmond, Va. - New York TimesA Different Russian Doping Scandal Hits Richmond, Va. - New York Times

    New York TimesA Different Russian Doping Scandal Hits Richmond, Va.New York TimesThe winners of two small-time road races in Richmond, Va., over the weekend have been disqualified — not for any known wrongdoing of their own, but for a link to the kind of doping scandal convulsing the top echelons of sports: Their Russian agent has ...Marathon winners disqualified for using agent tied to dopingRichmond.comall 4 news articles »

    Google News / 2 d. 7 h. 47 min. ago more
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  • Richmond area couple featured on HGTV's 'House Hunters' tonightRichmond area couple featured on HGTV's 'House Hunters' tonight

    House hunters Lauren and Rich Spain will appear on an episode of "House Hunters" on HGTV that will air Nov. 16. The couple look at two homes in Henrico County and one in Richmond. House hunters Lauren and Rich Spain will appear on an episode of "House Hunters" on HGTV that will air Nov. 16. The couple look at two homes in Henrico County and one in Richmond.

    Richmond News / 2 d. 9 h. 16 min. ago more
  • Goodlatte, Griffith, Garrett praise tax reform plan; Warner pans itGoodlatte, Griffith, Garrett praise tax reform plan; Warner pans it

    The Roanoke region’s three Republican congressmen are praising House passage of a tax reform bill. Bob Goodlatte, Morgan Griffith and Tom Garrett say in statements the bill will simplify the tax code, make it fairer and create more jobs and bigger paychecks. But on the Senate side, Democrat Mark Warner expressed frustration at a Finance Committee meeting over the GOP’s Senate version of the bill: WFIR’s Ian Price has more: 11-16 Individual Mandate WEB-WRAP

    WFIR / 2 d. 9 h. 59 min. ago more
  • The Underground Kitchen is About to Expand NationallyThe Underground Kitchen is About to Expand Nationally

    Hello, L.A. Micheal Sparks isn’t great at keeping secrets — or at least, he wasn’t when he launched the Underground Kitchen in 2013. Despite its name, he told everyone about it. And it’s probably Sparks’ big personality that makes the pop-up event series so successful. It’s hard to resist his enthusiasm and passion — you find yourself reaching for your wallet to buy tickets and get in on the action after talking with him. Now, the Underground Kitchen is poised to go national. But that doesn’t mean Sparks has forgotten Richmond. He intends to hold events here every two to three months. “What I don’t want to do,” he says, “is make Richmond suffer. … I have two crews: I have the crew who’s doing national and a crew who’ll be keeping up the promise we made to the community we serve right now.” Sparks’ concept is full of moving parts: He snags talented chefs, unusual venues and creates one-night dinner parties with gorgeous food. The catch is that you don’t know exactly where — other than the city — the pop-up will take place until the last minute, and often you don’t know which chefs will be cooking. You also need to be ready — event notifications go out to mailing list subscribers only and tickets often sell out within minutes. The Underground Kitchen has already made visits from South Carolina to Pennsylvania. And in March, it will begin an 18-month, 31-city national tour in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, with stops that include New York, Houston, Los Angeles and Seattle. “I’m trying to scale it so that we don’t lose the integrity of Underground Kitchen,” says Sparks. He plans to bring along local products for all of the dinners. “There’s so many great [things]. Belle Isle, for instance, so many people in New York and New Jersey don’t know about them — they don’t know they’ve turned into a boutique business.” At the same time, Sparks plans to find other local products elsewhere to bring back to Richmond. “It’s cross-marketing for the whole country,” he says. In addition, the events also expose smaller vendors to corporate sponsors. Sparks is also pushing other Underground Kitchen events into new territory conceptually. He calls it “enviro dining.” Another way to think about it might be theatrical dining. “It’s like Cirque du Soleil meets dinner party,” he says. Changing video images on the walls surround diners, while dramatic lighting design goes from bright to dark and back again. The sound, too, is carefully scripted. “It’s emotional, it’s sensory overload,” says Sparks. “Everything about the food experience is curated.” And in January, he plans to launch another offshoot of the Underground Kitchen along the lines of meals-in-a-box companies Blue Apron or Hello Fresh. Think of it as a party in a box. Say you want to have six friends over to your house to celebrate a birthday or anniversary. You’ll be able to go online and choose glasses, linens, dishes, place settings — even flowers — and they’ll all arrive in a box at your doorstep. I ask Sparks if he feels like he’s spreading himself — and the company — too thin. Not at all, he answers. He consults with a professional logistics company and an entertainment lawyer regularly to see if his ideas are feasible. “These things aren’t necessarily in my wheelhouse,” says Sparks. “But you get people who are behind you so you don’t make mistakes [they may have made in the past]. It’s been seamless — knock on wood — seamless the way we’ve done it.” You can get a taste of the Underground Kitchen at its Classic Comforts event, with six courses by six Richmond chefs, on Dec. 14 at 6:30 p.m. Visit theundergroundkitchen.org for more details.

    Style Weekly / 2 d. 10 h. 40 min. ago more
  • Lea, Rasoul among 85 appointed to Northam transition teamLea, Rasoul among 85 appointed to Northam transition team

    Sherman Lea, Sr. Del. Sam Rasoul Roanoke Mayor Sherman Lea and Delegate Sam Rasoul are among several people from our area who have been named as a member of Governor-elect Ralph Northam’s Transition Committee. There are 85 committee members in all, most of them Democrats, but there are some Republicans. Here is the governor-elect’s full news release: Today, Governor-elect Ralph Northam announced his bipartisan Transition Committee, consisting of Virginians from across the Commonwealth who will join him over the course of the next two months to lay the groundwork for a successful administration. “This bipartisan group of community leaders reflects the diversity that makes our Commonwealth a wonderful and inclusive place to live,” said Governor-elect Northam. “I am honored to have the help of such a great group of Virginians as we build an administration that reflects Virginia and takes our Commonwealth to the next level. We have a tremendous opportunity over the next four years to make a positive difference in the lives of Virginians, and to create opportunity for every Virginian, no matter who you are, no matter where you live. I look forward to hitting the ground running to do just that.”   Northam Transition Committee Members Jonathan Aberman Managing Director, Amplifier Ventures McLean Kim Adkins Marketing Director, Carter Bank & Trust Martinsville Stephen R. Adkins Chief, Chickahominy Tribe of Virginia Charles County The Honorable Kenneth “Kenny” Alexander Mayor, City of Norfolk Norfolk The Honorable Lamont Bagby House of Delegates Henrico County Andrea Bailey President, Prince William County NAACP Prince William County Brian Ball Partner, Williams Mullen Richmond Mark Bowles Executive Vice President, McGuireWoods Consulting LLC Richmond Jennifer Bowles Vice Mayor, Martinsville City Council Martinsville Robert Bragg III President, Virginia Professional Fire Fighters Richmond Jeffrey “Jeff” Breit Attorney, Breit, Drescher, Imprevento Virginia Beach David Broder President, SEIU Virginia 512 Vienna Carlos Brown Member, Commonwealth Transportation Board Richmond The Honorable C. William “Bill” Carrico Senate of Virginia Grayson County Keyanna Connor State Director, Office of United States Senator Mark Warner Richmond Henry “Hap” Connors, Jr. Member, Commonwealth Transportation Board Fredericksburg Vanessa Crawford Sheriff, City of Petersburg Petersburg The Honorable Barbara A. Favola Senate of Virginia Arlington County The Honorable Eileen Filler-Corn House of Delegates Springfield The Honorable R. Creigh Deeds Senate of Virginia Bath County The Honorable Adam P. Ebbin Senate of Virginia Alexandria The Honorable Jay Fisette Chairman, Arlington County Board of Supervisors Arlington Jay Ford Executive Director, Virginia Eastern Shorekeeper Norfolk Steven Gould Member, City of Danville School Board Danville Lori Haas Virginia State Director, The Coalition to Stop Gun Violence Richmond Mike Hamlar President, Hamlar Enterprises Roanoke The Honorable Eva T. Hardy Former Virginia Secretary of Health and Human Resources Richmond Margaret Nimmo Holland Executive Director, Voices for Virginia’s Children Richmond The Honorable Anne Holton Former Virginia Secretary of Education, former First Lady of Virginia Richmond The Honorable Mike Hymes Member, Tazewell Board of Supervisors Tazewell Allison Jones HosPAC Director, Virginia Hospital & Healthcare Association Richmond Reverend Kelvin F. Jones Director of Ministries, Blue Water Development Chincoteague Tarina Keene Executive Director, NARAL Pro-Choice Virginia Richmond Jack Kennedy Clerk of the Court, Wise County Circuit Court Norton Dr. Babur Lateef Ophthalmologist, Advanced Ophthalmology Inc. Woodbridge Dr. Michelle LaRue Virginia State Director, CASA Arlington Dr. Jennifer Lee Former Virginia Deputy Secretary of Health and Human Resources Arlington The Honorable Sherman P. Lea, Sr. Mayor, City of Roanoke Roanoke Harry T. Lester Chairman, Chesapeake Bay Foundation Virginia Beach Jim Livingston President, Virginia Education Association Richmond The Honorable Mamie Locke Senate of Virginia Hampton The Honorable Alfonso H. Lopez House of Delegates Arlington The Honorable Chris Lu Former United States Deputy Secretary of Labor Arlington Leopoldo Martinez Board Chair, Latino Victory Project Washington, D.C. Dennis Martire Vice President and Mid-Atlantic Regional Manager, LiUNA! Mid-Atlantic Region Reston The Honorable Andria McClellan Member, Norfolk City Council Norfolk The Honorable Jennifer McClellan Senate of Virginia Richmond Sanjay Mittal CEO, eHealthObjects Richmond The Honorable Ross Mugler Commissioner of the Revenue, City of Hampton Hampton Janet Muldoon Legislative Assistant, Office of State Senator Richard Saslaw Annandale Edward Mullen Partner, Reed Smith Richmond William L.”Bill” Murray Member, State Council of Higher Education for Virginia Richmond Reverend Tyrone Nelson Sixth Mount Zion Baptist Church Richmond Tram Nguyen Co-Executive Director, New Virginia Majority Washington, D.C. Jeff Novak Vice President and Deputy General Counsel – Ethics and Compliance, Oath Incorporated Reston Arnold Outlaw President, United Steelworkers Local 8888 – Newport News Newport News The Honorable Edward “Ed” Owens Mayor, Town of South Boston South Boston James Parrish Executive Director, Equality Virginia Richmond The Honorable L.F. Payne President, McGuireWoods Consulting LLC Washington, D.C. The Honorable Tom Perriello Former Congressman Charlottesville Chris Petersen Partner, Morris, Manning & Martin, LLP Vienna The Honorable Todd Pillion House of Delegates Abingdon The Honorable Evans Poston Commissioner of the Revenue, City of Norfolk Norfolk he Honorable Marcia “Cia” Price House of Delegates Newport News Atif Qarni Math Teacher, Prince William County Woodbridge The Honorable Phyllis Randall Chairwoman, Board of Supervisors Leesburg The Honorable Sam Rasoul House of Delegates Roanoke City Alexsis Rodgers Director of Communications, Planned Parenthood Virginia Richmond Nikki Rovner Associate State Director of External Affairs, The Nature Conservancy Richmond Jeff Rowe President, Virginia Association of IBEW Newport News Anna Scholl Executive Director, Progress Virginia Albermarle The Honorable Mark D. Sickles House of Delegates Franconia Aimee Perron Siebert Partner, Commonwealth Strategy Group Richmond The Honorable Levar Stoney Mayor, City of Richmond Richmond The Honorable Richard Stuart Senate of Virginia Westmoreland County Walter Tejada President, Virginia Latino Leaders Council Arlington Michael “Mike” Town Executive Director, League of Conservation Voters Richmond Pia Trigiani Attorney, MercerTrigiani Alexandria Ed Turner Disability Policy Consultant, Turner & Associates Richmond The Honorable Shannon Valentine Former Member of the Virginia House of Delegates Lynchburg Dr. Alan Wagner Ophthalmologist, Wagner Macula & Retina Center Virginia Beach The Honorable Molly Ward Virginia Secretary of Natural Resources Hampton The Honorable John Watkins Former State Senator Midlothian Katharine Webb Member, State Council of Higher Education for Virginia Richmond Matthew “Matt” Yonka President, Virginia State Building & Construction Trades Council Richmond  

    WFIR / 2 d. 11 h. 25 min. ago more
  • Pick: The Dustbowl Revival at Tin Pan on Thursday, Nov. 16Pick: The Dustbowl Revival at Tin Pan on Thursday, Nov. 16

    There's been so much happening musically in Richmond lately that it's hard to keep track of everything, much less write about it. One venue that continues to step up and deliver a steady flow of quality shows is the Tin Pan in Quioccasin Station Shopping Center. Former Richmonder Aimee Mann is coming in January. But first there's tonight's gig: acclaimed Los Angeles ensemble the Dustbowl Revival, whose self-titled album from last summer debuted at number one on Amazon's Americana/Alt. Country and Top 200. The eight-piece group's album, produced by Grammy winner Ted Hutt and featuring a guest turn from Keb'Mo', offers an infectious blend of vintage American sounds -- including swingin' New Orleans jazz, funk, blue-eyed soul and Stax R&B. Mostly it's high-energy, feel-good music likely to get Tin Pan listeners out of their dinner chairs and onto the dance floor. Just the thing people may need to get out of the November doldrums. Check out a new video from the group: Music writer Rob Sheffield, in Rolling Stone, hailed it as a great band “whose Americana swing was so fun I went back to see them again the next day.” The LA Weekly noted the “upbeat, old-school, All-American sonic safaris exemplify everything shows should be: hot, spontaneous, engaging and, best of all, a pleasure to hear.” If you check out more of their material, you get a sense of a band taking those old-school pleasures and hybridizing them with new school attitude, searching for a vibrant sound with a nod towards the future. Dustbowl Revival performs tonight, Nov. 16 at the Tin Pan, 8982 Quioccasin Road, at 8 p.m. $20-$25. 447-8189.

    Style Weekly / 2 d. 11 h. 50 min. ago more
  • Senator Kaine: Roy Moore “unfit” to serveSenator Kaine: Roy Moore “unfit” to serve

    Sen. Tim Kaine Members of his own party have come out against him – and now Virginia’s junior Democratic U.S. Senator speaks about about Alabama’s Roy Moore. WFIR’s Gene Marrano asked Tim Kaine about it this morning: 11-16 Kaine-Moore Wrap#2-WEB

    WFIR / 2 d. 13 h. 5 min. ago
  • Roben Farzad's "Hotel Scarface" Acquired for Television SeriesRoben Farzad's "Hotel Scarface" Acquired for Television Series

    Roben Farzad, the Richmond-based author, producer and host of NPR One's "Full Disclosure," has sold the rights to his new book, "Hotel Scarface: Where Cocaine Cowboys Partied and Plotted to Control Miami." As reported by Deadline, Stone Village Television has picked up TV and film rights to the book, which Style wrote about in this recent feature by Kate Andrews, and plans to create a limited series. Farzad will executive produce with Stone Village’s Scott Steindorff and Dylan Russell. The book is centered around the Mutiny at Sailboat Bay, an infamous hotel and club in Miami's Coconut Grove neighborhood. When the New York Times asked Farzad to persuade someone to read "Hotel Scarface" in 50 words or less, he responded: "The Mutiny was where the Cold War crashed into reefer madness and the cocaine wars. To this day, I can’t tell you if it was operated as a front company for the C.I.A. How many places do you find where all of those things happened?" According to its website, past work by Stone Village Television includes the syndicated NBC series “Las Vegas” with James Caan and Josh Duhamel and the Golden Globe and Emmy Award-winning HBO miniseries “Empire Falls” which starred Paul Newman, Ed Harris, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Helen Hunt, Joanne Woodward and Robin Wright.

    Style Weekly / 2 d. 14 h. 5 min. ago more
  • 'Worst, I've ever lived': Richmond renter without hot water for weeks'Worst, I've ever lived': Richmond renter without hot water for weeks

    Devona Spencer has lived in The Flats at Ginter Park for years, but she's gone without hot water for weeks. "I take half and keep it at home and the other half I go give out to someone who may be hungry," she said.

    Richmond News / 2 d. 14 h. 10 min. ago
  • UPDATE: Virginia regulators approve carbon-reduction planUPDATE: Virginia regulators approve carbon-reduction plan

    UPDATE: The Virginia Air Pollution Control Board today approved regulations to limit carbon emissions from Virginia electric utilities. The rule approved today intends to cap emissions from most power plants starting in 2020 and then require a 30 percent reduction over a decade. It could also open the door to Virginia joining the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, a cap-and-trade program among mostly northeastern states. PREVIOUSLY: RICHMOND, Va. (AP) – Regulators are set to vote on a plan to reduce carbon emissions from power plants in Virginia and allow for participation in a regional carbon-trading network. The proposed regulation is up for a vote Thursday before the Air Pollution Control Board. It would cap emissions from most power plants starting in 2020 and then require a 30 percent reduction over a decade. It could also open the door to Virginia joining the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, a cap-and-trade program among mostly northeastern states. Gov. Terry McAuliffe directed his administration to develop the regulation in May, saying Virginia can’t afford to sit by as President Donald Trump rolls back efforts to battle climate change. If the board approves the proposal, it’s subject to a public comment period and possible further changes.

    WFIR / 2 d. 14 h. 47 min. ago more
  • Old Ways Still the Right WayOld Ways Still the Right Way

    Brenner Pass ups the bar for the city’s dining scene.

    Richmond Magazine / 2 d. 15 h. 37 min. ago
  • Obamacare Provider Network ExpandsObamacare Provider Network Expands

    The lone ACA provider for much of metro Richmond now offers a choice of HCA and VCU facilities and service providers, plus more of the week's health news.

    Richmond Magazine / 2 d. 17 h. 14 min. ago
  • A Musical LegacyA Musical Legacy

    As a musician, educator and record-label founder, Bill McGee has changed lives.

    Richmond Magazine / 2 d. 18 h. 55 min. ago
  • Next Up after-school program provides opportunities for Richmond studentsNext Up after-school program provides opportunities for Richmond students

    Middle school is a time when young people's lives can go right or wrong. Keeping them on the right path is the goal of the after-school program Next Up .

    Richmond News / 2 d. 19 h. 1 min. ago
  • Sneak Peek: Change Makers 2017Sneak Peek: Change Makers 2017

    Meet the people striving to make Richmond a better place to live, work and play.

    Richmond Magazine / 2 d. 19 h. 10 min. ago
  • City of Richmond auctions more tax delinquent propertiesCity of Richmond auctions more tax delinquent properties

    The City of Richmond held another auction Wednesday night to recoup income lost from property owners not paying taxes for years. For months now, 8News investigator Kerri O'Brien has been shedding light on the issue.

    Richmond News / 2 d. 23 h. 39 min. ago
  • a Ita s surreala : Richmond teacher surprised with $25,000 Milken Educator Awarda Ita s surreala : Richmond teacher surprised with $25,000 Milken Educator Award

    What started off as a typical Wednesday for a teacher at Lucille M. Brown Middle School in Richmond turned out to be anything but. "He actually said, 'Dr. Gaines, I don't know what's going on, but I'm just not feeling it this year," Dr. Stacy Gaines recalled of her conversation with James.

    Richmond News / 3 d. 4 h. 14 min. ago
  • Popular New Hoodie Features Altered Lee MonumentPopular New Hoodie Features Altered Lee Monument

    Visions of the future are everywhere these days. Case in point: One of the most vocal proponents of local hip-hop culture, popular blogger Marc Cheatham of the Cheats Movement, has teamed with award-winning local artist Noah Scalin for a new hoodie design they hope will spark conversation. The New Legacy Hoodie, available for $45 here, features an image of the Lee monument pedestal, minus the Confederate commander and his horse, with a rainbow background. According to the website, the collaborators hope that "these hoodies will spark artistic dialogue about what the future can be on Monument Avenue." They were printed locally by Triple Stamp press and organizers note that "not only will [it] be your favorite hoodie, but it will send a strong message of activism." Cheatham tells Style that the design started with Scalin, after he appeared on a former Cheats Movement podcast to discuss the monument issue the week that Mayor Levar Stoney's Monument Commission was announced. "We had pretty intense talks. I think it's a great, artistic design that is right up the alley of what we believe in," says Cheatham. "Noah and I are both fathers, and collectively what we're seeing around the debate, it's so polarizing, a lot of good people won't feel comfortable showing activism on the front lines. So what's another effective way to show activism? [The design] is thought-provoking." Scalin says he was inspired to create the image after seeing the empty Confederate pedestal in New Orleans. "I wanted to make an image that normalized the idea of a Richmond without the monuments. I feel like many people are afraid of change, but they can embrace it better if they can see what it might look like," he explains. "For me, the colors of the background has two meanings: it's the sun setting on the old Richmond and its veneration of the Confederacy as well as a representation of the diversity and inclusion of the new Richmond that's being built right now." Cheatham notes that the image is more symbolic and not exactly how they envision the future of the Lee Monument. He's more for the monuments being relocated to museums or battlegrounds, he says, where descendants can visit them. The first limited run of 40 hoodies sold out, and Cheatham says the second run of 50 is about halfway sold. He imagines there will eventually be around 150-200 of them on the streets. Cheatham adds that without promotion, the pair is receiving orders from all over the country, from the Midwest to California. The image is also available on stickers at World of Mirth in Carytown. "I'm convinced the monuments are gonna go," Cheatham says. "The only question is when -- and what event is going to cause that?" Part of the profits for the hoodies will be donated to the Richmond Peace Education Center. For more info you can email Cheatham at thecheatsmovement@gmail.com.

    Style Weekly / 3 d. 10 h. 25 min. ago more
  • Movie Reviews: "Lady Bird" and "Jane"Movie Reviews: "Lady Bird" and "Jane"

    Two films explore leaving home in drastically different ways. The Kasekela chimpanzees in Gombe Stream National Park are the most famous nonhuman simians in history after being featured for a half-century by National Geographic, thanks mostly to Jane Goodall. An almost equally impressive fact in “Jane,” a documentary about Goodall, the park’s founder, is that she did it all in high top Converse sneakers. They appear in almost every scene of the film, which concentrates on Goodall’s pioneering career as a wildlife researcher, her footwear of choice hiking through vine-covered swamps, up mountains and across snake-laden streams. It’s impressive. Goodall braved the jungle at that age, at that time and in canvas shoes. The images serve to confirm she was a woman who, if not without fear, was armed with so much excitement about the prospect of her work that she didn’t consider the danger. She tells director Brett Morgen she reasoned if she didn’t bother any poisonous snakes or leopards, they wouldn’t bother her. Jane mostly uses footage shot by Goodall’s late husband, Hugo van Lawick, 60 years ago, stored by National Geographic for 50 years before handing the 100-odd hours of film to Morgen (“Kurt Cobain: Montage of Heck”; “The Kid Stays in the Picture”), who, frankly, got really lucky here. Lawick was a professional wildlife photographer and the soft, grainy footage he shot of Jane tramping through the jungle is interspersed with gazelles and lions on the Serengeti and the chimps, growing ever more comfortable with Goodall’s camp in Tanzania. Soon the couple’s son Grub arrives, also color stock, from infancy to adulthood, often within meters of the wild. Though the film might strike some as a mere overview of Goodall’s life and work, there is a lot of drama, especially for younger viewers who might not be as familiar with her story. For the rest, interesting facets about Goodall’s early forays into the massive continent come up often, foremost her impetus for taking on the 50-year study. Luckily, Goodall, now 83, mentally acute and witty, is still around to explain why she couldn’t wait to march into the unknown and sit elbow to elbow with large aggressive apes, armored only by the most necessary layers of fabric and an enormous degree of wonder and moxie. A similar urge to leave home and explore drives the plot of “Lady Bird,” a semi-autobiographical drama from actress Greta Gerwig (“Frances Ha”), behind the camera for her first major writing-directing effort. The indelible images here are all suburban: squat, concrete high-school buildings; cheap compact cars; dowdy living room furniture. This local wildlife is just as ripe for study. The film follows its titular character (Saoirse Ronan) as she navigates what she perceives as the monotonous confines of Sacramento, California, where Gerwig grew up, and, to a high-school adolescent, its suffocating boredom. Intermittently engaged by occasional love interests and best-friend dramas, Lady Bird’s principle focus is getting away, to a good university, as far away as possible. It’s a light, charming comedy. But it also aspires to be taken seriously as a meaningful coming-of-age tale, and attempting both proves too much. The comedy on display is cousin to the contemporary sitcom: a sustained barrage of non sequiturs spread amid loosely connected episodes. The conflicts are somewhat pedestrian: good cop-bad cop parents (Laurie Metcalf and Tracy Letts); good girl-bad girl best friends (Beanie Feldstein and Odeya Rush); good guy-bad guy boyfriends (Lucas Hedges and Timothée Chalamet). It’s as if “Pretty in Pink” got rebooted for the constant irony age. Also, Ronan is not a good fit for this type of film. Gerwig is a world-class film comedian. Ronan is a good actress, too, with star quality. But she’s enigmatic, not comedic. She lacks the necessary delivery and body language, a gift Gerwig has brought to so many similar films. Gerwig’s personality shines through occasionally -- like the sun, how could it not? And this is a landscape she knows well, not just because she lived it but because she has honed reliving it, in fictionalized versions. It’s surprising she sticks to the shallow end this time. There are two reasonable assumptions why. The obsession for clarity in the movie-making machinery streamlines nuance, and it was too late for Gerwig to star in this herself. “Lady Bird” feels more like a compromise than an achievement. “Lady Bird”: (R) 93 min. 3 stars. Opens at Bow Tie Movieland at Boulevard Square on Thursday, Nov. 16. “Jane”: (PG) 90 min. 4 stars. Available for pre-order On Demand.

    Style Weekly / 3 d. 12 h. 5 min. ago more
  • Weekly Food Notes: Prix Fixe, Handles + MoreWeekly Food Notes: Prix Fixe, Handles + More

    Fest, the latest offshoot of Capital Ale House, is opening at 7044 Woodlake Commons in Midlothian on Thursday, Nov. 15, at 6 p.m. The biergarten and Oktoberfest concept strips down the menu to sausages, cheese, charcuterie, sandwiches and big pretzels — simple fare that marries well with beer. You'll find German, other European and local brews on tap and in bottles. facebook.com/festmidlothian. The windows have been dark since Amour Wine Bistro closed in Carytown at the end of the summer, but on Friday, Nov. 17, the Broken Tulip Society Eatery will turn the lights back on. Owners David Crabtree-Logan and Sariann Lehrer will offer a prix fixe dinner menu Thursday to Saturday and another for brunch on Sundays. Reservations are required. thebrokentulip.com. Tazza Kitchen’s latest outpost is currently under construction in Scott’s Addition and the opening is planned for December. The company has also moved its headquarters there and has an enormous new central kitchen for prep work and events. tazzakitchen.com. After the death of Camden’s Dogtown Market’s front of the house manager and the departure of its sous chef, owner Andy Howell decided to suspend dinner hours. Right now, he’s gearing them back up with an evening prix fixe menu — lunch will stay the same — with more adventurous choices. “For the last month, we have been offering a constantly changing, three-course dinner menu for $20. We’ve fine-tuned the selections, gone through a couple of false starts on staff, but seem to be leveling off with a tasty and tight-knit plan,” Howell says. cdmrva.com. Pik Nik, the former Fan Noodle Bar and the latest spot from Joe and Sonny Kiaturson, has added brunch hours starting on Saturday, Nov. 18, and also will remain open on Thanksgiving. facebook.com/piknikrva. Today is the last day to take advantage of Virginia ABC stores’ deal on those big, 1.75 liter bottles of liquor, some have handles. They're offering 20 percent off until close tonight. On Black Friday, Nov. 24, you can get 15 percent off if you buy more than $75 of its products and 20 percent off purchases above $100. The ABC is even getting into Cyber Monday on Nov. 27. You can check out its 20-percent-off deals that day online at abc.virginia.gov. And this might be helpful — the Times-Dispatch reports that the cost of a typical Thanksgiving meal is up by almost 15 percent. Bistro 27 is under repair after flooding, reports Richmond magazine. The restaurant is closed until Tuesday, Nov. 20, because of flooding. “Owner William Wright says the European bistro will shift to a menu that focuses heavily on coastal seafood — all with lighter sauces.” bistrotwentyseven.com. Metro Grill is launching a new menu on Tuesday, Nov. 27. It’s part of the restaurant’s new direction, and owner Joey McCullough will have drink representatives on hand that night to offer samples, plus the new menu will be 30 percent off that evening. metrogrillrva.com. Coal Mine Coffee will hold its grand opening at 117 Brown's Way Road in Midlothian on Friday, Nov. 24. You can find out a little bit more about the history of coal mining in the area while sipping on a coffee drink, nibbling on breakfast, lunch or dessert, plus homemade fudge. facebook.com/coalminecoffeerva. And don’t forget, it’s still Cider Week in Virginia. You can check out the events right here and puts some apples back into your life.

    Style Weekly / 3 d. 13 h. 29 min. ago more
  • Sips & Swigs: Pasture’s The NelsonSips & Swigs: Pasture’s The Nelson

    A trip to a Nelson County distillery inspired Beth Dixon to craft a special drink for the fall.

    Richmond Magazine / 3 d. 14 h. 27 min. ago
  • Pencil Me InPencil Me In

    J. Alan Cumbey’s drawings, at Diversity's Richmond's Iridian Gallery through January, are a mashup of Jaqueline Susann, The Muppets and gay culture.

    Richmond Magazine / 3 d. 15 h. 3 min. ago
  • His Facebook post after brother’s overdose death touches thousandsHis Facebook post after brother’s overdose death touches thousands

    NINETY SIX, S.C. — A South Carolina man’s Facebook post about losing his brother to opioid addiction is reaching people around the world. Stephen Wood, of Ninety Six, made the heart-wrenching post On Oct. 26 after his 21-year-old brother Brandon died. Wood addressed the impact of drug addiction on victims and their families, and encouraged anyone battling addiction to get help. His post read: This isn’t easy but I want to speak directly to Brandon’s friends and enablers, and anybody else struggling with addiction. Tuesday night I was at my grandmas house for a normal visit. My new wife and I had just gotten back from our honeymoon the day before. The phone rang and my grandma answered with a sarcastic “what.” But the mood quickly changed and I knew what the call was. I rushed to Brandon’s girlfriends apartment where her and my mom were standing in the parking lot losing it. I kept it together pretty good until I climbed in the ambulance and looked at my little brother laying there knowing he was gone. Yesterday I went and planned his funeral and picked out his casket. Today I had to go look at him again and I bought a suit to wear to his funeral. These things shouldn’t have to be done for a 21 year old. So to his friends who are doing the same things he was. What I wanted to say to you is how badly I want you to use his life to turn yours around. It’s to late for him but there is still time for you. You think the drugs are only effecting yourself. But what you don’t know is how much it impacts everyone around you. You don’t know how many sleepless nights I’ve had worrying about him. You don’t know how many times he has told me he is going to beat his addiction, he won’t be a statistic. You don’t know what it’s like to feel your stomach drop every time the phone rings, because im scared it might be about him. You don’t know how it feels to know time is running out for him, and not being able to do anything to help. You don’t know the guilt I feel for not doing more than I did. You don’t know how I’ve heard every one of my relatives the last couple of days say “If I would have done this, or I would have done that, I know he would still be here.” You don’t know what it’s like watching grown men who you thought were invincible, standing over a casket crying. And you don’t know what it’s like to know that you’ll never be able to kick a soccer ball, play Xbox, argue over football, or any other little thing we take for granted with my brother ever again. So Don’t let him die for nothing. Get the help you need and get clean, if not for you, then for your family. You’re not invincible, you’re time is short and as much as you don’t want to believe it, you’re next. And to his dealers. I want you to know how many hours brandon spent at my house crying, telling me he hates what he has become, but there was no escape. Talking about how no matter how many numbers he blocks, you people still find a way to try to sell to him and how he gave in every time. I want you to know how hard he tried to help himself and to find help, and every time he did and got clean, you were lurking in the shadows calling his name. I want you to know that you are murdering people for 20 bucks a pop and I hope you feel terrible about it. I can’t imagine how it feels knowing $20 is worth more to you than another persons life. I want you to know how badly I want to take justice for my little brother into my own hands. How I know who some of you are and how much rage I feel when i look at your Facebook pages, living like nothing happened. And I want you to know that eventually what you are doing will catch up to you. But on the other hand I want you to know that this isn’t what you are on earth for. That if you turn your life around, there is so much you can do. Think of the people you can help. Get a real job, make your own money, do something you can be proud of. I have so much more I want to say but that’s all I have time for right now. Thank you if you have read this far. I want to thank all of Brandon’s friends who did all you could to help him. If you’re a true friend of Brandon’s, then you’re a friend of mine. Now reach out to anybody you know who is struggling, and do whatever you can to help, so we don’t have to lose someone else with their whole future ahead of them. It may be to late for Brandon, but don’t let him die in vain. Feel free to share, never know who it may help. The post has been shared more than 22,000 times.

    WTVR / 3 d. 16 h. 21 min. ago more
  • Taking the 5th With BeethovenTaking the 5th With Beethoven

    Classical Revolution RVA celebrates its fifth anniversary with a symphonic triumph.

    Richmond Magazine / 3 d. 16 h. 26 min. ago
  • Tazza Comes to TownTazza Comes to Town

    Tazza Kitchen prepares to unveil its first city location, opening next month in Scott's Addition.

    Richmond Magazine / 3 d. 18 h. 13 min. ago
  • Speaking of StatuesSpeaking of Statues

    During a two-hour meeting Tuesday night, the Monument Avenue Commission discussed legal opinions concerning Richmond's Civil War statues, how best to disseminate input collected on its website and plans to invite additional public conversation.

    Richmond Magazine / 4 d. 0 h. 55 min. ago
  • New Carytown Restaurant Announces Its OpeningNew Carytown Restaurant Announces Its Opening

    UPDATE: The new opening date for the Broken Tulip Social Eatery will be Friday, Nov. 17. Tue, Nov 14, 2017 at 11:51 a.m.: The Broken Tulip Social Eatery will open in Carytown on Thursday, Nov. 16, in the old Amour Wine Bistro space at 3129 W. Cary St. Co-owner David Crabtree-Logan worked in Michelin-starred the Plumed Horse and the Kitchin in Edinburgh, Scotland, and his wife and co-owner Sariann Lehrer co-authored “A Feast of Ice and Fire: the Official Game of Thrones Companion Cookbook.” “After several years and a couple of successful (if illegal) supper club operations in Oregon and Scotland, we settled in Richmond excited by the thriving food scene, long growing season and abundance of dedicated and talented farmers and artisans in the region,” its website says. The couple promises a farm-to-table, prix-fixe menu that will be served to diners seated at three large communal tables. “We want it to be more than a place to eat,” Crabtree-Logan said in a news release. “We want people to interact with each other, and we know that the best way for that to happen is over good food.” The Broken Tulip will be open for dinner from Thursday to Saturday with seatings at 6 p.m. and 8:30 p.m., and for brunch on Sunday with seatings at 10 a.m., noon and 2 p.m. Reservations are required. thebrokentulip.com

    Style Weekly / 4 d. 7 h. 50 min. ago more
  • Tazza Kitchen Bets Big in Scott’s AdditionTazza Kitchen Bets Big in Scott’s Addition

    It's a big smoker. Made from an old, 1,000-gallon underground propane tank, when you climb the steps and open one of the large doors, you'll see six beef briskets slowly cooking away. The next door reveals another six and several racks of ribs. You'll see something similar if you take a look behind the other two doors. And at Tazza Kitchen's new office and central kitchen in Scott's Addition, that monster isn't the only smoker parked by the side of the building. There's another smaller one — smaller being a relative term — that is hauled to events when it's not in use. Previously, both smokers lived outside of Tazza's Alverser Plaza location. Smoked meat might be a siren call to some of us, but the restaurant's neighbors — doctors' and dentists' offices — weren't always thrilled by the scent. "We kind of wore out our welcome there," says co-owner John Haggai, who handles construction — and the bar program — for the company. "I was tasked by Jeff to quickly [find a new space]." Jeff is Jeff Grant, also a Tazza co-owner and the man in charge of everything you eat at the restaurants — he's the one smoking briskets for upwards of 17 hours. "We're just total geeks about wood-fired cooking," he says. The reaction from Tazza's new Scott's Addition neighbors? "All we've gotten is, 'Dude, it smells so good. Can I eat a taco?'" Grant says. Right now, the newest Tazza location is under construction across the street from the Handcraft Building. A few blocks away, in a deceptively low-profile, cinder-block building that used to house a diesel repair shop, the new research and development and commissary space soars behind the offices in front. There's a wood-burning oven in the back, lots of long shiny stainless steel counters, a fully stocked bar station and a table where the team is experimenting with place settings for the new restaurant. The plan is to do the majority of prep work in what Tazza is calling the big kitchen. Grant says, "It's going to make the operations of all the restaurants improve, and not only that, it'll give us an incredible degree of quality control." It also makes event preparation much easier. Previously, the team worked out of Tazza's original spot in Short Pump — and controlled panic might be one way to describe the process. Now surrounded by plenty of space and equipment, the relief is palpable when you talk to Grant. With his hands in the pockets of his coat, the bearded chef shows off the new kitchen with something akin to awe. Tazza has grown rapidly since it began in 2013. The Scott's Addition restaurant will be its sixth. The third owner, John Davenport, originally came on first as an advisor, then an investor and now, after falling in love with the industry, manages Tazza's administration and finances. "Someone in the restaurant business asked me if I though Scott's Addition was way over," he says. "I said, 'No, it's probably in its third inning.'" First came the breweries, and although restaurants dot the boundaries of the neighborhood, Scott's Addition is poised, according to Davenport, to become the city's next restaurant hot spot. "These buildings are open boxes for people to come in and redevelop," he says. The latest Tazza will start stoking the grill and firing up the oven in December. When you walk in, you'll immediately be confronted by the enormous kitchen surrounded by bright blue bricks. It dominates the room, and that's intentional. Haggai says the place is designed to bring diners fully into the sensory experience of the wood, the fire, the smoke and the sound of the crackling food cooking over open flames. "The only thing separating us from the customers is a banquette," he says. "So, you're part of the party if you're in here."

    Style Weekly / 4 d. 8 h. 45 min. ago more
  • Why Companies Like Toys 'R' Us Love to Go Bust in Richmond, Va. - New York TimesWhy Companies Like Toys 'R' Us Love to Go Bust in Richmond, Va. - New York Times

    New York TimesWhy Companies Like Toys 'R' Us Love to Go Bust in Richmond, Va.New York TimesInstead, the toy company followed an increasing number of corporations — from Gymboree to a major coal company to a Pennsylvania fracking company — that are choosing to file for bankruptcy in Richmond, Va. In recent years, Richmond has become the ...

    Google News / 4 d. 10 h. 32 min. ago more
  • Getting ThereGetting There

    Chesterfield County’s rocky relationship with buses might soon take a new turn.

    Richmond Magazine / 4 d. 15 h. 43 min. ago
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  • I Love the Museum DistrictI Love the Museum District

    The VMFA serves as the cultural and recreational hub of this friendly, walkable city neighborhood.

    Richmond Magazine / 4 d. 17 h. 27 min. ago
  • A Proud Quarter CenturyA Proud Quarter Century

    A history of the Richmond Triangle Players’ first 25 years onstage. In 1985, Larry Kramer wrote "The Normal Heart," a play that portrayed the reaction of homosexual men to the spread of a mysterious "gay disease" in the early '80s. By 1991, the year Freddie Mercury of Queen died and basketball star Magic Johnson announced he was HIV-positive, AIDS awareness was becoming widespread. Tony Kushner's Pulitzer Prize-winning "Angels in America" came out that same year. Theater was the art form chronicling the gay community's reaction to the HIV/AIDS crisis, and so, in 1992, a trio of Richmonders produced a show to raise money for the Richmond AIDS Information Network. That show would lead to the creation of Richmond Triangle Players, the now-lauded company celebrating its 25th year. Through seasons working on a postage stamp-sized stage in the attic of a seedy nightclub, the Triangle Players defied Richmond's historically conservative culture to grow and thrive, thanks to a mix of savvy leadership and campy creativity. After its recently completed capital campaign, the company now owns its new venue, a popular spot in Scott's Addition's burgeoning social scene. The following history traces the company's unlikely development from a flippant idea, through a rocky transition during the 2008 financial crash, to its emergence as a Richmond cultural leader — a leader that, nevertheless, isn't above the occasional slice of frisky sex-positivity to spice up a theater-goer's Saturday night. In the early '90s, after 25 years managing the growth of the Bill's Barbecue restaurant chain, Michael Gooding left the company and was looking for new opportunities. Though married twice and the father to nine children, he had acknowledged his homosexuality and was living as an openly gay man. Gooding: "My friend Marcus Miller and I took over management of Fieldens on Broad Street, one of Richmond's only gay nightclubs at the time]. It was in bad shape and getting ready to close. Marcus and Steve Earle were roommates, and we were all really good friends." Steve Earle was an itinerant actor for many companies in Richmond and had started teaching in the Chesterfield schools at the time of this conversation. Earle: "The three of us were at Christopher's on Cary Street. I was moaning because I had proposed a show that had a gay theme to a local theater and the company said no. To be fair, in most of the shows that were gay-centered back then, the gay characters hated themselves or were stereotypes. Anyway, I was still upset I couldn't do my show. I was griping about it and Michael said, 'If I find you a space, do you want to do your show? We had had a couple drinks by then, so I said 'Sure!'" Gooding: "I tend to fall into these things. My thinking was that we don't use the upstairs at Fieldens until 2 in the morning. So, I asked the owners 'can we do a play upstairs?' They said, 'Sure, go ahead.' We didn't end up doing Steve's show. I had been to Gainesville, Florida, and seen a night of three one-act plays by Harvey Fierstein called "Safe Sex Trilogy." This was back in 1991. AIDS was a still a new thing. Not many people in Richmond had even heard about it." From the beginning, there were challenges to being a gay-centric company. Gooding: "One of the one-act plays, "Untidy Endings," has a character who's the 11-year-old son of someone who dies of AIDS. We thought: We've got a gay afterhours nightclub in conservative Richmond, and now we're going to put a preteen boy on the stage? They'll run us out of town on a rail." The three contacted Fierstein's management who allowed them to swap the potentially offending one-act with a different one. The three-night benefit, called "Safe Sex," was a sell-out. Earle: "We never dreamed it would be so popular. People kept saying, 'When are you going to do another one?' Because of that peer pressure, we said, maybe we should put a season together and see how it works. The first show was just a benefit. We never meant to do more." The trio asked local theater critic Roy Proctor for guidance on how to move forward. Proctor: "They invited me to a planning meeting. I had just returned from a theater critics' convention, and I was buoyed by the success of a Seattle LGBT theater. The founders were playing devil's advocate big-time: Was Richmond too conservative for a gay theater? Would any straights attend the shows? I finally said, 'Look, guys, you can do terrible theater, but the need is so great that you'll still succeed.' They didn't believe me, but soon proved me right. "One giant plus RTP had from the get-go was sound fiscal management. In a city where theaters are often founded by artists on little more than dewy-eyed optimism, that made a big difference." Earle: "From the beginning, Michael was very savvy. I brought in Jacqui Singleton who was a playwright, and Michael brought in John Knapp as a director. John wanted to do a show called "Vampire Lesbians of Sodom." I remember a meeting where I threw my pen down on the table and said, 'We are not going to do underwear, fart theater in this company.' Michael mocked me, threw his pen down and said, 'Yes we are, Steve, so we can pay for the boring shit you want to do that no one wants to come see.' Michael was right. He coaxed us to balance the serious stuff with the fun stuff." Knapp would end up working with the theater for 20 years, ultimately becoming its artistic director. Knapp: "I fell into this high camp thing, the drag stuff. There's where I found my niche. I knew those shows were going to be fun. As part of the model for the company, we needed to cover all of the bases." Their venue, Fieldens, was a near-constant source of challenges. Gooding: "We built the stage in sections because we had to put it up and take it down every night. It was horrible. It took us two hours to set up and an hour to take down. All the actors practically had to be construction workers." Earle: "For our first light board, I bought the kind of sliding dimmers you have in your dining room. I put six or eight of those together in a box with electrical plugs coming out the back. We'd do a blackout [by pushing all dimmers down with] with a yardstick. The fire marshal would have totally destroyed me. The space was limiting, but it was also fantastic because it made us take a very utilitarian approach to theater." T. Ross Aitken was a regular stage manager and set designer during those early years. Aitken: "The aesthetic at Fieldens was, 'How do we do a show for a dollar ninety-eight?' The lighting booth was a closet. The light board operator could only see about 75 percent of the stage. At least once during the run of every show you'd hear a loud bang and then me cursing because I'd hit my head on the air duct in there. There was a big gaping hole in the wall, so in the winter I'd have my pea coat on and a wool cap." Earle: "By the end of the second year, we knew we had something. Michael was a consummate businessman. He had an amazing vision. If it were not for him, we would have folded early on." Gooding: "My first goal was to finish a show, pay all the bills, and have enough money to pay the starting costs for the next show. Eventually my goal was to have enough to pay the total cost for the next show. That way, when we hired an actor, they knew they were going to get paid. We gained a good reputation with actors." While the subject matter of its plays still proved challenging to some, Richmond was surprisingly supportive of the new company. Knapp: "There were a few things like they wouldn't let us put up posters in Carytown for "Vampire Lesbians of Sodom." But when we did a show called "The Most Fabulous Story Ever Told" with the characters Adam and Steve, I was thinking: I hope we get picketed. It would be great publicity. One lady called and left a message: 'I think it's just disgusting you people are doing a show about the Bible and homosexuals. I hope no one comes to see it. But your show is sold out tonight, so never mind.'" Singleton's involvement ensured the company's focus extended beyond gay white males. She died in 2014. Katie Fessler became a subscriber early on with her partner and four other lesbian couples. She would later join the board of directors. Fessler: "We went to every single production. It was more of a roulette-wheel spin what the quality of any production would be, but it was an expression of social connection for us at a time when the world of gay women in this town was practically invisible." Knapp: "The tipping point was when we did "When Pigs Fly" [in 2001]. It got extended and extended, and we eventually moved it to the Barksdale at Willow Lawn. It was just gangbusters. It was a turning point because it brought in audiences that never would have walked in before." By that time, Gooding was the only founder still involved in day-to-day operations. Phil Crosby had joined the board of directors in 2000 and would prove instrumental in the company's next steps. Crosby: "The season of 'When Pigs Fly' was the point that I thought, this place really has a shot. Because the company was still in its relative infancy organizationally, I was able to go in and be highly impactful." Gooding: "After 12 years, Fieldens was getting to be a real problem. At the same time, our budgets were growing, we had a surplus every year, we were doing better and better shows." Crosby: "I had put together a grant for about $5,000 to redo the carpeting, make the bathrooms not as petrifyingly awful as they were. The owners at Fieldens were going to match it, then they said we don't have the money. It was coming down to: We need to leave or just close it down. That's when we concocted the idea to throw our first big party for our 15th anniversary." Gooding: "Our idea was: 'Party with Triangle Players at the Jefferson? When Pigs Fly!' The queer company is going to be at the Jefferson Hotel? No one would believe it. We ended up making a substantial amount of money, and we met a lot of friends there. That party in 2007 started our serious fundraising." Crosby: "[Real estate investor] Robb Moss said, 'I think I have a building that could work as a theater.' It was a time when people were speculating in Scott's Addition. Robb was going to buy the building, and we were just going to pay for renovations. We didn't even know how that was going to happen." Gooding: "The next fall, we announced we were going to raise $1 million. That was September 2008, exactly when the bottom dropped out of the stock market." The economic downturn crippled the transition to the new venue. The company relied heavily on the generosity of the community. Gooding: "I have a son-in-law in the carpet business and his company put in the carpeting at cost. The Richmond Men's Chorus painted the whole building. The wall coverings were given to us by a friend of the architect. The whole community coming together was how we were able to build our million-dollar theater for about $350,000." Knapp: "During the transition, the shows were all at different venues. We had to revert back to the way we did stuff the very first season. The set had to be taken down, the stage had to be pulled up [and] the costumes all had to be hidden. We never knew if our stuff was going to be there when we came back." The new venue officially opened in 2010. Crosby: "We were a little concerned about Scott's Addition, just that people didn't know where it was." Maggi Beckstoffer runs a marketing company that started renting space in Scott's Addition 20 years ago. Beckstoffer: "When Robb Moss bought the building for RTP, there still wasn't much going on. It wasn't an unsafe place necessarily. There just wasn't anybody there. They were an island in the middle of the desert. Triangle Players was very brave to move into Scott's Addition when they did." Gooding: "For our first show [in the new space], we didn't have money for a bar. I said, 'A bar is two 6-foot tables with a tablecloth and someone standing behind it. We're going to have a bar.' It wouldn't be a Triangle Players' show without a bar." Crosby had been working for Circuit City until it went bankrupt in 2009. The theater company hired him as managing director, its first full-time employee. The new location soon became a popular nightspot, drawing new audiences. Crosby: "This is now the big hot neighborhood. I like to think we had a little bit to do with that. We do bring 10,000 people into the area every year." Knapp left the area in 2012, moving to Baltimore with his husband. Knapp: "The joy of Triangle is that it has done stuff that nobody else would ever, ever, ever touch. We were always doing shows that people couldn't see anywhere else." The Richmond Triangle Players recently completed a $1 million capital campaign that allowed them to buy their building, upgrade lighting and sound equipment and add another full-time employee, recent Style Top 40 Under 40 winner Lucian Restivo, as associate producing artistic director. Crosby: "We've discovered what works here and what doesn't. Whatever mojo this building has, it has been incredible for us. When this place is cooking on a big sold-out night, you walk into that lobby and everybody is laughing and talking, and you feel like you just walked into the best party in the world." Fessler: "We try to maintain a balance between staying dedicated to having a really good time while also having voices around the table that will keep us on a solid business path. That's the sweet spot for a company like this." Gooding: "I am most happy that we have transitioned from a small seat-of-your-pants operation to what we think is the neatest little theater in the eastern United States. I am certainly proud of it for Richmond." Crosby: "We had some discussion three or four years ago about whether our mission was going to become outdated. But I think there needs to be an RTP in the same way I think there needs to be an African-American theater in town and a Jewish theater in town. The minute you lose each of those glorious individual voices, then the choir as a whole gets less strong and less beautiful." S This week, the Richmond Triangle Players opens "The Santaland Diaries" and "Season's Greetings," two one-acts it originally produced at Fieldens in 2004. It will be producing Larry Kramer's "The Normal Heart" in April.

    Style Weekly / 5 d. 0 h. 45 min. ago more
  • Parent: Active-Shooter Drills May Be Too Close to Reality for Some StudentsParent: Active-Shooter Drills May Be Too Close to Reality for Some Students

    It's been nearly five years since gunman Adam Lanza opened fire inside Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut, killing 20 children and six adults before turning the gun on himself. In the wake of the Dec. 14, 2012, shooting, school administrators across the country re-evaluated their emergency procedures and in-school drills began to change. In Henrico County, at least one parent of a Pocahontas Middle School student is unhappy with the district's approach to emergency drills. "He told me he was crying the whole time of the drill," says Laura Hafer of her 12-year-old son, who has experienced lock-and-hide practice, known as code blue drills, at school. "When I asked what he was afraid of, he said he was worried that one of his friends had been killed, or that one of his teachers had been killed, or that he was going to get killed." According to Henrico County Public Schools spokesman Andy Jenks, state requirements mandate that school administrators conduct emergency drills in schools. "A code blue is a drill that prepares the school for the worst of the worst," Jenks says. "It could be an intruder of some kind, it could be an active shooter. A code blue is the ultimate test of a school's response." Jenks says standard protocol is to announce the drills at the beginning of the year, monitor the results and, ultimately, conduct an unannounced drill. "That, in our opinion, is the only way to ensure that the staff and students are truly emergency-ready," he says. They start with classroom orientations, so teachers and students know what to expect, and he says the conversations differ from school to school, depending on what's age-appropriate. While high school students may be up to date on current events and understand the potential consequences of an intruder on campus, for younger children, the discussions focus on safe behaviors and trusting the adults at school to keep them safe. And that, according to Hafer, is where her son's school is falling short. She says her son, who has been diagnosed with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and depression, has been persistent in telling her that he found the code blue drills distressing. He never knows whether it's a drill or the real thing, she says, and in one particular instance, when the exercise lasted upwards of 30 minutes, he rated his anxiety level at an eight out of 10, and took an entire class period to calm down and refocus. In a letter she intends to send to school officials and parents in the county, Hafer cites "Best Practice Considerations for Schools in Active Shooter and Other Armed Assailant Drills," a 2014 report compiled by the National Association of School Psychologists and the National Association of School Resource Officers, which says that it is "critical that participation in drills be appropriate to individual development levels, and take into consideration prior traumatic experiences, special needs, and personalities." The report also advises schools to "develop a communications plan that gives all participants advance warning and the ability to opt out and/or provide feedback." Hafer would like to see administrators balance overall school safety with students' individual needs. After feeling blindsided by her son's tearful recollections of the drills, she also wants the school to inform parents about the drills in one way or another. Jenks says some principals notify parents during a drill, especially at the high schools, where students might text their families to let them know they're all right. Hafer says she never received a phone call, a letter or any kind of notification that her son would be expected to participate in the drills. It also never came up in any discussions about her son's individual education plan, she says. Transparency and communication or lack thereof between school administrators and parents is school security consultant Ken Trump's area of expertise. President of the Cleveland-based National School Safety and Security Services, Trump is a doctoral student at the Johns Hopkins University School of Education, and he's focusing on school safety leadership issues. "I've been encouraging school administrators to be a little more thoughtful, to pull back the reins a little bit in some cases, and do a better job of thinking through how they're doing some of these drills," Trump says. "While we want schools to push the envelope a little and diversify their drills, the key is to do so to a point of reasonableness." Lori Daley, a Henrico parent whose daughter with special needs attends a different middle school in the district, has had a strikingly different experience. She received a note following the school's most recent code blue drill stating that a teacher had taken her daughter outside for a walk before the drill to keep her anxiety at bay. Her daughter's needs during high-stress situations such as emergency drills came up during education-plan discussions early on, and Daley says she has been consistently happy with the way the school tends to her daughter's needs. And despite the fact that opting out of the drills means her daughter won't be prepared in the case of an actual emergency, Daley says she's not concerned. "My daughter has constant supervision," she says. "I trust the school environment that she's in, and she's always had adequate, compassionate supervision from the staff that provide her academic guidance." With the knowledge that students at other schools are being accommodated, Hafer wants to see more consistency across the district. As a social worker with a background in mental health, she's working with her son to develop coping mechanisms and relaxation techniques. But she also wants clearer communication, shorter drills, and accommodations for her son and other students with special needs. "I really don't want to make this out to be a big deal," Hafer says. "But I can't have my child coming home with [post-traumatic stress disorder] or being that anxious or upset." S

    Style Weekly / 5 d. 0 h. 45 min. ago more
  • Buried Over Two Millennia Ago, China’s Terracotta Soldiers Come to VMFABuried Over Two Millennia Ago, China’s Terracotta Soldiers Come to VMFA

    You may not know it, but Alex Nyerges, executive director of the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, began his career as an archaeologist. It was a pursuit that took him around the world, including a visit to the mausoleum of the first emperor of China, Qin Shi Huang, some 25 years ago. He doesn't mince words when describing the experience. "I've seen pretty much all of the most important and memorable and legendary places in the world that archaeologists have dug over the last several centuries," he says. "Nothing, and I underline that, nothing compares to Emperor Qin's terracotta army." Historians know Qin Shi Huang for unifying warring states in 221 B.C. among other achievements. When he died roughly a decade later, he was buried surrounded by an army of 8,000 terracotta soldiers, horse-drawn chariots, weapons and accouterments for his journey into the afterlife. His mausoleum in Shaanxi Province, China, was hidden until 1974 when farmers accidentally unearthed pottery fragments. After discovering an army of figures buried in a single pit, archaeologists uncovered two additional pits a couple years later. Specialists continue to investigate the site, which was listed as an UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1987 and recently yielded a stone armor pit and a pit of bronze water birds. Beginning Nov. 18, "Terracotta Army: Legacy of the First Emperor of China" brings 10 warriors, each standing more than 6 feet tall, from Emperor Qin's army to the VMFA. They will stand alongside 120 other objects including arms, armor and ritual bronze vessels, as well as 40 objects that have never left China. Among the items is stone armor that archaeologists reassembled from nearly 700 fragments. This is the first exhibition of ancient Chinese art and archaeology organized by the museum, and it's meant to provide a comprehensive look at the unification of China and the broader context, visual culture, and legacy of Emperor Qin and his people. The items that date from the Zhou dynasty through the Qin dynasty, or from 1046 to 206 B.C., are on loan from 14 museums and archaeological institutes across Shaanxi Province. Co-curated by Li Jian, the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter curator of East Asian art at the museum and Hou-mei Sung, curator of Asian art at the Cincinnati Art Museum, the exhibition travels to the Ohio city in April. The exhibit continues the Virginia Museum's ongoing partnership with Chinese institutions that includes the exchange of collection items and staff. Nyerges hopes to renew this relationship, now in its final years, and build a consortium of American and Chinese museums that might collaborate. Nyerges suggests that future plans might include a survey exhibition of Chinese bronzes from the ancient tradition. "Terracotta Army" was conceived in 2009 as the museum's expansion was coming to an end. Shortly after Li Jian was hired in 2007, she and Nyerges traveled to China to begin discussing an exhibition of the terracotta warriors with the Shaanxi Provincial Bureau of Cultural Heritage and the Terracotta Army Museum. "[This] has been in development for over two years, since the closing of the exhibition 'Forbidden City: [Imperial Treasures from the Palace Museum, Beijing]' in early 2015," says Li Jian. It continues ideas that she explored in an earlier project, "Eternal China: Splendors from the First Dynasties," from 1998 at the Dayton Art Institute where she was then the curator of Asian art and Nyerges was its director. In hope of fully communicating the rarity of the site, the museum is sending a 12-person team of staffers and journalists for a weeklong junket in January to Xi'an and Beijing. "Seeing the terracotta warriors in the museum, being able to put some texture, context, the setting, the aromas, the site, [and] the sounds really help to build a greater portfolio of information around the objects themselves," Nyerges explains. Virginia audiences might already be somewhat familiar with the terracotta army. Portions have traveled to the United States several times, and the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia currently has an exhibition, "Terracotta Warriors of the First Emperor," with another 10 warriors. Li Jian and Nyerges both point out that this exhibition offers fresh research and a new emphasis, mainly on aesthetic concerns, as the exhibition uses objects to present a compelling story about the first emperor who standardized laws, coinage and road systems. "Among these objects are jade figures and objects from the royal tombs at Liangdaicun, a ritual mask used by nomadic groups, early Qin vessels, and a large selection of horse tack and chariot ornaments," Li Jian says. Also, the museum has produced an exhibition catalog that will be distributed by Yale University Press and is hosting related media events, including eight life-size replicas of the warriors that will appear at popular destinations throughout the commonwealth. Those stops are still being decided, says a communications official with the museum, but they expect locations throughout Northern, Central and Eastern Virginia, including Tyson's Corner and Main Street Station here in Richmond. You may not know it, but Alex Nyerges, executive director of the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, began his career as an archaeologist. It was a pursuit that took him around the world, including a visit to the mausoleum of the first emperor of China, Qin Shi Huang, some 25 years ago. He doesn't mince words when describing the experience. "I've seen pretty much all of the most important and memorable and legendary places in the world that archaeologists have dug over the last several centuries," he says. "Nothing, and I underline that, nothing compares to Emperor Qin's terracotta army." Historians know Qin Shi Huang for unifying warring states in 221 B.C. among other achievements. When he died roughly a decade later, he was buried surrounded by an army of 8,000 terracotta soldiers, horse-drawn chariots, weapons and accouterments for his journey into the afterlife. His mausoleum in Shaanxi Province, China, was hidden until 1974 when farmers accidentally unearthed pottery fragments. After discovering an army of figures buried in a single pit, archaeologists uncovered two additional pits a couple years later. Specialists continue to investigate the site, which was listed as an UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1987 and recently yielded a stone armor pit and a pit of bronze water birds. Beginning Nov. 18, "Terracotta Army: Legacy of the First Emperor of China" brings 10 warriors, each standing more than 6 feet tall, from Emperor Qin's army to the VMFA. They will stand alongside 120 other objects including arms, armor and ritual bronze vessels, as well as 40 objects that have never left China. Among the items is stone armor that archaeologists reassembled from nearly 700 fragments. This is the first exhibition of ancient Chinese art and archaeology organized by the museum, and it's meant to provide a comprehensive look at the unification of China and the broader context, visual culture, and legacy of Emperor Qin and his people. The items that date from the Zhou dynasty through the Qin dynasty, or from 1046 to 206 B.C., are on loan from 14 museums and archaeological institutes across Shaanxi Province. Co-curated by Li Jian, the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter curator of East Asian art at the museum and Hou-mei Sung, curator of Asian art at the Cincinnati Art Museum, the exhibition travels to the Ohio city in April. The exhibit continues the Virginia Museum's ongoing partnership with Chinese institutions that includes the exchange of collection items and staff. Nyerges hopes to renew this relationship, now in its final years, and build a consortium of American and Chinese museums that might collaborate. Nyerges suggests that future plans might include a survey exhibition of Chinese bronzes from the ancient tradition. "Terracotta Army" was conceived in 2009 as the museum's expansion was coming to an end. Shortly after Li Jian was hired in 2007, she and Nyerges traveled to China to begin discussing an exhibition of the terracotta warriors with the Shaanxi Provincial Bureau of Cultural Heritage and the Terracotta Army Museum. "[This] has been in development for over two years, since the closing of the exhibition 'Forbidden City: [Imperial Treasures from the Palace Museum, Beijing]' in early 2015," says Li Jian. It continues ideas that she explored in an earlier project, "Eternal China: Splendors from the First Dynasties," from 1998 at the Dayton Art Institute where she was then the curator of Asian art and Nyerges was its director. In hope of fully communicating the rarity of the site, the museum is sending a 12-person team of staffers and journalists for a weeklong junket in January to Xi'an and Beijing. "Seeing the terracotta warriors in the museum, being able to put some texture, context, the setting, the aromas, the site, [and] the sounds really help to build a greater portfolio of information around the objects themselves," Nyerges explains. Virginia audiences might already be somewhat familiar with the terracotta army. Portions have traveled to the United States several times, and the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia currently has an exhibition, "Terracotta Warriors of the First Emperor," with another 10 warriors. Li Jian and Nyerges both point out that this exhibition offers fresh research and a new emphasis, mainly on aesthetic concerns, as the exhibition uses objects to present a compelling story about the first emperor who standardized laws, coinage and road systems. "Among these objects are jade figures and objects from the royal tombs at Liangdaicun, a ritual mask used by nomadic groups, early Qin vessels, and a large selection of horse tack and chariot ornaments," Li Jian says. Also, the museum has produced an exhibition catalog that will be distributed by Yale University Press and is hosting related media events, including eight life-size replicas of the warriors that will appear at popular destinations throughout the commonwealth. Those stops are still being decided, says a communications official with the museum, but they expect locations throughout Northern, Central and Eastern Virginia, including Tyson's Corner and Main Street Station here in Richmond. S "Terracotta Army: Legacy of the First Emperor of China" is on view at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts' from Nov. 18 through March 11. For information, including related events, see vmfa.museum. "Terracotta Army: Legacy of the First Emperor of China" is on view at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts' from Nov. 18 through March 11. For information, including related events, see vmfa.museum.

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  • Inaugural American Indian Film Festival Aims to Help Reframe the PastInaugural American Indian Film Festival Aims to Help Reframe the Past

    For those not sure that Richmond's first American Indian film festival is a must-see, consider how legendary director Francis Ford Coppola reacted upon hearing about it: He immediately signed on as a sponsor. "Pocahontas Reframed: Native American Storytellers Film Festival," a three-day event at the Byrd Theatre, involves nine of Virginia's tribes and screens films that have been official selections of prestigious events such as Sundance Film Festival, the Toronto International Film Festival and the South by Southwest Film Festival. The idea was born at the end of last year's French Film Festival when a group of people with ties to the film industry — university professors, actors, a representative of the Virginia Film Office, the Byrd manager — began talking about doing a Native American Film Festival because there isn't one on the East Coast. "We all thought it was a great idea, and they looked at me and said, 'Brad, you do it,'" recalls Brad Brown, a member of the Pamunkey Indian tribe who serves on its council and is presently assistant chief. He laughs at the memory. Luckily, his job was made easier because Peter Kirkpatrick, co-founder of the popular French Film Festival, was friends with longtime actor George Aguilar, who knew almost every Native American actor and director. "Having George as part of the conversation was invaluable because he knows the ways Native Americans are treated in this business," Kirkpatrick explains. "He asked how he could be supportive, and it went on from there." The result is a long weekend that will weave together multiple genres by Native American artists: silent film, a 1961 classic now part of the Library of Congress' National Film Registry, documentaries, modern films, sketch comedy, a rapper who was part of the Standing Rock protest, and music performance. "The idea of the festival is that it's a community discussion between the public and the makers of the films," Kirkpatrick says. Similar to the French Film Festival, movies will be introduced by members of the delegation in attendance, including Native American producers, directors and actors. Aguilar, a member of the Apache and Yaqui tribes, will present "Rumble: the Indians Who Rocked the World," a documentary about the influence of indigenous people on popular music. Among those featured are Jimi Hendrix, Buffy Sainte-Marie and Link Wray, who helped shape America's soundtrack. Director Neil Diamond, a Cree filmmaker, will present "Reel Injun," which looks at how Hollywood has portrayed Indians and contributed to our understanding and misunderstanding of them. Using interviews people including directors and activists — Clint Eastwood, Sacheen Littlefeather, Robbie Robertson — Diamond's film is both a provocative and entertaining look at the racial politics of Hollywood. Pulling the festival together has been time-consuming. "I thought it was going to be a part-time job," Brown admits. "Until you do a film festival, you have no idea. It's a passion." Once he began digging in, Brown turned to the internet for assistance, researching how to create a film festival. That's when he found out how good he had it. The first two steps — finding a venue and finding sponsors — are considered the most difficult and had already happened. Right from the start, Byrd Theatre manager Todd Schall-Vess had offered what Brown and Kirkpatrick call "the best venue in Virginia." Besides Coppola, American Evolution, a group commemorating the 400th anniversary of several key events that occurred in 1619 (the first representative legislative assembly, the arrival of the first Africans and the recruitment of English women) signed on as a sponsor because it wanted the film festival to be a legacy project for the commemoration. Brown was contacted by American Indian filmmakers wanting to be part of the event, and eventually he found himself in the unenviable position of having to reject films. But he's already starting to plan next year's event, so some of those films may be shown in 2018. Currently, all major Native American film festivals are on the West Coast. The group's mission is to become the largest and most important American Indian festival back East. And because it's the first year, tickets are available on the website at no cost. Brown sees Virginia as particularly well-suited to the festival because it was the first place of contact with the English. "It's time to reframe those events and finally have the discussions about Native American people and cultures that never took place 400 years ago," he says. S "Pocahontas Reframed: Native American Storytellers Film Festival" runs Nov. 17-19 at the Byrd Theatre, 2908 Cary St. Visit pocahontasreframed.com for free tickets.

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  • Virginia Opera’s “Girl of the Golden West” Offers a Lush, Sweeping Puccini ScoreVirginia Opera’s “Girl of the Golden West” Offers a Lush, Sweeping Puccini Score

    If Giacomo Puccini's "Girl of the Golden West" sounds hauntingly familiar to first-time listeners, it's probably because they've heard it before. In fact, a musical phrase from the opera sounds so similar to the melody of "The Music of the Night" from "The Phantom of the Opera" that Puccini's estate supposedly sued for copyright infringement. The matter is said to have been settled out of court. "There are some Broadway musicals that [have] helped themselves to Mr. Puccini's music," teases Lillian Groag, director of Virginia Opera's "Girl of the Golden West," which comes to town this weekend. Having a melody lifted by the Phantom isn't "Golden West's" only distinction. It's also the rare opera set in America's Wild West. Taking place at a gold rush-era mining camp in California, the opera tells the tale of Minnie, a saloon proprietress who's caught up in a love triangle. While Sheriff Jack Rance wants to marry Minnie, she'd much rather get with Dick Johnson, a bandit whose alias is Ramerrez. Naturally, Rance has it out for his romantic rival with a double phallic name. "It's a spaghetti Western with barroom brawls, in the plural," explains Groag of the opera. "Broken bottles, broken chairs, guns and gunshots. It's wonderful." Even for those who aren't Andrew Lloyd Webber fans, the opera may still sound surprisingly familiar; hundreds of Western films have mimicked Puccini's score. "We might describe [Puccini's score] as cinematic, and there's a reason for that," explains conductor Andrew Bisantz. "When European composers were coming over to Hollywood in the '20s and '30s to write scores for American Westerns, they had no idea what an American Western should sound like, but they did know Puccini's 'Girl of the Golden West.'" And Bisantz isn't just entranced by the show because he's a part of it. When this incarnation of the opera premiered years ago at New York's Glimmerglass Festival he was so entranced that he saw it 11 times in a row. "It is a rare chance to see one of Puccini's great masterpieces done well," says Bisantz of this production. "If you like 'Tosca,' if you like '[Madama] Butterfly' and certainly 'Turandot,' you will absolutely love this piece." While not as popular as the other Puccini operas Bisantz mentions, "Golden West" still boasts a lush, sweeping score and other hallmarks of the composer's work. "The show is not done often because it's a big show, and it's also extremely hard to sing," Groag explains. "You need huge voices, and you need stamina to last through the whole thing. " One such voice belongs to soprano Jill Gardner, who portrays Minnie in "Golden West." "This is an opera about characters that Americans are going to understand," Gardner says. "The American West is so much a part of our knowledge and experience in this country." In the town where the opera takes place, Minnie is more than just a proprietress; she's also the emotional heart of the male-dominated community of miners and gunslingers. "In a real way, she's also the mother to all of these boys," Gardner says. "She's a woman of faith, she's a major character of integrity in this story." Gardner encourages operagoers to ditch the fancy attire and dress the part instead. "Put your Western wear on, get your cowboy boots on, get your blue jeans on, and come see a Western at the opera," she says. "There will be guns, there will be fights, there's lots of whiskey being passed around. "It's a great love story set in the American West." S Virginia Opera's "Girl of the Golden West" plays Nov. 17 and 19 at the Dominion Arts Center, 600 E. Grace St. For information, visit vaopera.org or call 866-673-7282.

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