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    Google News / 31 min. ago
  • Have you seen these babies? Police: 2 girls endangered, taken by moms in Western NYHave you seen these babies? Police: 2 girls endangered, taken by moms in Western NY

    Officials say the missing mothers and their babies are together.

    Syracuse.com / 43 min. ago
  • AC/DC co-founder, guitarist Malcolm Young dies at 64AC/DC co-founder, guitarist Malcolm Young dies at 64

    Malcolm Young founded the Australian rock band in 1973 with his brother, Angus Young, who survives him.

    Syracuse.com / 58 min. ago
  • Woman stabbed in Syracuse during fight in the ValleyWoman stabbed in Syracuse during fight in the Valley

    The stabbing happened around 1:15 a.m. on West Glen Avenue.

    Syracuse.com / 2 h. 58 min. ago
  • Woman stabbed in Syracuse during fight in the Valley - Syracuse.comWoman stabbed in Syracuse during fight in the Valley - Syracuse.com

    Syracuse.comWoman stabbed in Syracuse during fight in the ValleySyracuse.comSYRACUSE, N.Y. -- A woman was stabbed early Saturday morning in Syracuse during a fight in the Valley. The Syracuse Police Department to the 200 block of West Glen Avenue at 1:15 a.m. after a stabbing was reported, said Sgt. Richard Helterline, a ...Two people arrested after attempted robbery in SyracuseCNYcentral.comSyracuse Police looking for details after early morning stabbingWSYRall 3 news articles »

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  • Surprise! New Christmas movie filmed in Syracuse airing on TV todaySurprise! New Christmas movie filmed in Syracuse airing on TV today

    The film changed titles twice.

    Syracuse.com / 3 h. 22 min. ago
  • Seth Collier's mom speaks to man who killed her son: 'You...Seth Collier's mom speaks to man who killed her son: 'You...

    The Syracuse teenager finished his late shift at Burger King on March 21 and ventured out into the cold, dark morning to begin the 3-mile walk to his North Side home. Collier was a full-time employee, his mother said -- saving up for a car and working hard to become a shift manager.

    Syracuse News / 3 h. 47 min. ago
  • 6 to 8 inches of snow expected in Upstate NY lake effect areas6 to 8 inches of snow expected in Upstate NY lake effect areas

    The heaviest snow will fall Sunday night and Monday morning.

    Syracuse.com / 6 h. 9 min. ago
  • Woman jumps from 3rd floor to escape DeWitt apartment fireWoman jumps from 3rd floor to escape DeWitt apartment fire

    The apartments along Caton Drive caught fire just before 11 p.m. Friday.

    Syracuse.com / 10 h. 52 min. ago
  • Firefighters responding to DeWitt apartment fire near Le Moyne CollegeFirefighters responding to DeWitt apartment fire near Le Moyne College

    The fire broke out just before 11 p.m. Friday.

    Syracuse.com / 12 h. 23 min. ago
  • Jamesville couple makes record $8 million donation to Upstate Medical University - Syracuse.comJamesville couple makes record $8 million donation to Upstate Medical University - Syracuse.com

    Syracuse.comJamesville couple makes record $8 million donation to Upstate Medical UniversitySyracuse.comThey also had a hand in the creation of the St. Joseph's Hospital Emergency Services building, the Christina M. Nappi Surgical Tower, and created Syracuse University's Biomedical Stem Cell Laboratory, officials said. "Sam and Carol Nappi have shown ...Local couple donate $8 million to Upstate Medical to fund neuroscienceCNYcentral.comall 3 news articles »

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  • Jamesville couple makes record $8 million donation to Upstate Medical UniversityJamesville couple makes record $8 million donation to Upstate Medical University

    The money will go toward a new eight-floor, 360,000 square foot wellness complex, according to Upstate officials.

    Syracuse.com / 13 h. 57 min. ago
  • New York Fire Chiefs to hold three conventions in Syracuse New York Fire Chiefs to hold three conventions in Syracuse

    The event is expected to bring 15,000 visitors to downtown Syracuse each year.

    Syracuse.com / 16 h. 28 min. ago
  • New York Fire Chiefs to hold three conventions in Syracuse ... - Syracuse.comNew York Fire Chiefs to hold three conventions in Syracuse ... - Syracuse.com

    Syracuse.comNew York Fire Chiefs to hold three conventions in Syracuse ...Syracuse.comThe event is expected to bring 15000 visitors to downtown Syracuse each year.Shareholders approve sale of Syracuse Chiefs to the NY Mets | WSTMCNYcentral.comShareholders approve sale of the Syracuse Chiefs to the Mets - WSYRWSYRShareholders approve sale of Syracuse Chiefs to MetsAmazin' Avenueall 7 news articles »

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  • Blaze Pizza coming to SyracuseBlaze Pizza coming to Syracuse

    LeBron James-backed pizza chain will open its first Central New York restaurant near Syracuse University.

    Syracuse.com / 17 h. 18 min. ago
  • Blaze Pizza coming to Syracuse - Syracuse.comBlaze Pizza coming to Syracuse - Syracuse.com

    Syracuse.comBlaze Pizza coming to SyracuseSyracuse.comSyracuse, N.Y. -- Blaze Pizza, the fast-growing pizza chain part-owned by LeBron James, plans to open its first Central New York location near Syracuse University next year. The company's website lists 727 S. Crouse Ave. as a Blaze Pizza location ...

    Google News / 17 h. 18 min. ago
  • GOP plan taxes employee tuition benefits at Hamilton College, Syracuse, Le MoyneGOP plan taxes employee tuition benefits at Hamilton College, Syracuse, Le Moyne

    Hundreds of employees at Upstate New York colleges would have to pay taxes on millions of dollars in tuition benefits for their children.

    Syracuse.com / 17 h. 39 min. ago
  • Homeowner killed when structure goes up in flames in Northern NYHomeowner killed when structure goes up in flames in Northern NY

    The property at 202 Main Ave. in Watertown caught fire around 1:30 a.m. Friday.

    Syracuse.com / 18 h. 46 min. ago
  • Thanksgiving week in CNY could start with 'hazardous' travel from ... - Syracuse.comThanksgiving week in CNY could start with 'hazardous' travel from ... - Syracuse.com

    NewYorkUpstate.comThanksgiving week in CNY could start with 'hazardous' travel from ...Syracuse.comSyracuse could get 6 inches of snow by Monday evening.6 to 8 inches of snow expected in Upstate NY lake effect areas ...NewYorkUpstate.comHeavy lake effect snow likely Sunday night/Monday morningWSYRall 7 news articles »

    Google News / 19 h. 39 min. ago
  • Thanksgiving week in CNY could start with 'hazardous' travel from heavy snowThanksgiving week in CNY could start with 'hazardous' travel from heavy snow

    Syracuse could get 6 inches of snow by Monday evening.

    Syracuse.com / 19 h. 41 min. ago
  • Not guilty a 3rd time: Syracuse man cleared of 2007 murder despite angry ex's effortsNot guilty a 3rd time: Syracuse man cleared of 2007 murder despite angry ex's efforts

    A Syracuse man has now been found not guilty in three separate trials in the past four years -- the latest being a murder trial. Alfred Thomas Jr., 30, twice acquitted of weapons charges , was found not guilty today by a jury of murdering Silas "Keith" Collier in 2007.

    Syracuse News / 19 h. 52 min. ago
  • What channel is Syracuse football-Louisville on? TV, time, live stream infoWhat channel is Syracuse football-Louisville on? TV, time, live stream info

    The Orange has lost three straight contests since upsetting No. 2 Clemson, most recently a 63-41 defeat against Wake Forest last weekend.

    Syracuse News / 19 h. 52 min. ago
  • Deputies identify man killed in fiery Onondaga SUV crashDeputies identify man killed in fiery Onondaga SUV crash

    An SUV went off the road, knocking down a tree and wires. The driver was trapped inside the vehicle.

    Syracuse.com / 19 h. 56 min. ago
  • What channel is Syracuse basketball vs. Texas Southern on? Live stream info and tipoff time - Syracuse.comWhat channel is Syracuse basketball vs. Texas Southern on? Live stream info and tipoff time - Syracuse.com

    Syracuse.comWhat channel is Syracuse basketball vs. Texas Southern on? Live stream info and tipoff timeSyracuse.comSyracuse, N.Y. -- The Syracuse basketball team improved its record to 2-0 after its 71-62 win over Iona at the Carrier Dome on Tuesday. The Orange will host Texas Southern at 7 p.m. Saturday. Texas Southern is 0-3 after three high-profile road games.and more »

    Google News / 20 h. 31 min. ago more
  • After Months of Uncertainty, Golden Corral Is Coming to SyracuseAfter Months of Uncertainty, Golden Corral Is Coming to Syracuse

    After months of uncertainty, plans for a new Golden Corral in Syracuse are back on. According to Syracuse.com, the popular buffet-style restaurant, Golden Corral, is now slated to open a Syracuse location by the end of 2018. Back in 2005, Central New York’s only Golden Corral (located on Fourth Street in Fulton in Oswego County) was closed. But In April 2016, Golden Corral announced its proposal to open a new location on the East Side of Syracuse. The proposal ended up fizzling out, however, once the franchise pulled out of the deal. As of mid-November, the deal is officially back on for the restaurant to open up on a vacant lot at 115 Simon Drive in Syracuse. Americans consume more than 10 million bowls of soup every year and Golden Corral patrons are a big part of that. Golden Corral has been in operation since 1973 and currently has 200 locations across the country in 42 states. Families have enjoyed all-you-can-eat soups, breakfast foods, steak dinners, and plenty of desserts for nearly 45 years. The new restaurant will be company-owned and not a franchised operation. As far as the building’s dimensions go, the restaurant will be approximately 10,308 square feet, roughly 800 square feet smaller than the original proposal back in April 2016. Additionally, there will be 240 parking spaces on the premises. The initial plans for the building included seating accommodations for at least 400 people. For the entire Golden Corral organization, throughout its history, gross sales have earned approximately $1.53 billion. Currently, there are five Golden Corral locations in New York State, including Queensbury, Colonie, Saratoga Springs, Middletown, and Rochester. Click here to comment on this article on our Facebook page. The post After Months of Uncertainty, Golden Corral Is Coming to Syracuse appeared first on CNY Vision.

    CNY Vision / 20 h. 59 min. ago more
  • More than 50 children officially join new families during mass adoption at Oncenter - Syracuse.comMore than 50 children officially join new families during mass adoption at Oncenter - Syracuse.com

    Syracuse.comMore than 50 children officially join new families during mass adoption at OncenterSyracuse.comSyracuse, NY - Forty-two families saw their lives change today during an annual mass adoption ceremony at the Convention Center at Oncenter. A total of 52 children - including 37 Onondaga County children - wer eadopted by families during the festive ...

    Google News / 21 h. 10 min. ago more
  • Syracuse vs. Louisville Official TNIAAM Predictions & PollSyracuse vs. Louisville Official TNIAAM Predictions & Poll

    The Syracuse Orange are staring into the abyss, and to make matter worse, it smells like terrible pizza. SU goes on the road Saturday to face the Louisville Cardinals .

    Syracuse News / 22 h. 17 min. ago
  • Honeywell To Complete Onondaga Lake Cleanup By November’s EndHoneywell To Complete Onondaga Lake Cleanup By November’s End

    Honeywell has announced that after five years of work, the company will finally finish its cleanup of Onondaga Lake by the end of this month. Allied, which acquired Honeywell in 1999 and changed its name accordingly, dumped approximately 165,000 pounds of mercury into Onondaga Lake from 1946 to 1970. The New York State Department of Conservation ordered Honeywell to take responsibility for the lake cleanup back in 2006. In 2014, the company finished dredging the bottom of the lake, 2.2 million cubic yards of ground in all, and in 2016, they capped 475 acres of lake bottom. They are expected to complete the restoration of 90 acres of wetlands and addition of underwater rock structures this month. The company will monitor the cap through 2026, which will include the testing of plants, water, plankton, and fish tissue. They will also continue to add nitrate to the lake bottom to reduce mercury levels, which were found to be so toxic in 2014 that experts estimated 20% of shore bird chicks would not survive as a result. Although swimming is the fourth most popular activity in the United States, residents would do well to stay out of Onondaga waters for now — particularly after last month, when the problematic Ley Creek Pipe burst yet again, dumping 4.5 million gallons of raw sewage and rain water into the lake. Honeywell has received criticism for their efforts. The Onondaga Nation has made it known that they believe that their clean-up has been more of a cover-up of toxic chemicals, a sentiment echoed by a former EPA regional director who said that beneath the sand caps lies nearly 10 million cubic yards of contaminated sediment. In addition to the final stages of cleanup and monitoring, Honeywell is also responsible for building trails, fishing piers, and additional wildlife habitats as part of a partnership with the federal government. In 2006, the estimated cost of cleanup was around $451 million, but Honeywell has declined to discuss the actual costs of the efforts. The post Honeywell To Complete Onondaga Lake Cleanup By November’s End appeared first on CNY Vision.

    CNY Vision / 22 h. 39 min. ago more
  • Not guilty a 3rd time: Syracuse man cleared of 2007 murder despite angry ex's efforts - Syracuse.comNot guilty a 3rd time: Syracuse man cleared of 2007 murder despite angry ex's efforts - Syracuse.com

    Syracuse.comNot guilty a 3rd time: Syracuse man cleared of 2007 murder despite angry ex's effortsSyracuse.comSyracuse, NY -- A Syracuse man has now been found not guilty in three separate trials in the past four years -- the latest being a murder trial. Alfred Thomas Jr., 30, twice acquitted of weapons charges, was found not guilty today by a jury of ...

    Google News / 23 h. 16 min. ago more
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  • Game day beer picks: Syracuse vs. LouisvilleGame day beer picks: Syracuse vs. Louisville

    The Syracuse Orange are on the road for the final time this season, heading out to face the Louisville Cardinals for a 3:30 p.m. ET kickoff. As we've mentioned all week, it's a must-win.

    Syracuse News / 1 d. 0 h. 51 min. ago
  • Ex-DA investigator gets 2 to 6 years in prison for crash that killed Syracuse teen - Syracuse.comEx-DA investigator gets 2 to 6 years in prison for crash that killed Syracuse teen - Syracuse.com

    Syracuse.comEx-DA investigator gets 2 to 6 years in prison for crash that killed Syracuse teenSyracuse.comSYRACUSE, N.Y. -- Peter Rauch was sentenced today to 2 to 6 years in prison for a drunken hit-and-run crash that killed a teenager in Syracuse. Under law, the maximum Rauch could have faced was 2 1/3 to 7 years for each of the crimes he pleaded guilty ...Friends, family of Seth Collier react to Peter Rauch's sentencingWSYRall 17 news articles »

    Google News / 1 d. 2 h. 9 min. ago more
  • Upstate NY weather: Rain, high winds and maybe some 'plowable' lake effect snow - NewYorkUpstate.comUpstate NY weather: Rain, high winds and maybe some 'plowable' lake effect snow - NewYorkUpstate.com

    NewYorkUpstate.comUpstate NY weather: Rain, high winds and maybe some 'plowable' lake effect snowNewYorkUpstate.comSyracuse, N.Y. -- Upstate New York is in for a soaking rain this weekend, followed by a cold front that could bring blowing lake effect snow as Thanksgiving week begins. The National Weather Service has issued hazardous weather outlooks for nearly all ...and more »

    Google News / 1 d. 3 h. 7 min. ago more
  • Thanksgiving 2017: Your guide to Thanksgiving Eve in SyracuseThanksgiving 2017: Your guide to Thanksgiving Eve in Syracuse

    The Wednesday before Thanksgiving is the busiest bar night of the year. For folks returning to their hometown for the holiday, it's an unofficial high school reunion with too much booze and an eventual hangover that'll be cured by turkey, mashed potatoes and stuffing.

    Syracuse News / 1 d. 3 h. 26 min. ago
  • DeWitt man repeatedly threatened to stab, kill wife during kidnapping, records sayDeWitt man repeatedly threatened to stab, kill wife during kidnapping, records say

    With his wife bound with duct tape in a cardboard box, William Sullivan repeatedly opened and closed a folding knife and threatened to stab her and kill her, according to court documents. Sullivan 38, of DeWitt, was arrested Nov. 3 by the Onondaga County Sheriff's Office after a domestic violence and drug investigation.

    Syracuse News / 1 d. 8 h. 24 min. ago
  • Deputies: Man trying to flee cops hit by tractor-trailer, killed in GeddesDeputies: Man trying to flee cops hit by tractor-trailer, killed in Geddes

    A man who was trying to flee from police died Thursday morning after he was hit by a tractor-trailer on Interstate 690, deputies said. A 22-year-old East Syracuse man was hit by a tractor-trailer at on I-690 east near the Route 695 interchange, said Sgt.

    Syracuse News / 1 d. 13 h. 1 min. ago
  • Syracuse church returns from medical mission trip to HaitiSyracuse church returns from medical mission trip to Haiti

    For years, one Syracuse church has held dear its bond with a church in Haiti, and its most recent medical mission has made a lasting impact on that Haitian community. In October, the Church of St. Michael and St. Peter in Syracuse held its annual book sale to raise money for its sister church in Chauffard, Haiti.

    Syracuse News / 1 d. 17 h. 43 min. ago
  • Syracuse wearing white helmets, white jerseys, orange pants vs. LouisvilleSyracuse wearing white helmets, white jerseys, orange pants vs. Louisville

    After last weekend's #PLATINUM disaster, it was time to get back to basics on the uniform front. So, the Syracuse Orange graciously decided to wear some orange against the Louisville Cardinals , just to get us looking a little more like ourselves.

    Syracuse News / 1 d. 22 h. 28 min. ago
  • Syracuse son can't recall bludgeoning mom to death with hammer; pleads insanitySyracuse son can't recall bludgeoning mom to death with hammer; pleads insanity

    A Syracuse man who was seen leaving a University Hill apartment building with a bloody hammer says he doesn't remember bludgeoning his mom to death, his lawyer said. Jamar Brown, 24, today pleaded not responsible by reason of mental disease or defect in the August 2016 murder of Sarah Brantley, 60. The incident started when Brantley called Brown's father, saying Brown was at her apartment with a hammer.

    Syracuse News / 2 d. 0 h. 57 min. ago more
  • Golden Corral plan to open a restaurant in Syracuse is back on, moving forwardGolden Corral plan to open a restaurant in Syracuse is back on, moving forward

    In April 2016, Golden Corral proposed opening one of its all-you-can-eat buffet restaurants on Syracuse's east side. Ten months later, the proposal fizzled when the franchisee pulled out of the deal, corporate officials said at the time.

    Syracuse News / 2 d. 0 h. 57 min. ago
  • City Announces Annual “Share Your Story” Home for the Holidays ChallengeCity Announces Annual “Share Your Story” Home for the Holidays Challenge

    By Staff –   Mayor Stephanie Miner has announced the “Share Your Story” challenge, as part of the city’s annual Home for the Holidays celebration. Three Syracuse students who share a holiday story will join Mayor Miner on stage to light the Clinton Square tree Friday, Nov. 24, at 6:30 p.m., city officials said. This will mark the eighth year of the contest. “This is a great opportunity to engage students in reading during the holiday season,” Mayor Miner stated. “This contest showcases creativity from students and I encourage all school students to submit an entry.” The city has asked students to name their favorite holiday story or book, and share their personal connection to it through their writing or drawing of a favorite scene in the tale. Applicants may submit their entries electronically to mayor@syrgov.net, or mail to: Mayor Stephanie Miner Office of the Mayor-Suite 203 233 East Washington St. Syracuse, New York 13202 The city must receive all entries by 5 p.m., Friday, Nov. 17; winners will be notified Monday, Nov. 20, by 5 p.m. Students must also be Syracuse residents, and all entries should include the student’s name, grade, name of the student’s school, name of their parent/guardian, and their telephone number, the city said. Click here to comment on this article on our Facebook page.   The post City Announces Annual “Share Your Story” Home for the Holidays Challenge appeared first on CNY Vision.

    CNY Vision / 2 d. 19 h. 14 min. ago more
  • City Receives $20,000 Grant to Create Financial Empowerment CenterCity Receives $20,000 Grant to Create Financial Empowerment Center

    By Staff –   Mayor Stephanie Miner has announced the city will receive a $20,000 grant from the Cities for Financial Empowerment (CFE) Fund and Bloomberg Philanthropies to develop and integrate a Financial Empowerment Center to help residents better manage their personal finances, and to lift families out of systemic poverty. “The struggle to end systemic poverty must include teaching families how to manage their finances, stay out of overwhelming debt, and build savings,” Mayor Miner said. “I look forward to the creation of a Financial Empowerment Center to compliment work already being done by government and nonprofit agencies working to alleviate poverty in Syracuse. I appreciate the support of the CFE Fund and Bloomberg Philanthropies in making resources available to address this issue.” Earlier this year, the city also received a $20,000 planning grant from the CFE Fund to study the personal financial needs of Syracuse residents. The $20,000 grant for the second phase will determine what a Financial Empowerment Center would look like when created: partnerships that will be needed, how it will be staffed, and the availability of sustainable funding streams, the city said. Visit www.cfefund.org for additional information regarding the CFE Fund. Click here to comment on this article on our Facebook page. The post City Receives $20,000 Grant to Create Financial Empowerment Center appeared first on CNY Vision.

    CNY Vision / 3 d. 16 h. 53 min. ago more
  • Marriott Syracuse Downtown Hotel Wins Outstanding AAA Award, Prepares For ExpansionMarriott Syracuse Downtown Hotel Wins Outstanding AAA Award, Prepares For Expansion

    According to Syracuse.com, the Marriott Syracuse Downtown is the only hotel in the city to earn AAA’s Four-Diamond Rating. Out of nearly 28,000 properties AAA judges each year, less than 6% receive the high rating. “We are thrilled to be recognized by AAA with this significant achievement. It’s a resounding testament to the work and vision that our team has devoted to bringing a hotel for the 21st century to life in the footprint of one of last century’s grandest,” said Marriott Syracuse Downtown owner Ed Riley in a news release. The hotel came to be after what was once known as the Hotel Syracuse underwent a $76 million restoration and reopened in August 2016. Now, the hotel features 261 rooms plus two restaurants: Shaughnessy’s Irish Pub and Eleven Waters. The AAA’s award isn’t the first the hotel has received. The Historic Hotels of America declared the Marriott earlier this year as the “Best City Center Historic Hotel” in the country for 2017. Of course, the renovations aren’t quite complete. Riley announced back in June that he plans to add a total of 54 guest rooms to the second, third, and 11th floors. He also wants to add a third restaurant — a steakhouse — to the first floor. Riley initially planned on adding the steakhouse to the 11th floor, but he has since altered those plants to allow for more guests. Building it on the first floor allows it to be combined with a re-creation of the hotel’s Rainbow Lounge art deco bar. The Lounge was initially intended to be used as a “pre-meeting” area during hotel events, although it was not open to the general public. Once the steakhouse gets added, however, the bar will be open to the public. The interior design industry generates $10 billion in revenue annually, and the prices of the guest room and restaurant additions bring the total cost of the renovation project to about $94.1 million. The work is expected to be completed during the first quarter of 2018 in order to be ready in time for the U.S. Bowling Congress’ Open Championships, which run from March to July at the Oncenter and is expected to bring about 80,000 visitors to Syracuse. Click here to comment on this article on our Facebook page. The post Marriott Syracuse Downtown Hotel Wins Outstanding AAA Award, Prepares For Expansion appeared first on CNY Vision.

    CNY Vision / 8 d. 2 h. 1 min. ago more
  • Former Prosecutor Defends Racial Bias Charge In Child Rape CaseFormer Prosecutor Defends Racial Bias Charge In Child Rape Case

    On Thursday, November 9, former prosecutor Anthony Germano defended a charge of racial bias in the case of a 2014 child rape trial. Germano was accused of dismissing a potential juror for the case because she was a black woman. The accusation of racial bias came from Craig Davis, the rapist convicted in the aforementioned case. Davis challenged Germano on appeal after which an appellate court from Rochester began an investigation. The Rochester appellate court ruled the Onondaga County District Attorney’s Office must be able to show a race-neutral reason for the disqualification for the juror. According to Syracuse.com, Germano’s testimony came down to a series of side notes he’d jotted down on a jury selection sheet in 2014 for the child rape case. The notes included the shorthand “what type” and “talk.” Germano, who now works in a private practice, said November 9 that he was unsure of what the notes were supposed to mean. The case took place over three years ago. “There was something I did not particularly like,” Germano said. He added that whatever it was he hadn’t liked about the juror, it must have been a race-neutral reason. During his testimony, Germano said the notes were due to something he’d seen on the dismissed juror’s questionnaire. The questionnaire is something all jurors must fill out prior to selection to reduce the risk of bias during the trial. Germano said he had a question about one of the dismissed juror’s answers on the questionnaire. However, before Germano could ask the question to the juror, Judge Anthony Aloi had informed him the time to question the jurors had ended. Unable to ask the question he needed, Germano said, he dismissed the juror from consideration based on peremptory challenge. At the time of the dismissal, defense attorney Paul Carey had questioned the motives of Germano’s removal of the juror. However, Germano had informed Aloi he had a race-neutral reason for the dismissal. Aloi agreed to Germano’s decision. During the November 9 hearing, Germano indicated multiple questions on the juror questionnaire that may have warranted his side notes. These questions included: “did you ever sit on a jury before? Have you or someone you know ever been convicted of a crime, been a victim of a crime or sued?” However, the original dismissed juror’s questionnaire hadn’t been kept and therefore her answers were unavailable. When pressed by lawyer John Gilsenan about Germano’s inability to say the question he wanted more information about, Germano replied he couldn’t remember the question. Senior Assistant District Attorney Jeremy Cali indicated the questionnaire had no bearing on race. Davis remains in prison where he is still convicted of child rape. Class A misdemeanors such as prostitution and solicitation are punishable by up to one year in prison. However, child rape is a felony. Davis has served only three years of a seven-year sentence. The hearing regarding Germano’s potential racial bias on the case was adjourned and will continue on November 21. Click here to comment on this article on our Facebook page. The post Former Prosecutor Defends Racial Bias Charge In Child Rape Case appeared first on CNY Vision.

    CNY Vision / 8 d. 2 h. 38 min. ago more
  • Cornell Cooperative Extension Names SCSD Director of Food and Nutrition 2017 “Outstanding Cooperator”Cornell Cooperative Extension Names SCSD Director of Food and Nutrition 2017 “Outstanding Cooperator”

    By Staff –   Cornell Cooperative Extension of Onondaga County has recognized Rachel Murphy, Syracuse City School District’s director of Food and Nutrition Services, as the 2017 “Outstanding Cooperator for Nutrition.” Murphy has worked closely with CCE Onondaga to support key community nutrition education initiatives that benefit local youth and families, SCSD said. Most recently, the partnership has focused on co-writing the Nutrition Education Standards for the 2017-18 School Wellness Policy, training for all district staff, supporting CATCH trainings for PE and health teachers, as well as recruitment for community nutrition education for parents. According to the district, Murphy has worked with CCE for over 5 years. Click here to comment on this article on our Facebook page. The post Cornell Cooperative Extension Names SCSD Director of Food and Nutrition 2017 “Outstanding Cooperator” appeared first on CNY Vision.

    CNY Vision / 8 d. 18 h. 35 min. ago more
  • Ben Walsh Elected Syracuse Mayor; City Council, School Board Incumbents Re-ElectedBen Walsh Elected Syracuse Mayor; City Council, School Board Incumbents Re-Elected

    By Staff –   Ben Walsh, Photo: Facebook Independent Ben Walsh has been elected Syracuse’s new mayor, in a surprising upset over Democratic nominee Juanita Perez-Williams. Walsh won 54 percent of the vote on Tuesday, in a city that largely votes Democratic, compared to Perez-Williams’ 38 percent. Green Party candidate Howie Hawkins and Republican candidate Laura Lavine each garnered 4 percent, and 2.4 percent of the vote, respectively. “Because of this decision, your decision, I know with more conviction than ever that the best days in the history of Syracuse are still ahead of us,” Walsh said during his victory speech. In the city council race for the 4th District, LaToya Allen won the seat vacated by Khalid Bey, while Bey moved into an at-large city council seat. Common Council candidate and community favorite Quante Wright won 20 percent of the vote for the seat. Timothy Rudd has also won an at-large seat, and incumbent councilors Joseph Carni, Chad Ryan, and Susan Boyle have also been re-elected. In addition, Common Council member Helen Hudson has been elected as president of the council. Syracuse City School District school board president Derrick Dorsey, vice president Patricia Body, and board member David Cecile have also been re-elected. All of the re-elected school board members are Democrats. Click here to comment on this article on our Facebook page. The post Ben Walsh Elected Syracuse Mayor; City Council, School Board Incumbents Re-Elected appeared first on CNY Vision.

    CNY Vision / 9 d. 18 h. 47 min. ago more
  • Price Chopper to Offer New Grocery Delivery Service in SyracusePrice Chopper to Offer New Grocery Delivery Service in Syracuse

    By Staff –   Price Chopper has partnered with Instacart, a new grocery-delivery service,  to offer same-day delivery in both Binghamton and Syracuse. The delivery fee for orders over $35 is $5.99 for orders placed at least two hours in advance, and $7.99 for orders requested within one hour. According to officials, the in-store price of Price Chopper’s products will remain the same as the delivered items, and the products available for delivery will contain “the vast majority of advertised sale prices.” “We’re proud of the product mix and shopping experience we provide in our stores,” Glen Bradley, Price Chopper’s vice president of marketing, stated. “And, we’re thrilled to extend both beyond our four walls by adding the convenience of grocery delivery through Instacart in these four markets. We know that our customers are busy and always looking for ways to save both time and money. Offering fresh produce, the best meats and grocery staples delivered right to the doorstep at a good value is yet another way that we can serve our customers. “Instacart’s success hinges on our ability to offer customers same-day delivery from the stores they love within their own communities,” Andrew Nodes, Instacart ‘s vice president of retail accounts, said. “We are proud to partner with Price Chopper and Market 32 Supermarkets to give customers a convenient, time-saving option to get the products they’ve come to rely on from this beloved brand.” Price Rite and Wegmans also offer delivery through Instacart in the area. Visit www.pricechopper.com for additional information regarding the service. Click here to comment on this article on our Facebook page. The post Price Chopper to Offer New Grocery Delivery Service in Syracuse appeared first on CNY Vision.

    CNY Vision / 10 d. 19 h. 15 min. ago more
  • Produce Food Truck Drives Up To Provide Fruits And Veggies In West SyracuseProduce Food Truck Drives Up To Provide Fruits And Veggies In West Syracuse

    A Syracuse food truck is putting a new twist on mobile vending — one that includes plenty of fruits and veggies. Syracuse.com reports that the Farm Fresh Mobile Market truck has opened in the parking lot of St. Joseph’s Primary Care Center – West. This new food service is providing much-needed relief after Nojaim Brothers Supermarket closed on Glifford Street. Among those most affected by the store’s closure were the West Side residents who were part of a diabetes education program, according to Syracuse.com. These residents receive $10 coupons for fruits and vegetables each time they attend a class at St. Joe’s. The Farm Fresh truck will now be parked outside of the church after every class. “It gives me salad for the month,” Patricia Sprague, one of the program participants, said in a statement to WAER. “I don’t have to worry about not having the things that I need because I’m able to get them. Fruits, vegetables, greens…you can get all that at the truck or Nojaim’s when it was open. It’s a blessing.” A Healthy Alternative Syracuse.com reports that St. Joe’s started the coupon program because there were many people in the surrounding neighborhood living with diabetes. And while a Harris Poll recently ranked pizza as the country’s top comfort food, this is not the type of food that people with illnesses need for nourishment. The ideal meal plan for someone with diabetes includes fresh foods, low carbohydrate intake, and little fat, according to the American Diabetes Association. The St. Joe’s coupon program allows lower-income populations to access the produce needed to regulate their blood sugar and commit to a balanced diet. “We wanted to get into the food deserts,” Diane Turner, who runs the Southside Interfaith Community Development Corporation, said in a statement to WAER. “A lot of the areas just don’t have the fresh produce that they need. We tried it with the corner stores, but they don’t want to provide what we have.” Just as medical professionals recommend that adults get seven to nine hours of sleep per night, it’s essential that those with diabetes, in particular, eat a healthy diet. This disease can lead to kidney disease, heart disease, and other complications. And for those in the program, the Farm Fresh Mobile Market truck is certainly meeting this demand, if not stretching to meet it. “It’ll go,” Turner told WAER. “There’s a lot of food in the truck. I’ll say I’ll be pretty much empty.” Click here to comment on this article on our Facebook page. The post Produce Food Truck Drives Up To Provide Fruits And Veggies In West Syracuse appeared first on CNY Vision.

    CNY Vision / 14 d. 20 h. 33 min. ago more
  • The Truth Is Out ThereThe Truth Is Out There

    Are we alone in the universe? According to UFO researcher and columnist Cheryl Costa, the answer is an emphatic no. And her book, UFO Sightings Desk Reference: United States of America 2001-2015 (paperback, $39.95), released on March 24, has the statistics to back up that claim. Costa and her wife, Linda Miller Costa, co-authored the 359-page amalgam of bar graphs and Excel sheets over a 16-month period of incessant number crunching. The book encompasses data from all 50 states from 2001 to 2015, which includes the number of sightings by month and year broken down by state and county. Shapes of the UFOs are also prominently featured. Cheryl Costa in her study room. Michael Davis Photo Due to her book’s groundbreaking subject matter, Costa has garnered national media attention from radio stations, science magazines, and even The New York Times. The task of gathering data from privately funded and civilian-run organizations was tedious, yet Costa was determined to release that information in a way that she said has never been done before. “This was the compelling notion: Let’s publish the numbers,” Costa said. “Let’s show people just how big this is. And we suspected it was really big.” Costa officially retired from the work force in February after nearly 10 years in the Air Force and the Navy as an electronic surveillance technician, more than 30 years at Lockheed Martin as a computer security analyst, and several other short-lived jobs. She now spends her time furthering her research on UFOs and writing a well-trafficked column on the Syracuse New Times website called New York Skies. Since starting the column in 2012, Costa has spoken at numerous symposiums around the country. Following the release of her book, more doors have been opened to speaking opportunities than ever before. “We did one in Erie, Pa., and we had an audience there from New York, Pennsylvania and Ohio,” Costa said. “So I shared charts with them for their individual states. At these conventions I talk to everybody about everything.” Costa is set to speak at the 2018 International UFO Congress in Arizona, which takes place Feb. 14 to 18. The event is the largest UFO conference in the nation, boasting 3,000 to 5,000 attendees per day each year. Closer to home, Costa will speak at the Center for the Arts, 72 S. Main St., Homer, on Thursday, Oct. 26, 7 p.m. At the free event, she plans to take a break from discussing more recent UFO sightings to instead discuss experiences from the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries. What first got you interested in UFOs? I saw my first one when I was about 12. In fact, the whole family saw it. We were coming back from a relative’s house, and we saw a big, silvery sphere parked out in a clear, blue sky in a late August afternoon. It was about a week before school started. My mother had my father pull the car over and we sat there for 15 to 20 minutes watching this thing. It was about the size of your fingernail out there in the sky. My mother explained it could be a lot of things. It might be people from another planet. That got a conversation going with my mother and I over time, and we started getting books from the library and reading stuff with each other. And that was about as far as it went. I had a few other sighting experiences in my early 20s. I’ve always just been very well read on the topic. In November 2012, I saw a sidebar story on CNN.com. It said, “UFOs have been declining since the 1980s. Perhaps they were always just an urban legend.” And that didn’t feel right. So I went out to the Mutual UFO Network website for the first time in my life, and I looked up numbers for a couple of years in the late-1980s right up through about 2000. And the chart went up like a rocket. And I thought to myself, “What memo didn’t the UFOs get?” That’s what got me going on the idea of, “Maybe we should start reporting these things.” So I pitched it to a couple of editors at different places, and finally I came over and talked to (former Syracuse New Times editor-in-chief) Larry Dietrich, and he was intrigued because I was going to pretty much tell New York state stories for the most part. That’s how we really got deep into it. It’s been five years. Where did you learn so much about the topic of UFOs? In 1990 I was recuperating from a medical illness for a time, and I was between apartments. A gentleman I knew at that time, he was taking care of his father who had cancer at another residence. He said, “Hey, if you feed my cat, you can stay at my house.” So I did. And he had first editions on everything that had been written up until that point on UFOs. So for the few months that I was there recuperating, I read about everything he had. Like I said, I was very well read but didn’t want to follow it. It had a stigma to it. But I think the (article on CNN’s website) in 2012 spoke to me from the standpoint of misinformation. And that’s been talked about a lot over the years. For over 70 years, there’s been this policy of denial and ridicule. So what does a lawyer do when he or she has an eyewitness to something? They do everything to discredit the witness. So they have this whole thing out there in the public mindset: “Oh, the people who report UFOs are crazy or hoaxers or crackpots or conspiracy theorists.” I hear this all the time, and that’s not the case. Most people I’ve met doing this column want to get it off their chest and there’s no place else to report it. For your weekly New York Skies blog, where do you get the inspiration for each topic that you write about? Some weeks, it’s as simple as looking at the report logs, and I see sightings that are interesting, and I’ll write one of them up. There’s a lot of activity lately with the whole disclosure issue. I’m plugged into people who are very close to that, so I’m very knowledgeable on the topic. Michael Davis Photo There was a poll in 2012 from National Geographic that said 70 percent to 80 percent of the American public think the government is not being clean with us about this stuff, so there’s an audience there for that. I started doing things where I was keeping county statistics. I have to write about something, with New York state being the beat, so to speak. I found out very quickly in the UFO community that I was about the only one reporting statistics. So, we did New York state back in 2015, and a number of UFO investigators in New York state said, “We didn’t know about that pattern or that pattern or the one over there. How did you get this pattern?” I said, “We added county data to the existing material.” And because of that, my spouse, Linda, and I were talking and we said, “Why don’t we do the whole United States?”  We figured it would take a year. It took 16 months, and that’s how the book came to be. One of the things I pride myself on is being able to show people the statistics and this stuff is happening, it’s real, and you don’t hear about it anyplace else but here. What compelled you to create the UFO Sightings Desk Reference? In 2015, we had (compiled statistics for) New York state, and it revealed truths we didn’t know. A good example was that everybody knew about the Lake Erie Effect. Lots of UFO sightings along Lake Erie and the Niagara frontier. What we didn’t know, until I put county data into the overall sighting data, was that there’s a Lake Ontario Effect. Monroe County has almost as many sightings for the same period of time as the Erie region does. So we said, “Wow, this is wild stuff! What would we see if we did the whole country?” It took 16 months, and there are two more books in the works that take the same data but format it differently. How will the books be different? Well, the first book we went with purely magnitudes. We wanted to show you the United States and down to the county level. We have city data. It’s not clean enough yet because people spell cities wrong and it doesn’t sort well. And when you’re manually touching 121,000 records, it gets messy and takes time. But we’re going to publish a cities directory, and I’m about a quarter of the way through it right now. If we had done it with this book, it would’ve been 700 pages. That was too big. So we’re going to do one that’s laid out similar to the current desk reference, except it will literally drill down to the city level and show what the counts are per city and all the states and counties that have these sightings. So if a county has 500 sightings in that 15-year period, we’ll be able to break down exactly what the cities were. We’ve already done it for a couple of news organizations that have reached out. For the other book, investigators have been asking for a good summary of the shapes, and we hope to do the same data, except when we get down to the county level, show them exactly what shapes they had in that 15-year period, and that’s a different format. Where did the data come from? What resources were used? The National UFO Reporting Center’s data, which was 60 percent to 70 percent of it, depending upon the state. Then the Mutual UFO Network. They were 30 percent to 40 percent. For the most part, that was the data we used. It was all of their public data. MUFON was very generous with us because we had to ask them to pull it special for us. NUFORC’s was available right off of the internet. It was just a matter of downloading their website’s data using Excel. We started at 5 o’clock in the morning on Jan. 1; you wouldn’t believe the bandwidth availability because every-body is sleeping. So we were able to download everything in about three hours. It was amazing. What has the reaction to your book been like so far? ‍In 70 years, ‍The New York Times ‍has never spoken nicely about UFOs. In fact, they were very stodgy about it. Our book rattled them. In fact, something we heard back from a couple media producers was that we caused some shockwaves in the media industry. Much more than we realized. Michael Davis Photo So when they decided to do an article about us, they came up and made sure we weren’t sleeping in my mother’s cellar or something. They spent a day with us. The flavor was that this was the first time anyone ever published the numbers. Numbers don’t lie, as they say. That’s why we got the headline, “People Are Seeing UFOs Everywhere, And This Book Proves It.” You can’t dislike a headline like that. There were people who were seriously interested, and it changed the dialogue of the conversation. Before the book, if I had any kind of an interview usually associated with the column, I usually got a lot of the silly questions: “Are they little green men?” And that was the limit of the conversation. After this ‍New York Times ‍article came out, a lot of copies (of the book) ended up in a lot of newsrooms because when they started coming to me for an interview, they came to me with serious, solid questions that suggested they had looked at the book. In terms of disclosure, they’re now asking smart questions for a change. I did get my fair share of people from a TV station asking, “Well, how do you know (the statistics are) credible?” Well, how do you know they’re not? Until someone disproves a witness, an eyewitness account can still get you convicted in any court in this country. We had 120,036 eyewitness accounts, so that was one of the reactions. But we were getting interview requests from places you wouldn’t expect: ‍Harper’s Magazine‍, a couple of science magazines. V‍ogue.com did a piece on us, and we wondered about that. Then we realized the ‍New York Times ‍article mentioned that our computer we wrote the book on was in our sewing room. So I guess they made that connection. Have you accomplished what you set out to accomplish with this book? Yes, we did. What we set out to do was: what, when, where and what shape. That’s all we wanted to know. The focus was we wanted to disprove this notion that had been misinformed for a long time, “Oh, UFOs, they’re gone. They’ve been declining. People don’t believe in them anymore.” And the numbers have been going up. Three waves over 15 years. So we dispelled that myth. We didn’t expect to discover things. We didn’t expect to discover the weather patterns associated with this, the latitude patterns, how they affect the shapes. We didn’t expect to find the day of the week these things are more prominent. And there’s stuff we’re still finding.” You’ve been in contact with some production companies for a TV show. What kinds of deals have been in the works? We signed an agreement in a development context, and that’s kind of where it sits. It’s in development, I have correspondents with (Atlas Media Corp.) in New York City. Of course, because we haven’t done a pilot yet or anything like that, these productions can take about 12 to 15 months. So after we get up to that stage, we’ll probably do a pilot. That’s when they’re going to go out and pitch this thing to prospective networks who might buy it. It’s going to be about UFOs from a modern context instead of all of the great UFO crashes of the last 50 years, because our book of statistics dealt with 21st- century sightings. We’re looking at that as our hook. And now the talk is that we’re going to go on the road to some of the hot spots in the United States and visit the people there and maybe camp out and do some sightings. Recently, the topic of disclosure has come out in the mainstream media. What does this mean, and what do you see happening from here? Disclosure: The idea of the government coming clean. I wrote a column some time back about three former presidents who, when they were on Jimmy Kimmel Live, wouldn’t give him a straight answer and nervously laughed it off. My question is: Why wasn’t 60 Minutes or 20/20 or some news organization asking that question? Why did it have to be a late-night comedian? It’s a conversation we don’t seem to be able to have. So that’s the big deal in disclosure right now. Back in January, right before President Obama left office, the CIA had declassified some older UFO documents. That was sort of a smoking gun because here are some of these documents — I’ve got PDFs of these things — they were pulling their hair out about 70 years ago about some of the things that Linda and I were pulling our hair out about when we were doing our book. And they were getting paid, I was getting ridiculed. The people in the UFO community know this stuff is genuine. There’s enough evidence out there. It’s the general public who haven’t had somebody bless it, so to speak, for some government official to stand up and say, “Yes, this is real.” And that’s what we’re trying to get. We’re trying to get them to be honest and own up to what’s going on. Michael Davis Photo Most classified material, and I worked with it both in the military and as a civilian contractor for an aerospace firm, is usually declassified in as little as 15 to 30 years; worst case about 50 years. It’s been 70 years on this topic matter. It’s classified higher than the H-bomb. If it’s so ridiculous, why is it still classified like it’s been since the 1950s? It’s wrong. We need to know what’s going on. (In one of my recent blog posts,) we had Luis Elizondo, the head of a particular (Department of Defense) unit that collected information on UFOs. And he got on that video and said, “They’re real, guys.” So that was very, very eye-opening. People in the UFO community wanted to drink from the fire hose, but for your average person who knew nothing about UFOs, that was about as much disclosure as they could take. I’ve talked to a few people who have seen that clip and they said, “Wow! Up until now I didn’t believe it was real, and now it’s real.” What do you hope to see change regarding UFOs? ‍There needs to be a national conversation on the topic matter. I had somebody writing something up about us and he referred to me as a UFO enthusiast. And I said, “No, I’m not a UFO enthusiast. I’m trying to out the truth out there.” I think this is an important thing. I hope that the truth does come out. There’s a lot of people besides me working on it. We had hoped it would happen at the end of the Obama administration. There’s a registered lobbyist in D.C., and he was working really hard at it. We don’t know where it’s going to go with the current administration, but there are other efforts afoot. I’d like to see the dialogue that’s going to lead to disclosure, because for 50 to 70 years, we’ve had this mentality that we’ve been sold a bill of goods. The people who are interested in this topic are loony toons, hoaxers, all of this stuff. And that is not the case. When I was first getting ready to write the column, I sat down at a diner and I said, “Hey, I’m getting ready to write a column about UFOs. Anybody here seen one besides me?” And somebody leaned in and said, “Yeah, I saw one.” Somebody came over a little while later and told me, “Oh yeah, my brother saw this during the war.” With the column, I’ve had people invite me to a backyard barbecue and say, “Hey, we want you to meet our Uncle Ralph who saw this.” We’re finding out that people are handing these things down like family heirlooms. People have been convinced that if you report one of these things, people are going to label you as a nut. For example, somebody in my family has been harassed because of the visibility that my book has caused. We’ve got to get past that. Part of the reason we can’t get congressional hearings is because everyone has bought into it. If a congressman stands up and says, “I think we need to have UFO and E.T. presence hearings,” they’re going to label them a kook because it’s been built into the culture over the last 70 years. I want to see that end. If it’s serious enough to be classified higher than the H-bomb, then it’s time for them to come clean with us. SNT The post The Truth Is Out There appeared first on Syracuse New Times.

    Syracuse New Times / 24 d. 10 h. 4 min. ago more
  • SALT Honors Waiting In The WingsSALT Honors Waiting In The Wings

    The nominations have been tallied for the 13th annual Syracuse New Times Syracuse Area Live Theater (SALT) Awards, which honor performances and behind-the-scenes work by area professional, regional and community theater companies. The SALT winners will be announced during a ceremony to be held Sunday, Nov. 5, 6:30 p.m., at Syracuse Stage’s Archbold Theater, 820 E. Genesee St. The show’s presenting sponsor is Empower Federal Credit Union. This year’s co-hosts will be WSYR-Channel 9’s Bridge Street personality Sistina Giordano and state Sen. John DeFrancisco. Cocktails and light fare will be available. Discounted pre-sale tickets are available for $20 until Saturday, Nov. 4, midnight. Tickets at the door will be $25. Visit cnytix.com/events/salt-awards to purchase tickets and like the SALT Awards on Facebook for regular event updates. PROFESSIONAL THEATER COMPANIES Play of the Year Deathtrap (Syracuse Stage); Disgraced (Syracuse Stage); How I Learned to Drive (Syracuse Stage) Best Director of a Play May Adrales, Disgraced (Syracuse Stage); Paul Barnes, Deathtrap (Syracuse Stage); Michael Bloom, Great Expectations (Syracuse Stage); Laura Kepley, How I Learned to Drive (Syracuse Stage) Leading Actress in a Play Madeleine Lambert, How I Learned to Drive (Syracuse Stage); Victoria Mack, Disgraced (Syracuse Stage); Marina Shay, Great Expectations (Syracuse Stage) Leading Actor in a Play Michael Brusasco, How I Learned to Drive (Syracuse Stage); Andrew Ramcharan Guilarte, Disgraced (Syracuse Stage); James Lloyd Reynolds, Deathtrap (Syracuse Stage); Robbie Simpson, Great Expectations (Syracuse Stage) Musical of the Year Ain’t Misbehavin’ (Syracuse Stage); Mary Poppins (Syracuse Stage); Ring of Fire (Syracuse Stage) Best Director of a Musical Peter Amster, Mary Poppins (Syracuse Stage); Patdro Harris, Ain’t Misbehavin’ (Syracuse Stage); Randal Myler, Ring of Fire (Syracuse Stage) Leading Actress in a Musical Trenna Barnes, Ring of Fire (Syracuse Stage); Emily Brockway, Mary Poppins (Syracuse Stage); Danielle Herbert, Ain’t Misbehavin’ (Syracuse Stage) Leading Actor in a Musical Anthony Boggess-Glover, Ain’t Misbehavin’ (Syracuse Stage); Jonathan Burke, Mary Poppins (Syracuse Stage); Benjamin D. Hale, Ring of Fire (Syracuse Stage) REGIONAL THEATER COMPANIES Play of the Year The Bomb-itty of Errors (Redhouse Arts Center); The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged) (Redhouse); Nana’s Naughty Knickers (Cortland Repertory Theatre); Six Degrees of Separation (Redhouse); The 39 Steps (Cortland Repertory) Best Director of a Play Vincent J. Cardinal, Six Degrees of Separation (Redhouse); Dustin Charles, The 39 Steps (Cortland Repertory); Ben Liebert, The Bomb-itty of Errors (Redhouse); Ben Liebert, The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged) (Redhouse); Kerby Thompson, Appointment with Death (Cortland Repertory) Sound Design of a Play Seth Asa Sengal, Appointment with Death (Cortland Repertory); Seth Asa Sengal, The 39 Steps (Cortland Repertory); Anthony Vadala, The Bomb-itty of Errors (Redhouse); Anthony Vadala, The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged) (Redhouse); Anthony Vadala, Six Degrees of Separation (Redhouse) Lighting Design of a Play Eric Behnke, Appointment with Death (Cortland Repertory); Eric Behnke, Nana’s Naughty Knickers (Cortland Repertory); Eric Behnke, The 39 Steps (Cortland Repertory); Erik Fox, The Bomb-itty of Errors (Redhouse); Marie Yokohama, Six Degrees of Separation (Redhouse) Set Design of a Play Shelley Barish, Nana’s Naughty Knickers (Cortland Repertory); Shane Cinal, Six Degrees of Separation (Redhouse); Joe Dotts, The 39 Steps (Cortland Repertory); Benjamin Kramer, The Bomb-itty of Errors (Redhouse); Steve TenEyck, The Foreigner (Hangar Theatre) Costume Design of a Play Eugenie Michelle Giasson, The Bomb-itty of Errors (Redhouse); Eugenie Michelle Giasson, Six Degrees of Separation (Redhouse); Jimmy Johansmeyer, The 39 Steps (Cortland Repertory); Ricky Lurie, Nana’s Naughty Knickers (Cortland Repertory); Wendi R. Zea, Appointment with Death (Cortland Repertory) Leading Actress in a Play Laura Austin, Six Degrees of Separation (Redhouse); Raquel Chavez, The Bomb-itty of Errors (Redhouse); Raquel Chavez, The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged) (Redhouse); Leah Gabriel, The 39 Steps (Cortland Repertory); Peggy Lewis, Nana’s Naughty Knickers (Cortland Repertory) Leading Actor in a Play Karl Gregory, Hand to God (Kitchen Theatre Company); Richard Lafleur, The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged) (Redhouse); Rakeem Lawrence, Six Degrees of Separation (Redhouse); James Taylor Odom, The 39 Steps (Cortland Repertory); Jeff Ronan, The Bomb-itty of Errors (Redhouse) Supporting Actress in a Play Elizabeth Bove, Appointment with Death (Cortland Repertory); Magdalyn Donnelly, The Bomb-itty of Errors (Redhouse); Montana Hoover, Hand to God (Kitchen Theatre); Marguerite Mitchell, Six Degrees of Separation (Redhouse); Sebastian Ryder, Nana’s Naughty Knickers (Cortland Repertory) Supporting Actor in a Play Maxwel Anderson, Six Degrees of Separation (Redhouse); Tom DeMichele, Nana’s Naughty Knickers (Cortland Repertory); Nathaniel Kent, Appointment with Death (Cortland Repertory); Donovan Stanfield, The Bomb-itty of Errors (Redhouse); Michael Patrick Trimm, Hand to God (Kitchen Theatre) Musical of the Year Avenue Q (Redhouse); The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas (Merry-Go-Round Playhouse); Footloose (Cortland Repertory); Guys and Dolls (Merry-Go-Round); Parade (Merry-Go-Round) Best Director of a Musical Stephen Brotebeck, Ghost: The Musical (Merry-Go-Round); Patrick Burns, Beauty and the Beast (Redhouse); Parker Esse, The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas (Merry-Go-Round); Brett Smock, Parade (Merry-Go-Round); Kate Sullivan Gibbens, Avenue Q (Redhouse) Choreographer of the Year Stephond Brunson, Avenue Q (Redhouse); Clare Cook, Footloose (Cortland Repertory); Matt Couvillon, La Cage Aux Folles (Cortland Repertory); Parker Esse, The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas (Merry-Go-Round); Richard J. Hinds, Guys and Dolls (Merry-Go-Round) Sound Design of a Musical Kevin Heard, Ghost: The Musical (Merry-Go-Round); Bobby Johnston, The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas (Merry-Go-Round); Miles Polaski, Guys and Dolls (Merry-Go-Round); Seth Asa Sengal, La Cage Aux Folles (Cortland Repertory); Anthony Vadala, Avenue Q (Redhouse) Lighting Design of a Musical Dan Ozminkowski, Ghost: The Musical (Merry-Go-Round); Dan Ozminkowski, Guys and Dolls (Merry-Go-Round); Jose Santiago, The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas (Merry-Go-Round); Jose Santiago, Parade (Merry-Go-Round); David A. Sexton, La Cage Aux Folles (Cortland Repertory) Set Design of a Musical Tim Brown, Avenue Q (Redhouse); Chad Healy, The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas (Merry-Go-Round); Shako Kambara, Guys and Dolls (Merry-Go-Round); Czerton Lim, Ghost: The Musical (Merry-Go-Round); Czerton Lim, Parade (Merry-Go-Round) Costume Design of a Musical Tiffany Howard, The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas (Merry-Go-Round); Tiffany Howard, Guys and Dolls (Merry-Go-Round); Tiffany Howard, Parade (Merry-Go-Round); Jimmy Johansmeyer, Footloose (Cortland Repertory); Jimmy Johansmeyer, La Cage Aux Folles (Cortland Repertory) Leading Actress in a Musical Briana Maia, Avenue Q (Redhouse); Haley McCormick, Footloose (Cortland Repertory); Caroline Strang, Beauty and the Beast (Redhouse); Kristen Wetherington, Parade (Merry-Go-Round); Sally Wilfert, The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas (Merry-Go-Round) Leading Actor in a Musical Ryan Andes, The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas (Merry-Go-Round); Derek Carley, Ghost: The Musical (Merry-Go-Round); Aaron Galligan, Parade (Merry-Go-Round); LaRon Grant, Avenue Q (Redhouse); Temar Underwood, Beauty and the Beast (Redhouse) Supporting Actress in a Musical Julie Cardia, Guys and Dolls (Merry-Go-Round); Allyson Kaye Daniel, Ghost: The Musical (Merry-Go-Round); Kathy Burge Egloff, Beauty and the Beast (Redhouse); Lilli Komurek, Secret Garden: Spring Version (Redhouse); Carmen Viviano-Crafts, Avenue Q (Redhouse) Supporting Actor in a Musical Carlos Lopez, Guys and Dolls (Merry-Go-Round); Phil Sloves, Footloose (Cortland Repertory); Jamison Stern, Parade (Merry-Go-Round); Jason Timothy, Beauty and the Beast (Redhouse); Anthony Wright, La Cage Aux Folles (Cortland Repertory) Musical Director of the Year Corrine Aquiline, The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas (Merry-Go-Round); Corrine Aquiline, Guys and Dolls (Merry-Go-Round); Christopher Blasting, Footloose (Cortland Repertory); Jacob Carll, Avenue Q (Redhouse); Jeff Theiss, Parade (Merry-Go-Round) COMMUNITY THEATER COMPANIES Play of the Year The Elephant Man (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild); Of Mice and Men (Central New York Playhouse); Peter and the Starcatcher (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild); The Tomkat Project (Rarely Done Productions); Twelve Angry Men (CNY Arts Center) Best Director of a Play Jessie Dobrzynski, Twelve Angry Men (CNY Arts); Len Fonte, Melagrana (Central New York Playhouse); Colin Keating, Peter and the Starcatcher (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild); Kasey Marie Polly, Of Mice and Men (Central New York Playhouse); William Edward White, The Elephant Man (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild) Sound Design of a Play Jack Cleland and Robert G. Searle, Melagrana (Central New York Playhouse); Colin Keating, Peter and the Starcatcher (Baldwinsville Theatre  Guild); Dan Rowlands, Night of the Living Dead, (Central New York Playhouse); Kasey Marie Polly, Of Mice and Men (Central New York Playhouse); William Edward White, The Elephant Man (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild) Lighting Design of a Play Sarah Anson, The Elephant Man (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild); Liam Fitzpatrick, Of Mice and Men (Central New York Playhouse); Shane Patterson, Peter and the Starcatcher (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild); Dan Randall, Melagrana (Central New York Playhouse); William Edward White, Twelve Angry Men (CNY Arts) Set Design of a Play Navroz Dabu, The Elephant Man (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild); Navroz Dabu, Melagrana (Central New York Playhouse); John Frank, Rumors (Rome Community Theater); Christopher Lupia, Dan Rowlands, Justin Polly and Kasey Marie Polly, Of Mice and Men (Central New York Playhouse); Chuck Moody and Henry Wilson, Peter and the Starcatcher (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild) Costume Design of a Play Kate Kisselstein, The Elephant Man (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild); Carleena Manzi, Of Mice and Men (Central New York Playhouse); Barbara Toman, One Man, Two Guvnors (Central New York Playhouse); Barbara Toman and Simon Moody, As You Like It (Syracuse Shakespeare Festival); Jodi Wilson, Peter and the Starcatcher (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild) Leading Actress in a Play Kimberly Grader, It’s a Wonderful Life, (Central New York Playhouse); Gracie Jarvis, A Doll’s House (Open Hand Theater); Clare Lopez, Peter and the Starcatcher (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild); Lauren Puente, One Man, Two Guvnors (Central New York Playhouse); Carmen Viviano-Crafts, Melagrana (Central New York Playhouse) Leading Actor in a Play Phil Brady, Of Mice and Men (Central New York Playhouse); Jordan Glaski, The Tomkat Project (Rarely Done); Josh Mele, One Man, Two Guvnors (Central New York Playhouse); Ryan Sparkes, Peter and the Starcatcher (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild); Alan Stillman, The Elephant Man (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild) Supporting Actress in a Play Binaifer Dabu, The Elephant Man (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild); Lynn Barbato King, Othello (Central New York Playhouse); Tina Lee, Sordid Lives (Rarely Done); Heather Roach, Witness for the Prosecution (Central New York Playhouse); Sabrina Woodward, Harvey (CNY Arts) Supporting Actor in a Play Matthew Gordon, Peter and the Starcatcher (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild); Joshua Kimball, The Tomkat Project (Rarely Done Productions); Simon Moody, The Elephant Man (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild); Geno Parlato, Silence of the Clams (Rarely Done); Garrett Robinson, Twelve Angry Men (CNY Arts) Musical of the Year American Idiot (Central New York Playhouse); Chicago (Central New York Playhouse); The Last Five Years (Rarely Done); Spring Awakening (Syracuse Summer Theatre); Sunday in the Park with George (St. David’s Celebration of the Arts) Best Director of a Musical Dustin M. Czarny, Chicago (Central New York Playhouse); Liam Fitzpatrick, American Idiot (Central New York Playhouse); Garrett Heater, Spring Awakening (Syracuse Summer Theatre); Ronald Hebert, Bye, Bye, Birdie (ManliusMusical/Town of Manlius Recreation Department); Henry Wilson, The Music Man, (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild) Musical Director of the Year Colin Keating, The Music Man (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild); Bridget Moriarty, Spring Awakening (Syracuse Summer Theatre); Abel Searor, American Idiot (Central New York Playhouse); Abel Searor, Chicago (Central New York Playhouse); Abel Searor, Sunday in the Park with George (St. David’s Celebration of the Arts) Choreographer of the Year Ellen Ayers, The Music Man (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild); Jodi Bova-Mele, Spring Awakening (Syracuse Summer Theatre); Marisa Guzman Colegrove, Bye, Bye, Birdie (ManliusMusical); Sami Hoerner, American Idiot (Central New York Playhouse); Shannon Tompkins, Chicago (Central New York Playhouse) Sound Design of a Musical Jonathan Hedges, Godspell (CNY Arts); Mark Palinkas, The Music Man (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild); Rob Searle, Chicago (Central New York Playhouse); Dylan Spencer, Bye, Bye, Birdie (ManliusMusical); Tony Vadala, Spring Awakening (Syracuse Summer Theatre) Lighting Design of a Musical Sarah Anson, Chicago (Central New York Playhouse); Dusten Blake, The Last Five Years (Rarely Done); LuAnn Boone-Isherwood, Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat (Rome Community Theater); Liam Fitzpatrick, American Idiot (Central New York Playhouse); Garrett Heater, Spring Awakening (Syracuse Summer Theatre) Set Design of a Musical Dustin Czarny, Chicago (Central New York Playhouse); Liam Fitzpatrick and Christopher Lupia, American Idiot (Central New York Playhouse); Garrett Heater, Spring Awakening (Syracuse Summer Theatre); Chad Lewis, Godspell (CNY Arts); Henry Wilson, The Music Man (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild) Costume Design of a Musical Sue and Julie Berger, Spring Awakening (Syracuse Summer Theatre); Alicia Cobb, Chicago (Central New York Playhouse); Stephanie Long, American Idiot (Central New York Playhouse); Gail Tucker, Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat (Rome Community Theater); Jodi Wilson, The Music Man (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild) Leading Actress in a Musical Alicia Bronzetti, Chicago (Central New York Playhouse); Maya Dwyer, Spring Awakening (Syracuse Summer Theatre); Aubrey Panek, The Last Five Years (Rarely Done); Erin Sills, Sunday in the Park with George (St. David’s Celebration of the Arts); Hannah Weiler, American Idiot (Central New York Playhouse) Leading Actor in a Musical Liam Fitzpatrick, Sunday in the Park with George (St. David’s Celebration of the Arts); Mike Gibson, American Idiot (Central New York Playhouse); Benjamin Sills, Chicago (Central New York Playhouse); Paul Thompson, The Last Five Years (Rarely Done); Chip Weber, Spring Awakening (Syracuse Summer Theatre) Supporting Actress in a Musical Sunny Hernandez, A Christmas Survival Guide (Rarely Done); Deborah Hooper, The Music Man (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild); Michaela Oney, Sunday in the Park with George (St. David’s Celebration of the Arts); Madeline Shuron, Spring Awakening (Syracuse Summer Theatre); Erin Sills, Chicago (Central New York Playhouse) Supporting Actor in a Musical Dan Bostick, The Music Man (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild); Josh Mele, Chicago (Central New York Playhouse); Robert G. Searle, Sunday in the Park with George (St. David’s Celebration of the Arts); Josh Taylor, American Idiot (Central New York Playhouse); Timothy Willard, Spring Awakening (Syracuse Summer Theatre) Hall of Fame Award Fred Houser Lifetime Achievement Award Rachel Lampert The post SALT Honors Waiting In The Wings appeared first on Syracuse New Times.

    Syracuse New Times / 31 d. 10 h. 9 min. ago more
  • Many Happy ReturnsMany Happy Returns

    You’ve probably seen Laurence Segal around town. He’s the guy who hauls those big, pink recycling bins around Central New York, including stops at the recent New York State Fair — all 13 days of it — and at Destiny USA. Segal, who grew up and lives in DeWitt, is out collecting empty cans and bottles, much of the time retrieving them from recycling bins, to raise money for breast cancer research. It’s an arduous task, but it doesn’t deter the activist. “I hope it shows people that they can make a difference,” Segal said. Segal will continue making a difference at Cans for Cancer, to be held at the pink parking lot at Destiny USA on Oct. 28, 7 a.m. to 3 p.m., as part of October’s Breast Cancer Awareness Month. The inaugural event, spearheaded by Segal, brings together the three main organizations he has donated to over the years: the Upstate Cancer Center, the American Cancer Society and the Carol M. Baldwin Breast Cancer Research Fund. Segal hopes for a large turnout of donated bottles and cans. As an incentive, everyone who donates to the cause will receive a coupon book to use at various businesses in the mall. After the large-scale Cans for Cancer drive has passed, Segal said he will go back to raising money by himself, hopefully with some newfound participants who were inspired by the event. “Breast cancer doesn’t just go away at the end of October,” Segal said. “It’s to encourage people to bring your bottles and cans throughout the year after this.” How did you get started collecting bottles? It’s because of my family’s history of breast cancer: my grandmother, my great-grandmother, my aunts; my great-aunt had colon cancer. Back in 1987, my mom decided to remove both of her breasts. She met with people in Washington, D.C., and in New York City, and, given her health risk for getting breast cancer, they guaranteed her that she would have it. It was a difficult decision at the time. When my mom did it, people ostracized her and made fun of her. When Angelina Jolie did it (years later), Beth Baldwin (from the Carol M. Baldwin Breast Cancer Research Fund) looked at me and said, “They look at her like she’s a hero.” Then she went on a campaign to educate people about breast cancer research, early detection, awareness. She had complications over the years from that. She’s had several stays at the hospital with almost literally near-death experiences — not from cancer but from her implants leaking. So the bottle and can drive came out of that. When the Simone family was still at the Syracuse Chiefs, I began to notice around NBT Bank Stadium all of the bottles and cans being thrown in the garbage every night, and it upset me. I said to them, “Do you think we could raise some money for cancer research?” And they said, “Yeah, go for it.” We had a giant pink cart at the top of the stairs, which I ran every night with my friend Jon, and we raised a ton of money for cancer research. Where do you store all of the bottles? I have a bottle recycling room at Destiny, and I also keep my pink garbage cans in there. So we bring the bottles back there. My friend James (Ayers) owns Bottles End on Montrose Avenue in Solvay, and we come and pick them up, or sometimes I’ll put some in my truck and bring them down there. There have been times when it’s built up like crazy, then it takes five people to go empty out the room. Where do you store them after local events? At the State Fair, for example, people saw (Segal’s recycling story) on the news, and they brought their bottles and cans from home into the fair, and we’d bag them. I’d keep them at the booth stacked high at the Center of Progress Building. In addition, we also pull off all of the pop tabs on every can and I donate all of the pop tabs to the Ronald McDonald House every week. The aluminum in the can has value in it. Laurence Segal: “I’ve made people aware of early detection, we’ve raised awareness for breast cancer and for all of cancer. I think it’s been effective. I know we’ve certainly helped the environment.” Michael Davis photo You started out exchanging the bottles at Wegmans. I still sometimes go there if I have tons of bottles. Typically, 99 percent of the bottles now go to Bottles End just because it makes my life easier. I just really like how James is as a human being. He’s had people in his family who have had cancer. I also use my friends at Bodow Recycling on Park Street and Hiawatha Boulevard. Bodow Recycling and Bottles End have just been faithful, loyal and really good. How did you get involved with the Carol M. Baldwin Breast Cancer Research Fund? Carol Baldwin and my mom founded the local chapter of the Susan G. Komen Foundation years ago. They’re the ones that started the original walk-run in Shoppingtown. They’re the ones who went to Washington, D.C., to meet with Congress back in late 1989 to 1990, with the idea of helping women and men who were facing breast cancer. Now everybody knows about it, but back then it wasn’t spoken about. When Carol Baldwin started her own fund around 1996, I sort of became directly involved with that. She calls me her fifth son. I’m close to all of the family members. I like that the money that’s raised stays locally. Their motto is “Together We’ll Find A Cure,” and I think that’s how you have to do it. It’s a collaborative effort with all of New York state, all of Central New York. It requires people to contribute every day and to be aware. How much have you raised as of now? We have donated more than $50,000 to the Carol Baldwin Breast Cancer Research Fund. Last year I did another $14,500 for the American Cancer Society, and right now we’ve done more than $5,000 from my Real Men Wear Pink campaign. It’s basically a group of men in the community saying they understand that not only (women) can get breast cancer. How do you decide which cause to donate to? I donate to Carol Baldwin and American Cancer Society. We’ve also donated some to the St. Baldrick’s Foundation (a fundraiser for children with cancer). We’ve looked at charities that will keep the money locally. A lot of it goes to Upstate Cancer Center. That’s important. I like the work that they’re doing there. Whom have you met on this journey? I met a woman named Rose Fazio out in Chittenango, who literally is disabled, and she was on her hands and knees, crawling. But she saved bottles for a year out there at her house. She called me again this year and said, “It’s Rose Fazio. Do you remember me?” She’s had tragedy in her family; her daughter has been sick. Yet selflessly, she donated a whole garage (of cans and bottles). I remember people that I’ve met at the fair who are going through breast cancer who were so sick. I’ve met people at Wegmans who donated their (bottle return) slips. People would come up to me and hand me a $5 bill when I was (collecting bottles) at Delta Sonic car wash in the middle of the cold. I’ve met amazing people who understand what I’m doing and who have selflessly donated and have not bragged to anybody else what they’ve done. It’s not about me, it’s about them caring enough to care about other people. How are you able to devote so much time to raising money for cancer research? I worked on The Price Is Right (as a production assistant) with Bob Barker and announcer Rod Roddy for several years (in the 1990s and early 2000s) in Los Angeles. When Rod passed away from cancer, he left me a good amount of money. So I invested it wisely, and I pretty much devote my whole life now to raising funds for cancer research. I was on that stage every day for years during the tapings. I was involved with writing scripts, picking contestants, everything. Behind the scenes, I stood next to Rod on stage every day. In April 2001, he started having pain during a show. I said, “Are you OK? Do you want me to call an ambulance?” And he said, “Absolutely not. I want to finish the show.” He went to the hospital after the show and discovered he was anemic, and they started running tests. On Sept. 10, 2001, they did a colonoscopy and discovered he had metastatic colon cancer, and he had emergency surgery on the 9/11 for seven and a half hours. A doctor from the John Wayne Cancer Institute saved his life that day on Sept. 11. He had radiation and chemo following that and another surgery on Sept. 20, 2002. Then he was diagnosed with primary male breast cancer on March 14, 2003. The summer of 2003 was brutal. I stayed with him the whole time in the hospital in addition to working on The Price Is Right. I went to chemo, I went to radiation, I stayed with him right until the day he died. It was a life-changing experience. He was my best friend, a wonderful person. He promoted early detection at the end of his life: mammograms, colonoscopies. I learned all about that from him. I had already had breast cancer impact my life. Nobody else was willing to really go to chemo and radiation with him, and I said, “I’ll go with you.” He died on Oct. 27, 2003, at 3:45 in the afternoon; I was with him. It’ll be 14 years (this month) when I turn 40. I miss him every day. I regret that he wasn’t diagnosed properly and early. The colon cancer, certainly. He put off having a colonoscopy for 13 years. The breast cancer came out of left field and just showed up. He also had prostate cancer that he had been diagnosed with early in 2001, but he hadn’t told anybody. Part of this bottle drive and raising funds for cancer research is to honor him. I just think it’s a waste of a life, as are all (cancer-related deaths). It shouldn’t happen in 2017. We need more early detection. People always say to me, “Well, why do we need cans and bottles? There’s enough dollars for research.” And I always say, “Obviously not.” Cancer doesn’t discriminate: Black or white, rich or poor, young or old, it’s a horrible disease. You herniated some discs in your back a couple of months ago. How is your back doing? I saw a great physical therapist, and I’ve had some acupuncture done. I was in very bad shape. It’s better now, but I still have pain every day. I’ve gone back to collecting bottles — slowly. I’m very careful in the way I reach into the cans and careful how I bend my knees. I’m not leaning over. What kinds of bottles do you see the most? People always say that the economy stinks, and I always laugh. I can tell you that Coca-Cola is not going out of business, neither is Pepsi, neither is Budweiser. To be honest, I see water bottles the most. Ever since the water bottle bill went into effect in 2008, I see a ton of Wegmans bottles, Aldi bottles, Price Chopper bottles. Sadly, I also see a lot of beer cans. I say sadly because I always hear there’s no money for cancer research, yet people have all this money to buy premium alcohol, which costs all of this money. So if they have money for alcohol, they probably have money to donate to cancer research. I see tons of Budweiser cans, Coors Lite, Miller Lite. A better bottle bill needs to be passed for all of New York state. It’s silly to throw one type of bottle in the garbage and recycle another type. I say to New York state, Why are only certain cans recyclable? They say, “Oh, because it’s carbonated and this one’s not.” It doesn’t make a difference. A bottle is a bottle, plastic is plastic, a can is a can. I see a lot of 1911 (cider), AriZona (iced tea), Monster (energy drink), and I see a ton of Gatorade and Powerade, too, which is why a better bottle bill needs to be passed. What do you do with the bottles that aren’t recyclable? I’ll bring them down to James. There’s a company that picks them up from him. But essentially there can’t be a donation made at that point for research. He gets a small amount from the recycling company to take those bottles. So are they getting recycled somewhere or another? Yes. But there should be a better bottle law, and it should cover everything. They do it in Maine, California, Hawaii. It’s non-excusable that it doesn’t happen here. I’ve met with people in Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s office and we’re going to have to go back and lobby some more, but I’m willing to do it. You just have to convince Democrats and Republicans to come together (laughs), that it’s for the betterment of the state and to pass the law. We’re closer than we were before, and they understand. Have you accomplished what you initially set out to? I’ve made people aware of early detection, we’ve raised awareness for breast cancer and for all of cancer. I think it’s been effective. I know we’ve certainly helped the environment. The bottles and cans don’t really mean anything to me. It just represents another 6 cents for cancer research. I hope, if anything, they represent hope and inspiration. People always go, “Why bottles and cans?” Well, it’s just to show people how much money is thrown away in Syracuse every day. I see it every day, no matter what gas station I go to, whether it’s vacuumed up at Delta Sonic every day, or it’s thrown away in the garbage. All of that money could go to cancer research. So I hope that point gets through to people. How long will you continue to do this? I’m going to go for as long as my health allows me to, and after that, I think I have a significant amount of people now, like almost my own little army, that will go out there and fight for it. I know people who will donate their time, no matter what. My goal doesn’t necessarily have to be with bottles and cans. If some business wants to come forward and make a big donation to cancer research, I’d love it. Delta Sonic did that last year; they made a $10,000 donation to Carol Baldwin in my name. So if a business thinks cancer research is worthwhile, and they want to make a tax-deductible donation and say, “Hey, I like what Laurence is doing,” I’m all for it. I want it to happen around the country. There’s plenty of money for cancer research because it exists. I encourage people, don’t throw money in the garbage. I just think that’s crazy. The post Many Happy Returns appeared first on Syracuse New Times.

    Syracuse New Times / 38 d. 10 h. 4 min. ago more
  • Writers Center Honors Late Poet Jason ShinderWriters Center Honors Late Poet Jason Shinder

    On Friday, Oct. 13, the Downtown Writers Center at the YMCA, 340 Montgomery St., will commemorate a late friend through a poetry reading. First, the center will dedicate its new performance room as the Jason Shinder Theater, honoring a poet and influential advocate for cultural programs at YMCAs. Shinder, who died in 2008, founded the YMCA Writer’s Voice program in New York City and worked with the national YMCA to expand it across the country. Then Marie Howe, a well-known poet and friend of Shinder, will read from her work and his. Phil Memmer, director of the Arts Branch for the local YMCA, connected with Shinder soon after the Downtown Writers Center opened in 2001. He was impressed by Shinder’s passion for poetry, energy and willingness to support a fledging organization. “Jason provided the funding that made it possible for us to bring in Reginald Shepherd as a writer-in-residence,” Memmer said. “Later there was financial help for readings by other writers.” That assistance helped launch an ongoing series for the center, which typically hosts between 20 and 25 readings a year. The poets, and other writers, come from Syracuse, Ithaca and Rochester and from across the nation. Over the years, a slew of prominent poets have read at Writers Center events: W.D. Snodgrass, winner of a Pulitzer Prize for poetry; Cornelius Eady, whose poems touch on jazz, blues and other topics; Judith Harris, author of Night Garden, which delves into the temporary nature of all things; Martha Collins, whose book-length poem, “Blue Front,” focuses on a race riot in Cairo, Ill. And now Marie Howe will read at the Oct. 13 event. She’s recognized for her ability to explore and reflect on love and faith, loss and death. In her book The Kingdom of Ordinary Life, she discussed her mother’s decline from illness and death, as well as violence, non-violence, and revenge. Star Market speculated on how Jesus Christ might have reacted to the customers of a neighborhood grocery store. Her 2017 book Magdalene reinterprets Mary Magdalene, a figure from the New Testament. In Howe’s telling, Magdalene is sensual and spiritual, deeply regrets mistakes she’s made and dwells in the current day watching The Sopranos or picking up sesame noodle takeout. This book is structured without a single narrator. Instead, several voices emerge, including an everywoman persona for “Magdalene Afterwards.” It speaks of living in the present or past, of having nine children or none, of facing execution as a political prisoner or growing bored at a business meeting. Howe is one of 10 finalists for a 2017 National Book Award in poetry, sharing that honor with Chen Chen, who read at the center on Sept. 22. The winner will be announced Nov. 5. In reflecting on the upcoming event, Memmer emphasizes the scope of Shinder’s activities. He had two books of poetry published by Graywolf Press, edited 10 anthologies of poetry, served as poet laureate for Provincetown on Cape Cod, and heavily promoted the notion of arts programming at YMCAs. “There was a time when most Ys dabbled in the arts,” Memmer said. “Jason pushed the idea of regular programs and had a national impact.” Shinder, it should be noted, wasn’t dictating to individual Ys. They don’t function as members of a franchise; they have autonomy in selecting programs. As it happens, the downtown YMCA fully embraced an arts menu. It operates the Writers Center with its readings, classes in poetry, playwriting, and other disciplines, and Young Authors Academy for teens and tweens. It also coordinates after-school programs at several sites and holds classes in dance and pottery at the Fayetteville and Baldwinsville branches. Finally, Memmer says that the room now known as the Jason Shinder Theater has several advantages over its predecessor: “It seats more people, has better lighting, and is located in a quieter section of the Y,” he said. The Oct. 13 reading, which begins at 7 p.m., is free and open to the public. For more information, call (315) 474-6851, Ext. 328. The post Writers Center Honors Late Poet Jason Shinder appeared first on Syracuse New Times.

    Syracuse New Times / 38 d. 10 h. 29 min. ago more
  • Nojaim’s No MásNojaim’s No Más

    After almost a century, and three generations, of serving the grocery needs of the neighborhood known as the Near West Side, Nojaim Brothers Supermarket, 307 Gifford St., is closing its doors. Originally a commercial district along a two-lane West Street provided a border with downtown Syracuse. Now the heavily Hispanic population has settled within Fayette, Geddes and West streets, some would argue the railroad tracks or the creek, with Onondaga Street on the South Side. Activists in the neighborhood, however, see it as significantly more than just a store closing. Father James Mathews, of St. Lucy’s Church, 432 Gifford St., gathered 31 pages of signatures in support of a plea for help to community leaders. He called the closing devastating, a crippling blow plunging neighborhood residents even deeper into the throes of poverty which already ravage them. For Mathews, it is the death of an institution. It was a different story even 50 years ago, when the neighborhood seemed to have a mom-and-pop store at every street corner. Over on Shonnard Street, Ward Bakery created special mini-loaves of Tip Top bread to distribute to lucky kids on field trips. Down on Gifford Street, shoppers wheeled their rickety carts across the wooden floors at Easy Bargain Center. International travelers had their passports created at Hawk Photo on Seymour Street. Paul Seymour, the former basketball great from the Syracuse Nationals, operated a bustling liquor store. Nojaim’s was at the center of this thriving retail mix. An often behind-the-scenes activist himself, owner Paul Nojaim maintains a positive perspective as the shelves empty and store staff focus on where the jobs are next. Huntington Family Center two blocks down Gifford Street has taken an active role in the job search, and Rite Aid has sent staff to set up a table for conducting interviews. “It’s up and down, like a funeral,” he says of the process. “One minute reflecting on happy memories, with a sad reflection the next. It’s like a funeral, and it is.” What has been the grandest moment of the neighborhood so far? Impossible to say one. If you’re talking to my father in (January) 1966, we didn’t close during the blizzard. The residents of the neighborhood gathered and we opened this place up. The (1998) Labor Day storm, when this place was decimated and out of power for weeks at a time, we set this place up as a Red Cross center, but also every agency in the neighborhood worked out of the store because they didn’t have power and we brought generators in. The best moments have been like that. We had a bad fire in the late 1970s and the neighbors heard all the fire trucks, they were everywhere and you could see the flames coming out the top of the place. All night long you could see people coming in and volunteering. We were open by morning, in some shape or form. If you go to modern times, last summer was an awful tragedy in this neighborhood with the shooting. They were planning the Westside Initiative in partnership with CNY Works to really activate Skiddy Park and create a play station with mentors all summer long. That folded with a fear of backlash being too dangerous to do it. But the kids who work here did it. They ran the program and were proud of the neighborhood. They ran it again this year. If you could wave a magic wand, and make the things happen that you see as needed in the neighborhood, what would you make happen? There’s a saying in this country that “Where there’s a will, there’s a way.” That’s not true. There has to be a way to foster the will. In this neighborhood, what I have seen, all those things that were ingredients in the healthy neighborhood have diminished. I’ve never had a kid come work for me who said, “Can you help me get in a gang?” Never had someone say, “How do I get incarcerated?” Never heard someone say, “Let’s be a mother of four by three different men by the time I’m 22 and living in public housing.” A “Store Closing” sign found on a wall inside Nojaim’s. Michael Davis photo So you do ask them what they want to be, and they want to be a lawyer, be a doctor, be a teacher, they want to be all the things that are the typical American dream. But it goes wrong. I believe it goes wrong because there’s nothing to move you through the social ladder and connect you to that. That is poverty. It’s not just racism. It is concentrated poverty. When I was a kid this was a poor neighborhood, but we had people here who were connected, and they were able to be your friend and introduce you to other opportunities. There’s another saying: “It’s not what you know, it’s who you know.” That one is true. What do you do if you’re living in public housing, you’re a single mom and your child wants to be something when you can’t even get him that first job, because you don’t have that networking ability. And God forbid if they want to be a lawyer or doctor, how would you even put them on that path? It’s an unfair playing field. A magic wand? I would change the playing field by eradicating poverty. You need, first of all, a mixed neighborhood. We’re diverse. Everybody admits that. But we’re also not diverse because everybody’s poor. The other thing is you need opportunities in the neighborhood. I always thought that Nojaim’s Supermarket was one place where if they knew Nojaim’s, Nojaim’s could get them to know somebody else. What happened? It’s very simple. We looked at ourselves as a grocery store, but not a grocery store. We believed we could do other things as well. We believed that that should be the whole food industry. That that is how society formed 12,000 years ago, with Fertile Crescent, irrigation, domesticated animals, and the next thing you know you had something to start trading and bartering, and that was society. For us, yes, we do trading and selling to our customers, but there is also something that makes society better. That is what we felt this place was. At the same token we’re operating in an industry that requires volume to pay the bills. The food business is very much tied to high volume and low margin. That equation has broken down for this store. We can no longer pay the bills. If you don’t have the magic wand, what will the neighborhood be? I’m not sure. I had great hopes for the programs and partnerships developing. Lots of great work has been done already. However, with (former Syracuse University Chancellor) Nancy Cantor gone, they have lost momentum. I’m hoping that can be rebuilt, that momentum. As an institution, the store was significant to the Hispanic community. What is the impact of its closing to them? One-third of the people in the neighborhood are Hispanic, and over 80 percent of that group is from Puerto Rico. There is a reason that this is where that population massed over time. That goes back to two things. One, we were the first store to carry Hispanic food. In the 1960s, when we started getting the migration of folks from Puerto Rico and then from Cuba when the Communists took over, they wanted to find their culture and their languages. My father found Goya Foods, a little company, and he met with the owner and we became the first store outside of metro New York City to carry Goya Foods. The Spanish Action League located here and became a magnet. What are you going to do? I have no idea. I have started to contemplate that. What do you do when you’ve never done a resume, you’ve never applied for a job? Right now I’m going to be getting jobs for the people who work here. Then I’m going to figure out how to get this weight of this building and this debt off of my family’s shoulder. The post Nojaim’s No Más appeared first on Syracuse New Times.

    Syracuse New Times / 45 d. 10 h. 4 min. ago more
  • Welcome To The Best of Syracuse 2017Welcome To The Best of Syracuse 2017

    Best of Syracuse is a reader-generated poll trademarked by the Syracuse New Times. Since its 1997 inception we have asked our readers to nominate in a number of categories. For the 21st anniversary edition, the categories include: Sports, Love and Sex, Arts and Culture, Music, Entertainment and Attractions, Health and Beauty, Local Celebrities, Food, Drink, Nightlife, Goods and Services, Around Town, Pets and Family, Fun and Games. Your nominations are tallied, and the results bring out the top five in each category. We then turn it all over to you again for the final voting, and the Best of Syracuse emerges. We are proud of the fact that Best of Syracuse is 100 percent reader-generated. If you have an award suggestion, email us at snt@syracusenewtimes.com. We want to hear from you. Thanks to all the readers who took the time to nominate and vote for your favorite picks. It was another record-breaking year for nominating and voting for Best of Syracuse, and we couldn’t be more excited about the responses. Congratulations to this year’s nominees and winners! Sports Turning Stone Resort and Casino, best golf course. Michael Davis photo Best Sports Venue: Carrier Dome, 900 Irving Ave. (315) 443-4634, carrierdome.com. Best Gymnastics Program: YMCA of Greater Syracuse. syracuse.ymca.org. Best Outdoor Trails: Green Lakes State Park, 7900 Green Lakes Road, Fayetteville. (315) 637-6111, parks.ny.gov/parks/172. Best Golf Course: Turning Stone Resort and Casino, 5218 Patrick Road, Verona. (800) 771-7711, turningstone.com. Best Place to Ski: Labrador Mountain, 6935 NY-91, Truxton. (607) 842-6204, skicny.com. Best Place to Bike: Onondaga Lake Park, 106 Lake Drive, Liverpool. (315) 453-6712, onondagacountyparks.com/parks/onondaga-lake-park. Best Organized Walk/Run: Paige’s Butterfly Run, 2911 Fargo Road, Baldwinsville. (315) 303-2578, pbrun.org. Best Health Club: YMCA of Greater Syracuse. syracuse.ymca.org. Best Yoga: Syracuse Yoga, 6181 Thompson Road, Suite 803. (315) 399-4333, cuseyoga.com. Love and Sex Best Date Night Location: Movie Tavern, 180 Township Blvd., Camillus. (315) 758-1678, movietavern.com/locations/syracuse. Best Adult Club: Club Paradise Found, 134 Headson Drive. (315) 701-0931, clubparadisefound.com. Best Wedding DJ: Black Tie Entertainment, 4683 Setting Sun Terrace. (315) 492-7985, btedj.com. Best Wedding Venue: Marriott Syracuse Downtown, 100 E. Onondaga St. (315) 474-2424, marriottsyracusedowntown.com. Arts and Culture M&T Jazz Fest, best music festival. Michael Davis photo Best Museum: The Milton J. Rubenstein Museum of Science & Technology, 500 S. Franklin St. (315) 425-9068, most.org. Best Ethnic Festival: Irish Festival. syracuseirishfestival.com. Best Food Festival: Taste of Syracuse. (315) 471-9597, tasteofsyracuse.com. Best Music Festival: M&T Jazz Fest. syracusejazzfest.com. Best Live Theater: Syracuse Stage, 820 E, Genesee St. (315) 443-3275. syracusestage.org. Music Ashley Cox, best female vocalist. David Armelino photo Best Female Vocalist: Ashley Cox. facebook.com/ProfessionalVictims, professionalvictims.com. Best Male Vocalist: Just Joe (Joe Altier). facebook.com/justjoesyracuse, justjoe.com. Best Band: Under the Gun. facebook.com/UnderTheGunSyracuse, utgrocks.com. Best Cover Band: Under the Gun. facebook.com/UnderTheGunSyracuse, utgrocks.com. Best Club DJ: DJ Skeet (Brian Prietti). facebook.com/DJSKEET315. Entertainment and Attractions Midway Drive-In, best movie drive-in. Michael Davis photo Best Movie Theater: Movie Tavern, 180 Township Blvd., Camillus. (315) 758-1678, movietavern.com/locations/syracuse. Best Movie Drive-In: Midway Drive-In, 2475 state Route 48, Fulton. (315) 343-0211, midwaydrivein.com. Best Ice Skating: Clinton Square Ice Rink, 2 S. Clinton St. (315) 423-0129, syrgov.net/parks/clintonsquarerink.html. Best Haunted Attraction: Fright Nights at the Fair, New York State Fairgrounds, 581 State Fair Blvd. (315) 396-8390, thefrightnights.com. Best Pumpkin Patch: Tim’s Pumpkin Patch, 2901 Rose Hill Road, Marietta. (315) 673-9209, timspumpkinpatch.com. Best Apple Picking: Beak & Skiff Apple Orchard, 2708 Lords Hill Road, Lafayette. (315) 696-8683, beakandskiff.com. Best Local Amusement or Water Park: Enchanted Forest Water Safari, 3183 state Route 28, Old Forge. (315) 369-6145, watersafari.com. Best Go-Karts: RPM Raceway, Destiny USA, 9090 Destiny USA Drive. (315) 423-7223, rpmraceway.com. Family, Fun and Games Best Pre-School Program: Learn As You Grow Early Education Centers. learnasyougrowccc.com. Best CNY Playground: Wegmans Playground, Onondaga Lake Park, 6763-6777 Onondaga Lake Parkway, Liverpool. (315) 453-6712, onondagacountyparks.com/parks/onondaga-lake-park/wegmans-playground. Best After-School Program: YMCA of Greater Syracuse. syracuse.ymca.org. Best Bowling Alley: Flamingo Bowl, 7239 Oswego Road, Liverpool. (315) 457-7470, flamingobowlcny.com. Health and Beauty Best Hair Salon: Innovations Beauty Spa Boutique, 3627 state Route 31, Liverpool. (315) 622-3005, innovationsdayspa.com. Best Barbershop: Nick’s Barber Shop, 600 N. Main St. (315) 476-4257, facebook.com/nickscny. Best Spa: Mirbeau Inn & Spa, 851 W. Genesee Street Road, Skaneateles. (877) 647-2328, mirbeau.com. Best Massage: Mirbeau Inn & Spa, 851 W. Genesee Street Road, Skaneateles. (877) 647-2328, mirbeau.com. Best Doctor: Dr. Karen Beckman, CNY Family Care, 4939 Brittonfield Parkway, East Syracuse. (315) 463-1600, cnyfamilycare.org. Best Chiropractor: Sportelli Chiropractic Center, 112 Dewitt St. (315) 422-4712, syracusechiropractor.com. Best Health Store: Natur-Tyme, 3160 Erie Blvd E. (315) 488-6300, natur-tyme.com. Best Pediatrician: Pediatric Associates, pediatricassociatesny.com. Best Dentist: Dr. Michael Fallon, Fallon and Fallon, 5109 W. Genesee St., Camillus. (315) 469-6871, facebook.com/Fallondentistry. Local Celebrities Wayne Mahar, best TV personality and best weather person. Michael Davis photo Best Local Reporter: Brandon Roth, CNY Central. cnycentral.com/station/people/brandon-roth. Best Radio Personality: Ted and Amy, WNTQ-FM 93.1 (93Q). 93q.com/tedandamy. Best TV Personality: Wayne Mahar, CNY Central. cnycentral.com/station/people/wayne-mahar. Best Bartender: Ryan Vendetti, Funk ‘N Waffles, 307 S. Clinton St. (315) 474-1060, funknwaffles.com. Best Local Chef: Anthony Donofrio, Modern Malt, 325 S Clinton St. (315) 471-MALT, eatdrinkmalt.com. Best Weather Person: Wayne Mahar, CNY Central. cnycentral.com/station/people/wayne-mahar. Food Best Mexican Restaurant: Alto Cinco, 526 Westcott St. (315) 422-6399, altocinco.net. Best Asian/Hibachi Restaurant: Ichiban Japanese Steakhouse, 302 Old Liverpool Road, Liverpool. (315) 457-0000, ichibanjapanesesteakhouse.com. Best Polish Restaurant: Eva’s European Sweets, 1305 Milton Ave. (315) 487-2722, evaspolish.com. Best Burger: The Blarney Stone, 314 Avery Ave. (315) 487-9675, blarneystonesyr.com. Best Sandwich Shop: Brooklyn Pickle. brooklynpickle.com. Best Bakery: Harrison Bakery, 1306 W. Genesee St. (315) 422-1468, harrisonbakerysyracuse.com. Best Family Restaurant: Tully’s Good Times. tullysgoodtimes.com. Best New Restaurant: Finally Ours Diner, 3788 W, Seneca Turnpike. (315) 928-6857, finallyoursdiner.com. Best Steakhouse: Delmonico’s Italian Steakhouse, 2950 Erie Blvd E. (315) 445-1111, delmonicositaliansteakhouse.com. Best Barbecue: Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 246 W. Willow St. (315) 476-4937, dinosaurbarbque.com. Best Local Caterer: Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 246 W. Willow St. (315) 476-4937, dinosaurbarbque.com. Best Fish Fry/Seafood: Doug’s Fish Fry. dougsfishfry.com. Best Middle Eastern Restaurant: King David’s Restaurant, 129 Marshall St. (315) 471-5000, kingdavids.com. Best Food Truck/Food Stand: Toss ‘N’ Fire Wood Fired Pizza, 315 N Main St., North Syracuse. (315) 458-9380, tossnfirepizza.com. Best Thai Restaurant: Lemon Grass Restaurant, 238 W Jefferson St. (315) 475-1111, lemongrasscny.com. Original Italian Pizza, best wings. David Armelino photo Best Wings: Original Italian Pizza (O.I.P.). myoip.com. Best Place for Lunch: The Retreat, 302 Vine St., Liverpool. (315) 457-6358, retreatrestaurant.com. Best Italian Restaurant: Francesca’s Cucina, 545 N. Salina St. (315) 425-1556, francescas-cucina.com. Best Breakfast Spot: Stella’s Diner, 110 Wolf St. (315) 425-0353, stellasdinersyracuse.com. Best Frozen Treats: Gannon’s Isle Ice Cream. gannonsicecream.com. Best Indian Restaurant: Dosa Grill, 4467 E. Genesee St. (315) 445-5555, syracusedosagrill.com. Best Pizza: Toss ‘N’ Fire Wood Fired Pizza, 315 N. Main St., North Syracuse. tossnfirepizza.com. Best Sushi: Wegmans Food Markets. wegmans.com. Best Birthday Cake: Wegmans Bakery. wegmans.com. Best Cupcakes: Wegmans Bakery. wegmans.com. Best Bagel: Bagelicious, 7608 Oswego Road, Liverpool. (315) 652-6007, bageliciousbagels.com. Best Hot Dog: Heid’s of Liverpool. 305 Oswego St., Liverpool. (315) 451-0786, heidsofliverpool.com. Best Doughnuts: Just Donuts, 219 County Route 57, Phoenix. (315) 695-1387, justdonutsnobagels.com. Best Place for Sunday Brunch: Empire Brewing Company, 120 Walton St. (315) 475-2337, empirebrew.com. Best Veggie/Vegan: CoreLife Eatery, 7265 Buckley Road. (315) 299-4451, corelifeeatery.com. Best Local Food: Gianelli Sausage, 111 Gateway Park Drive, North Syracuse. (315) 471-9164, gianellisausage.com. Drink Beak & Skiff, best hard cider. Michael Davis photo Best Hard Cider: Beak & Skiff Apple Orchard, 2708 Lords Hill Road, Lafayette. (315) 696-8683, beakandskiff.com. Best Coffee: Café Kubal Coffee. cafekubal.com. Best Brew: Empire Brewing Company, 120 Walton St. (315) 475-2337, empirebrew.com. Best Beer Selection: World of Beer, Destiny USA, 306 Hiawatha Blvd. W. (315) 422-2330, worldofbeer.com. Best Winery: Three Brothers Winery & Estates, 623 Lerch Road, Geneva. (315) 585-4432, 3brotherswinery.com. Best Liquor Store: Liquor City, 6793 E. Genesee St., Fayetteville, (315) 449-1818, liquorcitywineandspirits.com. Nightlife Coleman’s Irish Pub, best bar and best trivia night. Michael Davis photo Best Late-Night Munchie Spot: B’ville Diner, 18 E. Genesee St., Baldwinsville. (315) 635-3180, bvillediner.com. Best Bar: Coleman’s Irish Pub, 100 S. Lowell Ave. (315) 476-1933, colemansirishpub.com. Best Happy Hour: The Blarney Stone, 314 Avery Ave. (315) 487-9675, blarneystonesyr.com. Best Dive Bar: Shifty’s Bar & Grill, 1401 Burnet Ave. (315) 474-0048, shiftysbar.com. Best Sports Bar: Tully’s Good Times. tullysgoodtimes.com. Best Trivia Night: Coleman’s Irish Pub, 100 S. Lowell Ave. (315) 476-1933, colemansirishpub.com. Best Karaoke: Singers Karaoke Club, 1345 Milton Ave. (315) 484-7464, singerskaraokeclub.com. Best LGBT Bar: Rain Lounge, 103 N. Geddes St. (315) 218-5951, facebook.com/RainLoungeSyracuse. Best Dance Club: Lava Nightclub, 5218 Patrick Road, Verona. (315) 361-8177, turningstone.com/nightlife-lounges/lava-nightclub. Goods and Services Best Piercing/Tattoo Shop: Tymeless Tattoo, 36 Oswego St., Baldwinsville. (315) 635-5481, tymelesstattoo.com. Best Florist: Sam Rao Florist, 104 Myron Road. (315) 488-3164, samraoflorist.com. Best Place to Buy Music: The Sound Garden, 310 W. Jefferson St. (315) 473-4343, cdjoint.com/syracuse-store.cfm. Best Auto Repair Shop: John’s Auto Care, 2045 Milton Ave. (315) 468-6880, johnsautocareandtire.com. Best Dance Program: Ballet & Dance of Upstate NY, 932 Spencer St. (315) 487-4879, balletanddanceofupstateny.com. Best Psychic/Medium: Michele Love. michele-love.com, healing-inspirations.com. Best Car Dealership: Driver’s Village, 5885 Circle Drive E., Cicero. (877) 514-1748, driversvillage.com. Around Town Marriott Syracuse Downtown, best hotel and best wedding venue. Michael Davis photo Best Used Bookstore: Books End, 2443 James St. (315) 437-2312, thebooksend.com. Best Hotel: Marriott Syracuse Downtown, 100 E. Onondaga St. (315) 474-2424, marriottsyracusedowntown.com. Best Radio Station: WNTQ-FM 93.1 (93Q). 93q.com. Best Park: Onondaga Lake Park, 106 Lake Drive, Liverpool. (315) 453-6712, onondagacountyparks.com/parks/onondaga-lake-park. Best Library: Onondaga Free Library, 4840 W. Seneca Turnpike. (315) 492-1727, oflibrary.org. Best Not-For-Profit: Helping Hounds Dog Rescue, 6606 Kinne Road. (315) 446-5970, helpinghoundsdogrescue.org. Best Car Wash: Delta Sonic. deltasoniccarwash.com. Pets Best Pet Daycare/Boarding: Carm’s Dog House. carmsdoghouse.com. Best Veterinarian: Liverpool Village Animal Hospital, 6770 Onondaga Lake Parkway, Liverpool. (315) 451-5455, liverpoolvillagevets.com. Best Animal/Pet Rescue: Helping Hounds Dog Rescue, 6606 Kinne Road. (315) 446-5970, helpinghoundsdogrescue.org. Best Dog Park: Wegmans Good Dog Park at Onondaga Lake Park, 49 Cold Springs Trail, Liverpool. onondagacountyparks.com/parks/onondaga-lake-park/wegmans-good-dog-park. Best Animal Whisperer: Jake Grenier, Dog Trainer at PetCo. petco.com. The post Welcome To The Best of Syracuse 2017 appeared first on Syracuse New Times.

    Syracuse New Times / 52 d. 10 h. 4 min. ago more
  • The Hole TruthThe Hole Truth

    When Brian Yerdon was 9 years old, he bought a $20 metal detector from Radio Shack. Yerdon, a Lyncourt native and current city resident, would take the device up to the Adirondacks when he vacationed with his family. “It was the thrill of not knowing what I would find,” he recalls, “like looking for the prize at the bottom of a Cracker Jack box.” Unable to find anything at a young age, Yerdon gave up the hobby, but he never forgot the excitement. Some of Brian Yerdan’s findings. David Haas photo. Forty-three years later, that feeling finally got the best of him. In the winter of 2013, Yerdon began watching YouTube videos to learn how to properly become a metal detecting hobbyist. The following spring, he purchased the proper equipment and dove in, shovel first. Beginning in local parks, Yerdon hunted for anything he could find, knowing he wasn’t there to strike it rich. “For me, it’s about the hunt and the story,” he says. “I want to know what lies under our feet and the history behind it.” A recent dig occurred at his friend’s property in Manlius, a home located at what is considered one of the highest points in Onondaga County. Yerdon unearthed a 1790 Spanish coin and 28 buttons from the late 1700s and early 1800s. These finds left him to wonder what might have occurred on that land so many years ago. Yerdon has since upgraded his detector equipment. His new device, a Garrett AT-Pro, tells him exactly how deep to dig once he hears the proper signal. The depth of an item can range from 1 to 10 inches, although the depth doesn’t determine the age. “Some modern coins might be several inches deep, while older coins are waiting at the surface,” he says. Yerdon explains that it all depends on the conditions: “As our weather shifts, so does the earth beneath us.” That’s the reason why Yerdon and other metal detector hobbyists can revisit sites and continue to find new treasures. A prepress manager for a local printing company, Yerdon typically goes out on evenings and weekends when time allows. He also takes care of his live-in mother-in-law, who suffers from dementia, calling his time away a chance to “de-stress.” Yerdon highlights his hunts and findings on his own YouTube channel, “Yerdigginit Metal Detecting,” which has more than 600 subscribers. In addition to his own social media pages, he also moderates Syracuse Metal Detectives, a Facebook group of 150-plus local residents who share in his passion. Del Breazeale, another local digger and member of the Syracuse Metal Detectives, is also trying to hunt down the past. “My goal is to find history and preserve it,” he says. “If we don’t save the items from the ground, they’ll simply rot away and never be seen.” Recently, a Syracuse University student with hearing loss used the Facebook page to recruit Breazeale to help her recover a lost hearing aid near campus, an item he found within three hours. Other members use the page to share photographs of their discoveries or organize group digs. One popular location for local metal detectors is Thornden Park, where Yerdon recently uncovered a gold ring and a silver coin from 1877. “Thornden Park has been giving away relics for years,” he says. “It will never be hunted out.” Brian Yerdan showcases his discoveries. David Haas photo. Although hunters are quick to point out their successes, it’s important to know that most of the items are not worth keeping. “More than not, your dig will consist of trash from bottle caps to rusty nails,” Yerdon says. “But the time spent is worth it.” Of all the items Yerdon has found, he has never sold a thing, and he doesn’t intend to. He keeps his findings in display cases, while specific items are categorized into Mason jars consisting of cap gun parts, toy cars, bullets, silverware and more. Occasionally, Yerdon will find an item that he can trace to the rightful owner, such as a 1960 Hamilton High School ring that he is in the process of researching. He encourages anyone who wants to try their hand at metal detecting to know their town ordinances and learn the proper procedures before getting started. “It’s important to fill your hole 100 percent,” Yerdon cautions. “It should look like you were never there.” Metal Detecting for Beginners and Beyond, a popular instructional guide, includes a code of ethics for all diggers to follow. A similar code is emphasized on the profile picture seen on the Syracuse Metal Detectives’ Facebook page. Yerdon’s biggest interest now is home permissions, the opportunity to dig on untouched personal property. His hope is that as his work becomes better known, he’ll be invited to new locations by home owners. To see what relics my property was hiding, I invited Brian Yerdon to my house in Eastwood to search my yard. To my surprise, his dig consisted of dozens and dozens of wheat pennies, a harmonica reed, three rings, a pin and several Syracuse Transportation bus tokens. From now on, I’ll be following along to see what else Yerdon and the Syracuse Metal Detectives unearth. I might just join the effort. David Haas operates the Instagram account @SyracuseHistory and writes about Central New York’s historical legacies for his website Storycuse.com. The post The Hole Truth appeared first on Syracuse New Times.

    Syracuse New Times / 52 d. 10 h. 9 min. ago more
  • Comin’ ’Round The MountainsComin’ ’Round The Mountains

    Not waiting for the calendar to remind them about the official end of summer, hummingbirds disappear on Labor Day. On the western horizon the sun, approaching the autumnal equinox, sets appreciably farther to the south. The days are noticeably shorter. Students return to the classroom. Nights in the mountains chill off, summer camps in the woods and on the water sit empty, crowds thin, bugs disappear, leaves mutate into the brilliant shades of autumn. In the Adirondacks, New York’s 6 million-acre wilderness, the passions of summer give way to the introspections and nostalgia of the change of seasons. With a population of 100,000 permanent residents, the mountain economy is heavily dependent on tourism and the stimulus provided by the estimated 10 million annual visitors. And while some of summer’s attractions have decamped for the year, autumn in the mountains offers its own enticements. Camping in the wilderness is one of the Adirondacks’ most popular options, and the New York State Parks are second to none in providing the car-camping experience. Although many of the 42 sites within the Blue Line (park boundary) close on Labor Day, several easily accessible sites, including Nick’s Lake, Eighth Lake, Lake Durant and Indian Lake Campgrounds, remain open through Oct. 8. Site availability and reservations can be accessed at reserveamerica.com. The Old Forge area, just a two-hour drive from Syracuse, offers recreational options throughout the year. Get a bird’s-eye view of the mountains and fall foliage by taking a $6 chair lift ride at McCauley Mountain, open Wednesdays through Sundays until Columbus Day. Call (315) 369-3225/6983 or visit oldforgeny.com. Or take the one-mile hike up nearby Bald Mountain for another great panorama, located on Rondaxe Road off Route 28 north of Old Forge. In nearby Raquette Lake, the Great Camp Sagamore, the 1890s-era 27-building complex built by William West Durant, offers autumnal options for visitors, with seasonal programs and accommodations. Check in and enjoy what the Gilded Agers thought of as roughing it by calling (315) 354-5311 or visit greatcampsagamore.org. The Raquette Lake Navigation Company operates the W.W. Durant, the double-decker tour boat with a schedule of dining and sightseeing excursions running through October. Call (315) 354-5532 or visit raquettelakenavigation.com. The institutions that define and preserve the cultural, historical and natural character of the Adirondacks don’t close on Labor Day, either. In Old Forge, View (formerly the Arts Center of Old Forge) schedules exhibitions, workshops and performances throughout the year. The annual National Exhibition of American Watercolors ends Oct. 8, while the ceramic artist-in-residence and the private lessons programs both run through the end of the year. Call (315) 601-9728 or visit viewarts.org. Farther up the road on Route 30 in Blue Mountain Lake, the Adirondack Experience (formerly the Adirondack Museum) has received high praise for its current exhibitions including Life in the Adirondacks, as well as its permanent collections of art and watercraft. A visit to this venerated 121-acre campus is its own reward. Open through Oct. 8, details are available at (518) 352-7311 or theadkx.org. Just across the road on Route 30, find the trailhead to Blue Mountain, a strenuous 2-mile climb with a life-altering view of the surrounding mountains, including the high peaks to the Northeast on top. Farther still up Route 30 in Tupper Lake, the natural history museum, zoo and educational complex known as the Wild Center remains open through the year except for the month of April. This unique rustic-modern facility abuts the Raquette River and offers a plethora of special events and activities, including canoeing, kayaking, stand-up paddle boarding, workshops and performances. Its “Wild Walk,” an elevated walkway above the tree tops, provides a unique perspective you haven’t had yet. At one end of this aerie you will find an eagle’s nest, yet another perch from which to ogle the multi-chromatic display below. This facility and the Adirondack Experience stand well against any similar institutions in the country. There is also still plenty of time to launch your canoe or kayak in the Adirondacks’ 2,500 miles of navigable waterways. Old Forge Pond sits at the base of the Fulton Chain of Lakes and provides a starting point for a good paddle toward 4th Lake and Inlet and beyond. Autumn also provides quieter waters, with many of the motorized craft retired for the season. For a tranquil river paddle, check in at Mountainman Outdoor Supply on Route 28 in Old Forge, where you can rent a canoe or kayak (or bring your own) for transportation up the Moose River and a scenic paddle/float back. Rates are $28 to $46, depending on equipment and length of the trip. Call (315) 369-6670 or visit mountainmanoutdoors.com. At the end of any of this, refreshment surely awaits. In Old Forge on Route 28, Slickers is a friendly local tavern that welcomes any and all with a cozy ambience, notable pub menu, craft beer and, at times, live music. Call (315) 369-3002 or visit slickerstavern.com. For tasty Italian fare, Billy’s (behind Walt’s Diner) is intimate, casual and reasonably priced. Call (315) 369-2001 or visit billysrestaurantoldforge.com. And for breakfast, lunch, a great sandwich and good java, it’s Ozzie’s Coffee Bar, (315) 369-6246. Autumn appears early in the North Country, due to the latitude and elevation, and spring shows up late for the same reasons, leaving a long winter in between. Enjoying the autumnal splendor of the Adirondack mountains is temporal and fleeting. The time is now. The post Comin’ ’Round The Mountains appeared first on Syracuse New Times.

    Syracuse New Times / 59 d. 9 h. 57 min. ago more
  • Autumn Times Local Business DirectoryAutumn Times Local Business Directory

    Haunted Houses Cayo Industrial Horror Realm. 811 Broad St., Utica. The 2015 winner of the Best Haunted Attraction and Best Boo-for-Your-Buck in Central New York awards returns for its 13th year. Ages 13 and up. Oct. 6-8, 13-15, 20-22, 27-31, 6:30 to 10:30 p.m. $10/each event; $30/four attractions; $40/five attractions. cayoindustrial.com. Demon Acres. 341 County Route 36, Hannibal. This triple threat haunted experience features three spooky attractions equipped with high-tech special effects and sets. Ages 13 and up. Fridays and Saturdays from Oct. 6-28, 7 to 11 p.m. $12/hayride; $12/haunted house; $25/combo. (315) 564-8070. demonacres.com. Field of Screams Haunted House. 2040 State Route 49, North Bay. The most “spine-tingling, fright enticing” haunted house in Central New York returns for its fourth Halloween season. All ages welcome. Every weekend in October starting Oct. 7: Fridays, dusk to 11 p.m.; Saturdays, dusk to midnight; Sundays, dusk to 10 p.m. $10. twistedtheclown@twcny.rr.com, fieldofscreamscny.com/news.php. Fright Nights at the Fair. 581 State Fair Blvd. With three equally terrifying haunted houses located throughout the New York State Fairgrounds, fear is the name of the game here. Ages 9 and up recommended. Weekends in October: Fridays and Saturdays, 7 p.m. to midnight; Sundays, 7 to 11 p.m. $10/single ticket, $25/combo ticket. (315) 396-8390; thefrightnights.com. Frightmare Farms. 4816 State Route 49, Palermo. This 2015 winner of the Best Haunted Trail in Central New York offers a spooky tour of the haunted estate of Professor Whitaker. Ages 9 and up. Oct. 7-8, 14-15, 21-22, 28-29, 7 to 10 p.m. $13/single attraction; $22/two attractions; $25/all three attractions. (844) 374-4481; frightmarefarms.net. Hafner’s Haunted House. 7265 Buckley Road, North Syracuse. A not-too-scary experience for kids of all ages. Sept. 30-Oct. 22. Mondays through Fridays, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Saturdays and Sundays, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. $4. (315) 458-2231; chuckhafner.com. Raven Haven Haunted House. 7475 Thunderbird Road, Liverpool. The 2015 winner of the Best Home-Haunt returns with a family-friendly experience. All ages welcome. Oct. 21, 22, 28, 29, 31. Free. (315) 451-6294. Spooky Hollow Haunted Maze. Behling Orchards, 114 Potter Road, Mexico. This kid-friendly haunted attraction is also home to a harvest festival, you-pick pumpkins and more. Ages 10 and up for the haunted maze. Weekends in October. Free admission, prices may vary for attractions. (315) 963-7068; behlingorchards.com. Trail of Terror. 475 Clifford Road, Fulton. This haunted attraction returns for its 27th season with an even scarier walk-through and haunted house experience. Ages 13 and up. Weekends in October. $12/trail; $12/house; $20/combo. (315) 593-2999; thetrailofterror.com. Apple Orchards Adams Acres Farm. 7047 Sevier Road, Jamesville. The home of the Adams Acres Apple Fest (Sept. 24) is now open for you-pick organic apples. (315) 498-6654; adamsacres.net. Beak & Skiff Apple Hill Campus. 2708 Lords Hill Road, Lafayette. The home of 1911 Hard Cider is also open for apple picking until late October, with 15 different varieties. (315) 696-8683; beakandskiff.com. Behling Orchards. 114 Potter Road, Mexico. The birthplace of the Jenna Blush apple (grown exclusively at Behling’s) and offering 80 different varieties, the orchard is also home to an old-fashioned cider mill, a zombie paintball tournament, and family-geared fun fall activities. (315) 963-7068. Deer Run Farms Apple Orchard. 2695 Route 11A, Lafayette. Billed as the home of the “original apple fritter,” enjoy 15 varieties of apples to pick at this local favorite. (315) 677-8087; deerrunfarms.webs.com. Fruit Valley Orchard. 507 Bunker Hill Road, Oswego. This multi-fruit farm features 11 varieties of apples, as well as pears for picking during the apple season. (315) 342-3793. McLusky Orchards. 4603 McLusky Road, Lafayette. One of the oldest family-owned and operated apple orchards in Central New York, McLusky offers pickers a wide variety of apples and fresh apple cider. (315) 677-5176. Navarino Orchard. 3655 Cherry Valley Turnpike. More than 20 different varieties of apples for picking during the fall. You-pick pumpkins are also available from late September through October. (315) 673-9181; navarinoorchard.com. O’Neill’s Orchard. 4872 Route 20, Lafayette. After producing no apples in 2016, O’Neill’s is back and flourishing with 18 varieties to pick this season. Make sure to check out the apple-smoked barbecue, too! (315) 677-9407; oneillsorchard.com. Owen Orchards. 8174 Grant Ave., Weedsport. This old-fashioned family orchard and farm is the perfect place to pick apples (15 varieties), take wagon rides, and select pumpkins this fall. (315) 252-4097; owenorchard.com. Rocking Horse Farm. 3736 Apulia Road, Jamesville. This farm is home not only to five acres of apple trees offering more than 10 varieties, but also to Christmas trees, alpacas and mini-donkeys for sale, and a small gift shop. (315) 492-1100; rockinghorsefarmcny.com. Pumpkin Patches Abbott Farms. 3275 Cold Springs Road, Baldwinsville. With a wide selection of different-sized pumpkins, plus you-pick apples and prunes, Abbott’s is a great place for families to enjoy a day out this fall. (315) 638-7783; abbottfarms.com. Cicero “Pumkin” Patch. 7169 Island Road, Cicero. The “Home of the Hermit Hayride” offers a wide variety of decorative breeds of pumpkins. (315) 699-2200. Iron Kettle Farm. 707 Owego Road, Candor. This farm has been offering up fun fall family activities for almost 50 years, including pumpkin picking, hayrides and corn mazes. (607) 659-7707; ironkettlefarm.com. Katie’s Pumpkin Patch. 8484 Dunham Road, Baldwinsville. This local farm offers you-pick pumpkins, hayrides ($1 per person), and a free corn maze exploration with any purchase. (315) 638-0876; katiespumpkinpatch.com. Navarino Orchard. 3655 Cherry Valley Turnpike. Many pumpkins are ready for picking, with you-pick apples also available through October. (315) 673-9181; navarinoorchard.com. Our Farm. 1590 Peth Road, Manlius. Visitors of this pumpkin patch will be delighted by a scenic wagon ride through the farm on their way to the you-pick pumpkin fields. (315) 655-8453; fallpumpkinfarm.com. The Pumpkin Hollow. 3735 W. Seneca Turnpike. From picking pumpkins, feeding the farm animals, and going on hayrides, there’s always something to do at this pumpkin patch. (315) 960-4557; thepumpkinhollow.com.  Tim’s Pumpkin Patch. 2901 Rose Hill Road, Marietta. After 30 years in business, this pumpkin patch is still going strong with 40 acres of pumpkins available for picking. (315) 673-9209; timspumpkinpatch.com. The post Autumn Times Local Business Directory appeared first on Syracuse New Times.

    Syracuse New Times / 59 d. 9 h. 58 min. ago more
  • Family Fun In A Camden Pumpkin PatchFamily Fun In A Camden Pumpkin Patch

    “Happy Halloween” is more than just a greeting at Will’s Cackleberry Castle Pumpkin Farm. It’s the theme, as the owners ensure that guests at their Camden farm enjoy their visit. “Everybody’s happy when they come here,” said third-generation co-owner Misty Will Portner. “I like to just watch all the people walking around with smiles on their faces.” The farm had humble beginnings, growing from a simple vegetable stand to become one of Central New York’s premiere autumn family destinations. Will’s Cackleberry Castle Pumpkin Farm has given their guests, and their own family members, multi-generational memories of fall farm fun since the mid-1950s. Original owners Bob and Verda Will had a produce stand in front of their Hillsboro Road farm back in the early 1950s. In 1955, their children carved 11 jack-o-lanterns that were lighted and displayed near the stand to celebrate the Halloween holiday. When the Wills noticed that passers-by often stopped to take a look, they decided to expand their modest display. The farm soon featured huge totem poles piled high with orange pumpkin faces, hayrides in the field, and the conversational Mrs. Pumpkin, one of the very few talking pumpkins in existence. Now entering the Spook Walk. Michael Davis photo Verda Will was often seen scooting around the site dressed as a witch, albeit a good witch rather than the nasty counterpart. If kids got scared by her appearance, she would show that she wasn’t really all that frightening. She also loved when people recognized her away from the farm, although parents were sometimes taken aback as their children still called her a “witch” when she was out of costume. When the Wills’ children had grown up and moved out of state by 1996, the parents decided to close down the pumpkin farm after that season. Bob Will died in 2001, while Verda Will today lives in a nursing home. It was a long, solemn absence for the next 15 years in the fields of Hillsboro Road, until family members brought it back in 2011. Misty Will Portner, the Wills’ granddaughter, and her husband, Chris, re-launched the festivities at the same location, where Misty had spent so much quality time as a child working alongside Grandma and Grandpa. Their return was heralded by thousands of well-wishers that first season, many of whom had their own fond childhood memories of the farm and now wanted to share those with newer generations. “Misty was always her grandmother’s right-hand man around the farm,” said middle-generation member Alan Will, who is Misty’s father and Verda and Bob’s son. “That’s how she learned everything about running it. It’s great that she has kept the tradition of making this a family-oriented attraction.” It was Misty’s idea to bring the farm back for the families of the area to enjoy anew, her dad added. “It’s great to be able to work with family, friends, neighbors and our employees,” Misty said. “And we keep growing this bigger every year.” Misty said their preparations for the season begin with crop planting in the spring, and continues in June with maintenance to their attractions. The farm really kicks into high gear after the Fourth of July to make sure everything is set for their annual September reopening. Signs of the many attractions the pumpkin patch has to offer. Michael Davis photo One of their biggest jobs is carving the faces on all those jack-o-lanterns. “We carve 250 pumpkins a week for the totem poles,” Misty noted. Open now through Halloween, the farm features a kids’ playground area and a bounce house; the “Spook Walk” corn trail; hayrides; outdoor family-friendly movies as weather permits; a concession stand, fudge house, and popcorn palace; a graveyard, a novelty shop; and plenty of pumpkins, gourds, corn stalks, and cider for sale. Field trips and bus tours are available by appointment on Thursdays and Fridays. Admission and parking are both free, and so are visits with Mrs. Pumpkin and viewing their attractions. Their visitors are also encouraged to share their own photos of trips to the pumpkin farm with them for inclusion in a running slideshow; details are on their website. Chris said he came to the farm as a child, and had fond memories there. Misty’s stepmom Rashelle Will said she married into the business, and has only been around for the new generation. But what she sees there is “awesome,” she complimented. The future looks secure as the next generation is being groomed to continue the Will tradition. Young Max and Amelia Portner, Misty and Chris’ kids, are already doing their own chores there. Max, 9, says he enjoys decorating around the scenes and feeding the animals, including sheep, pigs, chickens, cows, and even mini-horses. Amelia, 7, says she also likes to help out with her own chores as much as possible. Chris Portner said the family time they spend together on the farm is invaluable. “Working together with my family really makes us closer,” he said. “Sometimes it’s a challenge to keep up with all of it, but I know I have family right here to back me up.” Will’s Cackleberry Castle Pumpkin Farm is located at 1175 Hillsboro Road in Camden. Hours are Thursdays and Fridays, 4 to 9 p.m.; Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.; and Sundays, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. For more details, call (315) 245-0104 or visit cackleberrycastle.com. View more of Michael Davis’ photos of Will’s Cackleberry Castle Pumpkin Farm here. The post Family Fun In A Camden Pumpkin Patch appeared first on Syracuse New Times.

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