• This RSS feed URL is deprecatedThis RSS feed URL is deprecated

    This RSS feed URL is deprecated, please update. New URLs can be found in the footers at https://news.google.com/news

    Google News / 17.01.2018 04:01
  • California couple's ordinary home held torture chamberCalifornia couple's ordinary home held torture chamber

    Sheriff's deputies said they found 13 children ranging from 2 to 29 years old, some of them chained to furniture.

    Syracuse.com / 50 min. ago
  • SU to make decision on Carrier Dome roof by this summerSU to make decision on Carrier Dome roof by this summer

    SU officials have been tight-lipped about the project for more than a year.

    Syracuse.com / 1 h. 45 min. ago
  • See the top 10 Uber destinations in Syracuse six months after launchSee the top 10 Uber destinations in Syracuse six months after launch

    Syracuse.com / 2 h. 49 min. ago
  • I-81 southbound closes near MarathonI-81 southbound closes near Marathon

    Both lanes of Interstate 81 south are blocked near Marathon, between exits 8 and 9. Traffic is being re-routed onto I-81 south at exit 8.

    Syracuse.com / 4 h. ago
  • Cuomo unveils NY state budget plan, calls for big tax changesCuomo unveils NY state budget plan, calls for big tax changes

    Cuomo said he'll urge lawmakers to consider restructuring the state tax system to soften the blow of the new federal tax overhaul

    Syracuse.com / 4 h. 28 min. ago
  • Sylvan Beach flooding worst in at least 50 years -- and it's not overSylvan Beach flooding worst in at least 50 years -- and it's not over

    Remaining ice jams have residents, officials nervous.

    Syracuse.com / 4 h. 38 min. ago
  • Syracuse recruit Darius Bazley named to McDonald's All-American Game - Syracuse.comSyracuse recruit Darius Bazley named to McDonald's All-American Game - Syracuse.com

    Syracuse.comSyracuse recruit Darius Bazley named to McDonald's All-American GameSyracuse.comSyracuse, N.Y. -- Darius Bazley, a 6-9 forward who has signed to play for Syracuse University next year, was named to the 2018 McDonald's All-American Game on Tuesday. Bazley attends Princeton High School in Cincinnati, Ohio. He signed a national ...and more »

    Google News / 4 h. 39 min. ago more
  • Growing TCGplayer eyes HQ move to Galleries of SyracuseGrowing TCGplayer eyes HQ move to Galleries of Syracuse

    Online collectible gaming card marketer says it needs more space for its rapidly growing workforce.

    Syracuse.com / 5 h. 16 min. ago
  • Growing TCGplayer eyes HQ move to Galleries of Syracuse - Syracuse.comGrowing TCGplayer eyes HQ move to Galleries of Syracuse - Syracuse.com

    Syracuse.comGrowing TCGplayer eyes HQ move to Galleries of SyracuseSyracuse.comSyracuse, N.Y. -- TCGplayer, a rapidly growing online marketer of collectible trading cards, has a tentative deal to move its headquarters into the Galleries of Syracuse downtown. Ascension Gaming Network Inc., the company behind TCGplayer, is ...

    Google News / 5 h. 17 min. ago
  • What would you do with $1.5M? CNY man buys waterfalls, donates them to be parksWhat would you do with $1.5M? CNY man buys waterfalls, donates them to be parks

    The retired Syracuse University professor is making the land accessible and open to the public.

    Syracuse.com / 5 h. 35 min. ago
  • Wayne County man charged with making threats of violence against del Lago CasinoWayne County man charged with making threats of violence against del Lago Casino

    Scott C. Furey, 47, was banned from the casino in June 2017 after casino officials learned he was engaging in fraudulent gaming activities.

    Syracuse.com / 5 h. 40 min. ago
  • 'Surprise': After winning appeal, B'ville husband admits killing wife 33 years ago'Surprise': After winning appeal, B'ville husband admits killing wife 33 years ago

    Ronald Meadow pleaded guilty today mid-way through his second trial.

    Syracuse.com / 5 h. 57 min. ago
  • 'Surprise': After winning appeal, B'ville husband admits killing wife 33 years ago - Syracuse.com'Surprise': After winning appeal, B'ville husband admits killing wife 33 years ago - Syracuse.com

    Syracuse.com'Surprise': After winning appeal, B'ville husband admits killing wife 33 years agoSyracuse.comSyracuse, NY -- Ronald Meadow spent more than three decades denying his role in the 1985 strangulation of his estranged wife in a Syracuse apartment. Meadow, 63, successfully appealed a 2014 murder conviction following his 2013 cold-case arrest when ...and more »

    Google News / 5 h. 58 min. ago more
  • Cuomo proposes windfall profit fee on NY health insurersCuomo proposes windfall profit fee on NY health insurers

    Gov. Andrew Cuomo wants to impose a 14 percent surcharge on the profits of private health insurers.

    Syracuse.com / 6 h. 10 min. ago
  • Republican running for NY governor wants recreational marijuana to fund projectsRepublican running for NY governor wants recreational marijuana to fund projects

    Joel Giambra plans to roll out his plan later in the campaign.

    Syracuse.com / 6 h. 34 min. ago
  • Could Syracuse remove snow from sidewalks like Rochester does?Could Syracuse remove snow from sidewalks like Rochester does?

    Officials often point to Rochester's sidewalk program, but is it doable here?

    Syracuse.com / 6 h. 49 min. ago
  • Could Syracuse remove snow from sidewalks like Rochester does? - Syracuse.comCould Syracuse remove snow from sidewalks like Rochester does? - Syracuse.com

    Syracuse.comCould Syracuse remove snow from sidewalks like Rochester does?Syracuse.comSYRACUSE, N.Y. -- With a new mayor and new Common Council, Syracuse policy talk has once again turned to the perennial issue of clearing snow from sidewalks. Last week, Mayor Ben Walsh said Syracuse will explore a snow removal program similar to one in ...

    Google News / 6 h. 49 min. ago more
  • Police ID Syracuse district fire chief injured in 3-vehicle crashPolice ID Syracuse district fire chief injured in 3-vehicle crash

    The district fire chief suffered minor injuries, police say.

    Syracuse.com / 7 h. 2 min. ago
  • Syracuse basketball: Paschal Chukwu emerging for OrangeSyracuse basketball: Paschal Chukwu emerging for Orange

    In the Syracuse Orange 's latest two outings - arguably the most challenging - Paschal Chuwku has put together two of his better performances in orange. The 7-foot-2 big man fell just one point shy of a double-double against Virginia, most notably hauling in 16 rebounds.

    Syracuse News / 8 h. 20 min. ago
  • See what it's like to climb huge rock wall at new Syracuse gymSee what it's like to climb huge rock wall at new Syracuse gym

    Central Rock Gym, one of the largest indoor rock climbing facilities in New York, has opened in Syracuse's Franklin Square. Located in a 113-year-old former mincemeat factory at 600 N. Franklin St., Central Rock Gym boasts 16,000 square feet of climbing terrain on walls up to 45 feet tall.

    Syracuse News / 8 h. 20 min. ago
  • See what it's like to climb huge rock wall at new Syracuse gym (video, photos) - Syracuse.comSee what it's like to climb huge rock wall at new Syracuse gym (video, photos) - Syracuse.com

    Syracuse.comSee what it's like to climb huge rock wall at new Syracuse gym (video, photos)Syracuse.comSyracuse, N.Y. -- Central Rock Gym, one of the largest indoor rock climbing facilities in New York, has opened in Syracuse's Franklin Square. Located in a 113-year-old former mincemeat factory at 600 N. Franklin St., Central Rock Gym boasts 16,000 ...and more »

    Google News / 9 h. 15 min. ago more
  • NY's Soraa fiasco, gerbil for council, downtown snow removalNY's Soraa fiasco, gerbil for council, downtown snow removal

    "Debacle" is too tame a word to describe the failed Soraa development in DeWitt. New York taxpayers spent $90 million to build an LED lighting factory in exchange for Soraa's promise to create 420 jobs.

    Syracuse News / 10 h. 42 min. ago
  • 2 residents injured in fire on Syracuse's Far West Side - Syracuse.com2 residents injured in fire on Syracuse's Far West Side - Syracuse.com

    Syracuse.com2 residents injured in fire on Syracuse's Far West SideSyracuse.comSYRACUSE, N.Y. -- Two people were injured Tuesday morning after their home on Syracuse's Far West Side caught on fire. The Syracuse Fire Department rushed to 125 Erie St. at 5:32 a.m. after multiple people called 911. Residents living in the two-family ...Multi-Family House Fire in SyracuseCNYcentral.comall 3 news articles »

    Google News / 11 h. 50 min. ago more
  • Winter weather alerts issued in Upstate New York for winter storm - NewYorkUpstate.comWinter weather alerts issued in Upstate New York for winter storm - NewYorkUpstate.com

    NewYorkUpstate.comWinter weather alerts issued in Upstate New York for winter stormNewYorkUpstate.comWinter weather alerts issued in Upstate New York for winter storm. Updated January 16, 2018 at 9:09 AM ; Posted January 16, 2018 at 7:58 AM. A woman walks her dog at Long Branch Park in Liverpool in this February 2017 file photo. Winter weather ...and more »

    Google News / 12 h. 3 min. ago more
  • SUNY ESF president abruptly ousts three department chairs in shake-up - Syracuse.comSUNY ESF president abruptly ousts three department chairs in shake-up - Syracuse.com

    Syracuse.comSUNY ESF president abruptly ousts three department chairs in shake-upSyracuse.comSYRACUSE, N.Y. - SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry President Quentin Wheeler has abruptly ousted three long-time department chairs one month after faculty approved a resolution criticizing him for not consulting with them. David H ...

    Google News / 12 h. 39 min. ago more
  • Coming soon to Upstate New York: Northway Brewing Co.Coming soon to Upstate New York: Northway Brewing Co.

    A new line of beer is coming to Upstate New York from a big brewery just off Interstate 87 in the Adirondacks. The Northway Brewing Co.

    Syracuse News / 15 h. 29 min. ago
  • Kidz Bop Live coming back to Lakeview Amp in 2018Kidz Bop Live coming back to Lakeview Amp in 2018

    The Kidz Bop Kids return often to Syracuse, having headlined the LEON Festival in 2014 and 2016. They also performed at the Lakeview Amp in 2017.

    Syracuse News / 19 h. 58 min. ago
  • NY District Chief Injured in Crash on Way to Fire - Firehouse.com (press release) (blog)NY District Chief Injured in Crash on Way to Fire - Firehouse.com (press release) (blog)

    Firehouse.com (press release) (blog)NY District Chief Injured in Crash on Way to FireFirehouse.com (press release) (blog)Jan. 15--SYRACUSE, NY-- The Syracuse district fire chief injured in a multi-vehicle crash Monday afternoon was on the way to a fire call when a van collided with his city-owned vehicle, police said. Police have not yet released the district chief's ...Emergency crews on scene of multi-car accident with injuries in ...Syracuse.comSyracuse district fire chief injured in three-car crashSpectrum Newsall 6 news articles »

    Google News / 23 h. 20 min. ago more
  • more news
  • LaFayette man, Syracuse district fire chief taken to hospital after 3-vehicle crashLaFayette man, Syracuse district fire chief taken to hospital after 3-vehicle crash

    The Syracuse district fire chief injured in a multi-vehicle crash Monday afternoon was on the way to a fire call when a van collided with his city-owned vehicle, police said. Police have not yet released the district chief's name, but they have identified two other drivers involved in the crash at North Geddes Street and West Belden Avenue.

    Syracuse News / 1 d. 0 h. 31 min. ago more
  • Syracuse Teenager Charged With Murder In Shooting DeathSyracuse Teenager Charged With Murder In Shooting Death

    A Syracuse teenager has been arrested and charged with second-degree murder in connection with the shooting death of another teenager in early December. Sixteen-year-old Lamar Murray also was charged Friday with criminal possession of a weapon.

    Syracuse News / 1 d. 2 h. 46 min. ago
  • Syracuse native McAuliffe pranks Northam with special pillowcasesSyracuse native McAuliffe pranks Northam with special pillowcases

    The peaceful transfer of power in Virginia would not be complete without a prank pulled by the outgoing governor on his successor. So it was that as newly inaugurated Democratic Gov. Ralph Northam hit the sack Saturday night after his inauguration, he found something special on his pillowcase - and it was not one of those fancy hotel good-night chocolates.

    Syracuse News / 1 d. 2 h. 46 min. ago more
  • Upstate University Hospital To Open Adolescent Psychiatric Unit In 2019Upstate University Hospital To Open Adolescent Psychiatric Unit In 2019

    After 13 years of consideration and planning, New York State has approved Upstate University Hospital’s plan for an inpatient psychiatric unit exclusively for teenagers. Syracuse.com reports that the eight-bed unit will be on the seventh floor of the main hospital in downtown Syracuse. The $3.2 million facility will treat patients between the ages of 12 and 17. While there are 5,564 registered hospitals in the United States, not all of them have full inpatient psychiatric services. According to Syracuse.com, health professionals often transfer kids to facilities in Buffalo and Saratoga Springs, but this new unit will allow them to stay closer to home. “This unit will keep children and their families together in our community while they receive care, but this is only the beginning as there is much work to be done in bringing additional mental health services to children to our region,” Dr. Thomas Schwartz, the chair of the psychiatry department at Upstate, said in a statement, according to Syracuse.com. Previously, Four Winds, a private psychiatric hospital, provided 64 beds for youth in Syracuse. But that facility closed in 2004, according to Syracuse.com. This leaves just 30 beds at Hutchings Psychiatric Center. Now, there is hope for parents who seek mental health care in this region. This new unit comes at a time when mental health is at the forefront of national discussion. The National Institute for Occupation Safety and Health found that 40% of workers say that their job is “very or extremely stressful.” And while stress can be a factor for the one in five adults who have a mental illness, this demographic is no longer the only group in concern. In fact, about one in five adolescents has a diagnosable mental illness as well, with almost one third showing symptoms of depression. In a recent statement to Oregon Live, Dr. Ajit Jetmalani, director of child and adolescent psychiatry at Oregon Health and Science University, said that we are at a critical turning point for childhood mental health. “I think we’ve reached a place where there’s a fork in the road: There could be movement around what’s best for kids based around obvious negative trend lines,” Jetmalani said. “I don’t think it’s going to come from a national level. It’s going to come from a local level.” And with this new facility, Syracuse is doing exactly that. Click here to comment on this article on our Facebook page. The post Upstate University Hospital To Open Adolescent Psychiatric Unit In 2019 appeared first on CNY Vision.

    CNY Vision / 1 d. 3 h. 9 min. ago more
  • Duke's Jordan Tucker, a former Syracuse basketball recruit, will transfer to ButlerDuke's Jordan Tucker, a former Syracuse basketball recruit, will transfer to Butler

    Jordan Tucker, who left Duke after just one semester at the school, announced on Monday that he will transfer to Butler University. Andrew Slater, of The Fieldhouse, was the first to report Tucker's decision to go to Butler following his short stay at Duke.

    Syracuse News / 1 d. 5 h. 8 min. ago
  • Familiar Syracuse names could be mentioned in upcoming NY corruption trialFamiliar Syracuse names could be mentioned in upcoming NY corruption trial

    Dozens of politicians, business leaders, union officials and others could be mentioned during the upcoming corruption trial of a high-ranking New York official, two Syracuse developers and another business executive, according to a list released by the court Friday. People on the list, which includes prominent Central New Yorkers, are not accused of wrongdoing and might not even testify.

    Syracuse News / 1 d. 10 h. 2 min. ago more
  • Familiar Syracuse names could be mentioned in upcoming NY corruption trial - Syracuse.comFamiliar Syracuse names could be mentioned in upcoming NY corruption trial - Syracuse.com

    Syracuse.comFamiliar Syracuse names could be mentioned in upcoming NY corruption trialSyracuse.comAmong more than 140 people whose names could come up during the trial: Syracuse Mayor Ben Walsh; former Syracuse mayors Stephanie Miner and Tom Young; Onondaga County Executive Joanie Mahoney; state Sen. John DeFrancisco; and Central New York labor ...

    Google News / 1 d. 10 h. 53 min. ago more
  • Onondaga County snowplow crashes into pole in Lysander; slick roads problematic countywideOnondaga County snowplow crashes into pole in Lysander; slick roads problematic countywide

    Many drivers Sunday had a difficult time getting up the hill on Onondaga Road in the town of Camillus that emergency crews decided to temporarily shut down the road, according to 911 dispatchers. On Lamson Road in the town of Lysander, an Onondaga County snowplow struck a telephone pole as the driver backed up the truck, sheriff's spokesman Sgt.

    Syracuse News / 1 d. 19 h. 16 min. ago more
  • Syracuse woman set shirt on fire, left it burning on neighbor's doorstep, police saySyracuse woman set shirt on fire, left it burning on neighbor's doorstep, police say

    Syracuse police say a North Side resident was so upset at a neighbor in her apartment building that she set a shirt on fire and left it burning in front of the other person's apartment door. Bridget Thomas, 32, of 824 Kirkpatrick St., was charged with second-degree attempted arson, a felony, after the fire Saturday night, officials said.

    Syracuse News / 1 d. 23 h. 42 min. ago
  • Syracuse police: Teens wanted a backpack. They got Dinosaur BBQ and a felony robbery charge.Syracuse police: Teens wanted a backpack. They got Dinosaur BBQ and a felony robbery charge.

    Three teens chased and threatened a man with a knife late Saturday night near the 700 block of West Genesee Street, according to city police. In the end, they got the bag - which held some clothes and a Dinosaur Bar-B-Que sandwich - and a serious charge of felony robbery.

    Syracuse News / 2 d. 8 h. 36 min. ago
  • Mayor Walsh, City Officials Announce New “Snow Safety Plan”Mayor Walsh, City Officials Announce New “Snow Safety Plan”

    By Staff –   Mayor Ben Walsh and other city officials have announced a new “Snow Safety Plan” for the city of Syracuse. The city will take immediate steps to address concerns about snow clearance from sidewalks, streets and around fire hydrants, city officals stated. “Snow covered sidewalks are a serious hazard to pedestrians, and illegally parked cars during snow events create safety problems for residents and the DPW,” Mayor Walsh said. “With the city leading the way, it’s time for all of us to pull together and improve our response to dangerous snow conditions. That begins today and will continue from this day forward.” “People should not need to walk in our streets during and after snow storms, and everyone should be able to get off their streets when they need to, except in the very worst of conditions,” Common Council President Helen Hudson added. “We’re hearing the concerns of our neighbors and taking action.” According to Walsh, the city is committed to the following: Ensuring timely snow removal from sidewalks on all city-owned properties; Increasing awareness of existing ordinances and responsibilities for city residents; Using city data to step up enforcement of parking regulations in priority spots and throughout the city, as well as violations by private plow operators; Engaging city residents in reporting problem sidewalks and in developing solutions to the sidewalk snow removal issues. The city’s innovation office will also hold a “Snow Safety Summit” Thursday, Feb. 15, to gather additional ideas and input from city residents. The event will take place from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Dr. Weeks Elementary School, 710 Hawley Ave. Visit http://www.syrgov.net/uploadedFiles/A_Content/2018-12-01%20Snow%20Safety%20Plan.pdf to view the city’s full plan. Click here to comment on this article on our Facebook page. The post Mayor Walsh, City Officials Announce New “Snow Safety Plan” appeared first on CNY Vision.

    CNY Vision / 4 d. 2 h. 29 min. ago more
  • Onondaga County Office for Aging to Celebrate “Older Americans Month”Onondaga County Office for Aging to Celebrate “Older Americans Month”

    By Staff  –   Onondaga County Office for Aging will celebrate “Older Americans Month” in May, by awarding seniors and other community members with recognition in the following categories:  – Senior Citizen of the Year – The award will recognize a county resident, age 60 or older, who’s demonstrated the power of making a difference through civic engagement. – Serving Seniors Honoree of the Year – The award will honor an individual (either currently employed or retired) who has made significant contributions in a career field which serves people age 60 or older. – Flanders Memorial Caregiver of the Year – The award will recognize an individual of any age who’s provided care for a person or persons age 60 or older, and whose actions, philosophy, and coordination of services serve as a model and inspiration for other caregivers. The organization will honor the award recipients during a celebration luncheon at Drumlins Country Club, 800 Nottingham Rd., on May 10. Interested individuals may submit nominations by visiting http://www.ongov.net/aging/news.html. Submissions are due by Feb 16. Click here to comment on this article on our Facebook page.   The post Onondaga County Office for Aging to Celebrate “Older Americans Month” appeared first on CNY Vision.

    CNY Vision / 5 d. 2 h. 21 min. ago more
  • Syracuse’s Office of Innovation Seeking Community Input for 2018Syracuse’s Office of Innovation Seeking Community Input for 2018

    By Staff –   The city of Syracuse’s Office of Innovation, or “i-team,” is seeking community input to determine the office’s focus area for 2018, the city stated. Each year, the i-team focuses on one challenge facing the city, and uses a data-driven approach to create and implement innovative solutions. This year, the city’s newly-elected Mayor Ben Walsh, and the innovation office, are asking for public input to select the city’s priority area. “We are working to establish a culture of inclusiveness, where citizens truly feel like engaged participants in our local government,” Mayor Walsh said. “This is among the first of what we anticipate to be many opportunities for the people of our city to be involved in decision-making processes that impact them, and our community at large.” The i-team will be accepting input until Jan. 24, and interested individuals may visit www.innovatesyracuse.com/ideas to submit their ideas. Customer service, economic development, education, eviction, government efficiencies, and neighborhood improvement, will be some of the topic areas to choose from, among others. Ultimately, the office will determine the most popular responses, then release those to the public for a two-week voting period, before the innovation team sends the top topics to the mayor for final review. According to the i-team, the city will render its decision by the end of February. In the past, the team has focused on infrastructure, opportunity and housing. Click here to comment on this article on our Facebook page. The post Syracuse’s Office of Innovation Seeking Community Input for 2018 appeared first on CNY Vision.

    CNY Vision / 6 d. 1 h. 37 min. ago more
  • Onondaga County Office for Aging to Hold HEAP Outreach Events for SeniorsOnondaga County Office for Aging to Hold HEAP Outreach Events for Seniors

    By Staff –   The Onondaga County Office for Aging will hold several Home Energy Assistance Program (HEAP) outreach events to assist seniors with applying for the program.  HEAP provides limited subsidies for heating and utility costs. “The December outreach events were very successful, but the temperatures are continuing to dip,” Pete Headd, executive director of the office, stated.”The Office for Aging is seeking to assist seniors, age 60 or older and income eligible, who need help paying their energy bills, with the HEAP application process. HEAP assistance is available on a first come, first served, basis so applications should be filed as soon as possible.” According to Headd, appointments are not needed for the events, and seniors who are unable to attend can call (315) 435-2362 to request an application by mail. The Office for Aging will offer assistance for seniors at the following locations, dates and times: MONDAY, JAN. 22 Cicero Library, 8686 Knowledge Lane, Cicero 9:30-11:30 Dewitt Community Church, 3600 Erie Blvd. East, Dewitt 10:00-1:00 Brewerton Library, 5440 Bennett St., Brewerton 1:00-3:00 Betts Library, 4862 S. Salina St., Syracuse 1:30-3:30 TUESDAY, JAN. 23 Magnarelli Center (formerly McChesney) 2300 Grant Blvd., Syracuse 9:30-11:30 Syracuse Northeast Community Center, 716 Hawley Ave., Syracuse 9:30-12:30 Jordan Elbridge Community Center, 1 Rte. 31, Jordan 10:30-12:30 Onondaga Senior Center, 4834 Velasko Rd., Syracuse 1:30-3:30 WEDNESDAY, JAN. 24 Baldwinsville Public Library, 33 East Genesee St., Baldwinsville 10:00-Noon THURSDAY, JAN. 25 Camillus Senior Center, 25 1st St., Camillus 9:30-11:30 Paine Branch Library, 113 Nichols Ave., Syracuse 9:30-11:30 Mundy Library, 1204 S. Geddes, Syracuse 10:00-Noon Solvay Public Library, 615 Woods Ave., Syracuse 10:00-1:00 White Branch Library, 763 Butternut St., Syracuse 11:00-1:00 FRIDAY, JAN. 26 Westcott Community Center, 826 Euclid Ave., Syracuse 10:30-1:30 Maxwell Memorial Library, 14 Main St., Camillus 1:30-3:30 MONDAY, JAN. 29 Central Library in the Galleries, 447 South Salina St., Syracuse 1:45-3:45 TUESDAY, JAN. 30 Conifer Village Community Room, 70 Conifer Dr., Baldwinsville 9:00-11:00 Brown Memorial Church, 228 Davis St., Syracuse 10:00-Noon PEACE, Inc., County West Family Resource Center, 93 Syracuse St., B’ville 10:00-Noon WEDNESDAY, JAN. 31 Cicero Library, 8686 Knowledge Lane, Cicero 2:00-4:00 FRIDAY, FEB. 2 Lafayette Free Library, 2577 County Rt. 11, Lafayette 10:30-12:30 PEACE Inc., Eastside Family Resource Center, 202 S. Beech St., Syracuse 11:00-1:30 THURSDAY, FEB. 8 Tully Free Library, 12 State Street, Tully 10:30-12:30 Visit www.ongov.net/aging for additional information regarding the events. Click here to comment on this article on our Facebook page. The post Onondaga County Office for Aging to Hold HEAP Outreach Events for Seniors appeared first on CNY Vision.

    CNY Vision / 7 d. 2 h. 33 min. ago more
  • Syracuse’s Icon Tower Finalist for Urban Land Institute’s 2018 Excellence in Development AwardsSyracuse’s Icon Tower Finalist for Urban Land Institute’s 2018 Excellence in Development Awards

    Syracuse is hoping its Icon Tower will win the Urban Land Institute’s 2018 Excellence in Development Awards. The Icon Tower is one of three finalists in the Excellence in Repositioning or Redevelopment category for New York State’s Urban Land Institute Awards. The New York competition is in its third year, awarding real estate leaders who demonstrate a commitment to planning, design, community involvement and impact, sustainability and resilience, and market success. Across eight different categories, a total of 19 finalists were selected for the awards for Excellence and the winners will be announced at a Gala in New York City on April 10. Syracuse’s Icon Tower has been vacant since 2006 after the building’s tenant, Excellus BlueCross BlueShield, moved to DeWitt — a suburb in Syracuse. The building has since been redeveloped throughout 2017 (finalized in March) and is made up of 89 apartments, office and retail space, and even a modern fitness center to accommodate for the growing popularity of working out. In fact, 58 million people go to either a gym or a health club annually, so this facility is sure to be a hit among Syracuse residents. Additionally, the building sports a large parking garage, authentic restaurants, and plenty of breathtaking views. “By incorporating innovative and creative design, Icon Tower is now one of the centerpieces in the revitalization of Syracuse’s central business district,” officials from the Urban Institute said. “Featuring great city views, the ground floor is home to a thriving 5,000-square-foot restaurant, the second-floor features 20,000 square feet of Class A office space, and what had once been a 2,000-square-foot mechanical room is now a glass enclosed 24/7 rooftop fitness center.” The Icon Tower — developed by ICON Real Estate and The ICON Companies — is located at 344 S. Warren Street. Click here to comment on this article on our Facebook page. The post Syracuse’s Icon Tower Finalist for Urban Land Institute’s 2018 Excellence in Development Awards appeared first on CNY Vision.

    CNY Vision / 11 d. 6 h. 56 min. ago more
  • Independent Mayor Of Syracuse Meets Andrew Cuomo In NYCIndependent Mayor Of Syracuse Meets Andrew Cuomo In NYC

    Ben Walsh, mayor of Syracuse, traveled to New York City for the first time since being elected, and while there he spoke with the mayor of the city, met an executive with the Mets, and was invited to the governor’s mansion to speak with Governor Andrew Cuomo. Walsh, the first mayor elected in Syracuse as an Independent in over 100 years, comes from a long line of Republicans. That said, his campaign was supported strongly by both sides of the aisle, a rarity in recent times. While Walsh was in NYC, he bumped into State Assemblyman Bill Magnarelli, a Democrat also from Syracuse, who brought Walsh to meet the governor. Walsh was excited about continuing to cultivate connections with Cuomo. The two political officials had talked on another occasion — when Walsh won the election. Over the phone, they discussed their fathers. Jim Walsh, a Republican congressman who held his seat for 10 terms, worked closely with Cuomo across party lines. “It’s how he said he’d like to see our relationship work,” Syracuse.com reports Walsh saying. “He said he’d like to accelerate our progress in Syracuse, and I certainly would welcome it.” Cross-aisle collaboration is certainly in short supply these days. In fact, according to the New York Times, partisan politics are at an all-time high. Perhaps the problem is communication. The Times article suggests that because Americans increasingly live in politically homogenized neighborhoods, consume confirmation biased social media, and date online, it is much less likely to meet someone with opposing views. This leads to an utter lack of communication. Similar communication issues lead to inefficiency and sometimes intense dislike in businesses as well. In fact, more than 80% of leaders surveyed from HR, sales, and other department say that problems can be traced to a lack of communication between internal systems. What is a state government if not an internal system? Open communication is an optimistic signal for Syracuse and New York as a whole because it bridges a gap. As Walsh gets to work on executing his campaign promises, the real brilliance is found in collaboration between two individuals with utterly different political backgrounds. Click here to comment on this article on our Facebook page. The post Independent Mayor Of Syracuse Meets Andrew Cuomo In NYC appeared first on CNY Vision.

    CNY Vision / 12 d. 2 h. 34 min. ago more
  • Central New York Schools Announce Closings Due to Extreme Winter WeatherCentral New York Schools Announce Closings Due to Extreme Winter Weather

    By Staff –   Several central New York school districts have currently announced they will be closed Friday, Jan. 5, due to extreme winter weather conditions that are expected to impact the area, according to an article on Syracuse.com. The following school closings have been announced as follows: Auburn, Cayuga County Brookfield, Madison County Cincinnatus, Cortland County Cortland, Cortland County Dundee, Yates County Groton, Tompkins County Hamilton, Madison County Hammondsport, Steuben County Homer, Cortland County Lansing, Tompkins County Newfield. Tompkins County North Rose-Wolcott, Wayne County Otselic Valley, Chenango County Penn Yan, Yates County Port Byron, Cayuga County Skaneateles, Onondaga County Sodus Central, Wayne County South Seneca, Seneca Count Spencer-Van Etten, Tioga County Tyburn Academy, Cayuga County Wells College, Tompkins Cortland Community College, and Finger Lakes Community College have also announced the schools will be closed. Check back for additional updates. Click here to comment on this article on our Facebook page. The post Central New York Schools Announce Closings Due to Extreme Winter Weather appeared first on CNY Vision.

    CNY Vision / 12 d. 2 h. 51 min. ago more
  • Common Councilor Khalid Bey Seeks Appointment of Lanessa Owens to Hudson’s Vacant SeatCommon Councilor Khalid Bey Seeks Appointment of Lanessa Owens to Hudson’s Vacant Seat

    By Staff –   Syracuse Common Councilor Khalid Bey Syracuse Common Councilor Khalid Bey is seeking the appointment of Lanessa Owens, director of the New Start program at the Volunteer Lawyers Project of Onondaga County, to fill the at-large seat formerly held by current Council President Helen Hudson. Hudson vacated the seat in November, after she was elected as president of the council. And, now, through a selection process that has become somewhat controversial, Bey has proposed legislation to appoint Owens to the seat, while several others, including former Green Party candidate Frank Cetera, have also submitted resumes to the city in an effort to fill the position. Cetera, a former councilor-at-large candidate, called on the council in November to appoint the appropriate candidate by using a fair and transparent selection process. “All of the council and mayoral candidates this campaign season have made a large deal about government access, transparency, and constituent services at the public forums we have all participated in,” he stated. “They now need to demonstrate that by demanding proper open process for the appointment of this seat.” Currently, the city is in the process of reviewing resumes to fill the position, and the council has also discussed Owen’s appointment during a special study session recently. “The process is determined by the council, and as of yet we have not decided on the process,” Hudson said in response to Cetera’s statement. “[The charter] states that the council makes the choice. There is nothing in the charter dictating any process.” The city’s deadline for applicants to send in resumes was Dec. 29, and, ultimately, the person the council chooses will hold the seat until November, and then face re-election to keep the position for the remainder of the term. Click here to comment on this article on our Facebook page.       The post Common Councilor Khalid Bey Seeks Appointment of Lanessa Owens to Hudson’s Vacant Seat appeared first on CNY Vision.

    CNY Vision / 14 d. 1 h. 32 min. ago more
  • Frank Fowler Will Remain SPD Chief for One Year Following Miner’s ExitFrank Fowler Will Remain SPD Chief for One Year Following Miner’s Exit

    By Staff –   Mayor-elect Ben Walsh and his deputy mayor, Sharon Owens speak with members of the media during press conference. Photo: Facebook Syracuse Police Chief Frank Fowler will remain police chief for one year following Mayor Stephanie Miner’s exit, according to Mayor-Elect Ben Walsh. First Deputy Chief Joe Cecile will also remain in his position for the same period of time. Walsh said he plans to conduct a national search for a new police chief, in addition to appointing three new deputy chiefs and authorizing a new class of police officers in 2018. “I am fully confident the department leadership will be responsive to the needs of the community as we complete our search,” Walsh stated during a press conference. Fowler has agreed to stay with the department until Walsh has completed the search process. He joined the department in 1989, and has been SPD’s chief since 2010. City Court Judge Derrek Thomas will  offically swear in Walsh as mayor on Saturday, Jan. 6, at 10 a.m. on the steps of City Hall, and an open house with refreshments, tours of City Hall, and performances by local cultural groups will follow. Visit https://www.facebook.com/BenWalshforMayor/ for additional information regarding Walsh’s police leadership plan, or the inauguration ceremony. Click here to comment on this article on our Facebook page.           The post Frank Fowler Will Remain SPD Chief for One Year Following Miner’s Exit appeared first on CNY Vision.

    CNY Vision / 19 d. 0 h. 53 min. ago more
  • Sky-High Jackpot Payout In VeronaSky-High Jackpot Payout In Verona

    The progressive Bad Beat Jackpot at the Turning Stone Resort and Casino Poker Room stood at an all-time high of $507,277 on Monday, Nov. 27, when two men playing a $2-to-$4 limit Texas Hold ’Em game each drew four of a kind. It was the luckiest loss of John Kelly’s life. His quad 6s suffered the bad beat when Paul Jones turned over quad 8s, and the nine players at the table rejoiced. More than a half-million dollars was split among the nine players, with Kelly — a resident of Rochester — awarded the largest share of the payout at more than $200,000. Paul Jones — a Turning Stone regular from Camillus known in the poker room by his nickname, The Colonel — also took home a hearty six-figure payout. Turning Stone spokesperson Kelly Abdo declined to report the amounts won by each of the nine players, but the other seven men at the table are believed to have won more than $25,000 each. The $500,000-plus jackpot was the largest bad beat ever hit at the Turning Stone, and is among the higher poker jackpots ever awarded in the casino’s industry. On Aug. 17 at the Playground Poker Club in Montreal, an entire roomful of cash game players split a $1,210,989 Bad Beat Jackpot on Aug. 17. Back in August 2012, Caesars Entertainment in Atlantic City paid out $800,000 on a bad beat. As at the Playground, the Caesars money was divvied up between several hundred players in the poker room. The Turning Stone Bad Beat stipulated that the payout would be made when a player holding a hand of aces full of kings or better is beaten by a stronger hand such as four-of-a-kind or a straight flush. The card players at that table when the bad beat is dealt share in the payout. Since Nov. 1, 2014, the Turning Stone’s poker room had paid out $1,146,894 in bad beat jackpots, and now that total has increased by nearly 30 percent to $1,654,121. Besides Kelly and the Colonel, the jackpot winners were Sylvio Bersani of Harpursville; Richard Havlik of Cooperstown; Joseph Marhatta of North Chili; Eric Paccone of Liverpool; Jay Sherman of Syracuse; and Karl Triplett of Cooperstown. One other player at the winning table requested anonymity. In the future, the Turning Stone Bad Beat Jackpot will require a hand of quad 8s or better beaten by a higher hand. As of Dec. 14, the jackpot there stood at $4,619. Scuttlebutt around the poker room suggested that management is capping the Bad Beat Jackpot, perhaps as low as $25,000, at which time hands weaker than four 8s will also qualify. So it’s highly unlikely that there will ever be another poker room jackpot of that magnitude. The post Sky-High Jackpot Payout In Verona appeared first on Syracuse New Times.

    Syracuse New Times / 28 d. 8 h. 35 min. ago more
  • The Truth Is Out ThereThe Truth Is Out There

    Are we alone in the universe? According to UFO researcher and columnist Cheryl Costa, the answer is an emphatic no. And her book, UFO Sightings Desk Reference: United States of America 2001-2015 (paperback, $39.95), released on March 24, has the statistics to back up that claim. Costa and her wife, Linda Miller Costa, co-authored the 359-page amalgam of bar graphs and Excel sheets over a 16-month period of incessant number crunching. The book encompasses data from all 50 states from 2001 to 2015, which includes the number of sightings by month and year broken down by state and county. Shapes of the UFOs are also prominently featured. Cheryl Costa in her study room. Michael Davis Photo Due to her book’s groundbreaking subject matter, Costa has garnered national media attention from radio stations, science magazines, and even The New York Times. The task of gathering data from privately funded and civilian-run organizations was tedious, yet Costa was determined to release that information in a way that she said has never been done before. “This was the compelling notion: Let’s publish the numbers,” Costa said. “Let’s show people just how big this is. And we suspected it was really big.” Costa officially retired from the work force in February after nearly 10 years in the Air Force and the Navy as an electronic surveillance technician, more than 30 years at Lockheed Martin as a computer security analyst, and several other short-lived jobs. She now spends her time furthering her research on UFOs and writing a well-trafficked column on the Syracuse New Times website called New York Skies. Since starting the column in 2012, Costa has spoken at numerous symposiums around the country. Following the release of her book, more doors have been opened to speaking opportunities than ever before. “We did one in Erie, Pa., and we had an audience there from New York, Pennsylvania and Ohio,” Costa said. “So I shared charts with them for their individual states. At these conventions I talk to everybody about everything.” Costa is set to speak at the 2018 International UFO Congress in Arizona, which takes place Feb. 14 to 18. The event is the largest UFO conference in the nation, boasting 3,000 to 5,000 attendees per day each year. Closer to home, Costa will speak at the Center for the Arts, 72 S. Main St., Homer, on Thursday, Oct. 26, 7 p.m. At the free event, she plans to take a break from discussing more recent UFO sightings to instead discuss experiences from the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries. What first got you interested in UFOs? I saw my first one when I was about 12. In fact, the whole family saw it. We were coming back from a relative’s house, and we saw a big, silvery sphere parked out in a clear, blue sky in a late August afternoon. It was about a week before school started. My mother had my father pull the car over and we sat there for 15 to 20 minutes watching this thing. It was about the size of your fingernail out there in the sky. My mother explained it could be a lot of things. It might be people from another planet. That got a conversation going with my mother and I over time, and we started getting books from the library and reading stuff with each other. And that was about as far as it went. I had a few other sighting experiences in my early 20s. I’ve always just been very well read on the topic. In November 2012, I saw a sidebar story on CNN.com. It said, “UFOs have been declining since the 1980s. Perhaps they were always just an urban legend.” And that didn’t feel right. So I went out to the Mutual UFO Network website for the first time in my life, and I looked up numbers for a couple of years in the late-1980s right up through about 2000. And the chart went up like a rocket. And I thought to myself, “What memo didn’t the UFOs get?” That’s what got me going on the idea of, “Maybe we should start reporting these things.” So I pitched it to a couple of editors at different places, and finally I came over and talked to (former Syracuse New Times editor-in-chief) Larry Dietrich, and he was intrigued because I was going to pretty much tell New York state stories for the most part. That’s how we really got deep into it. It’s been five years. Where did you learn so much about the topic of UFOs? In 1990 I was recuperating from a medical illness for a time, and I was between apartments. A gentleman I knew at that time, he was taking care of his father who had cancer at another residence. He said, “Hey, if you feed my cat, you can stay at my house.” So I did. And he had first editions on everything that had been written up until that point on UFOs. So for the few months that I was there recuperating, I read about everything he had. Like I said, I was very well read but didn’t want to follow it. It had a stigma to it. But I think the (article on CNN’s website) in 2012 spoke to me from the standpoint of misinformation. And that’s been talked about a lot over the years. For over 70 years, there’s been this policy of denial and ridicule. So what does a lawyer do when he or she has an eyewitness to something? They do everything to discredit the witness. So they have this whole thing out there in the public mindset: “Oh, the people who report UFOs are crazy or hoaxers or crackpots or conspiracy theorists.” I hear this all the time, and that’s not the case. Most people I’ve met doing this column want to get it off their chest and there’s no place else to report it. For your weekly New York Skies blog, where do you get the inspiration for each topic that you write about? Some weeks, it’s as simple as looking at the report logs, and I see sightings that are interesting, and I’ll write one of them up. There’s a lot of activity lately with the whole disclosure issue. I’m plugged into people who are very close to that, so I’m very knowledgeable on the topic. Michael Davis Photo There was a poll in 2012 from National Geographic that said 70 percent to 80 percent of the American public think the government is not being clean with us about this stuff, so there’s an audience there for that. I started doing things where I was keeping county statistics. I have to write about something, with New York state being the beat, so to speak. I found out very quickly in the UFO community that I was about the only one reporting statistics. So, we did New York state back in 2015, and a number of UFO investigators in New York state said, “We didn’t know about that pattern or that pattern or the one over there. How did you get this pattern?” I said, “We added county data to the existing material.” And because of that, my spouse, Linda, and I were talking and we said, “Why don’t we do the whole United States?”  We figured it would take a year. It took 16 months, and that’s how the book came to be. One of the things I pride myself on is being able to show people the statistics and this stuff is happening, it’s real, and you don’t hear about it anyplace else but here. What compelled you to create the UFO Sightings Desk Reference? In 2015, we had (compiled statistics for) New York state, and it revealed truths we didn’t know. A good example was that everybody knew about the Lake Erie Effect. Lots of UFO sightings along Lake Erie and the Niagara frontier. What we didn’t know, until I put county data into the overall sighting data, was that there’s a Lake Ontario Effect. Monroe County has almost as many sightings for the same period of time as the Erie region does. So we said, “Wow, this is wild stuff! What would we see if we did the whole country?” It took 16 months, and there are two more books in the works that take the same data but format it differently. How will the books be different? Well, the first book we went with purely magnitudes. We wanted to show you the United States and down to the county level. We have city data. It’s not clean enough yet because people spell cities wrong and it doesn’t sort well. And when you’re manually touching 121,000 records, it gets messy and takes time. But we’re going to publish a cities directory, and I’m about a quarter of the way through it right now. If we had done it with this book, it would’ve been 700 pages. That was too big. So we’re going to do one that’s laid out similar to the current desk reference, except it will literally drill down to the city level and show what the counts are per city and all the states and counties that have these sightings. So if a county has 500 sightings in that 15-year period, we’ll be able to break down exactly what the cities were. We’ve already done it for a couple of news organizations that have reached out. For the other book, investigators have been asking for a good summary of the shapes, and we hope to do the same data, except when we get down to the county level, show them exactly what shapes they had in that 15-year period, and that’s a different format. Where did the data come from? What resources were used? The National UFO Reporting Center’s data, which was 60 percent to 70 percent of it, depending upon the state. Then the Mutual UFO Network. They were 30 percent to 40 percent. For the most part, that was the data we used. It was all of their public data. MUFON was very generous with us because we had to ask them to pull it special for us. NUFORC’s was available right off of the internet. It was just a matter of downloading their website’s data using Excel. We started at 5 o’clock in the morning on Jan. 1; you wouldn’t believe the bandwidth availability because every-body is sleeping. So we were able to download everything in about three hours. It was amazing. What has the reaction to your book been like so far? ‍In 70 years, ‍The New York Times ‍has never spoken nicely about UFOs. In fact, they were very stodgy about it. Our book rattled them. In fact, something we heard back from a couple media producers was that we caused some shockwaves in the media industry. Much more than we realized. Michael Davis Photo So when they decided to do an article about us, they came up and made sure we weren’t sleeping in my mother’s cellar or something. They spent a day with us. The flavor was that this was the first time anyone ever published the numbers. Numbers don’t lie, as they say. That’s why we got the headline, “People Are Seeing UFOs Everywhere, And This Book Proves It.” You can’t dislike a headline like that. There were people who were seriously interested, and it changed the dialogue of the conversation. Before the book, if I had any kind of an interview usually associated with the column, I usually got a lot of the silly questions: “Are they little green men?” And that was the limit of the conversation. After this ‍New York Times ‍article came out, a lot of copies (of the book) ended up in a lot of newsrooms because when they started coming to me for an interview, they came to me with serious, solid questions that suggested they had looked at the book. In terms of disclosure, they’re now asking smart questions for a change. I did get my fair share of people from a TV station asking, “Well, how do you know (the statistics are) credible?” Well, how do you know they’re not? Until someone disproves a witness, an eyewitness account can still get you convicted in any court in this country. We had 120,036 eyewitness accounts, so that was one of the reactions. But we were getting interview requests from places you wouldn’t expect: ‍Harper’s Magazine‍, a couple of science magazines. V‍ogue.com did a piece on us, and we wondered about that. Then we realized the ‍New York Times ‍article mentioned that our computer we wrote the book on was in our sewing room. So I guess they made that connection. Have you accomplished what you set out to accomplish with this book? Yes, we did. What we set out to do was: what, when, where and what shape. That’s all we wanted to know. The focus was we wanted to disprove this notion that had been misinformed for a long time, “Oh, UFOs, they’re gone. They’ve been declining. People don’t believe in them anymore.” And the numbers have been going up. Three waves over 15 years. So we dispelled that myth. We didn’t expect to discover things. We didn’t expect to discover the weather patterns associated with this, the latitude patterns, how they affect the shapes. We didn’t expect to find the day of the week these things are more prominent. And there’s stuff we’re still finding.” You’ve been in contact with some production companies for a TV show. What kinds of deals have been in the works? We signed an agreement in a development context, and that’s kind of where it sits. It’s in development, I have correspondents with (Atlas Media Corp.) in New York City. Of course, because we haven’t done a pilot yet or anything like that, these productions can take about 12 to 15 months. So after we get up to that stage, we’ll probably do a pilot. That’s when they’re going to go out and pitch this thing to prospective networks who might buy it. It’s going to be about UFOs from a modern context instead of all of the great UFO crashes of the last 50 years, because our book of statistics dealt with 21st- century sightings. We’re looking at that as our hook. And now the talk is that we’re going to go on the road to some of the hot spots in the United States and visit the people there and maybe camp out and do some sightings. Recently, the topic of disclosure has come out in the mainstream media. What does this mean, and what do you see happening from here? Disclosure: The idea of the government coming clean. I wrote a column some time back about three former presidents who, when they were on Jimmy Kimmel Live, wouldn’t give him a straight answer and nervously laughed it off. My question is: Why wasn’t 60 Minutes or 20/20 or some news organization asking that question? Why did it have to be a late-night comedian? It’s a conversation we don’t seem to be able to have. So that’s the big deal in disclosure right now. Back in January, right before President Obama left office, the CIA had declassified some older UFO documents. That was sort of a smoking gun because here are some of these documents — I’ve got PDFs of these things — they were pulling their hair out about 70 years ago about some of the things that Linda and I were pulling our hair out about when we were doing our book. And they were getting paid, I was getting ridiculed. The people in the UFO community know this stuff is genuine. There’s enough evidence out there. It’s the general public who haven’t had somebody bless it, so to speak, for some government official to stand up and say, “Yes, this is real.” And that’s what we’re trying to get. We’re trying to get them to be honest and own up to what’s going on. Michael Davis Photo Most classified material, and I worked with it both in the military and as a civilian contractor for an aerospace firm, is usually declassified in as little as 15 to 30 years; worst case about 50 years. It’s been 70 years on this topic matter. It’s classified higher than the H-bomb. If it’s so ridiculous, why is it still classified like it’s been since the 1950s? It’s wrong. We need to know what’s going on. (In one of my recent blog posts,) we had Luis Elizondo, the head of a particular (Department of Defense) unit that collected information on UFOs. And he got on that video and said, “They’re real, guys.” So that was very, very eye-opening. People in the UFO community wanted to drink from the fire hose, but for your average person who knew nothing about UFOs, that was about as much disclosure as they could take. I’ve talked to a few people who have seen that clip and they said, “Wow! Up until now I didn’t believe it was real, and now it’s real.” What do you hope to see change regarding UFOs? ‍There needs to be a national conversation on the topic matter. I had somebody writing something up about us and he referred to me as a UFO enthusiast. And I said, “No, I’m not a UFO enthusiast. I’m trying to out the truth out there.” I think this is an important thing. I hope that the truth does come out. There’s a lot of people besides me working on it. We had hoped it would happen at the end of the Obama administration. There’s a registered lobbyist in D.C., and he was working really hard at it. We don’t know where it’s going to go with the current administration, but there are other efforts afoot. I’d like to see the dialogue that’s going to lead to disclosure, because for 50 to 70 years, we’ve had this mentality that we’ve been sold a bill of goods. The people who are interested in this topic are loony toons, hoaxers, all of this stuff. And that is not the case. When I was first getting ready to write the column, I sat down at a diner and I said, “Hey, I’m getting ready to write a column about UFOs. Anybody here seen one besides me?” And somebody leaned in and said, “Yeah, I saw one.” Somebody came over a little while later and told me, “Oh yeah, my brother saw this during the war.” With the column, I’ve had people invite me to a backyard barbecue and say, “Hey, we want you to meet our Uncle Ralph who saw this.” We’re finding out that people are handing these things down like family heirlooms. People have been convinced that if you report one of these things, people are going to label you as a nut. For example, somebody in my family has been harassed because of the visibility that my book has caused. We’ve got to get past that. Part of the reason we can’t get congressional hearings is because everyone has bought into it. If a congressman stands up and says, “I think we need to have UFO and E.T. presence hearings,” they’re going to label them a kook because it’s been built into the culture over the last 70 years. I want to see that end. If it’s serious enough to be classified higher than the H-bomb, then it’s time for them to come clean with us. SNT The post The Truth Is Out There appeared first on Syracuse New Times.

    Syracuse New Times / 83 d. 17 h. 30 min. ago more
  • SALT Honors Waiting In The WingsSALT Honors Waiting In The Wings

    The nominations have been tallied for the 13th annual Syracuse New Times Syracuse Area Live Theater (SALT) Awards, which honor performances and behind-the-scenes work by area professional, regional and community theater companies. The SALT winners will be announced during a ceremony to be held Sunday, Nov. 5, 6:30 p.m., at Syracuse Stage’s Archbold Theater, 820 E. Genesee St. The show’s presenting sponsor is Empower Federal Credit Union. This year’s co-hosts will be WSYR-Channel 9’s Bridge Street personality Sistina Giordano and state Sen. John DeFrancisco. Cocktails and light fare will be available. Discounted pre-sale tickets are available for $20 until Saturday, Nov. 4, midnight. Tickets at the door will be $25. Visit cnytix.com/events/salt-awards to purchase tickets and like the SALT Awards on Facebook for regular event updates. PROFESSIONAL THEATER COMPANIES Play of the Year Deathtrap (Syracuse Stage); Disgraced (Syracuse Stage); How I Learned to Drive (Syracuse Stage) Best Director of a Play May Adrales, Disgraced (Syracuse Stage); Paul Barnes, Deathtrap (Syracuse Stage); Michael Bloom, Great Expectations (Syracuse Stage); Laura Kepley, How I Learned to Drive (Syracuse Stage) Leading Actress in a Play Madeleine Lambert, How I Learned to Drive (Syracuse Stage); Victoria Mack, Disgraced (Syracuse Stage); Marina Shay, Great Expectations (Syracuse Stage) Leading Actor in a Play Michael Brusasco, How I Learned to Drive (Syracuse Stage); Andrew Ramcharan Guilarte, Disgraced (Syracuse Stage); James Lloyd Reynolds, Deathtrap (Syracuse Stage); Robbie Simpson, Great Expectations (Syracuse Stage) Musical of the Year Ain’t Misbehavin’ (Syracuse Stage); Mary Poppins (Syracuse Stage); Ring of Fire (Syracuse Stage) Best Director of a Musical Peter Amster, Mary Poppins (Syracuse Stage); Patdro Harris, Ain’t Misbehavin’ (Syracuse Stage); Randal Myler, Ring of Fire (Syracuse Stage) Leading Actress in a Musical Trenna Barnes, Ring of Fire (Syracuse Stage); Emily Brockway, Mary Poppins (Syracuse Stage); Danielle Herbert, Ain’t Misbehavin’ (Syracuse Stage) Leading Actor in a Musical Anthony Boggess-Glover, Ain’t Misbehavin’ (Syracuse Stage); Jonathan Burke, Mary Poppins (Syracuse Stage); Benjamin D. Hale, Ring of Fire (Syracuse Stage) REGIONAL THEATER COMPANIES Play of the Year The Bomb-itty of Errors (Redhouse Arts Center); The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged) (Redhouse); Nana’s Naughty Knickers (Cortland Repertory Theatre); Six Degrees of Separation (Redhouse); The 39 Steps (Cortland Repertory) Best Director of a Play Vincent J. Cardinal, Six Degrees of Separation (Redhouse); Dustin Charles, The 39 Steps (Cortland Repertory); Ben Liebert, The Bomb-itty of Errors (Redhouse); Ben Liebert, The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged) (Redhouse); Kerby Thompson, Appointment with Death (Cortland Repertory) Sound Design of a Play Seth Asa Sengal, Appointment with Death (Cortland Repertory); Seth Asa Sengal, The 39 Steps (Cortland Repertory); Anthony Vadala, The Bomb-itty of Errors (Redhouse); Anthony Vadala, The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged) (Redhouse); Anthony Vadala, Six Degrees of Separation (Redhouse) Lighting Design of a Play Eric Behnke, Appointment with Death (Cortland Repertory); Eric Behnke, Nana’s Naughty Knickers (Cortland Repertory); Eric Behnke, The 39 Steps (Cortland Repertory); Erik Fox, The Bomb-itty of Errors (Redhouse); Marie Yokohama, Six Degrees of Separation (Redhouse) Set Design of a Play Shelley Barish, Nana’s Naughty Knickers (Cortland Repertory); Shane Cinal, Six Degrees of Separation (Redhouse); Joe Dotts, The 39 Steps (Cortland Repertory); Benjamin Kramer, The Bomb-itty of Errors (Redhouse); Steve TenEyck, The Foreigner (Hangar Theatre) Costume Design of a Play Eugenie Michelle Giasson, The Bomb-itty of Errors (Redhouse); Eugenie Michelle Giasson, Six Degrees of Separation (Redhouse); Jimmy Johansmeyer, The 39 Steps (Cortland Repertory); Ricky Lurie, Nana’s Naughty Knickers (Cortland Repertory); Wendi R. Zea, Appointment with Death (Cortland Repertory) Leading Actress in a Play Laura Austin, Six Degrees of Separation (Redhouse); Raquel Chavez, The Bomb-itty of Errors (Redhouse); Raquel Chavez, The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged) (Redhouse); Leah Gabriel, The 39 Steps (Cortland Repertory); Peggy Lewis, Nana’s Naughty Knickers (Cortland Repertory) Leading Actor in a Play Karl Gregory, Hand to God (Kitchen Theatre Company); Richard Lafleur, The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged) (Redhouse); Rakeem Lawrence, Six Degrees of Separation (Redhouse); James Taylor Odom, The 39 Steps (Cortland Repertory); Jeff Ronan, The Bomb-itty of Errors (Redhouse) Supporting Actress in a Play Elizabeth Bove, Appointment with Death (Cortland Repertory); Magdalyn Donnelly, The Bomb-itty of Errors (Redhouse); Montana Hoover, Hand to God (Kitchen Theatre); Marguerite Mitchell, Six Degrees of Separation (Redhouse); Sebastian Ryder, Nana’s Naughty Knickers (Cortland Repertory) Supporting Actor in a Play Maxwel Anderson, Six Degrees of Separation (Redhouse); Tom DeMichele, Nana’s Naughty Knickers (Cortland Repertory); Nathaniel Kent, Appointment with Death (Cortland Repertory); Donovan Stanfield, The Bomb-itty of Errors (Redhouse); Michael Patrick Trimm, Hand to God (Kitchen Theatre) Musical of the Year Avenue Q (Redhouse); The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas (Merry-Go-Round Playhouse); Footloose (Cortland Repertory); Guys and Dolls (Merry-Go-Round); Parade (Merry-Go-Round) Best Director of a Musical Stephen Brotebeck, Ghost: The Musical (Merry-Go-Round); Patrick Burns, Beauty and the Beast (Redhouse); Parker Esse, The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas (Merry-Go-Round); Brett Smock, Parade (Merry-Go-Round); Kate Sullivan Gibbens, Avenue Q (Redhouse) Choreographer of the Year Stephond Brunson, Avenue Q (Redhouse); Clare Cook, Footloose (Cortland Repertory); Matt Couvillon, La Cage Aux Folles (Cortland Repertory); Parker Esse, The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas (Merry-Go-Round); Richard J. Hinds, Guys and Dolls (Merry-Go-Round) Sound Design of a Musical Kevin Heard, Ghost: The Musical (Merry-Go-Round); Bobby Johnston, The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas (Merry-Go-Round); Miles Polaski, Guys and Dolls (Merry-Go-Round); Seth Asa Sengal, La Cage Aux Folles (Cortland Repertory); Anthony Vadala, Avenue Q (Redhouse) Lighting Design of a Musical Dan Ozminkowski, Ghost: The Musical (Merry-Go-Round); Dan Ozminkowski, Guys and Dolls (Merry-Go-Round); Jose Santiago, The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas (Merry-Go-Round); Jose Santiago, Parade (Merry-Go-Round); David A. Sexton, La Cage Aux Folles (Cortland Repertory) Set Design of a Musical Tim Brown, Avenue Q (Redhouse); Chad Healy, The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas (Merry-Go-Round); Shako Kambara, Guys and Dolls (Merry-Go-Round); Czerton Lim, Ghost: The Musical (Merry-Go-Round); Czerton Lim, Parade (Merry-Go-Round) Costume Design of a Musical Tiffany Howard, The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas (Merry-Go-Round); Tiffany Howard, Guys and Dolls (Merry-Go-Round); Tiffany Howard, Parade (Merry-Go-Round); Jimmy Johansmeyer, Footloose (Cortland Repertory); Jimmy Johansmeyer, La Cage Aux Folles (Cortland Repertory) Leading Actress in a Musical Briana Maia, Avenue Q (Redhouse); Haley McCormick, Footloose (Cortland Repertory); Caroline Strang, Beauty and the Beast (Redhouse); Kristen Wetherington, Parade (Merry-Go-Round); Sally Wilfert, The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas (Merry-Go-Round) Leading Actor in a Musical Ryan Andes, The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas (Merry-Go-Round); Derek Carley, Ghost: The Musical (Merry-Go-Round); Aaron Galligan, Parade (Merry-Go-Round); LaRon Grant, Avenue Q (Redhouse); Temar Underwood, Beauty and the Beast (Redhouse) Supporting Actress in a Musical Julie Cardia, Guys and Dolls (Merry-Go-Round); Allyson Kaye Daniel, Ghost: The Musical (Merry-Go-Round); Kathy Burge Egloff, Beauty and the Beast (Redhouse); Lilli Komurek, Secret Garden: Spring Version (Redhouse); Carmen Viviano-Crafts, Avenue Q (Redhouse) Supporting Actor in a Musical Carlos Lopez, Guys and Dolls (Merry-Go-Round); Phil Sloves, Footloose (Cortland Repertory); Jamison Stern, Parade (Merry-Go-Round); Jason Timothy, Beauty and the Beast (Redhouse); Anthony Wright, La Cage Aux Folles (Cortland Repertory) Musical Director of the Year Corrine Aquiline, The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas (Merry-Go-Round); Corrine Aquiline, Guys and Dolls (Merry-Go-Round); Christopher Blasting, Footloose (Cortland Repertory); Jacob Carll, Avenue Q (Redhouse); Jeff Theiss, Parade (Merry-Go-Round) COMMUNITY THEATER COMPANIES Play of the Year The Elephant Man (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild); Of Mice and Men (Central New York Playhouse); Peter and the Starcatcher (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild); The Tomkat Project (Rarely Done Productions); Twelve Angry Men (CNY Arts Center) Best Director of a Play Jessie Dobrzynski, Twelve Angry Men (CNY Arts); Len Fonte, Melagrana (Central New York Playhouse); Colin Keating, Peter and the Starcatcher (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild); Kasey Marie Polly, Of Mice and Men (Central New York Playhouse); William Edward White, The Elephant Man (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild) Sound Design of a Play Jack Cleland and Robert G. Searle, Melagrana (Central New York Playhouse); Colin Keating, Peter and the Starcatcher (Baldwinsville Theatre  Guild); Dan Rowlands, Night of the Living Dead, (Central New York Playhouse); Kasey Marie Polly, Of Mice and Men (Central New York Playhouse); William Edward White, The Elephant Man (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild) Lighting Design of a Play Sarah Anson, The Elephant Man (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild); Liam Fitzpatrick, Of Mice and Men (Central New York Playhouse); Shane Patterson, Peter and the Starcatcher (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild); Dan Randall, Melagrana (Central New York Playhouse); William Edward White, Twelve Angry Men (CNY Arts) Set Design of a Play Navroz Dabu, The Elephant Man (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild); Navroz Dabu, Melagrana (Central New York Playhouse); John Frank, Rumors (Rome Community Theater); Christopher Lupia, Dan Rowlands, Justin Polly and Kasey Marie Polly, Of Mice and Men (Central New York Playhouse); Chuck Moody and Henry Wilson, Peter and the Starcatcher (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild) Costume Design of a Play Kate Kisselstein, The Elephant Man (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild); Carleena Manzi, Of Mice and Men (Central New York Playhouse); Barbara Toman, One Man, Two Guvnors (Central New York Playhouse); Barbara Toman and Simon Moody, As You Like It (Syracuse Shakespeare Festival); Jodi Wilson, Peter and the Starcatcher (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild) Leading Actress in a Play Kimberly Grader, It’s a Wonderful Life, (Central New York Playhouse); Gracie Jarvis, A Doll’s House (Open Hand Theater); Clare Lopez, Peter and the Starcatcher (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild); Lauren Puente, One Man, Two Guvnors (Central New York Playhouse); Carmen Viviano-Crafts, Melagrana (Central New York Playhouse) Leading Actor in a Play Phil Brady, Of Mice and Men (Central New York Playhouse); Jordan Glaski, The Tomkat Project (Rarely Done); Josh Mele, One Man, Two Guvnors (Central New York Playhouse); Ryan Sparkes, Peter and the Starcatcher (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild); Alan Stillman, The Elephant Man (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild) Supporting Actress in a Play Binaifer Dabu, The Elephant Man (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild); Lynn Barbato King, Othello (Central New York Playhouse); Tina Lee, Sordid Lives (Rarely Done); Heather Roach, Witness for the Prosecution (Central New York Playhouse); Sabrina Woodward, Harvey (CNY Arts) Supporting Actor in a Play Matthew Gordon, Peter and the Starcatcher (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild); Joshua Kimball, The Tomkat Project (Rarely Done Productions); Simon Moody, The Elephant Man (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild); Geno Parlato, Silence of the Clams (Rarely Done); Garrett Robinson, Twelve Angry Men (CNY Arts) Musical of the Year American Idiot (Central New York Playhouse); Chicago (Central New York Playhouse); The Last Five Years (Rarely Done); Spring Awakening (Syracuse Summer Theatre); Sunday in the Park with George (St. David’s Celebration of the Arts) Best Director of a Musical Dustin M. Czarny, Chicago (Central New York Playhouse); Liam Fitzpatrick, American Idiot (Central New York Playhouse); Garrett Heater, Spring Awakening (Syracuse Summer Theatre); Ronald Hebert, Bye, Bye, Birdie (ManliusMusical/Town of Manlius Recreation Department); Henry Wilson, The Music Man, (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild) Musical Director of the Year Colin Keating, The Music Man (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild); Bridget Moriarty, Spring Awakening (Syracuse Summer Theatre); Abel Searor, American Idiot (Central New York Playhouse); Abel Searor, Chicago (Central New York Playhouse); Abel Searor, Sunday in the Park with George (St. David’s Celebration of the Arts) Choreographer of the Year Ellen Ayers, The Music Man (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild); Jodi Bova-Mele, Spring Awakening (Syracuse Summer Theatre); Marisa Guzman Colegrove, Bye, Bye, Birdie (ManliusMusical); Sami Hoerner, American Idiot (Central New York Playhouse); Shannon Tompkins, Chicago (Central New York Playhouse) Sound Design of a Musical Jonathan Hedges, Godspell (CNY Arts); Mark Palinkas, The Music Man (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild); Rob Searle, Chicago (Central New York Playhouse); Dylan Spencer, Bye, Bye, Birdie (ManliusMusical); Tony Vadala, Spring Awakening (Syracuse Summer Theatre) Lighting Design of a Musical Sarah Anson, Chicago (Central New York Playhouse); Dusten Blake, The Last Five Years (Rarely Done); LuAnn Boone-Isherwood, Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat (Rome Community Theater); Liam Fitzpatrick, American Idiot (Central New York Playhouse); Garrett Heater, Spring Awakening (Syracuse Summer Theatre) Set Design of a Musical Dustin Czarny, Chicago (Central New York Playhouse); Liam Fitzpatrick and Christopher Lupia, American Idiot (Central New York Playhouse); Garrett Heater, Spring Awakening (Syracuse Summer Theatre); Chad Lewis, Godspell (CNY Arts); Henry Wilson, The Music Man (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild) Costume Design of a Musical Sue and Julie Berger, Spring Awakening (Syracuse Summer Theatre); Alicia Cobb, Chicago (Central New York Playhouse); Stephanie Long, American Idiot (Central New York Playhouse); Gail Tucker, Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat (Rome Community Theater); Jodi Wilson, The Music Man (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild) Leading Actress in a Musical Alicia Bronzetti, Chicago (Central New York Playhouse); Maya Dwyer, Spring Awakening (Syracuse Summer Theatre); Aubrey Panek, The Last Five Years (Rarely Done); Erin Sills, Sunday in the Park with George (St. David’s Celebration of the Arts); Hannah Weiler, American Idiot (Central New York Playhouse) Leading Actor in a Musical Liam Fitzpatrick, Sunday in the Park with George (St. David’s Celebration of the Arts); Mike Gibson, American Idiot (Central New York Playhouse); Benjamin Sills, Chicago (Central New York Playhouse); Paul Thompson, The Last Five Years (Rarely Done); Chip Weber, Spring Awakening (Syracuse Summer Theatre) Supporting Actress in a Musical Sunny Hernandez, A Christmas Survival Guide (Rarely Done); Deborah Hooper, The Music Man (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild); Michaela Oney, Sunday in the Park with George (St. David’s Celebration of the Arts); Madeline Shuron, Spring Awakening (Syracuse Summer Theatre); Erin Sills, Chicago (Central New York Playhouse) Supporting Actor in a Musical Dan Bostick, The Music Man (Baldwinsville Theatre Guild); Josh Mele, Chicago (Central New York Playhouse); Robert G. Searle, Sunday in the Park with George (St. David’s Celebration of the Arts); Josh Taylor, American Idiot (Central New York Playhouse); Timothy Willard, Spring Awakening (Syracuse Summer Theatre) Hall of Fame Award Fred Houser Lifetime Achievement Award Rachel Lampert The post SALT Honors Waiting In The Wings appeared first on Syracuse New Times.

    Syracuse New Times / 90 d. 17 h. 35 min. ago more
  • Many Happy ReturnsMany Happy Returns

    You’ve probably seen Laurence Segal around town. He’s the guy who hauls those big, pink recycling bins around Central New York, including stops at the recent New York State Fair — all 13 days of it — and at Destiny USA. Segal, who grew up and lives in DeWitt, is out collecting empty cans and bottles, much of the time retrieving them from recycling bins, to raise money for breast cancer research. It’s an arduous task, but it doesn’t deter the activist. “I hope it shows people that they can make a difference,” Segal said. Segal will continue making a difference at Cans for Cancer, to be held at the pink parking lot at Destiny USA on Oct. 28, 7 a.m. to 3 p.m., as part of October’s Breast Cancer Awareness Month. The inaugural event, spearheaded by Segal, brings together the three main organizations he has donated to over the years: the Upstate Cancer Center, the American Cancer Society and the Carol M. Baldwin Breast Cancer Research Fund. Segal hopes for a large turnout of donated bottles and cans. As an incentive, everyone who donates to the cause will receive a coupon book to use at various businesses in the mall. After the large-scale Cans for Cancer drive has passed, Segal said he will go back to raising money by himself, hopefully with some newfound participants who were inspired by the event. “Breast cancer doesn’t just go away at the end of October,” Segal said. “It’s to encourage people to bring your bottles and cans throughout the year after this.” How did you get started collecting bottles? It’s because of my family’s history of breast cancer: my grandmother, my great-grandmother, my aunts; my great-aunt had colon cancer. Back in 1987, my mom decided to remove both of her breasts. She met with people in Washington, D.C., and in New York City, and, given her health risk for getting breast cancer, they guaranteed her that she would have it. It was a difficult decision at the time. When my mom did it, people ostracized her and made fun of her. When Angelina Jolie did it (years later), Beth Baldwin (from the Carol M. Baldwin Breast Cancer Research Fund) looked at me and said, “They look at her like she’s a hero.” Then she went on a campaign to educate people about breast cancer research, early detection, awareness. She had complications over the years from that. She’s had several stays at the hospital with almost literally near-death experiences — not from cancer but from her implants leaking. So the bottle and can drive came out of that. When the Simone family was still at the Syracuse Chiefs, I began to notice around NBT Bank Stadium all of the bottles and cans being thrown in the garbage every night, and it upset me. I said to them, “Do you think we could raise some money for cancer research?” And they said, “Yeah, go for it.” We had a giant pink cart at the top of the stairs, which I ran every night with my friend Jon, and we raised a ton of money for cancer research. Where do you store all of the bottles? I have a bottle recycling room at Destiny, and I also keep my pink garbage cans in there. So we bring the bottles back there. My friend James (Ayers) owns Bottles End on Montrose Avenue in Solvay, and we come and pick them up, or sometimes I’ll put some in my truck and bring them down there. There have been times when it’s built up like crazy, then it takes five people to go empty out the room. Where do you store them after local events? At the State Fair, for example, people saw (Segal’s recycling story) on the news, and they brought their bottles and cans from home into the fair, and we’d bag them. I’d keep them at the booth stacked high at the Center of Progress Building. In addition, we also pull off all of the pop tabs on every can and I donate all of the pop tabs to the Ronald McDonald House every week. The aluminum in the can has value in it. Laurence Segal: “I’ve made people aware of early detection, we’ve raised awareness for breast cancer and for all of cancer. I think it’s been effective. I know we’ve certainly helped the environment.” Michael Davis photo You started out exchanging the bottles at Wegmans. I still sometimes go there if I have tons of bottles. Typically, 99 percent of the bottles now go to Bottles End just because it makes my life easier. I just really like how James is as a human being. He’s had people in his family who have had cancer. I also use my friends at Bodow Recycling on Park Street and Hiawatha Boulevard. Bodow Recycling and Bottles End have just been faithful, loyal and really good. How did you get involved with the Carol M. Baldwin Breast Cancer Research Fund? Carol Baldwin and my mom founded the local chapter of the Susan G. Komen Foundation years ago. They’re the ones that started the original walk-run in Shoppingtown. They’re the ones who went to Washington, D.C., to meet with Congress back in late 1989 to 1990, with the idea of helping women and men who were facing breast cancer. Now everybody knows about it, but back then it wasn’t spoken about. When Carol Baldwin started her own fund around 1996, I sort of became directly involved with that. She calls me her fifth son. I’m close to all of the family members. I like that the money that’s raised stays locally. Their motto is “Together We’ll Find A Cure,” and I think that’s how you have to do it. It’s a collaborative effort with all of New York state, all of Central New York. It requires people to contribute every day and to be aware. How much have you raised as of now? We have donated more than $50,000 to the Carol Baldwin Breast Cancer Research Fund. Last year I did another $14,500 for the American Cancer Society, and right now we’ve done more than $5,000 from my Real Men Wear Pink campaign. It’s basically a group of men in the community saying they understand that not only (women) can get breast cancer. How do you decide which cause to donate to? I donate to Carol Baldwin and American Cancer Society. We’ve also donated some to the St. Baldrick’s Foundation (a fundraiser for children with cancer). We’ve looked at charities that will keep the money locally. A lot of it goes to Upstate Cancer Center. That’s important. I like the work that they’re doing there. Whom have you met on this journey? I met a woman named Rose Fazio out in Chittenango, who literally is disabled, and she was on her hands and knees, crawling. But she saved bottles for a year out there at her house. She called me again this year and said, “It’s Rose Fazio. Do you remember me?” She’s had tragedy in her family; her daughter has been sick. Yet selflessly, she donated a whole garage (of cans and bottles). I remember people that I’ve met at the fair who are going through breast cancer who were so sick. I’ve met people at Wegmans who donated their (bottle return) slips. People would come up to me and hand me a $5 bill when I was (collecting bottles) at Delta Sonic car wash in the middle of the cold. I’ve met amazing people who understand what I’m doing and who have selflessly donated and have not bragged to anybody else what they’ve done. It’s not about me, it’s about them caring enough to care about other people. How are you able to devote so much time to raising money for cancer research? I worked on The Price Is Right (as a production assistant) with Bob Barker and announcer Rod Roddy for several years (in the 1990s and early 2000s) in Los Angeles. When Rod passed away from cancer, he left me a good amount of money. So I invested it wisely, and I pretty much devote my whole life now to raising funds for cancer research. I was on that stage every day for years during the tapings. I was involved with writing scripts, picking contestants, everything. Behind the scenes, I stood next to Rod on stage every day. In April 2001, he started having pain during a show. I said, “Are you OK? Do you want me to call an ambulance?” And he said, “Absolutely not. I want to finish the show.” He went to the hospital after the show and discovered he was anemic, and they started running tests. On Sept. 10, 2001, they did a colonoscopy and discovered he had metastatic colon cancer, and he had emergency surgery on the 9/11 for seven and a half hours. A doctor from the John Wayne Cancer Institute saved his life that day on Sept. 11. He had radiation and chemo following that and another surgery on Sept. 20, 2002. Then he was diagnosed with primary male breast cancer on March 14, 2003. The summer of 2003 was brutal. I stayed with him the whole time in the hospital in addition to working on The Price Is Right. I went to chemo, I went to radiation, I stayed with him right until the day he died. It was a life-changing experience. He was my best friend, a wonderful person. He promoted early detection at the end of his life: mammograms, colonoscopies. I learned all about that from him. I had already had breast cancer impact my life. Nobody else was willing to really go to chemo and radiation with him, and I said, “I’ll go with you.” He died on Oct. 27, 2003, at 3:45 in the afternoon; I was with him. It’ll be 14 years (this month) when I turn 40. I miss him every day. I regret that he wasn’t diagnosed properly and early. The colon cancer, certainly. He put off having a colonoscopy for 13 years. The breast cancer came out of left field and just showed up. He also had prostate cancer that he had been diagnosed with early in 2001, but he hadn’t told anybody. Part of this bottle drive and raising funds for cancer research is to honor him. I just think it’s a waste of a life, as are all (cancer-related deaths). It shouldn’t happen in 2017. We need more early detection. People always say to me, “Well, why do we need cans and bottles? There’s enough dollars for research.” And I always say, “Obviously not.” Cancer doesn’t discriminate: Black or white, rich or poor, young or old, it’s a horrible disease. You herniated some discs in your back a couple of months ago. How is your back doing? I saw a great physical therapist, and I’ve had some acupuncture done. I was in very bad shape. It’s better now, but I still have pain every day. I’ve gone back to collecting bottles — slowly. I’m very careful in the way I reach into the cans and careful how I bend my knees. I’m not leaning over. What kinds of bottles do you see the most? People always say that the economy stinks, and I always laugh. I can tell you that Coca-Cola is not going out of business, neither is Pepsi, neither is Budweiser. To be honest, I see water bottles the most. Ever since the water bottle bill went into effect in 2008, I see a ton of Wegmans bottles, Aldi bottles, Price Chopper bottles. Sadly, I also see a lot of beer cans. I say sadly because I always hear there’s no money for cancer research, yet people have all this money to buy premium alcohol, which costs all of this money. So if they have money for alcohol, they probably have money to donate to cancer research. I see tons of Budweiser cans, Coors Lite, Miller Lite. A better bottle bill needs to be passed for all of New York state. It’s silly to throw one type of bottle in the garbage and recycle another type. I say to New York state, Why are only certain cans recyclable? They say, “Oh, because it’s carbonated and this one’s not.” It doesn’t make a difference. A bottle is a bottle, plastic is plastic, a can is a can. I see a lot of 1911 (cider), AriZona (iced tea), Monster (energy drink), and I see a ton of Gatorade and Powerade, too, which is why a better bottle bill needs to be passed. What do you do with the bottles that aren’t recyclable? I’ll bring them down to James. There’s a company that picks them up from him. But essentially there can’t be a donation made at that point for research. He gets a small amount from the recycling company to take those bottles. So are they getting recycled somewhere or another? Yes. But there should be a better bottle law, and it should cover everything. They do it in Maine, California, Hawaii. It’s non-excusable that it doesn’t happen here. I’ve met with people in Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s office and we’re going to have to go back and lobby some more, but I’m willing to do it. You just have to convince Democrats and Republicans to come together (laughs), that it’s for the betterment of the state and to pass the law. We’re closer than we were before, and they understand. Have you accomplished what you initially set out to? I’ve made people aware of early detection, we’ve raised awareness for breast cancer and for all of cancer. I think it’s been effective. I know we’ve certainly helped the environment. The bottles and cans don’t really mean anything to me. It just represents another 6 cents for cancer research. I hope, if anything, they represent hope and inspiration. People always go, “Why bottles and cans?” Well, it’s just to show people how much money is thrown away in Syracuse every day. I see it every day, no matter what gas station I go to, whether it’s vacuumed up at Delta Sonic every day, or it’s thrown away in the garbage. All of that money could go to cancer research. So I hope that point gets through to people. How long will you continue to do this? I’m going to go for as long as my health allows me to, and after that, I think I have a significant amount of people now, like almost my own little army, that will go out there and fight for it. I know people who will donate their time, no matter what. My goal doesn’t necessarily have to be with bottles and cans. If some business wants to come forward and make a big donation to cancer research, I’d love it. Delta Sonic did that last year; they made a $10,000 donation to Carol Baldwin in my name. So if a business thinks cancer research is worthwhile, and they want to make a tax-deductible donation and say, “Hey, I like what Laurence is doing,” I’m all for it. I want it to happen around the country. There’s plenty of money for cancer research because it exists. I encourage people, don’t throw money in the garbage. I just think that’s crazy. The post Many Happy Returns appeared first on Syracuse New Times.

    Syracuse New Times / 97 d. 17 h. 30 min. ago more
  • Writers Center Honors Late Poet Jason ShinderWriters Center Honors Late Poet Jason Shinder

    On Friday, Oct. 13, the Downtown Writers Center at the YMCA, 340 Montgomery St., will commemorate a late friend through a poetry reading. First, the center will dedicate its new performance room as the Jason Shinder Theater, honoring a poet and influential advocate for cultural programs at YMCAs. Shinder, who died in 2008, founded the YMCA Writer’s Voice program in New York City and worked with the national YMCA to expand it across the country. Then Marie Howe, a well-known poet and friend of Shinder, will read from her work and his. Phil Memmer, director of the Arts Branch for the local YMCA, connected with Shinder soon after the Downtown Writers Center opened in 2001. He was impressed by Shinder’s passion for poetry, energy and willingness to support a fledging organization. “Jason provided the funding that made it possible for us to bring in Reginald Shepherd as a writer-in-residence,” Memmer said. “Later there was financial help for readings by other writers.” That assistance helped launch an ongoing series for the center, which typically hosts between 20 and 25 readings a year. The poets, and other writers, come from Syracuse, Ithaca and Rochester and from across the nation. Over the years, a slew of prominent poets have read at Writers Center events: W.D. Snodgrass, winner of a Pulitzer Prize for poetry; Cornelius Eady, whose poems touch on jazz, blues and other topics; Judith Harris, author of Night Garden, which delves into the temporary nature of all things; Martha Collins, whose book-length poem, “Blue Front,” focuses on a race riot in Cairo, Ill. And now Marie Howe will read at the Oct. 13 event. She’s recognized for her ability to explore and reflect on love and faith, loss and death. In her book The Kingdom of Ordinary Life, she discussed her mother’s decline from illness and death, as well as violence, non-violence, and revenge. Star Market speculated on how Jesus Christ might have reacted to the customers of a neighborhood grocery store. Her 2017 book Magdalene reinterprets Mary Magdalene, a figure from the New Testament. In Howe’s telling, Magdalene is sensual and spiritual, deeply regrets mistakes she’s made and dwells in the current day watching The Sopranos or picking up sesame noodle takeout. This book is structured without a single narrator. Instead, several voices emerge, including an everywoman persona for “Magdalene Afterwards.” It speaks of living in the present or past, of having nine children or none, of facing execution as a political prisoner or growing bored at a business meeting. Howe is one of 10 finalists for a 2017 National Book Award in poetry, sharing that honor with Chen Chen, who read at the center on Sept. 22. The winner will be announced Nov. 5. In reflecting on the upcoming event, Memmer emphasizes the scope of Shinder’s activities. He had two books of poetry published by Graywolf Press, edited 10 anthologies of poetry, served as poet laureate for Provincetown on Cape Cod, and heavily promoted the notion of arts programming at YMCAs. “There was a time when most Ys dabbled in the arts,” Memmer said. “Jason pushed the idea of regular programs and had a national impact.” Shinder, it should be noted, wasn’t dictating to individual Ys. They don’t function as members of a franchise; they have autonomy in selecting programs. As it happens, the downtown YMCA fully embraced an arts menu. It operates the Writers Center with its readings, classes in poetry, playwriting, and other disciplines, and Young Authors Academy for teens and tweens. It also coordinates after-school programs at several sites and holds classes in dance and pottery at the Fayetteville and Baldwinsville branches. Finally, Memmer says that the room now known as the Jason Shinder Theater has several advantages over its predecessor: “It seats more people, has better lighting, and is located in a quieter section of the Y,” he said. The Oct. 13 reading, which begins at 7 p.m., is free and open to the public. For more information, call (315) 474-6851, Ext. 328. The post Writers Center Honors Late Poet Jason Shinder appeared first on Syracuse New Times.

    Syracuse New Times / 97 d. 17 h. 55 min. ago more