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    WPTZ / 01.01.2018 07:55
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    Google News / 18.12.2017 06:14
  • McCain treated for viral infection, returns home to Arizona McCain treated for viral infection, returns home to Arizona

    The 81-year-old senator will undergo physical therapy and rehabilitation at the Mayo Clinic in the state.

    WPTZ / 13 min. ago
  • Cost-cutting by schools on agendaCost-cutting by schools on agenda

    Gov. Phil Scott says a 5-to-1 student to staff ratio would save $100 million annually and solve this coming year's education fund gap. Gov. Phil Scott says a 5-to-1 student to staff ratio would save $100 million annually and solve this coming year's education fund gap.

    Vermont News / 24 min. ago
  • Holland barn fire kills 68 cowsHolland barn fire kills 68 cows

    Several fire departments battled the flames for hours

    WPTZ / 54 min. ago
  • Plattsburgh mayor's controversial comments caught on video, posted to YouTube Plattsburgh mayor's controversial comments caught on video, posted to YouTube

    Mayor Colin Read responds to, stands by conversation with council member

    WPTZ / 1 h. 15 min. ago
  • Vermont sues EPA over ozone - vtdigger.orgVermont sues EPA over ozone - vtdigger.org

    vtdigger.orgVermont sues EPA over ozonevtdigger.orgSimilar upwind pollution from fossil fuel emissions has caused acid rain and is directly attributable to Midwestern power plants. The emissions harmed trees and acidified lakes in Vermont. The regions of the nation where ozone is coming from are not ...and more »

    Google News / 1 h. 15 min. ago
  • Plaintiff speaks out after courthouse rape trial Plaintiff speaks out after courthouse rape trial

    Jessica Goulet hopes her story won't discourage other women from coming forward

    WPTZ / 1 h. 21 min. ago
  • Wine glasses have gotten a lot bigger in the past 300 yearsWine glasses have gotten a lot bigger in the past 300 years

    The average glass size is currently 15.1 ounces.

    WPTZ / 1 h. 25 min. ago
  • Jerry Richardson will sell Carolina Panthers amid sexual misconduct allegationsJerry Richardson will sell Carolina Panthers amid sexual misconduct allegations

    The team said Friday that former White House Chief of Staff Erskine Bowles was overseeing the investigation by a Los Angeles-based law firm.

    WPTZ / 1 h. 43 min. ago
  • Adorable video shows airport employee dancing with girls at gate Adorable video shows airport employee dancing with girls at gate

    An employee at a Dallas airport showed two young passengers his dance moves while they were waiting for a flight.

    WPTZ / 2 h. 11 min. ago
  • Power restored at 1 concourse in Atlanta airportPower restored at 1 concourse in Atlanta airport

    More than 600 flights to and from Atlanta have been canceled, including 350 departures, according to Flightradar24.

    WPTZ / 2 h. 19 min. ago
  • Here's why your pillowcases are dirtier than you thinkHere's why your pillowcases are dirtier than you think

    Yuck! Here's why it's so important to wash your pillowcases!

    WPTZ / 2 h. 21 min. ago
  • Americans consume a lot of media each dayAmericans consume a lot of media each day

    How is possible to spend 12 hours a day in front of a screen or listening to music? Media multi-tasking - many people use more than one device at a time.

    WPTZ / 3 h. 24 min. ago
  • Light snow accumulation MondayLight snow accumulation Monday

    Bitter cold returns Thursday

    WPTZ / 3 h. 41 min. ago
  • Carrie Wulfman: OneCare Vermont will be successful - vtdigger.orgCarrie Wulfman: OneCare Vermont will be successful - vtdigger.org

    Carrie Wulfman: OneCare Vermont will be successfulvtdigger.orgEditor's note: This commentary is by Dr. Carrie Wulfman, a primary care provider at UVM Health Network Primary Care in Brandon. My career as a family practice physician working in Vermont spans nearly two decades. I have been a practicing physician at ...

    Google News / 4 h. 37 min. ago
  • Woman, 32, killed in Vermont fire: 2 others seriously injured, flown to ... - MassLive.comWoman, 32, killed in Vermont fire: 2 others seriously injured, flown to ... - MassLive.com

    MassLive.comWoman, 32, killed in Vermont fire: 2 others seriously injured, flown to ...MassLive.comBROOKLINE, VT - A 32-year-old woman was killed and two people were seriously injured in a fire that destroyed a home early Sunday morning. Elizabeth Cutts, of Brookfield, Vermont, was found dead in the home when the fire was extinguished. Vermont State ...1 dead, 2 injured in Brookline fire - Burlington Free PressBurlingtonFreePress.comBrookline woman dies in house fireRutland Heraldall 7 news articles »

    Google News / 5 h. 7 min. ago more
  • One dead in Brookline fireOne dead in Brookline fire

    State fire investigators looked for an unaccounted-for occupant of a two-story log cabin at 45 Papoose Lane after a two-alarm fire destroyed the building early Sunday morning. "We know that there's one decedent in the building at this point," Vermont State Police Det.

    Vermont News / 5 h. 11 min. ago
  • Vermont's moose population struggles despite hunting cutbackVermont's moose population struggles despite hunting cutback

    Scientists say they fear shifting climate conditions are to blame for Vermont's declining moose population

    ABCNews.com / 7 h. 22 min. ago
  • I-91 Rockingham bridge construction updateI-91 Rockingham bridge construction update

    The projected completion date is May 18, 2020. Here is the anticipated construction schedule for the week of Dec. 18, 2017.

    Vermont News / 7 h. 28 min. ago
  • Vermont's Moose Population Struggles Despite Hunting Cutback ... - U.S. News & World ReportVermont's Moose Population Struggles Despite Hunting Cutback ... - U.S. News & World Report

    Vermont's Moose Population Struggles Despite Hunting Cutback ...U.S. News & World ReportISLAND POND, Vt. (AP) — Scientists say they fear shifting climate conditions are to blame for Vermont's struggling moose population.and more »

    Google News / 7 h. 42 min. ago
  • Then Again: How Christmas came to Vermont - vtdigger.orgThen Again: How Christmas came to Vermont - vtdigger.org

    vtdigger.orgThen Again: How Christmas came to Vermontvtdigger.orgReading the letter, which is stored at the Vermont History Center in Barre, I started to wonder how far back our modern Christmas traditions began. I did a little digging, and soon that welcome sense of being in a foreign place returned. Flash back to ...

    Google News / 8 h. 10 min. ago
  • Legislator Comes Out in Support of Stricter Seat Belt Laws | Vermont ... - U.S. News & World ReportLegislator Comes Out in Support of Stricter Seat Belt Laws | Vermont ... - U.S. News & World Report

    Legislator Comes Out in Support of Stricter Seat Belt Laws | Vermont ...U.S. News & World ReportCOLCHESTER, Vt. (AP) — A Vermont legislator who previously opposed more stringent seatbelt laws says a recent series of deadly crashes has changed his mind.and more »

    Google News / 9 h. 9 min. ago
  • Springfield man facing drug charges after police in Vermont say he ... - MassLive.comSpringfield man facing drug charges after police in Vermont say he ... - MassLive.com

    MassLive.comSpringfield man facing drug charges after police in Vermont say he ...MassLive.comA Springfield man will appear in a Vermont court Monday after police say he was caught with 240 bags of heroin during a traffic stop.240 bags of heroin and cash recovered in Vermont - NEWS10 ABCNEWS10 ABCSpringfield man arrested on drug charges in Vermontwwlp.comall 6 news articles »

    Google News / 10 h. 16 min. ago more
  • FILE - In this Dec. 31, 2012 file photo, a snowmobile travels a newly-groomed trail in East Montpelier, Vt. With plenty of fresh snow covering much of northern New England, the 2017 winter snowmobile ...FILE - In this Dec. 31, 2012 file photo, a snowmobile travels a newly-groomed trail in East Montpelier, Vt. With plenty of fresh snow covering much of northern New England, the 2017 winter snowmobile ...

    FILE - In this Dec. 31, 2012 file photo, a snowmobile travels a newly-groomed trail in East Montpelier, Vt. With plenty of fresh snow covering much of northern New England, the 2017 winter snowmobile season is off to a good start. (AP Photo/Toby Talb

    ABCNews.com / 10 h. 51 min. ago
  • Vermont Fish and Wildlife to offer ice fishing clinics - Seattle TimesVermont Fish and Wildlife to offer ice fishing clinics - Seattle Times

    WPTV.comVermont Fish and Wildlife to offer ice fishing clinicsSeattle TimesMONTPELIER, Vt. (AP) — The Vermont Department of Fish and Wildlife is planning a series of clinics to help people learn about ice fishing. The free clinics will be offered from the middle of January through the middle of February at different ...Vermont's moose population struggles despite hunting cutbackPhys.Orgall 3 news articles »

    Google News / 13 h. 59 min. ago more
  • Man arrested after 100 mph chase in Vermont, New York | Crime ... - Glens Falls Post-StarMan arrested after 100 mph chase in Vermont, New York | Crime ... - Glens Falls Post-Star

    Glens Falls Post-StarMan arrested after 100 mph chase in Vermont, New York | Crime ...Glens Falls Post-StarA Vermont man faces numerous charges after he led police on a high-speed chase from Vermont into Washington County in a stolen vehicle early Sunday, according to police.Vermont man arrested for assaulting officer, leading police on high-speed chaseBoston.comall 4 news articles »

    Google News / 14 h. 41 min. ago more
  • Saturday's Vermont sports scores and Sunday's schedule - BurlingtonFreePress.comSaturday's Vermont sports scores and Sunday's schedule - BurlingtonFreePress.com

    BurlingtonFreePress.comSaturday's Vermont sports scores and Sunday's scheduleBurlingtonFreePress.comMen's college basketball. St. Bonaventure 81, Vermont 79. New Hampshire 111, Lyndon State 31. Johnson State 82, Plymouth State 76. Women's college basketball. Plymouth State 74, Johnson State 45. High school boys hockey. North Country 4, Hartford 3 ...

    Google News / 23 h. 10 min. ago more
  • Rutland to include competition with annual blood driveRutland to include competition with annual blood drive

    A Vermont city is scheduled to host one of the largest blood drives for the American Red Cross in the United States. The Rutland Herald reports teams will compete to donate the mos

    Big News Network.com / 1 d. 2 h. 49 min. ago
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  • Burlington to discuss increasing downtown public bathroomsBurlington to discuss increasing downtown public bathrooms

    BURLINGTON, Vt. (AP) -- The city council in Vermont's largest community is going to debate a plan to increase the number of public bathrooms in the downtown....

    Big News Network.com / 1 d. 8 h. 59 min. ago
  • Utility hires private contractor to inspect its damsUtility hires private contractor to inspect its dams

    The inspections are underway thanks to renewed pressure from state utility regulators on the Public Utilities Commission Coaticook River Water Power Company. The Caledonian-Record...

    Big News Network.com / 1 d. 9 h. ago
  • Burglar caught by 95-year-old veteran and his daughterBurglar caught by 95-year-old veteran and his daughter

    A career criminal in Wisconsin learned you don't mess with a Marine Corps veteran and his daughter.

    WPTZ / 1 d. 10 h. 51 min. ago
  • State officials want overhaul of pre-K billing systemState officials want overhaul of pre-K billing system

    Vermont Public Radio reports that a report sent to the Legislature by two state agencies recommends that the Agency of Education take over administration of Vermont's Universal pre-K system. Lawmakers in 2014 established a publicly-funded, universal prekindergarten system overseen by the Agency of Education and the Agency of Human Services.

    Vermont News / 1 d. 11 h. 5 min. ago more
  • Brock, Two Others Nominated For Franklin County Senate SeatBrock, Two Others Nominated For Franklin County Senate Seat

    Franklin County Republicans sent three nominees to Gov. Phil Scott Friday night to fill the vacant state Senate seat left by Dustin Degree when he took a job as special assistant to the governor and executive director of workforce expansion. The Franklin Senatorial District Committee, which is made up of local Republican Party officials, chose Randy Brock of Swanton, Daniel Pipes of Fairfield and Steve Trahan of St. Albans Town in a meeting Friday evening, according to Rep. Brian Savage (R-Swanton). If Scott taps him to serve out Degree's term, Brock would replace his replacement: He served two terms in the Senate, from 2009 to 2013, and unsuccessfully challenged incumbent Democrat Peter Shumlin for governor in 2012. After sitting out the 2014 election, Brock lost the race for lieutenant governor to Progressive/Democrat David Zuckerman in 2016. Prior to joining the Senate, Brock served as state auditor from 2005 to 2007. Trahan, the former chair of the Franklin County Republican Party, ran for state representative in 2012. Governors typically fill vacant Senate seats with those nominated by senatorial district committees, but they are free to select from outside that pool. Scott's pick will serve alongside Sen. Carolyn Branagan (R-Franklin) in the two-member district through the 2018 election. …

    Seven Days / 1 d. 23 h. 18 min. ago more
  • Organizations develop strategies to attract a younger work forceOrganizations develop strategies to attract a younger work force

    Windham County high school students visit the Women in Engineering Summit Bridge-Building Workshop with the Fast Tracks to Success Program. Windham County high school students visit the Chroma Technology Corps, in Bellows Falls,Workshop with the Fast Tracks to Success Program.

    Vermont News / 1 d. 23 h. 26 min. ago
  • City Council to Delay Final Burlington Telecom VoteCity Council to Delay Final Burlington Telecom Vote

    The Burlington City Council will once again delay a decision on the Burlington Telecom sale by postponing a final vote on the buyer's bid. Councilors were scheduled to approve a $30.8 million purchase and sale agreement with Schurz Communications and ZRF Partners this Monday. Instead, councilors will meet in executive session at the December 18 meeting so they can clarify details of the deal, according to council president Jane Knodell (P-Central District). Afterwards, the council will release the purchase and sale agreement, which it now expects to vote on at a December 27 meeting. Knodell would not say what questions remain about the bid, though she did say they'd be made public once the proposal is released. The sale process has included multiple delays and postponements; it was originally scheduled to be completed in July.  Since September, the tangled process included a councilor's recusal, one bidder's conflict of interest, a failed joint venture, along with a flurry of criticism from councilors and the public alike. The council voted to select the joint Schurz/ZRF bid in the early morning hours of November 28. Since then, Mayor Miro Weinberger has been negotiating with Schurz CEO Todd Schurz to nail down the terms of the final agreement. On December 11, the council asked Schurz questions  and discussed details of the contract in executive session; this Monday will feature yet another round behind closed doors. If the sale isn't completed by the end of the year, the city's portion of the net proceeds decreases from 50 to 35 percent. Knodell said she's "not really concerned" about the possibility of additional delays and lost revenues. "I think things are going well and we're working through [remaining issues]," she said.…

    Seven Days / 2 d. 3 h. 55 min. ago more
  • Vermont Democratic leaders announce legislative agendaVermont Democratic leaders announce legislative agenda

    House Speaker Mitzi Johnson and Senate President Pro Tem Tim Ashe say they want to find a long-term funding source for clean water efforts, protect Vermonters' personal data, and address the state's mental health system. Ashe says his top focus is raising the minimum wage.

    Vermont News / 2 d. 4 h. 39 min. ago
  • Man found not guilty of assaulting woman in court bathroomMan found not guilty of assaulting woman in court bathroom

    A Vermont man has been found not guilty on a charge that he sexually assaulted a woman in the bathroom of the state courthouse in Burlington just over two years ago

    ABCNews.com / 2 d. 6 h. 10 min. ago
  • The Cannabis Catch-Up: Despite Legalization, Colorado Teen Pot Use DeclinesThe Cannabis Catch-Up: Despite Legalization, Colorado Teen Pot Use Declines

    Data, data, data. The cannabis legalization debate almost always comes back to numbers: This survey shows one thing, toxicology results show another and car crash data present something else entirely. Here’s some data that legalization proponents will likely seize upon. A new federal survey found that “adolescent marijuana use in Colorado has fallen to its lowest rate in nearly a decade,” the Washington Post reported. This, of course, comes five years after Colorado voters legalized recreational use of the drug and three years after the first taxed-and-regulated recreational marijuana dispensaries opened in the state. Keep in mind, marijuana in Colorado is legal only for adults 21 and over. Still, the anti-legalization crowd was concerned that kids would more easily get their hands on the drug.  It seemed at first as if they were right. Last year’s National Survey on Drug Use and Health found Colorado ranked No. 1 in the country in adolescent cannabis use. This year, though, Colorado dropped to No. 7, behind Maine (No. 2) and — you guessed it — Vermont at No. 6. “Teen use appears to be dropping now that state and local authorities are overseeing the production and sale of marijuana,” Brian Vicente of Vicente Sederberg LLC, one of the drafters of Colorado's marijuana ballot measure, said in a statement to the Post. “There are serious penalties for selling to minors, and regulated cannabis businesses are being vigilant in checking IDs.” Will Vermont legislators look at this data? Again, there are plenty of numbers out there and both sides bend them to their will. But it’s certainly worth adding to the legalization debate. [Washington Post, Christopher Ingram] Here are some other stories we’ve been following this week: December 10: Hey, it’s a CBD/hemp holiday market — right in our own backyard! The folks over at Heady Vermont hosted 20 vendors who sold wares full of cannabidiol during the event last Sunday at Burlington City Hall. [MyNBC 5, Renee Wunderlich] December 10: Our neighbors to the north may be having second thoughts about this whole cannabis legalization thing. Conservative Canadian senators are holding up two bills that are key to the whole process, meaning the country could miss its deadline of Canada Day (that’s July 1 to us Yankees). The delay could push legalization to the end of 2018, presenting all sorts of problems, per the Globe and Mail. The costs of missing that deadline…

    Seven Days / 2 d. 6 h. 11 min. ago more
  • Judge puts off request to dismiss lawsuit in mystery deathsJudge puts off request to dismiss lawsuit in mystery deaths

    A New Hampshire judge has put off a decision on whether to dismiss a lawsuit accusing a Vermont man of killing his millionaire grandfather and possibly his mother to collect an inheritance

    ABCNews.com / 2 d. 9 h. 17 min. ago
  • 70-year-old woman indicted in retirement home ricin case70-year-old woman indicted in retirement home ricin case

    A federal grand jury has issued an indictment against a 70-year-old woman charged with manufacturing the deadly toxin ricin at a Vermont retirement community

    ABCNews.com / 2 d. 12 h. 45 min. ago
  • Walters: Lawmakers Defend Handling of Misconduct Allegation, Pledge ReviewWalters: Lawmakers Defend Handling of Misconduct Allegation, Pledge Review

    Leaders of the Vermont legislature acknowledged Thursday that the Statehouse's sexual harassment policy is in need of revision, even as they sought to defend its near-total secrecy. Current policies on handling allegations of misbehavior by lawmakers are handled almost completely behind closed doors, with no public disclosure except in rare circumstances. Speaking at a press conference in the Statehouse's Cedar Creek Room, House Speaker Mitzi Johnson (D-South Hero) acknowledged a changed atmosphere around sexual misconduct in recent months. Allegations of sexual assault and harassment against Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein have opened the floodgates to revelations of inappropriate behavior by men in almost every walk of life. "In light of all the allegations across the country, we’re really diving in and looking at how we can take our current policies and make them the gold standard," Johnson said. Those policies appear to fall well short of the "gold standard." Think something more like tin, or possibly pig iron. The inadequacy of House and Senate policies is highlighted in a case we never knew existed until Vermont Public Radio's Peter Hirschfeld reported it last week. Last April, according to VPR, a complaint of inappropriate behavior was filed against a sitting state senator. It went through the process and was disposed of without ever being disclosed to the public. Even now, nothing more can be said. "The policy was followed from beginning to end," said Senate Majority Leader Becca Balint (D-Windham), who chairs the Senate's sexual harassment panel and spoke to reporters after the press conference. "You can go back and read the policy, and that’s all that I can share at this point in terms of the details." Nothing. What was alleged, who was accused, what decision was reached and what (if any) punishment was handed down — we don't know and, under Senate rules, we can't know. That seems a disservice to those who work in or visit the Statehouse, and to constituents who might unknowingly cast their votes for an abuser. Even the leader of the Senate was in the dark until he heard the VPR report. "I don’t know the specifics because I’m not on the panel," said Senate President Pro Tempore Tim Ashe (D/P-Chittenden). When WCAX-TV's Neal Goswami noted that it seems "remarkable" that Ashe wouldn't know about the case, the pro tem…

    Seven Days / 3 d. 2 h. 58 min. ago more
  • Johnson Denounces Vermont House Democrats' Twitter 'Name-Calling'Johnson Denounces Vermont House Democrats' Twitter 'Name-Calling'

    House Speaker Mitzi Johnson (D-South Hero) on Thursday condemned the “name-calling” of a Twitter account that purports to represent her fellow House Democrats.  As Seven Days reported Tuesday, the Vermont Democratic Party has repeatedly tweeted insults and unsubstantiated accusations using the “VT House Dems” Twitter handle. One message described former Vermont Republican Party chair David Sunderland as "racist" and a "serial liar," without evidence or explanation. Johnson did not respond to a request for comment Tuesday. But after an unrelated press conference Thursday, she told reporters, “I don’t approve of the language that was used. I don’t approve of that kind of tone. It’s not how I choose to operate, and I called the party and let them know.” She said she spoke with the party’s executive director, Conor Casey, informing him, “I don’t want to be in any way connected with that kind of name-calling.” Casey appears to have gotten the message, although he's not striking a particularly repentant tone. “We’ll tone down the Twitter account,” he said when asked about Johnson's phone call. But the party leader then went on to defend his staff members, arguing that they have good reason to be “frustrated” with Vermont Republicans, who, in their view, have failed to take a stand against racism. Political editor Paul Heintz contributed reporting.…

    Seven Days / 3 d. 3 h. 38 min. ago more
  • 'Rebels' Supporters Win Round in Fight for Vote on Name Change'Rebels' Supporters Win Round in Fight for Vote on Name Change

    South Burlington residents who want a public vote on the Rebels name change won a round in court this week. Vermont Superior Court Judge Robert Mello cleared the way for a lawsuit on the question to go to trial, and he denied the school district's motion to dismiss the case. Members of a group called the Rebel Alliance raised funds for the lawsuit. The 19-page ruling, issued Tuesday, generally supported the residents' argument that the school board violated the Vermont constitution by refusing to put the name question on the ballot after at least 5 percent of city voters signed a petition calling for a public vote. The ruling suggested that the school board could be ordered to put the question on the ballot. "If the facts relied upon by the Plaintiffs turn out to be true, then Plaintiffs would be entitled to an order in the nature of a writ of mandamus compelling the South Burlington School District to put Plaintiff's ballot question to a vote by the electorate," Mello wrote. "The District's duty to put Plaintiff's ballot question to such a vote is imposed by the Constitution and is certain, clear, and non-discretionary. " The school board voted in February to change the name after critics said it had racist overtones involving the Confederacy. Defenders of the nickname said it was a harmless tradition that dated back to South Burlington's rivalry with Burlington, slightly to the north, and had nothing to do with the Civil War. Whatever the origin, at times in the school's history students waved Confederate flags and played "Dixie" at football games. A few months after the vote to drop the name, the school district adopted a new mascot, the Wolves. Student athletes have been playing under that name since September. The ballot question would be advisory. It asks if all South Burlington sports teams should be known as the South Burlington Rebels and if the school board should be required to retain the name. However, even if the majority of voters say yes, the school board would not be legally obligated to obey, district lawyers argue. District attorney Pietro Lynn had argued that since the question is advisory, the argument to put it on the ballot is weak. He also cited case law in which the courts upheld the city's right to reject…

    Seven Days / 3 d. 4 h. 57 min. ago more
  • FILE - In this Nov. 9, 2017 file photo, U.S. Rep. Keith Ellison, the D-Minn., speaks in Burlington, Vt. Minnesota Democrats are trying to clear a path for Tina Smith's bid to hang on to a Senate seat ...FILE - In this Nov. 9, 2017 file photo, U.S. Rep. Keith Ellison, the D-Minn., speaks in Burlington, Vt. Minnesota Democrats are trying to clear a path for Tina Smith's bid to hang on to a Senate seat ...

    FILE - In this Nov. 9, 2017 file photo, U.S. Rep. Keith Ellison, the D-Minn., speaks in Burlington, Vt. Minnesota Democrats are trying to clear a path for Tina Smith's bid to hang on to a Senate seat in next year's unexpected election. Smith was appo

    ABCNews.com / 3 d. 5 h. 9 min. ago
  • VCFA Student Helps Solve California Cold Case MurderVCFA Student Helps Solve California Cold Case Murder

    Jennifer Kathleen Gibbons, a Vermont College of Fine Arts student, was visiting her grandmother's gravesite in a California cemetery in 2013 when another headstone, made of pink marble, caught her eye. The inscription read, "Suzanne Arlene Bombardier: Born on March 14, 1966. Died on June 22, 1980." Something about it struck Gibbons. She searched for Bombardier on the internet and learned the teen had been sexually assaulted and murdered; her case was unsolved. Gibbons wrote about it in her journal and then dedicated a blog to the case. Her story set off an improbable chain of events that culminated on Monday when police in Antioch, Calif., arrested registered sex offender Mitchell Lynn Bacom, 63, and charged him with killing Bombardier. Police linked Bacom, who has a lengthy criminal record, to the crime through DNA evidence. The East Bay Times, a California newspaper, said he was a "longtime suspect." But investigators have been quick to credit Gibbons, who has no training in law enforcement or journalism, for bringing needed attention to the case. "I was stunned. I'm gobsmacked," Gibbons told Seven Days. "I was speechless for the first day." Gibbons initially pitched Bombardier's story to California journalists. When they didn't bite — a cold case with no new developments was a tough sell — she decided she would do it herself. "Well, it's either nothing gets done, or maybe a little thing can get done," she remembers thinking. She launched a blog entitled "The Lost Girl." Gibbons' work eventually caught the eye of two retired detectives who had been familiar with the unsolved murder and had been trying to convince local authorities to establish a cold case unit. The detectives successfully pushed local police to revive the long-cold crime investigation. Bombardier, a straight-A student, disappeared while babysitting her nieces in Antioch. Her body was found in a nearby river; she'd been fatally stabbed. "I felt like I owed it to her," said Gibbons, who divides her time between Montpelier and Fresno, Calif. "I had no idea who did it. All I knew was I had to put her name out there so people knew who she was." Gibbons, who began the VCFA's two-year master of fine arts in writing and publishing program in 2016, is developing her writing about the…

    Seven Days / 3 d. 5 h. 12 min. ago more
  • Vermont Law School Launches Center for Justice ReformVermont Law School Launches Center for Justice Reform

    Vermont Law School announced Thursday that it will offer a master's degree in restorative justice as part of a new Center for Justice Reform it is opening. The three-semester program, which will cater to both law students looking for dual degrees and standalone students, is expected to have about 15 pupils when it launches in the fall of 2018, and could grow to around 30, said the center's director, Robert Sand. "People will learn about a new way to think about harm and conflict," said Sand, a former Windsor County state's attorney. "Instead of thinking about crime as a violation against the state or larger entity, our students will come to understand the relationship nature of crime and ask, who has been affected? How can they have a meaningful voice in shaping the outcome? What obligations does the individual owe who has created the harm, and how can we build a response that ... leads to healing instead of punishment?" The master's program will include classes at the VLS campus and significant online learning opportunities, Sand said. Course offerings will cover mass incarceration and examining race in the criminal justice system. VLS, which is best known for its environmental law program, is the first law school in the country to offer such a program, Sand said. The center will include an expungement clinic where students will work with practicing attorneys to help people exercise their legal right to have their records wiped clean. Sand said he hopes to launch that initiative in coordination with the Chittenden County State's Attorney's Office. Eventually, Sand said, the center could grow into a think tank, churning out position papers and hosting guest lecturers devoted to upending traditional criminal justice approaches. As a prosecutor, Sand was an early advocate of marijuana decriminalization. He often testifies in the Statehouse on behalf of reform initiatives. The move comes at a time when VLS, like many law schools, is struggling with budgetary problems tied to declining enrollment.…

    Seven Days / 3 d. 11 h. 5 min. ago more
  • Site of former dry cleaners, Division Street early ed program slated for air quality testsSite of former dry cleaners, Division Street early ed program slated for air quality tests

    The state has identified the Division Street building that houses the Southwest Vermont Supervisory Union's Early Childhood Education program as requiring an indoor air quality assessment, due to being located at the site of a former dry cleaning business. The Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation last month identified seven childcare programs across the state that are located within 200 feet of a presently-operating or historic dry cleaner.

    Vermont News / 3 d. 19 h. 19 min. ago more
  • Judge Overturns Rutland Sex Offender RegulationsJudge Overturns Rutland Sex Offender Regulations

    A Rutland ordinance barring sex offenders from living within 1,000 feet of schools, playgrounds and other locations is illegal, a Rutland Superior Court judge has ruled. Judge Samuel Hoar Jr. sided with three anonymous sex offenders who sued the city after they were forced to move, or pay massive fines, for living within areas protected by the 2008 ordinance. The judge ruled that the city did not have legal authority to create the ordinance, and called the policy needlessly punitive. "What the city has done here is effectively to declare an entire class of persons to be a public nuisance, by simple virtue of their physical existence," Hoar wrote in a 13-page decision issued December 8. "Plaintiffs have been convicted and punished; the city cannot now say to them, anymore than they could to any other citizen, 'We don’t want your type in our town.' The boldness and breadth of this assertion is virtually without precedent." Three sex offenders, all identified as "John Doe" in court documents, had complied with requirements of the sex offender registry and had been under the supervision of probation and parole officers. Their only offense was living within a 1,000-foot zone created by Rutland's "child safety ordinance." Designed to keep sex offenders from living in places where children often congregate, the zone encompassed almost the entirety of downtown Rutland and much of the city. The men were ordered in 2016 to move out or face fines of up to $500. The Vermont Prisoners' Rights Office sued on their behalf. Defender General Matt Valerio said ordinances restricting sex offenders needlessly fuel public hysteria and make it more difficult for offenders to peacefully reintegrate into society. "Sex offenders and any other person getting out of jail are going to live somewhere, and usually the places they have the best likelihood to be successful and not reoffend are where they are close to services, close to jobs, close to resources, and close to family so that they have a safety net and a job," Valerio said. During the lawsuit, attorneys for Rutland argued that the city had the right to regulate sex offenders because it considered them a "public nuisance" on par with slaughterhouses or public alcohol consumption. But Hoar rejected that logic. "The city declares plaintiffs nuisances for no discernible activity but drawing breath,"…

    Seven Days / 4 d. 5 h. 18 min. ago more
  • Scott; "Cut your own"Scott; "Cut your own"

    Gov. Phil Scott cut a few Christmas trees for his Montpelier office at a Vermont tree farm last week. Vermont trees are shipped throughout the East Coast and to Florida and California, and to a variety of foreign markets, including Bermuda.

    Vermont News / 4 d. 11 h. 52 min. ago
  • South Burlington Police K9 Rumble Takes an Early RetirementSouth Burlington Police K9 Rumble Takes an Early Retirement

    A South Burlington police canine is taking early retirement. Rumble is just 8 months old, but his career has been cut short by an elbow ailment. Since the German shepherd pup started in July, he has followed his handler, Officer Sarah Bellavance, everywhere. The duo trained daily, working on tracking techniques. Bellavance would bring Rumble to the office for socialization and take him home with her when the day was over. "He loved people, loved kids. He's friendly with other dogs — he was perfect," Bellavance said. "He was super smart; I was impressed." In October, Bellavance noticed Rumble would limp after running around or jumping off her couch. She took him to the vet, who first thought Rumble had panosteitis — growing pains — a common malady in big dogs. Instead, X-rays showed Rumble has ununited anconeal process, an elbow disorder. A follow-up with a specialist revealed he also has fragmentation of the coronoid process, another form of elbow dysplasia. That spelled the end of Rumble's brief career in public safety. The officer, who has another dog at home, adopted the pooch. "I've had the dog with me nearly 24-7 for the last six months, so, of course, I've bonded with him, so I can't let him go," said the four-year veteran of the South Burlington force. Rumble still needed surgery to repair the condition, which can be alleviated but never cured. Bellavance started a GoFundMe page to raise the needed $4,000 — and met her goal in a week. Surgery is scheduled for Friday. Any extra cash will go to the department as it replaces Rumble with another police canine. Bellavance will be that new pup's handler, too. Rumble, meanwhile, is taking to the easy life. "I thought he would be more sad than he actually is," Bellavance said. "He has a dog brother at home who he really likes, so I think he's fine because he's happy to play with him all day." The original print version of this article was headlined "Bite Out of Crime" …

    Seven Days / 4 d. 12 h. 14 min. ago more
  • Letters to the Editor (12/13/17)Letters to the Editor (12/13/17)

    Former Councilor 'Disappointed' [Re "How the Burlington Telecom 'Debacle' Divided a City Council," December 6]: As a former Burlington city councilor, I've watched the latest Burlington Telecom travails from afar, alternately amused, aghast and, in the end, keenly disappointed. Councilor Dave Hartnett's posturing has been unconscionable. Bellowing expletives, storming out of meetings, personal attacks and self-congratulation have become standard fare for him, regardless of whether the topic is BT, commission appointments, walk-bike master planning, smoking in parks or supporting organized labor. Given his frequent pronouncements trumpeting transparency, it was particularly hypocritical for Hartnett to play a closed-door role in leading Schurz Communications/ZRF Partners to the BT trough. Kudos to Councilor Joan Shannon for standing up to his melodrama. Keep BT Local's proposal was the weakest from the outset of deliberations last spring, when I was still on the council. It's particularly troubling to hear Councilors Max Tracy and Ali Dieng imply that all for-profit entities are conspiratorial capitalists interested only in fattening up BT for Comcast's ultimate consumption. Ting/Tucows has a well-deserved reputation for being precisely the kind of successful, socially responsible company Vermonters have long championed. The fact that KBTL's board, by one scant vote, rejected an opportunity to partner with Ting in operating BT is most unfortunate. Had I still been serving on the council on November 6, I'd have supported Ting with no qualms, and a last-minute gamble on BT's future would've been avoided. The failures of Schurz to commit to net neutrality and ZRF to reveal its investors should be subjects of grave concern for the Burlington City Council as it ponders a final BT purchase agreement. Tom Ayres Randolph Vote Them Out The loss of our Burlington Telecom is an unpopular decision ["How the Burlington Telecom 'Debacle' Divided a City Council," December 6]. The city councilors who approved the sale to out-of-town investors should be held accountable. It's time for long-serving city councilors to move on and make way for new members. On March 6, there will be an opportunity to elect councilors with a sense of decorum and responsibility to those they represent. Jack Daggitt Burlington Gun Sense-less ["A Gunshot Survivor Aims to Secure Background Checks in Vermont," December 6]: It should surprise no one that Gun Sense Vermont has had little success in efforts to restrict Vermonters' lawful gun rights. I assert that the board president's description of the group as "a bit…

    Seven Days / 4 d. 12 h. 14 min. ago more
  • Carina Driscoll Says She'll Run for Burlington Mayor 'Her' WayCarina Driscoll Says She'll Run for Burlington Mayor 'Her' Way

    When Burlington mayoral candidate Carina Driscoll made her pitch to city Progressives for their endorsement December 6, she conspicuously avoided any mention of her connection with the Queen City's most famous resident. That was intentional, Sen. Bernie Sanders' (I-Vt.) stepdaughter later explained to Seven Days. "It's important to me that I enter this campaign on my own," she said. Come March, Driscoll hopes to unseat two-term incumbent Mayor Miro Weinberger, a Democrat, and beat out fellow independent and political novice Infinite Culcleasure. Driscoll, 43, said she wants to win on her own merits. Yet she moved into a campaign office on Church Street that happens to be just two doors down from the office of the Sanders Institute, the think tank established by her stepfather and run by her brother, David Driscoll, and mother, Jane O'Meara Sanders. The campaign office, a sparsely furnished room with two plastic folding tables, a computer and a printer, is temporary and has nothing to do with the institute, she explained quickly. The optics aren't good, she acknowledged, but a friend helped her find it in a pinch. Driscoll said she signed a one-month lease and is seeking a more suitable space. The proximity to her famous family highlights the fine line Driscoll is trying to walk: establishing the legitimacy of her own candidacy while remaining in the glow of Sanders' success. After his failed 2016 presidential bid, her 76-year-old stepfather has become the nation's most popular politician, espousing much the same credo as he did during his eight years as Burlington mayor in the 1980s. Driscoll's association with the Sanders political machine can be a double-edged sword. She and her mother, who remains Sanders' top political confidant, have been accused of nepotism. Once president of Burlington College, O'Meara Sanders is inextricably linked to its demise. And Driscoll's business ties to the college as founder of the Vermont Woodworking School drew national media scrutiny this year. She's tried to create an appearance of distance. Driscoll said that she hadn't spoken to Sanders since her December 4 announcement. Vermont's junior senator refused to talk to reporters about her candidacy, though he released a brief statement the day she announced, acknowledging his pride. "Today is Carina's day, and her words and her ideas should be the focus, not anyone else's," he said. O'Meara Sanders, on the other hand, tweeted Driscoll's campaign announcement to her 76,600 followers…

    Seven Days / 4 d. 12 h. 14 min. ago more
  • Ho-Ho Pomerleau: Vermont Pols Kiss the RingHo-Ho Pomerleau: Vermont Pols Kiss the Ring

    It was a festive scene on Sunday at the Hilton Burlington on the waterfront. A small squadron of winter-themed mascots and elves (plus the University of Vermont's mascot, Rally Catamount) filled the lobby, greeting the invited guests and posing for selfies. At 11 a.m. sharp, the doors opened. Parents and children filed into the Adirondack Ballroom for one of the signature events of Burlington's holiday season: the 37th annual Pomerleau Holiday Party, hosted by the patriarch of the clan, 100-year-old Tony Pomerleau. There were gift bags, ornaments, a temporary tattoo station and crayons at every table with place mats for the kids to color. Santa and Mrs. Claus worked the room and a five-piece ensemble played soft jazz versions of the holiday classics. There were speeches by Vermont's most prominent politicos, gushing in celebration of their host. How gushing? Try this: "Much of Burlington's success is due to Mr. Pomerleau," said Gov. Phil Scott. "He's a role model for many in living the American dream. Thank you for everything you do for us every day, Mr. Pomerleau." And this: "What Tony has done has been remarkable over the years," said Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.), whose wife Marcelle is Pomerleau's niece. "You are my favorite uncle." The guests, almost 400 in number, included many of Burlington's neediest families, selected by the city's Department of Parks, Recreation & Waterfront in consultation with children's centers and community organizations around the city. It was a day of unvarnished praise for Mr. Pomerleau, with a faint whiff of noblesse oblige in the air. Pomerleau sat in a wheelchair (his only visible concession to age), but he occupied it like a throne, and Vermont's leading politicians acted like eager courtiers. He was attended by the state's two U.S. senators, Leahy and Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), and their wives, as well as Scott and Burlington Mayor Miro Weinberger. It's not very often you see all those people in one place at one time — let alone around a single table. Congressman Peter Welch (D-Vt.) sent his regrets, "due to a family commitment," according to an email from spokesperson Kate Hamilton. "He has attended in the past and sees it as a wonderful event for children and a tribute to Mr. Pomerleau's commitment to the community." As Scott told me, "Anytime Antonio Pomerleau invites you to an event, you show up." The most effusive of the pols —…

    Seven Days / 4 d. 12 h. 14 min. ago more
  • Bernt Out: Veteran Sanders Aide Calls It a CareerBernt Out: Veteran Sanders Aide Calls It a Career

    Ten minutes before Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) took the podium at the Champlain Valley Exposition in March 2016, his presidential campaign manager approached his longtime state director with a message from the boss. "Phil, Bernie wants you to introduce him," Jeff Weaver told Phil Fiermonte backstage at the Essex fairgrounds. It was Super Tuesday, the night Sanders would lose a ribbon of southern states to Democratic rival Hillary Clinton and run up a delegate deficit he would never overcome. But it was also the night he'd win his home state by an astonishing 72-point margin — cashing in on the goodwill he'd earned over decades in office. To warm up the adoring hometown crowd of 4,000, Sanders could have chosen any one of the celebrities or prominent politicos who'd recently glommed on to his campaign, but instead he picked his most senior and trusted aide. Dressed in gray slacks, a black sweater and thick-rimmed glasses, Fiermonte bounded to the stage to salute a man he introduced as "the next president of the United States." More than any other aide — with the possible exception of Weaver — it was Fiermonte who had laid the groundwork for Sanders' Green Mountain landslide. For the better part of the previous 35 years, he had built his boss' political operation one spaghetti supper, town hall meeting and voter registration drive at a time. Now, after two decades as Sanders' top state staffer, the 62-year-old Burlingtonian is preparing to call it quits at the end of the year. "It seems like a good time to make a change," Fiermonte said, explaining that he hopes to spend more time with his Montréal-based partner and his 96-year-old father. "I tell people I'm retiring from 20 years of federal government service but not from a lifetime of social activism." His only immediate plans, he said, are to join the board of the Vermont- and New Hampshire-based progressive group Rights & Democracy. In Sanders' world, where loyalty is measured in decades, not years, Fiermonte will not easily be replaced. "Bernie and Phil, they're extremely tight," Weaver said. "It takes a while for Bernie to warm up to people, but Phil has been there through a zillion campaigns — in the House office, the Senate office and on the presidential campaign." Fiermonte's departure follows that of longtime spokesman Michael Briggs, who left Sanders' Washington, D.C., office earlier this…

    Seven Days / 4 d. 12 h. 14 min. ago more
  • Firefighters: Residents ignored carbon monoxide detectorsFirefighters: Residents ignored carbon monoxide detectors

    About two dozen people are back in their homes after a major carbon monoxide leak in Williston Monday night. Firefighters tell us this is a case of missed warning signs that could have turned deadly and a lesson in why you should not silence your carbon monoxide detector.

    Vermont News / 5 d. 4 h. 40 min. ago
  • To the editor: Green Mountain Party a cure to status quoTo the editor: Green Mountain Party a cure to status quo

    Ethics - Bring our D- to an A+. Give our ethics commission some money to operate, investigatory powers and enforcement powers.

    Vermont News / 5 d. 9 h. 21 min. ago
  • Rep. Sheldon is named 'Climate Champion'Rep. Sheldon is named 'Climate Champion'

    State Rep. Amy Sheldon of East Middlebury has been named a Climate Champion by the social-justice activist group Vermont Businesses for Social Responsibility . VBSR honored Sheldon along with other Vermont House legislators as Climate Champions last week.Sheldon was recognized for her efforts to grow the economy and create green jobs by putting a price on carbon pollution, which many believe is changing the Earth's climate.

    Vermont News / 5 d. 11 h. 36 min. ago more
  • Zero carbonZero carbon

    Vermont utilities have to import "offset" nuclear power via New Hampshire's Seabrook Nuclear Power Station, a zero-carbon, high energy workhorse. Que sera, sera , as Doris Day used to sing-at least the nation's 2015 Clean Power Plan offered renewed hope to those smarter U.S. states not having foolishly discarded their in-state nuclear options.

    Vermont News / 5 d. 13 h. 52 min. ago more
  • Castleton University welcomes new presidentCastleton University welcomes new president

    Skida is Swedish for, "to go for a ski." One woman has given the word Skida a whole new meaning thanks to her Made in Vermont headwear and accessories.

    Vermont News / 6 d. 0 h. 21 min. ago
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    Editor of the Reformer: I am a mom. The love and connection I have with my children and acting to protect them are top priorities in my life.

    Vermont News / 6 d. 6 h. 57 min. ago
  • 100-year-old man throws $13,000 party for the less fortunate100-year-old man throws $13,000 party for the less fortunate

    Over 450 people got to enjoy free holiday food and fun thanks to a 100-year-old Vermont resident's annual holiday party

    ABCNews.com / 6 d. 10 h. 21 min. ago
  • Poet Robert Frost's original Christmas cards on displayPoet Robert Frost's original Christmas cards on display

    A series of Christmas cards and booklets that feature Robert Frost poems are on display at Vermont's Middlebury College for the first time in more than half a century.

    ABCNews.com / 7 d. 12 h. 44 min. ago
  • In this Wednesday, Dec. 6, 2017 photo, Middlebury College Archivist Danielle Rougeau holds a Christmas card sent by poet Robert Frost in 1962, shortly before his death. For the first time in decades, ...In this Wednesday, Dec. 6, 2017 photo, Middlebury College Archivist Danielle Rougeau holds a Christmas card sent by poet Robert Frost in 1962, shortly before his death. For the first time in decades, ...

    In this Wednesday, Dec. 6, 2017 photo, Middlebury College Archivist Danielle Rougeau holds a Christmas card sent by poet Robert Frost in 1962, shortly before his death. For the first time in decades, the college in Middlebury, Vt., this year has on d

    ABCNews.com / 7 d. 13 h. 9 min. ago
  • In this Wednesday, Dec. 6, 2017 photo, Middlebury College Professor Jay Parini poses with a number of Christmas cards sent by poet Robert Frost, in Middlebury, Vt. For the first time in decades, the ...In this Wednesday, Dec. 6, 2017 photo, Middlebury College Professor Jay Parini poses with a number of Christmas cards sent by poet Robert Frost, in Middlebury, Vt. For the first time in decades, the ...

    In this Wednesday, Dec. 6, 2017 photo, Middlebury College Professor Jay Parini poses with a number of Christmas cards sent by poet Robert Frost, in Middlebury, Vt. For the first time in decades, the college this year has on display a series of Christ

    ABCNews.com / 7 d. 13 h. 10 min. ago
  • 5 gross things that happen when you don't change your toothbrush5 gross things that happen when you don't change your toothbrush

    When was the last time you switched your toothbrush out?

    WPTZ / 17 d. 9 h. 58 min. ago