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    This RSS feed URL is deprecated, please update. New URLs can be found in the footers at https://news.google.com/news

    Google News / 18.12.2017 06:09
  • Hawaii's blistering 19-2 run shocks Pac-12's Arizona - Swish AppealHawaii's blistering 19-2 run shocks Pac-12's Arizona - Swish Appeal

    Swish AppealHawaii's blistering 19-2 run shocks Pac-12's ArizonaSwish AppealTucson, AZ — Arizona (3-7) returned to their home court after coming off of a 39-point win last week, but were unable to break through their struggles as a young team defensively, blowing a seven point fourth quarter lead and losing to the Hawaii ...Arizona women falter down the stretch in loss to HawaiiArizona Daily Starall 4 news articles »

    Google News / 46 min. ago more
  • Horrifying moment a woman is caught dragging a dog behind her car in Hawaii for TWO BLOCKS - Daily MailHorrifying moment a woman is caught dragging a dog behind her car in Hawaii for TWO BLOCKS - Daily Mail

    Horrifying moment a woman is caught dragging a dog behind her car in Hawaii for TWO BLOCKSDaily MailHorrifying moment a woman is caught dragging a dog behind her car in Hawaii for TWO BLOCKS. A horrifying video caught on a bystander's dash cam shows a dog being dragged behind a car in Hawaii for more than two blocks; YouTube user Johnny Chang ...

    Google News / 2 h. 14 min. ago more
  • With pineapple and sugar production gone, Hawaii weighs its agricultural future - Washington PostWith pineapple and sugar production gone, Hawaii weighs its agricultural future - Washington Post

    Washington PostWith pineapple and sugar production gone, Hawaii weighs its agricultural futureWashington PostKAHULUI, Maui — Tens of thousands of abandoned acres of farmland lie fallow on this island, cemeteries of Hawaii's defunct plantation era, which met its end last year when the state's last remaining sugar grower shut down an operation that had run for ...and more »

    Google News / 4 h. 36 min. ago more
  • Building teetering on edge at Sunset Beach due to extreme erosion - Hawaii News NowBuilding teetering on edge at Sunset Beach due to extreme erosion - Hawaii News Now

    Building teetering on edge at Sunset Beach due to extreme erosionHawaii News NowSUNSET BEACH, Hawaii - Ocean Safety officials are telling the public to stay away from Sunset Beach. Extreme erosion has caused an Ocean Safety storage room to teeter on the edge of a 20 foot drop. Tomorrow city crews will be at the beach to come up ...and more »

    Google News / 4 h. 37 min. ago more
  • Novato man, tour guide hurt while riding mules on Hawaii trail - Santa Rosa Press DemocratNovato man, tour guide hurt while riding mules on Hawaii trail - Santa Rosa Press Democrat

    Santa Rosa Press DemocratNovato man, tour guide hurt while riding mules on Hawaii trailSanta Rosa Press DemocratWAILUKU, Hawaii — Two mule riders had to be airlifted from a trail in Molokai island after they fell off their mules and were injured, a Hawaii fire official said. Maui Fire Services Chief Edward Taomoto told the Maui News that a man suffered a head ...and more »

    Google News / 5 h. 34 min. ago more
  • North Korea Nuclear Attack: Hawaii Taking Major Steps To Prepare For Potential Strike From Kim - NewsweekNorth Korea Nuclear Attack: Hawaii Taking Major Steps To Prepare For Potential Strike From Kim - Newsweek

    NewsweekNorth Korea Nuclear Attack: Hawaii Taking Major Steps To Prepare For Potential Strike From KimNewsweekHawaii also tested a Cold War-era warning siren for the first time in more than 30 years and has prepared emergency text alert. State officials have been holding weekly meetings with Homeland Security Department and Defense Department officials. The ...Cautious Hawaii Prepares for a Nuclear AttackMilitary.comall 18 news articles »

    Google News / 12 h. 17 min. ago more
  • Mom keeps fighting despite challengesMom keeps fighting despite challenges

    After years of addiction - to alcohol and to drugs from marijuana to crystal meth - Joanna Schutz is in recovery, sober for 20 months. &

    Big News Network.com / 14 h. 26 min. ago
  • Aloha Airlines employees plan reunion to mark 10 years since shutdownAloha Airlines employees plan reunion to mark 10 years since shutdown

    In March, it will be 10 years since Aloha Airlines shut down. This is a story about a reunion being planned for Aloha employees, but also about how the soul of the airline has lived on past

    Big News Network.com / 14 h. 26 min. ago
  • Alivado nominated to Police CommissionAlivado nominated to Police Commission

    Shannon Alivado, director of government relations for the General Contractors Association of Hawaii, has been nominated to the Honolulu Police Commission by Mayor Kirk Caldwell. ..

    Big News Network.com / 14 h. 26 min. ago
  • New craft brewery promotes island ingredients, self-sufficiencyNew craft brewery promotes island ingredients, self-sufficiency

    KAILUA-KONA — When customers come to Ola Brew Co. on Luhia Street, they can sip on the new brewery’s Ola Pale Ale or Ola Lager as they look out the taproom’s windows onto the brewery floor below.

    Hawaii Tribune-Herald / 17 h. 3 min. ago
  • Girlfriend faces attempted murder charge after reportedly striking boyfriend with rental carGirlfriend faces attempted murder charge after reportedly striking boyfriend with rental car

    KAILUA-KONA — A woman visiting from Alaska was arrested Friday on suspicion of attempted murder after allegedly striking her boyfriend with a rental car that day.

    Hawaii Tribune-Herald / 17 h. 3 min. ago
  • Victim of alleged rape describes incident at Old AVictim of alleged rape describes incident at Old A

    KAILUA-KONA — Fifteen months after police began an investigation into an alleged violent rape at Old Kona Airport Park, the victim testified in court last month about the incident and described her two attackers.

    Hawaii Tribune-Herald / 17 h. 3 min. ago
  • Census survey: Poverty dips even as incomes remain flatCensus survey: Poverty dips even as incomes remain flat

    Hawaii Island’s stubbornly high poverty rate dipped in 2016 but still remained above pre-recession levels, according to recent U.S. Census Bureau estimates.

    Hawaii Tribune-Herald / 17 h. 3 min. ago
  • Hemp-growing program suffers setbackHemp-growing program suffers setback

    Plans for a statewide industrial hemp-growing program hit a snag after a shipment of cannabis seeds from Jamaica had to be destroyed in October.

    Hawaii Tribune-Herald / 17 h. 3 min. ago
  • The beach is back: Heavy rains bring black sand, ohana to Honolii shoreThe beach is back: Heavy rains bring black sand, ohana to Honolii shore

    Visit Honolii Beach Park these days and you might see a few more people — and a lot more sand — than usual.

    Hawaii Tribune-Herald / 17 h. 3 min. ago
  • Tom Yamachika: When Is Gambling Criminal Conduct?Tom Yamachika: When Is Gambling Criminal Conduct?

    Our state was recently in the news when state Reps. Chris Lee and Sean Quinlan held a press conference in response to the controversy surrounding loot boxes and micro-transactions in video games. Lee announced that he would be looking to introduce legislation to combat predatory practices by game publishers. He called Star Wars: Battlefront II, an “online casino specifically designed to lure kids into spending money.” He added that he wants to “protect kids who are underage, not psychologically or emotionally mature enough to be able to gamble which is why gambling is prohibited under 21.” Imperial forces on the planet Hoth prepare to attack the Rebel Alliance, from Star Wars: Battlefront II.Flickr: BarricadeCaptures In Hawaii, our law says that gambling is where a person 1) stakes or risks something of value, 2) upon the outcome of a contest of chance or a future contingent event, 3) upon an agreement or understanding that there will be something of value received upon a certain outcome. Which means that gambling needs to have a bet, an element of chance, and a prize. Our Supreme Court held in 1961 (State v. Prevo, 44 Haw. 665, 361 P.2d 1044) that an entry fee, or paying just to play the game, satisfies the “bet” element. Most games, online or not, have a chance element (rolling a pair of dice, for example). So, we need to think about whether games such as this have a “prize.” The Entertainment Software Rating Board, or ESRB, as well as the UK’s gambling regulator, took the position that a “prize” needs to have value outside the game in which it is generated before it could be considered a prize from gambling. They feel that if only in-game items result, the “bet” is a sunk cost. It may be different if the game allows, or at least turns a blind eye to, a “black market” where people can and do trade real money for in-game items. ‘Token, Object, Article’ The Hawaii law defining gambling, HRS section 71 2-1220, defines “something of value” in the prize context as “any money or property, any token, object, or article exchangeable for money or property, or any form of credit or promise directly or indirectly contemplating transfer of money or property or of any interest therein, or involving extension of a service or entertainment. ” The last few words in this definition may be broad enough to include in-game items as satisfying the prize element of gambling. But that definition may be broad enough to sweep up lots of other things. How about paying taxes? I pay taxes, which satisfies the “bet” element. If I’m lucky (there’s the element of chance), my trash gets picked up, the pothole on my street gets fixed, or the public school that my kids attend gets a few air conditioners. What about federal law? Federal law doesn’t regulate gambling. The Unlawful Internet Gambling Enforcement Act of 2006, or UIGEA (31 U.S.C. sections 5361 to 5366) prohibits gambling businesses from knowingly accepting payments for internet gambling activity that is unlawful under any federal or state law. This law doesn’t legalize or criminalize the underlying game. In any event, all we are talking about here is what kind of gambling constitutes criminal conduct. That’s a different question from whether parents should allow their kids to access gaming sites with a valid payment card (especially if it’s not the kid’s money). If you’re a parent who doesn’t want your child spending money on in-game items, you can check to see if games have micro-transactions or loot boxes. You can also make sure that no payment method, such as a debit or credit card, is attached to consoles or accounts that they’re using. Whether you complain about loot boxes or micro-transactions, the reality is that if consumers are buying them, developers and publishers will want to keep offering them. But if you as a citizen make your voice heard, you can help make a difference as lawmakers or governments may start listening to the dialogue, as they did with the Star Wars: Battlefront II controversy. The post Tom Yamachika: When Is Gambling Criminal Conduct? appeared first on Honolulu Civil Beat.

    Civil Beat / 17 h. 8 min. ago more
  • Hawaii State to continue to champion net neutralityHawaii State to continue to champion net neutrality

    MEDIA RELEASE Statement by Govewrnor DVid Ige My administration has long been and will continue to be a strong proponent of maintaining net neutrality, despite the Federal Communications Commission’s recent repeal of neutrality rules. We had the foresight to require neutrality in agreements with Internet Service Providers (ISPs). Attorney General Doug Chin and Office of Consumer Protection director Stephen Levins have already started their strong opposition to the repeal, and I am committed to ensuring that all Hawai‘i residents have the benefit of an open platform of innovation, education and free expression. I will be working with stakeholders to protect the integrity of this critical resource. –Govewrnor David Ige

    Hawaii 24/7 / 22 h. 2 min. ago more
  • Hawaii Island lane closures for the week of December 16-22, 2017Hawaii Island lane closures for the week of December 16-22, 2017

    MEDIA RELEASE PLEASE NOTE: Lane closure schedules may change at any time without further notice. All projects are weather permitting. There will be no lane closures scheduled for Friday, Dec. 22, due to HDOT’s Holiday Lane Closure Restriction from Dec. 22 – Dec. 26. — VOLCANO ROAD/MAMALAHOA HIGHWAY (ROUTE 11) — 1) KEAAU Lane closure on Mamalahoa Highway (Route 11) in both directions between Milepost Markers 6 and 9 in the vicinity of Keaau Pahoa Bypass Road on Monday, Dec. 18, through Thursday, Dec. 21, from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., for pavement marking. 2) PAHALA Alternating lane closure on Mamalahoa Highway (Route 11) between Mile Marker 53 and Mile Marker 57 on Monday, Dec. 18, through Thursday, Dec. 21, from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., for pavement reconstruction. — HAWAII BELT ROAD (ROUTE 19) — 1) HAKALAU Alternating lane closures on Hawaii Belt Road (Route 19) in both directions at Mile Marker 16 on Monday, Dec. 18, through Thursday, Dec. 21, from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., for bridge rehabilitation work on Umauma Bridge.

    Hawaii 24/7 / 22 h. 31 min. ago more
  • ThinkTech: Business in Hawaii with Reg BakerThinkTech: Business in Hawaii with Reg Baker

    These two ladies were so much fun and had a great message to share. Leaving the corporate world to roll the dice on starting your own business is very scary! But boy are they having so much fun and helping people too!!   The post ThinkTech: Business in Hawaii with Reg Baker appeared first on Hawaii Reporter.

    Hawaii Reporter / 1 d. 0 h. 6 min. ago
  • Man hit by car at Old A; woman arrested near sceneMan hit by car at Old A; woman arrested near scene

    KAILUA-KONA — A man was taken to Kona Community Hospital with serious injuries after being hit by a car in Old Kona Airport Park.

    Hawaii Tribune-Herald / 1 d. 2 h. 28 min. ago
  • Slipknot: Will Trump fire Mueller to derail collusion probe?Slipknot: Will Trump fire Mueller to derail collusion probe?

    WASHINGTON, U.S. - With three of U.S. President Donald Trump’s allies, including the ousted former National Security adviser Michael Flynn and one-time campaign manager Paul Manafort, already

    Big News Network.com / 1 d. 5 h. 18 min. ago
  • Six Hawaii post offices to be open this Sunday - Hawaii News NowSix Hawaii post offices to be open this Sunday - Hawaii News Now

    Six Hawaii post offices to be open this SundayHawaii News NowThe Postal Service announced that the following six Oahu Post Offices will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. this Sunday to serve its seasonal increase in holiday customers. - Airport (Main) Post Office. - Ala Moana Post Office. - Kaneohe Post Office ...and more »

    Google News / 1 d. 5 h. 20 min. ago
  • TV Ratings: 'Exorcist' Finale Steady, 'Hawaii Five-0' Down | Deadline - DeadlineTV Ratings: 'Exorcist' Finale Steady, 'Hawaii Five-0' Down | Deadline - Deadline

    DeadlineTV Ratings: 'Exorcist' Finale Steady, 'Hawaii Five-0' Down | DeadlineDeadlineThe Exorcist (0.4/2) ended its second season and 2017 with a narrative bang last night. On a Blue Blood-less Friday that saw little movement for most shows, the bloody and unexpected death of a major character on the finale of the Fox horror drama was ...TV Ratings Friday: 'Exorcist' finale steady, 'Hawaii Five-0' leads – TV ...TVbytheNumbersall 4 news articles »

    Google News / 1 d. 8 h. 50 min. ago more
  • Trigger-happy North Korea gearing for another shocker?Trigger-happy North Korea gearing for another shocker?

    PYONGYANG, North Korea - As the world united against its nuclear ambitions on Friday, the undeterred nuclear state, North Korea was believed to have shut its ears to the world.Experts believ

    Big News Network.com / 1 d. 12 h. 10 min. ago
  • Nigeria troops arrest 400-plus Boko Haram fighters, familiesNigeria troops arrest 400-plus Boko Haram fighters, families

    Maiduguri - Military authorities say Nigerian soldiers have arrested more than 400 people associated with the Boko Haram extremist group hiding on the islands of Lake Chad, including fighters, wives a

    Big News Network.com / 1 d. 14 h. 29 min. ago
  • Phone scams mar holiday seasonPhone scams mar holiday season

    The holiday season is a time for shopping and gift giving — and apparently prime time for telephone scams, as well.

    Hawaii Tribune-Herald / 1 d. 17 h. 3 min. ago
  • Roadwork on schedule: West Kawailani Street project to be completed by late 2018Roadwork on schedule: West Kawailani Street project to be completed by late 2018

    After more than half a year of work, construction on upper West Kawailani Street is still on track to be completed near the end of 2018.

    Hawaii Tribune-Herald / 1 d. 17 h. 3 min. ago
  • Hospital billing errors correctedHospital billing errors corrected

    Hilo Medical Center confirmed that Hawaii Health Systems Corp. completed sending customers corrected billing statements after errors were uncovered in September.

    Hawaii Tribune-Herald / 1 d. 17 h. 3 min. ago
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  • Roadwork begins Monday at Ainaloa and KawailaniRoadwork begins Monday at Ainaloa and Kawailani

    Starting Monday, the merge lane from Ainaola Drive onto West Kawailani Street in the Waiakea Uka area of Hilo will be closed and a temporary right-turn lane will be installed to access Kawailani for travel in the eastward direction.

    Hawaii Tribune-Herald / 1 d. 17 h. 3 min. ago
  • Police report high number of scam robo-calls to residentsPolice report high number of scam robo-calls to residents

    MEDIA RELEASE The Hawaiʻi Police Department has received numerous calls from island residents reporting robo-calls, or spoofing. These are thieves trying to fool you into thinking you owe money to the IRS, power company or that you your auto warranty has expired. These telephone calls are designed to trick you into giving them sensitive and private information to take your money. Use caution if you receive a suspicious call; merely hang up. Do not give out banking information, credit card information or personal information like your social security number. If you are out shopping, please remember to lock your car doors and windows to avoid theft. Do not leave valuables like Christmas Gifts visible. Place them out of site in the trunk to lessen the possibility of someone breaking into your vehicle. We want your holidays to be safe and memorable. Slow down and enjoy them.

    Hawaii 24/7 / 1 d. 17 h. 30 min. ago more
  • Police stepping up DUI checkpoints during the holiday seasonPolice stepping up DUI checkpoints during the holiday season

    MEDIA RELEASE As Americans hit the road this holiday season to celebrate with family and friends, it’s important that we all drive safely and safe driving means sober driving. The Hawaiʻi Police Department will participate in a National Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over holiday campaign, (December 13-31), to raise public awareness of the dangers of drunk driving. During the Campaign, officers will increase DUI Checkpoints and roving patrols looking for drunk drivers. Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over, drives home why it is so critical to always drive sober. Over the past five years, an average of 300 people died in drunk-driving crashes during the Christmas through New Year’s holiday period. In December 2016 alone, 781 people lost their lives in drunk-driving crashes. To support Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over, NHTSA released a new advertisement called “No Big Deal,” which vividly illustrates the destruction caused by a drunk driver. This ad is accompanied by a 360-degree virtual reality web experience of a drunk driving crash scene (nhtsa.gov/crash), allows the viewer to interact with first responders and understand how one selfish choice to drink and drive can affect others. The “No Big Deal” VR experience also highlights another consequence of drinking and driving and getting arrested. Law enforcement around the country will be making a special effort during Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over, to find and arrest drunk drivers. The average arrest, including attorney fees, fines, court costs, and other expenses, can set you back $10,000. About one-third of all drivers arrested or convicted of drunk driving are repeat offenders. Protect yourself and others this holiday season by always driving sober. For many, the holidays and holiday parties involve alcohol. Be honest with yourself about how you celebrate, and make a plan to get home without getting behind the wheel. Designate a driver, take public transportation, or use Uber. This is the season of giving, so give yourself and all your neighbors the gift of safer roads by driving sober over the holidays. Carry that safer driving habit into the New Year by resolving to always drive sober. If we all do that, we will celebrate the holidays safely and ring in a better and safer 2018. The Hawai’i Police Department wishes everyone a happy and safe holiday season.

    Hawaii 24/7 / 1 d. 17 h. 31 min. ago more
  • ACUF's 2017 Hawaii Ratings Show the State Remains Radically...ACUF's 2017 Hawaii Ratings Show the State Remains Radically...

    The American Conservative Union Foundation has just released its ratings for the 2017 meeting of the Hawaii State Legislature. These ratings, a portion of the comprehensive and nationwide ratings released by the ACUF, are designed to reflect how elected officials view the role of government and are helpful in illustrating how both chambers of the legislature as well as individual members' prioritize a wide variety of issue areas that directly affect Hawaiians.

    Hawaii News / 1 d. 19 h. 27 min. ago more
  • White House Signals Western Wall Has to Be Part of IsraelWhite House Signals Western Wall Has to Be Part of Israel

    WASHINGTON - Senior Trump administration officials outlined their view Friday that Jerusalem's Western Wall ultimately will be declared a part of Israel, in another declaration sure to inflame passio

    Big News Network.com / 2 d. 5 h. 4 min. ago
  • Police warrants list for Friday, December 15, 2017Police warrants list for Friday, December 15, 2017

    MEDIA RELEASE As of Friday, December 15, 2017, the following individuals are wanted by the Hawaii Police Department because of outstanding warrants: This is the official list from the Hawaii County Police Department Police ask that anyone who knows the whereabouts of a person on this list call the Police Department’s non-emergency line at 935-3311. Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call Crime Stoppers at 961-8300 and may be eligible for a reward of up to $1,000. Crime Stoppers is a volunteer program run by ordinary citizens who want to keep their community safe. Crime Stoppers doesn’t record calls or subscribe to caller ID. All Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential. Persons who know a warrant is out for their arrest are advised to report to the nearest police station to avoid having an officer go to their home or workplace to arrest them. Individuals can find out if they have a misdemeanor warrant or a traffic warrant by going to the Hawaii State Judiciary’s website at www.courts.state.hi.us. From there, click on “eCourt Kokua” and then follow the directions. Information about felony warrants is not yet available online. Why is this a partial list? Police department explanation Originally, the list was for newspapers, which have limited space. The reason we do it in alphabetical order rather than chronological order is that sometimes we have a long list of new names and sometimes that list is short. This is a way we can be consistent with filling a specified amount of space for the newspapers. We realize that space isn’t a factor for a website, but to create a different version for you (Hawaii 24/7) would require doing both versions. Unfortunately, we only have one employee who is responsible for all the police department’s court documents and she is the one who has to prepare the weekly list for the media. It would take away too much time from her primary duties if she had to do both lists.

    Hawaii 24/7 / 2 d. 8 h. 18 min. ago more
  • Prince Harry, Meghan Markle to marry on May 19Prince Harry, Meghan Markle to marry on May 19

    New Delhi [India], Dec. 15 (ANI): Prince Harry and his fiancee Meghan Markle will tie the knot on May 19 at St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle in England. The Kensington Palace? posted a picture of th

    Big News Network.com / 2 d. 12 h. 32 min. ago
  • Your Hawaii hotel bill will go up in 2018, thanks to a new tax increase - Los Angeles TimesYour Hawaii hotel bill will go up in 2018, thanks to a new tax increase - Los Angeles Times

    Los Angeles TimesYour Hawaii hotel bill will go up in 2018, thanks to a new tax increaseLos Angeles Times“There will be a … busing system that once they get to Ala Moana that will get them into Waikiki. I think visitors will use it. And I think they're going to use it to get out to Kapolei,” he said. Hawaii ranks third highest among the 50 states in ...

    Google News / 2 d. 12 h. 53 min. ago more
  • Return of 2 Ill GOP Senators Crucial Next Week for Tax BillReturn of 2 Ill GOP Senators Crucial Next Week for Tax Bill

    WASHINGTON - Ailing Republican senators John McCain and Thad Cochran missed votes this week, but their presence will be crucial early next week as the GOP tries to pass a sweeping $1.5 trillion tax p

    Big News Network.com / 2 d. 14 h. 4 min. ago
  • Napeahi to run for House District 2 seatNapeahi to run for House District 2 seat

    Terri Napeahi, a community activist focused on health and environmental issues, will run for state House District 2 in 2018 as a Democrat.

    Hawaii Tribune-Herald / 2 d. 17 h. 3 min. ago
  • Former Kim aide back on contract to help during legislative sessionFormer Kim aide back on contract to help during legislative session

    Mayor Harry Kim is once again bringing his former executive director back into the fold to present county priorities before the state Legislature.

    Hawaii Tribune-Herald / 2 d. 17 h. 3 min. ago
  • Police: Ka‘u body has ‘suspicious’ injuriesPolice: Ka‘u body has ‘suspicious’ injuries

    Police are seeking information about the death of a 42-year-old Ka‘u man whose body was found Tuesday evening in his home.

    Hawaii Tribune-Herald / 2 d. 17 h. 3 min. ago
  • Civil Beat Poll: Lottery Has Big Support In HawaiiCivil Beat Poll: Lottery Has Big Support In Hawaii

    Hawaii is one of only two states with no form of gaming, and one of only a handful that does not have a lottery. And yet, a clear majority of registered voters surveyed in a new Civil Beat Poll want either a statewide lottery or to join a multi-state lottery such as Powerball. Those who support a lottery lead opponents 55 percent to 34 percent in the poll, with just 4 percent unsure and 7 percent saying it doesn’t matter. But a lottery is likely a tough sell to the state Legislature, which has continually rejected any form of gambling. if("undefined"==typeof window.datawrapper)window.datawrapper={};window.datawrapper["NWXng"]={},window.datawrapper["NWXng"].embedDeltas={"100":538,"200":446,"300":423,"400":423,"500":400,"600":400,"700":400,"800":400,"900":400,"1000":400},window.datawrapper["NWXng"].iframe=document.getElementById("datawrapper-chart-NWXng"),window.datawrapper["NWXng"].iframe.style.height=window.datawrapper["NWXng"].embedDeltas[Math.min(1e3,Math.max(100*Math.floor(window.datawrapper["NWXng"].iframe.offsetWidth/100),100))]+"px",window.addEventListener("message",function(a){if("undefined"!=typeof a.data["datawrapper-height"])for(var b in a.data["datawrapper-height"])if("NWXng"==b)window.datawrapper["NWXng"].iframe.style.height=a.data["datawrapper-height"][b]+"px"});   In the most recent session, a House bill setting up a state lottery commission to implement a lottery and a Senate bill to establish a Hawaii internet lottery and gaming corporation for the purpose of conducting internet gambling were quickly shelved. Both carry over to the 2018 session, but their chances of being heard are slim. That has been the fate of most gaming bills, including ones calling for a casino in Waikiki and shipboard gambling in Hawaii waters. It’s ironic, given that cockfighting is illegal here and yet perceived as tolerated. Las Vegas is also known as Hawaii’s Ninth Island because of the popularity of Sin City as a travel destination for locals. Not in Hawaii: Powerball is very popular across much of the United States. Should Hawaii consider a lottery of its own?Flickr: Ross Catrow This week Civil Beat has reported on how voters feel about controversial proposals that have struggled at the Legislature. The poll found that most voters surveyed support holding a constitutional convention and having citizen initiative and referendum — ways to enact change without having to go through elected representatives. The Civil Beat Poll, conducted Nov. 27-29, surveyed 843 registered voters statewide, 70 percent on landlines and 30 percent with cellphones. Its margin of error is plus or minus 3.4 percent. ‘Our Schools Need It’ P. Denise La Costa of Lahaina, who took the poll, said she supports a lottery. The reason is money. “I think it’s a way to get additional revenue, because Lord knows our schools need it,” said La Costa, a real estate broker. “As long as people don’t get a gambling addiction.” Related Flickr.com/cagrimmett Civil Beat Poll: Voters Just Say No To Legalizing Recreational Marijuana December 14, 2017 Anthony Quintano/Civil Beat Civil Beat Poll: Support Is Still Strong For Medical Aid In Dying December 13, 2017 Cory Lum/Civil Beat Civil Beat Poll: Power To The People — Voters Want More Control December 12, 2017 Cory Lum/Civil Beat Civil Beat Poll: Let’s Have A Constitutional Convention December 11, 2017 La Costa said she has only gambled one time, but she does like to buy a lottery ticket when she travels to the mainland. “I won $96 from the California Lottery,” she said. But Clarence Kano of Honolulu opposes a lottery for Hawaii. “I think those that can’t afford it will play the lottery,” he said. “The state makes lots of money, but it’s a form of tax for the poor.” Kano, who does not gamble, said the argument that a lottery would bring in revenue “has its merits. But I think it’s a form of taxation.” Matt Fitch, executive director of Merriman River Group, which conducted the poll, said lotteries in other states were initially targeted to shore up education funding.   if("undefined"==typeof window.datawrapper)window.datawrapper={};window.datawrapper["L371r"]={},window.datawrapper["L371r"].embedDeltas={"100":515,"200":446,"300":423,"400":423,"500":423,"600":400,"700":400,"800":400,"900":400,"1000":400},window.datawrapper["L371r"].iframe=document.getElementById("datawrapper-chart-L371r"),window.datawrapper["L371r"].iframe.style.height=window.datawrapper["L371r"].embedDeltas[Math.min(1e3,Math.max(100*Math.floor(window.datawrapper["L371r"].iframe.offsetWidth/100),100))]+"px",window.addEventListener("message",function(a){if("undefined"!=typeof a.data["datawrapper-height"])for(var b in a.data["datawrapper-height"])if("L371r"==b)window.datawrapper["L371r"].iframe.style.height=a.data["datawrapper-height"][b]+"px"}); Fitch called attention to the fact that 63 percent of voters surveyed without college degrees favor a lottery, compared with just 27 percent opposing the idea. Those who earn less than $50,000 a year support lotteries somewhat more than those making more money. More Appealing Than Taxes Lotteries appear here to stay, however, at least in other states. The Washington Post reported last year that Powerball had a $2 million jackpot when it launched in 15 states in 1992. “Today, you can play the game in 47 states,” Niraj Chokshi reported. “It generates more than $4 billion in annual sales.” Powerball is coordinated by the nonprofit Multi-State Lottery Association, which describes itself as a “government-benefit association owned and operated by its member lotteries.” MUSL lists over 30 states as members, from Arizona to New Hampshire. “All profits are retained by the individual lotteries and are used to fund projects approved by the legislature authorizing each lottery,” according to MUSL. A 2016 report from the National Conference of State Legislatures said states are “betting on gaming” to help fund local governments: With state budgets still lagging pre-recession revenue levels, lawmakers hope to score a windfall by expanding legal gaming. Revenues from gambling offer an appealing alternative to the politically unpopular, increasingly undoable and invariably conflict-laden effort to hike taxes. NCSL’s Jackson Brainerd reported that gambling raised $27.7 billion in fiscal year 2015 for state and local governments. “Sounds good,” he wrote. “But it represents a relatively small portion of most state budgets, somewhere between 2 and 2.5 percent.” The Civil Beat Poll Dec. 2017 — Statewide Lottery: The post Civil Beat Poll: Lottery Has Big Support In Hawaii appeared first on Honolulu Civil Beat.

    Civil Beat / 2 d. 17 h. 7 min. ago more
  • Finding Hawaii Heroes In A School CafeteriaFinding Hawaii Heroes In A School Cafeteria

    Pictured on this page are Napoleon Kaʻiliawa and Albert Scales. These two guys are my heroes. Why are they heroes? Because they worked together to make their community healthier, more resilient and caring. Napoleon Kaʻiliawa is the cafeteria manager at Keaau High School, and Albert Scales is Napoleonʻs “big boss,” the director of the School Food Service Branch of Hawaiiʻs Department of Education. What are they doing? They are bringing locally grown products into the school lunch menu. They are helping kids to eat healthier foods like local fruits, vegetables and meat and supporting local farmers and ranchers. This in turn makes for a more resilient community. How did they do it? By working together for the good of the whole; by being two leaders in a network of people that made positive change happen. Two people doing some good in our world: Napoleon Kaʻiliawa, left, and Albert Scales.Michelle Galimba It took a group of people believing in each other to make this happen. With so much going “wrong” in the world, it’s easy to overlook all of the ordinary folks who are keeping the good and necessary but not very glamorous institutions — like public schools — going. But they’re not just keeping them going, they are patiently and persistently working to make their corner of the world a little bit better. And these guys, by doing what they do, are making new stories — stories about heroes whose superpowers are caring and nurturing their community — rather than exploiting and destroying it, as so many big businesses and celebrated CEOs do. These are the heroes of peace and service, rather than the heroes of war and competition. At First, Cynical I did not expect to run into heroes when I went to the Farm-to-School kick-off event that Napoleon had organized. In fact, and Iʻm really ashamed about this, I didn’t return Napoleon’s call the first time he rang me up about wanting to get locally grown beef. I was cynical. I didn’t believe in him. In my defense, I have been hearing about the Department of Education wanting to do this for years and it never quite gets done. But it got done. And it’s because of Napoleon’s quiet efforts that it got done. He cares so much about getting healthy, fresh, tasty meals to the kids and he has the character and courage to ask other people to care, too. For instance when he started coordinating the food service a few years ago only 35 percent of the students ate lunch at the cafeteria, despite the fact that lunches are free because of the high level of poverty in the school’s service area. Now 85 percent of the students eat lunch at school. The best kind of leader takes all of the blame and gives away all the credit, and this is a great example of that kind of leadership. How has he done this? Because he thinks deeply and creatively about serving the students. He thinks about the cultural food preferences of recent immigrants, such as the Marshallese islanders. They prefer to eat bananas green rather than ripe, so he ordered green bananas for them. He adapts traditional Hawaiian and Filipino dishes so that they will fit USDA food guidelines. What motivates him is knowing that “for some of these kids lunch at school is going to be the only healthy meal they get, because their parents are working too many jobs to make home-cooked meals for them.” And Napoleon makes sure that the food tastes good, by pulling aside focus groups of students and adults to taste-test new menu items. The principal of the high school, Dean Cevellos, another key supporter of the Farm-to-School program says, “This is how much my chef cares: We have students that can only eat pureed foods because of their disabilities. He makes sure the cafeteria staff taste every batch before they send it out.” Locally grown: Farm-to-School Korean Bi Bim Bap bowls using local beef and vegetables that were served at the Keaau High School cafeteria.Michelle Galimba Albert Scales is a hero in another way. He says, “All I did was let Napoleon go. He knew what he wanted to do. He’s spent years thinking about this. Iʻm probably going to get in trouble for this later, but we got it done.” The best kind of leader takes all of the blame and gives away all the credit, and this is a great example of that kind of leadership. The truth is that it takes courage and judgment to be an effective administrator. Closing The Circle Big public institutions like the Department of Education have a dead weight of rules and procedures that too often stifle attempts at change. Institutional turf wars can be brutal. Political support for new ideas can be fickle. The work of aligning multiple levels of bureaucracy and political alliances takes very particular skills and experience. And then the courage to trust, to let out the reins, to believe in each other, to not be cynical. What moved me was that everyone understood that this was about building relationships as much as anything — about rebuilding caring, vital relationship between the students and their families through the school through the farmers back to the land. This was about closing the circle and supporting each other in a community. This was about farmers being able to feed the students and students seeing that their food comes from their neighborhood and their neighbors. It was also about a group of people working together to change a system based on the kind of world they want to see. That’s a pretty amazing thing to experience. The post Finding Hawaii Heroes In A School Cafeteria appeared first on Honolulu Civil Beat.

    Civil Beat / 2 d. 17 h. 8 min. ago more
  • These Hawaii Seniors Hang Out In A Warehouse To Spice Up Their LivesThese Hawaii Seniors Hang Out In A Warehouse To Spice Up Their Lives

    Loneliness is a silent killer that affects one in three seniors over the age of 65 — a number that jumps to half for those older than 85, according to a 2015 study on the effects of social isolation. The problem is especially bad for older men, who are 10 percent less likely than women to keep up with extended family and friends, a British study found. Glenn Sears had these facts in mind when he worked with other volunteers to start the Hawaii Men’s Shed Association, a community-based nonprofit aimed at improving senior health through socialization, community involvement and workmanship. Wellness And Welding Every Wednesday and Saturday from 9 a.m. to noon, some of the group’s 47 members assemble in a warehouse on Pier 19 at Honolulu Harbor to tinker and talk story. The interior is like something out of a high school carpentry class: tools lie helter-skelter on all surfaces, bikes and furniture projects are stacked to one side, and the sounds of whirring and banging merge with laughter and conversation. “If you want to come and work you can do that, and if you just want to talk story and drink coffee — you can do that too,” said Jerry Taniyama, 70, the group’s secretary. “We call it a safe zone for seniors.” Members work on projects such as restoring abandoned bicycles and building furniture and playhouses. Some of their products are requested by paying customers, others are donated to charitable organizations. A 2011 Baylor University study found that while women are more likely to socialize through face to face interaction, men are prone to communicating side by side in shared activities. Hence the association’s motto, “shoulder-to-shoulder.” “It isn’t just coming to our own separate spaces and working; we’re helping each other and we’re working together,” said Bob Jewell, 62. “That’s the best part.” “I’ve got friends who have retired and they sit and wait and watch television.” — Mick McAndrews The nonprofit group uses activities like woodworking and welding to create an environment where seniors can get their hands dirty and talk about everything from the weather to the challenges of growing old. “Where else can you discuss your prostate problems?” asked Sears, 83. Studies have found that as men age, especially after retirement, they are more likely to become socially isolated and neglect their health. Social isolation in seniors has been found to be a predictor of early death that surpasses obesity, according to a 2015 study. “We see (problems with) cognitive impairment too, people who are isolated have a higher risk of developing dementia,” said Dr. Jeremy Chun, a geriatrician at Queen’s Medical Center. “Loneliness is a common problem for seniors, unfortunately.” Mick McAndrews, the association’s president, said that most social groups for seniors on the island have mostly female members and engage in activities that he doesn’t connect with, like lei making and line dancing. “I’ve got friends who have retired and they sit and wait and watch television,” said McAndrews, 68. “(The Shed) gives a guy a choice other than just sitting around.” David Horen, left, and Walter Miyashiro share a laugh at the association’s warehouse.Anthony Quintano/Civil Beat Origins Down Under Sears said that he got the idea to start the shed in 2015 after reading a magazine article about the international community-based health initiative. He said that he was looking for a way to continue making things when his wife didn’t want him messing up the house. “When I read the article in the Rotary Club magazine I thought, this is what I’ve been looking for,” said Sears, a retired engineer and engineering professor. The Australian Men’s Shed Association started the movement in 1997 as the result of a medical conference on the health of older men. The Australian government came to the conclusion that a public health outreach effort was needed to remedy the problem of isolation within its older male population, according to Caroline Kunitake, a volunteer grant writer for the Hawaii Men’s Shed Association. The organization has expanded to other countries including Finland, New Zealand and Canada. The Hawaii chapter is the first in the United States. “We’ve got an airline pilot, an attorney, a dentist, a medical practitioner — we’re people from all different walks of life. There’s no status here, we’re all equal.” — Jerry Taniyama All chapters are required to operate as nonprofit community groups. The Hawaii chapter is currently working on two philanthropic projects; one restoring abandoned bikes and donating them, the other a 6-foot wooden playhouse that they plan on giving to a children’s organization on the island. Despite its name and central mission, the group is open to women and young adults. It currently has three female members, one of whom is in her 30s and is considered the “tech expert” of the group. “We’ve got an airline pilot, an attorney, a dentist, a medical practitioner — we’re people from all different walks of life,” Taniyama said. “There’s no status here, we’re all equal.” The Men’s Shed finds members through a craigslist ad and by word of mouth. It’s already in its third temporary location despite only being established in April of 2016. Its last headquarters was in a warehouse near Sand Island and the group has struggled to find a permanent home. “It takes a lot of work to make these spaces ready to work in,” Sears said. “Having a permanent place to stay would be very helpful.” The Shed’s current location was provided by the Department of Transportation’s Harbors Division and is only guaranteed for the next six to 12 months. “They’re really looking for a bigger, long-term facility to work out of,” Kunitake said. Hank Hankins, left, and Rich Sullivan work on a project at the Hawaii Men’s ShedAnthony Quintano/Civil Beat Providing Purpose Hawaii has one of the smallest percentages in the country of kupuna who live alone at about 4 percent, according to data from the University of Hawaii Manoa Center on The Family. While living in a family setting can do a lot to prevent loneliness, having relatives around doesn’t necessarily mean seniors are staying active. “When there’s work I work, otherwise I’d just be around the house feeding my fish,” said David Horen, 70, a member who lives with his wife. “The Men’s Shed gives me purpose.” “Two years ago I had maybe three friends and now I have 30.” — Glenn Sears Ron Berman, 72, sustained back and brain injuries when he fell off a roof on a construction job about five years ago. He had trouble talking and following conversations. “I came here to be with other guys my age and I eventually became able to talk fairly well,” Berman said. “It made me feel like I had a little more hope.” Sears said the quality of his life has improved significantly since starting the Men’s Shed last year. “Two years ago I had maybe three friends and now I have 30,” Sears said. “I feel so much better now than I did a couple of years ago.” The post These Hawaii Seniors Hang Out In A Warehouse To Spice Up Their Lives appeared first on Honolulu Civil Beat.

    Civil Beat / 2 d. 17 h. 8 min. ago more
  • How Will Hawaii Fare Under Federal Tax Changes?How Will Hawaii Fare Under Federal Tax Changes?

    Congressional Republicans’ looming federal tax reform bill could be both good and bad news for Hawaii taxpayers. While most people will get some kind of tax break in the short run, over time the tax cuts could force reductions in federal services, increase the trade deficit and discourage visitor spending. That’s according to Carl Bonham, a professor and director of the University of Hawaii Economic Research Organization. He doesn’t expect the tax cuts to do much for the islands’ economy. Hawaii’s high cost of housing and relatively high state and local taxes mean that limits on deductions for mortgage interest and state taxes could hurt the middle class. And developers say the anticipated corporate tax cuts are already making it harder to finance low-income units. The full details of congressional Republicans’ tax cut plan are expected Friday.Cory Lum/Civil Beat “Some people are calling it tax reform. I like to call it deficit enhancement,” said Bonham, noting that the proposed income tax cuts are temporary while the corporate tax cuts are permanent. “Despite what we’re being told by the proponents of these tax changes, it’s not going to pay for itself. It’s not going to cause huge increases in growth.” President Donald Trump said he wants to give Americans a big tax cut by Christmas, and House and Senate Republicans agreed on a draft Wednesday. The full details are expected out Friday, according to the New York Times. But Republicans still haven’t figured out how to pay for the $2 trillion proposal. Bonham said slashing the corporate tax rate could help the economy in the short term. But he’s not optimistic that Hawaii would see much job growth, given that the state’s unemployment rate already was down to 2.2 percent in October. The state could eventually suffer under the plan because of its dependence on tourism. Bonham said lowering tax rates could increase inflation, which is likely to cause the Federal Reserve to increase interest rates. That would strengthen the dollar and discourage spending by international visitors. New Limits On Deductions Some aspects of the latest version of the congressional tax bill aren’t as bad for Hawaii as previous drafts, Bonham said. Instead of eliminating the federal deduction for payment of state and local taxes, the measure would cap the deduction at $10,000. In 2015, 151,000 Hawaii taxpayers used the state and local tax deduction to reduce their federal tax burden by about $343 million, Gov. David Ige told Civil Beat. Gov. David Ige said the ability to deduct state and local tax payments is important to Hawaii residents.Cory Lum/Civil Beat The latest proposal would also cap the mortgage interest deduction at $750,000 of mortgage debt. Bonham said he interprets that provision to mean that that mortgages higher than $750,000 could deduct interest on that amount, but no higher. That’s a higher threshold than previous versions, but could still affect a lot of Hawaii homeowners given that the median price of a home in Hawaii hit $780,000 earlier this year. The average mortgage interest deduction in Hawaii is $12,752, compared to the national average of $8,612, Ige said. “It’s hard to measure what the impact would be because they’re looking at a number of changes and they’re all interrelated,” the governor said. He added that he hasn’t actually heard much concern from constituents about the bill, but has heard from affordable housing developers like Kevin Carney of EAH Housing. “It’s a nightmare for our industry,” Carney said of the tax bill. The GOP plan could hamper the redevelopment of the Mayor Wright public housing project.Cory Lum/Civil Beat Anticipation of corporate tax cuts has already diminished the value of low-income housing tax credits, which developers sell to investors to finance affordable housing projects. Carney said his organization has already been forced to seek extra money to refinance a low-income rental housing project. If the tax cuts take effect, the tax credits may be even less attractive to investors. It’s unclear whether the final version of the bill would get rid of private activity bonds, a key method for financing low-income projects. Another proposal would eliminate the preference for artists in developments like one of Carney’s projects in Kakaako. Ige said the elimination of private activity bonds could hurt the state’s ability to pay for the redevelopment of the Mayor Wright public housing project. The work is supposed to add thousands of much-needed units, but the loss of the bonds could put more pressure on states to spend millions more to fund low-income projects. ‘Congress Is Really Rushing’ Apart from the specific provisions, Ige took issue with how the tax bill is being crafted. “My biggest concern is that Congress is really rushing through this tax reform bill,” Ige said. Hawaii Congresswoman Colleen Hanabusa, a Democrat, said a bigger concern is how taxpayers will have to pay for the tax cuts down the line. She’s worried they’ll result in cuts to programs like Medicare, Medicaid and Social Security. “What’s critical is that the tax break doesn’t last,” she said. “In a few years it’s going to all expire and it’s the middle class that’s going to end up paying for everything else in between.” If that happens, Bonham said the end result would be simply income redistribution. “That’s what the plan is — effectively raise taxes on your average working person and give that money to a corporation,” he said. The post How Will Hawaii Fare Under Federal Tax Changes? appeared first on Honolulu Civil Beat.

    Civil Beat / 2 d. 17 h. 8 min. ago more
  • Update on state highways projects for Hawaii IslandUpdate on state highways projects for Hawaii Island

    MEDIA RELEASE HONOLULU – Hawaii Department of Transportation (HDOT) Deputy Director for Highways, Ed Sniffen, provided an update today, Dec. 14, 2017, on high visibility current and upcoming highways projects statewide. Video of the update can be found on HDOT’s Facebook page at www.facebook.com/HawaiiDepartm… Keaau-Pahoa Road – Four-lane restriping and Shower Drive Intersection Improvements Work to add a traffic signal at the intersection of Keaau-Pahoa Road (Highway 130) and Shower Drive and the restriping project, which will remove a restricted shoulder lane and add an unrestricted travel lane through restriping from Keaau Town to Shower Drive, will be substantially completed by the beginning of 2018. An update will be sent out at the close of the project to remind Hawaii Island drivers of the changes to the area as well as the reduction of the speed limit to 45 mph (from 55 mph) on Highway 130 between MP 2.3 and 3.7 and between MP 7.4 to 9.9. Queen Kaahumanu Widening, Phase 2 The Queen Kaahumanu Highway Widening Project, Phase 2 to widen the existing two-lane highway to a four-lane divided highway from Kealakehe Parkway to Keahole Airport Access Road is expected to be substantially complete by August 2018. Remaining work on the project includes milling and resurfacing of north bound lanes, pavement extension of the north bound lanes, paving of south bound lanes south of Kealakehe Parkway, construction of swales and median barrier in the south segment, side road transitions, and installation of signage, pavement markings, and landscaping. Queen Kaahumanu Highway Intersection Improvements at Kawaihae Road Bid in December 2017, work expected to begin April 2018 Project will widen the intersection to provide a right-turn lane for northbound Queen Kaahumanu Highway traffic, a right-turn lane for east bound Kawaihae Road traffic, an acceleration lane on Kawaihae Road and lengthening the left-turn lane for west bound Kawaihae Road traffic. Hawaii Island rumble strip projects – HDOT to install rumble strips where possible to provide tactile and audible warning for motorists straying from their lane. Planned rumble strip projects for Hawaii Island are: • Kohala Mountain Road Safety Improvements, MP 7.2 to MP 9.2 Advertised November 2017 Est. Cost $1-5 Million Project will add milled rumble strips to centerline and shoulders, high friction surface treatment, pavement markings, signage, and curve ahead signs and beacons • Mamalahoa Highway Safety Improvements, MP 3.9 to MP 6.9 Will advertise December 2017 Est. Cost $1-5 Million Project will install milled rumble strips in the centerline and shoulders, pavement markings, and signage, and will upgrade guardrails • Queen Kaahumanu Highway Rumble Strip Improvements, Mahaiula to Kawaihae Construction to begin January 2018, estimated completion May 2018 Work includes installation of centerline rumble strips, new pavement markings and striping to enhance lane visibility and will be conducted in five phases to minimize impact to motorists Highways project status can be found at any time on the Highways Program Status Map, which was featured at the news conference. This ESRI-powered map highlights current and upcoming construction projects on state highways as well as data on traffic volumes, traffic fatalities, and road conditions. Data on the state’s 782 bridges will be added to the Highways Program Status Map at the end of the year with construction lane closure information to follow shortly. HDOT also plans to introduce a crowd sourcing app in Spring 2018 that will allow community members to report road issues such as potholes and street lighting outages.

    Hawaii 24/7 / 2 d. 20 h. 2 min. ago more
  • Volcano Watch: Progress can be slow but adds upVolcano Watch: Progress can be slow but adds up

    Geologist examines spatter and ash deposits within Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park along Kīlauea’s southwest rift zone. New understanding of the age of the ash deposits, based on years of careful research, has prompted an important revision of the ages of these surface lava flows. USGS photograph by Tim Orr, November 6, 2015. (Volcano Watch is a weekly article written by scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey’s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory.) Sometimes the days go by and you don’t seem to accomplish much. E-mails, phone calls, paper work, futzing around just aren’t getting you anywhere. Faced with frusUtration, it’s good to stand back, take a deep breath, and examine what has been learned during decades of study of Hawaiian volcanoes. From such perspective, astounding progress has been made, and we at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory have been privileged to be part of the story. Unlike sausage making, the scientific learning process is open to observation, warts and all. Blunders, some rather embarrassing, will be caught, even if made by luminaries. For example, Thomas Jaggar, founder of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, once thought that Kīlauea was older than Mauna Loa, a conclusion quite opposite what we know today. Generally, though, it is not blunders but small errors that are corrected. Even more often, new data or changes in interpretation drive the process forward. Progress is incremental, sometimes two steps forward and one step back or, momentarily, even the reverse. Grand breakthroughs are unusual, plate tectonics being an example. With that said, where do we stand today with big-picture knowledge of Kīlauea and Mauna Loa acquired in the past few decades? Hawaiian volcanoes seem to remain active for several hundred thousand, perhaps a million, years. Mauna Loa is well into its life span and will, eventually, be replaced by Lōʻihi, now a large and growing seamount south of the island. Kīlauea probably has more years ahead of it than behind, starting perhaps 300,000 years ago. The two volcanoes formed along different curving but parallel lines, the Loa and Kea trends, that erupt chemically different magma. This was recognized in the 19th century as a geometric pattern but was not identified chemically until the last half of the 20th century. Giant submarine landslides, first recognized in the early 1960s, have peeled away from the west side of Mauna Loa, most recently about 105,000 years ago. No such giant slides are known at Kīlauea The south or southeast flanks of both volcanoes are continuously moving southeastward a few centimeters a year owing to volcano spreading. Gravity is the principal cause, aided by intrusion of magma into rift zones. The summit of each volcano sits atop a poorly understood pathway that transports magma upward from a melting site 100 km (62 miles) deep in the Earth’s mantle. A shallow reservoir system 2-5 km (1-3 miles) deep caps this pathway, and magma moves from there upward to the surface or into the rift zones that sprout laterally from the reservoir. Most eruptions produce lava flows, a fact long known, but each volcano has violent explosive eruptions triggered by pent-up magmatic gas or steam from heated groundwater. Explosive eruptions are not unusual over a time horizon of centuries and need consideration in long-term planning. These findings, far from exhaustive, are awfully impressive. All were acquired since the late 1950s and took major effort to amass the necessary evidence. They result from research. Whether at a university or a volcano observatory, research is needed to better understand volcanism. The science can’t stand pat, arrogantly assuming that it already knows enough to suit society’s needs. To improve, we must always learn more. Here are some important questions about Mauna Loa and Kīlauea that we can’t yet answer. What are the details of melting in the mantle, and why does the supply rate of magma from the mantle to the shallow plumbing system change over time? What will cause the next giant landslide from Mauna Loa and, perhaps, the first from Kīlauea? Can we develop a way to determine how long an eruption, once underway, will last? Can the next explosive eruption be predicted? How large will it be? A new concept for Kīlauea is that periods dominated by explosive activity last centuries and alternate with periods of similar length dominated by lava flows. If so, when will the next explosive period start at Kīlauea? What clues might foretell it? When will it end? Such questions drive research—with progress inevitable, if at times frustratingly slow.

    Hawaii 24/7 / 3 d. 0 h. 11 min. ago more
  • Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for December 14, 2017Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for December 14, 2017

    Time-lapse thermal image movie of Halemaumau Overlook Vent. December 7-14, 2017. Images courtesy of USGS/HVO Time-lapse movie of Halemaumau Overlook Vent. December 7-14, 2017. Images courtesy of USGS/HVO Time-lapse movie of Halemaʻumaʻu Overlook Vent from Hawaiian Volcano Observatory. December 7-14, 2017. Images courtesy of USGS/HVO Time-lapse movie of Kīlauea Caldera from Hawaiian Volcano Observatory. December 7-14, 2017. Images courtesy of USGS/HVO (Activity updates are written by scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey’s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory.) This past week, Kīlauea Volcano’s summit lava lake level generally rose in concert with summit inflation, ranging from about 50 to 30 m (98–162 ft) below the vent rim. On the East Rift Zone, the 61g lava flow remained active downslope of Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō, with scattered breakouts on the pali and coastal plain. The ocean entry remained inactive. The 61g flows do not pose an immediate threat to nearby communities. Mauna Loa is not erupting. Small-magnitude earthquakes continue to occur beneath the summit caldera and upper Southwest Rift Zone at depths less than 5 km (3 mi). A few deeper earthquakes were scattered beneath the volcano’s southeast and west flanks at depths of 5–13 km (3–8 mi). GPS and InSAR measurements continue to show slow deformation related to inflation of a magma reservoir beneath the summit and upper Southwest Rift Zone. Overall, rates of seismicity and deformation have decreased. No significant changes in volcanic gas emissions were measured. There were 3 events with 3 or more felt reports in the Hawaiian Islands during the past week. On December 13, 2017 at 07:09 a.m. HST, a magnitude-2.8 earthquake occurred 3 km (2 mi) NW of Honaunau-Napoopoo at 13 km (8 mi) depth. On December 11, 2017 at 06:39 a.m. HST, a magnitude-2.7 earthquake occurred 9 km (6 mi) SSE of Volcano at 8 km (5 mi) depth. On December 10, 2017 at 02:13 p.m. HST, a magnitude-2.5 earthquake occurred 3 km (2 mi) ESE of Leilani Estates at 2 km (1 mi) depth. Time-lapse movie of Pu’u ‘O’o Crater. December 7-14, 2017. Images courtesy of USGS/HVO Time-lapse movie from a camera positioned on the southeast flank of Puʻu ʻŌʻō, looking toward the active flow advancing to the southeast. The breakout point is at the left edge of the image, and the mid-field skyline at the right is roughly coincident with the top of the pali. December 7-14, 2017. Images courtesy of USGS/HVO Time-lapse image movie from a research camera positioned on Holei Pali, looking east towards Lava Flow 61G and Kalapana. December 7-14, 2017. Images courtesy of USGS/HVO This map is similar to the map above but shows a thermal map over the Episode 61g lava flow. Cooler colors (blue and green) show cooled, inactive portions of the flow surface. Hot colors (red and orange) show areas of active surface breakouts.The thermal map was constructed by stitching many overlapping oblique thermal images collected by a handheld thermal camera during a helicopter overflight of the flow field. This map shows recent changes to Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone lava flow field. The area of the active flow field as of November 22 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the active flow as of December 12 is shown in red. Older Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows (1983–2016) are shown in gray. The yellow line is the trace of the active lava tubes; based on the lack of activity in the lower reaches of the flow field, a portion of the main lava tube leading to the ocean may contain little or no moving lava, but it is still quite hot to the thermal camera. The Kamokuna ocean entry is inactive.The blue lines over the Puʻu ʻŌʻō flow field are steepest-descent paths calculated from a 2013 digital elevation model (DEM), while the blue lines on the rest of the map are steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 DEM (for calculation details, see pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth’s surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. The base map is a partly transparent 1:24,000-scale USGS digital topographic map draped over the 1983 10-m digital elevation model (DEM).

    Hawaii 24/7 / 3 d. 0 h. 17 min. ago more
  • Police investigate Ka‘u man found dead Thursday (Dec 14)Police investigate Ka‘u man found dead Thursday (Dec 14)

    MEDIA RELEASE Hawaiʻi Island police are investigating the death of a 42-year-old man in the Kaʻū district. At about 7:37 p.m., Tuesday evening, (December 12), police received a call of an unresponsive man located within a residence located on Catamaran Lane in the Hawaiian Ocean View Estates subdivision. Upon arrival to the scene, medics with the Hawaiʻi Fire Department determined the male was deceased. The man sustained several injuries that appeared to be suspicious. Detectives from the Area II Criminal Investigation Section responded to the scene to continue the investigation. Preliminary results of an autopsy performed this morning, (December 14), failed to identify an exact cause of death, with no signs of foul play. The pathologist has deferred her determination as to the cause of death until the toxicology results are received. The victim has been identified as 42-year-old Zachariah Sugrue of Hawaiian Ocean View Estates. The case has been classified as a coroner’s inquest. Police ask anyone who had recent contact with the victim or anyone with information regarding this investigation to contact Detective Pernell Hanoa with the Area II Criminal Investigation Section via email at Pernell.Hanoa@hawaiicounty.gov or at (808) 326-4646 ext. 281.

    Hawaii 24/7 / 3 d. 1 h. 50 min. ago more
  • Consent to kids at heart of gay Hawaii couple's child support case - Santa Rosa Press DemocratConsent to kids at heart of gay Hawaii couple's child support case - Santa Rosa Press Democrat

    Santa Rosa Press DemocratConsent to kids at heart of gay Hawaii couple's child support caseSanta Rosa Press DemocratKANEOHE, Hawaii — Attorneys for a divorced lesbian couple fighting over child support in a closely watched case agreed Thursday that consent to having a baby together is a crucial issue but disagreed over whether both spouses gave it. A woman wants to ...Hawaii case draws attention to same-sex child support issuesNBCNews.comHawaii Supreme Court must affirm equality of same-sex parents.Slate Magazine (blog)all 9 news articles »

    Google News / 3 d. 2 h. 52 min. ago more
  • Hasinger leaving UH Institute of Astronomy for the European Space AgencyHasinger leaving UH Institute of Astronomy for the European Space Agency

    MEDIA RELEASE Günther Hasinger University of Hawaiʻi Institute for Astronomy (IfA) Director Günther Hasinger is leaving UH to be the next director of science at the European Space Agency (ESA), Europe’s equivalent to NASA. He will be responsible for the definition, planning and execution of ESA’s science program, which includes working with member countries and international partners like the United States. Hasinger has been with the university since 2011. “I am extremely honored to have been part of the IfA ʻohana and to have worked with such a talented and dedicated group of people,” said Hasinger, who will be based in Spain and will be closer to his family, including his first grandchild. “I look forward to future partnerships between ESA, NASA and the ground-based observatories, especially those here in Hawaiʻi.” UH will name an interim director for IfA and begin the search for a new director. During his tenure, Hasinger led the institute during the ongoing TMT process and regularly represented the university during the proceedings. He also oversaw many significant advances at IfA. The Pan-STARRS1 telescope on Haleakalā, Maui, came into full operation, eventually producing the world’s foremost sky survey, and becoming the world leader in the detection of asteroids, comets and near-Earth objects. Hasinger also helped shepherd the transfer to UH of the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope and James Clerk Maxwell Telescope on Maunakea. The Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope, also on Haleakalā, drew close to completion during his tenure. Lasting changes to IfA’s education and outreach programs were also made under his leadership. The institute and the UH Mānoa College of Natural Sciences developed a new undergraduate degree program, offering a BA in astronomy and a BS in astrophysics. IfA also worked with the Maunakea observatory community to significantly expand public outreach, including development of the Maunakea Scholars program. IfA now organizes more than 200 events annually, reaching 25,000 people across the state.

    Hawaii 24/7 / 3 d. 4 h. 46 min. ago more
  • Hawaii Supreme Court: Christopher Deedy Can Go On Trial For A Third TimeHawaii Supreme Court: Christopher Deedy Can Go On Trial For A Third Time

    Christopher Deedy, a U.S. State Department special agent who shot and killed Kollin Elderts on Nov. 5, 2011, can be put on trial for a third time, according to a decision issued Thursday by the Hawaii Supreme Court. Deedy faced two criminal trials in which the Honolulu Prosecuting Attorney’s Office charged him with murder for the death of Elderts, who is from Kailua. But both times the trials ended with deadlocked juries. Special Agent Christopher Deedy, seen here in 2014, could face a third trial for manslaughter.PF Bentley/Civil Beat Honolulu prosecuting attorney Keith Kaneshiro said he was “gratified” by the ruling, and that he would pursue a third trial of Deedy. The Supreme Court’s decision was not unanimous. Associate Justice Paula Nakayama issued a dissenting opinion saying that pursing charges for a third time is “patently unfair.” The case stems from an early morning fight between Deedy and Elderts inside a Waikiki restaurant. Deedy was in Honolulu as part of a diplomatic security detail for the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation conference, while Elderts, a 23-year-old from Kailua, had gone to Waikiki to celebrate his birthday. Related Can a White Federal Agent Who Killed a Hawaii Local Get a Fair Trial? June 18, 2012 Honolulu Prosecutor: Deedy Will Face New Murder Charge August 28, 2013 At What Point Is Killing Another Man Considered Self-Defense in Hawaii? August 2, 2013 Their paths crossed inside a McDonald’s on Kuhio Avenue after a night of bar-hopping with friends. Prosecutors say Deedy was drunk and the one who instigated a fight with Elderts. Deedy and his attorneys, on the other hand, said he was sticking up for others who were being bullied by Elderts and acting in self-defense once he was attacked. Deedy was indicted by the Honolulu Prosecuting Attorney’s Office in 2011 on a charge of second-degree murder and using a firearm in the commission of a felony. When he went on trial in the summer of 2013, Circuit Court Judge Karen Ahn didn’t allow the jury to consider a lesser charge of manslaughter, saying she “didn’t think there was any evidence to support manslaughter anyway.” The jury deadlocked in the case, resulting in a mistrial. In 2014, prosecutors again pursued a murder charge against Deedy. But when the jurors went into deliberations, Ahn, who was again presiding over the case, allowed them to consider lesser charges of reckless manslaughter and assault. Related Podcast BREAKING: Hawaii Supreme Court rules that Christopher Deedy should be tried a third time in connection to the 2011 death of Kollin Elderts. Need background? Listen to @OffshorePodcast Season One, “A Killing in Waikiki.” https://t.co/ud9s73qcfg pic.twitter.com/Btgli1fful — Offshore (@OffshorePodcast) December 14, 2017 This time the jury acquitted Deedy of second-degree murder and deadlocked on all the other offenses. Ahn left the door open, however, for the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office to pursue a third trial against Deedy on the lesser charges. Deedy filed motions to get the case dismissed, which Ahn denied. He then appealed to the Hawaii Supreme Court, saying, among other things, that a third trial would be double jeopardy. He also argued that it would violate the Supremacy Clause, which protects federal agents from being prosecuted in state court for doing their job. Deedy’s attorney, Thomas Otake, said Thursday he would appeal the state Supreme Court decision through the federal system. The legal team has not yet decided whether to start with federal district court or go directly to the U.S. Supreme Court, Otake said. Deedy’s attorney, Thomas Otake, criticized the Supreme Court ruling at a press conference Thursday.Cory Lum/Civil Beat He criticized the effort to prosecute Deedy a third time on manslaughter charges, especially since prosecutors have already said publicly that the evidence doesn’t support it. “We believe it’s misconduct of the worst kind,” Otake said.  The federal courts will consider constitutional issues that have not been at play in the state proceedings, he said.  In the meantime, Deedy’s attorneys will try to stay the third trial until a final resolution in federal court, which could take years. Otake said he had spoken with Deedy. “He’s obviously disappointed and looking forward to putting this behind him,” Otake said. Prosecutor Keith Kaneshiro held his own press conference to discuss a third trial for Deedy.Cory Lum/Civil Beat Kaneshiro said it was not unusual to try a case three times, and recalled doing it himself in a murder case. He declined to discuss evidence or how a new manslaughter trial might differ. Regardless of any federal proceedings , the state trial court will decide the timeline, he said. He expects a status conference soon. Kaneshiro declined to estimate the cost of retrying the case, saying, “We don’t put a cost to achieving justice.” What’s important, he said, is that there’s a legal and factual basis for a retrial. “We should not get caught up and lose that message.” Deedy’s lawyers submitted multiple arguments to the Supreme Court for why a third trial would constitute double jeopardy. They also argued unsuccessfully that Deedy should have been immune from state prosecution because he was acting under his authority as a federal agent when he shot Elderts. Deedy was off duty at the time of the shooting, and failed to explain “… how a night of socializing and drinking alcoholic beverages in Waikiki with friends was part of his ‘official duties’ as a State Department agent,” according to the court opinion issued Thursday. In her dissenting opinion, Nakayama wrote: In other words, the State unambiguously argued during the first and second trials that there was no rational basis in the evidence to support a conviction of reckless manslaughter. Yet, in defense of its opportunity to try the case a third time, the State completely flipped its position, and argued that there is a rational basis in the evidence to support a conviction of reckless manslaughter.” Editor’s note: Civil Beat examined the death of Kollin Elderts and Deedy’s first two trials in season one of Offshore. The 10-episode podcast series also looks at national issues surrounding use of force, Hawaii history and race relations.  Read the Supreme Court decision and Associate Justice Paula Nakayama’s dissenting opinion: The post Hawaii Supreme Court: Christopher Deedy Can Go On Trial For A Third Time appeared first on Honolulu Civil Beat.

    Civil Beat / 3 d. 4 h. 53 min. ago more
  • California Lawmakers Propose Health Coverage for ImmigrantsCalifornia Lawmakers Propose Health Coverage for Immigrants

    SACRAMENTO, CALIF. - California, flush with cash from an expanding economy, would eventually spend $1 billion a year to provide health care to immigrants living in the state illegally under a proposa

    Big News Network.com / 3 d. 8 h. 4 min. ago
  • Consent To Kids At Heart Of Gay Couple’s Child Support CaseConsent To Kids At Heart Of Gay Couple’s Child Support Case

     (AP) — Attorneys for a divorced lesbian couple fighting over child support in a closely watched case agreed Thursday that consent to having a baby together is a crucial issue but disagreed over whether both spouses gave it. A woman wants to sever her parental rights to a child her ex-wife gave birth to while she was deployed with the military and is asking the Hawaii Supreme Court to overturn a family court ruling denying that request.The justices heard arguments Thursday and seemed troubled by considering consent. Associate Justice Sabrina McKenna said that could lead to treating same-sex couples differently from opposite-sex couples. This is likely the first time such a case has come before a state supreme court.Cory Lum/Civil Beat National gay rights advocates are watching how the dispute plays out, likely the first such case before a state supreme court, experts say. The woman seeking to end her parental rights didn’t agree to her then-wife getting pregnant through a sperm donor, wasn’t there for the baby’s birth and never had a meaningful relationship with the child, her attorney, Rebecca Copeland, told the justices.The dispute reflects the “changing landscape” of families in Hawaii, Copeland said, adding that the state’s laws need to change. “They jointly made a choice as a married couple to bring him into this world,” argued Peter Renn of prominent LGBT-rights group Lambda Legal, which is representing the woman who gave birth. When discussing consent, the justices explored a variety of hypothetical situations, including a woman who stops taking birth control without her husband’s knowledge and a man disputing his parental rights after finding out his wife had a child by having an affair with another man. Chief Justice Mark Recktenwald said the court will issue a ruling later. The couple, who are not identified in the confidential family court case, married in Washington, D.C., in 2013 and moved to Hawaii because of military orders for the woman seeking to end her parental rights. Throughout the marriage, the couple talked about the possibility of having a child together, the court said. While the woman was deployed between January and September 2015, her wife got pregnant. The woman filed for divorce in October 2015, and the child was born while it was pending. The family court denied her petition because it found that Hawaii’s Uniform Parentage Act and Marriage Equality Act presumes that a legal spouse of a woman who gives birth to a baby is the parent of that child, regardless of the spouse’s gender. “This is a very important and of-the-moment question in the LGBT community right now, which is how are states going to treat parents of children where there are a same-sex marriage couple,” said Cathy Sakimura, family law director for the National Center for Lesbian Rights, which is not involved in the case. “Are they going to give them the same kind of recognition that any other couple would get or are they going to have a different rule applied to them?” Sakimura said. There are a handful of similar cases nationwide, but the Hawaii dispute is likely the first involving a same-sex married couple with a child support case before a state’s highest court, she said. Most same-sex parental rights cases involve a spouse who didn’t give birth to a child and wants custody, Sakimura said. “It doesn’t happen that often in the same-sex parenting world, but there are few cases where they are trying to avoid child support,” she said. In such cases, conception is a key question, Sakimura said. “Did the spouse consent to the procedure and know about it? And that is what triggers them being a parent,” she said. The case will test marriage equality, Renn with Lambda Legal has said. “This is unusual in that biology is being used as a shield to evade parental obligation,” he said. “Equal rights come with equal responsibility.” Arguments were held in a high school auditorium because the case is being used to teach students about courts. The post Consent To Kids At Heart Of Gay Couple’s Child Support Case appeared first on Honolulu Civil Beat.

    Civil Beat / 3 d. 10 h. 33 min. ago more
  • Civil Beat Poll: Voters Just Say No To Legalizing Recreational MarijuanaCivil Beat Poll: Voters Just Say No To Legalizing Recreational Marijuana

    A new Civil Beat poll shows a clear generational divide when it comes to legalizing recreational marijuana use. Sixty-one percent of registered voters 50 and older don’t want the state to permit recreational use of marijuana, while just 33 percent favor the idea. But exactly 50 percent of voters younger than 50 support it, while 38 percent oppose it. “Age is everything on this,” said Matt Fitch, executive director of Merriman River Group, which conducted the poll. “Ethnicity a little bit too. Caucasians favor it more than Japanese. But, with age, it’s going to reach a tipping point sooner or later.” if("undefined"==typeof window.datawrapper)window.datawrapper={};window.datawrapper["U8iSn"]={},window.datawrapper["U8iSn"].embedDeltas={"100":492,"200":446,"300":423,"400":423,"500":400,"600":400,"700":400,"800":400,"900":400,"1000":400},window.datawrapper["U8iSn"].iframe=document.getElementById("datawrapper-chart-U8iSn"),window.datawrapper["U8iSn"].iframe.style.height=window.datawrapper["U8iSn"].embedDeltas[Math.min(1e3,Math.max(100*Math.floor(window.datawrapper["U8iSn"].iframe.offsetWidth/100),100))]+"px",window.addEventListener("message",function(a){if("undefined"!=typeof a.data["datawrapper-height"])for(var b in a.data["datawrapper-height"])if("U8iSn"==b)window.datawrapper["U8iSn"].iframe.style.height=a.data["datawrapper-height"][b]+"px"}); Overall, 55 percent of respondents oppose legalizing pot while 36 percent support it. Only 6 percent said it doesn’t matter and just 3 percent said they are unsure. Young people in Hawaii generally “do not make their voice heard, and so Hawaii’s politics and policy are dominated by the older voters that vote,” said Fitch. The poll, conducted Nov. 27-29, surveyed 843 registered voters statewide, 70 percent on landlines and 30 percent with cellphones. Its margin of error is plus or minus 3.4 percent. This week Civil Beat is reporting on how voters feel about issues that have been considered by the Legislature in recent years and could come up again as soon as the next session that starts in Janaury. Our coverage concludes Friday when we measure interest in having a lottery. ‘Not A Horrible Thing’ Among the poll respondents who oppose legalizing recreational use of majijuana is Janice Flachsbart, 63, of Kaneohe. “I don’t really have strong feelings about it, but when the answer is either ‘yes’ or ‘no,’ I generally don’t think that that form of drug needs to be available to the people without any restraints or ways of curbing its use,” she said. Flachsbart does recognize there are opposing viewpoints. “It’s not such a terrible thing,” she said. “Alcohol is legal, prescription drugs are legal, and all sorts of things you can get your hands on do much more damage and are legal. I guess it would not be such a horrible thing, but ‘yes’ or ‘no,’ I lean more to no.” if("undefined"==typeof window.datawrapper)window.datawrapper={};window.datawrapper["8rt8e"]={},window.datawrapper["8rt8e"].embedDeltas={"100":595,"200":486,"300":446,"400":423,"500":423,"600":423,"700":400,"800":400,"900":400,"1000":400},window.datawrapper["8rt8e"].iframe=document.getElementById("datawrapper-chart-8rt8e"),window.datawrapper["8rt8e"].iframe.style.height=window.datawrapper["8rt8e"].embedDeltas[Math.min(1e3,Math.max(100*Math.floor(window.datawrapper["8rt8e"].iframe.offsetWidth/100),100))]+"px",window.addEventListener("message",function(a){if("undefined"!=typeof a.data["datawrapper-height"])for(var b in a.data["datawrapper-height"])if("8rt8e"==b)window.datawrapper["8rt8e"].iframe.style.height=a.data["datawrapper-height"][b]+"px"}); Shea Baker, 28, of Honolulu, leans the other way. “Me, personally, I don’t do drugs, I can’t do drugs,” said Baker, who serves in the U.S. Marine Corps. “But I think there is an overwhelming amount of evidence that supports the more liberal approach — that it has proven medical qualities that make it a good alternative for a lot of people who are responsible adults.” Baker added, “I don’t think I have ever seen someone smoke a joint and get violent and punch someone in the face. But I can tell you countless stories of people getting drunk and punching someone in the face.” Baker said smoked marijuana “back in high school and college,” while Flachsbart said she tried marijuana “many years ago.” Recreational marijuana use in Hawaii is illegal, and poll results suggest a majority of voters want to keep it that way.Flickr.com/cagrimmett If pot was legal for personal use, and taxed and regulated, Baker believes it could change people’s opinions. “I think that, by and large, my generation tends to look at a lot of things that may have been taboo for their parents,” he said. “I think we like to have an open and honest discussion of the pros and cons.” Flachsbart, however, does not believe that legalizing pot to make it a source of tax revenue is the way to go. “You always have to be careful how you are making money,” she said. “For example, gambling. I would never support that here, even though it might bring money in. I do not want our state to rely on money from marijuana and gambling.” Rising Green Tide? Bills seeking to decriminalize or legalize the possession of marijuana are often introduced at the Hawaii Legislature. They always die, many times without a hearing. Four measures were introduced in the House during the 2017 session and went nowhere. It was the same story for eight in the Senate. The proposals included legislation to: decriminalize possession of 1 ounce or less of pot; allow possession and distribution of marijuana for personal use, so long as the amount did not exceed 1 ounce and was used for private, personal or recreational purposes by people 21 years of age and above; authorize counties to adopt ordinances to legalize marijuana cultivation, possession, sale, transfer and use, for persons over 21; require the Legislative Reference Bureau to study “various effects” that the legalization of pot has had on other states; and require the Department of Public Safety to reassess the classification of marijuana as a Schedule I drug under state law and to report its findings to the Legislature. All five of those proposals carry over to the 2018 session that begins in January. The Legislature did pass a bill last session that reclassified drug paraphernalia possession and delivery offenses from felonies to violations subject to a fine of no more than $500. Nationally, a green tide appears to be rising. Governing magazine reports that 29 states and the District of Columbia currently have laws “broadly legalizing marijuana in some form.” It notes: Seven states and the District of Columbia have adopted the most expansive laws legalizing marijuana for recreational use. Most recently, California, Massachusetts, Maine and Nevada all passed measures in November (2016) legalizing recreational marijuana. State Sen. Will Espero, a candidate for lieutenant governor in 2018, believes marijuana will be legal in four to five years. He, too, considers it is a generational issue. “I think it’s an argument worth having, especially when we see medical marijuana dispensaries becoming mainstream in health care, to a degree,” he said. “Decriminalizing for adult use and highly regulating it and taxing it, from that perspective, I think we could get more support.” State Sen. Will Espero speaking in the Senate chamber in August. He believes Hawaii will allow some form of recreational marijuana use within five years.Cory Lum/Civil Beat Creating a steady revenue stream for the state could make the difference, Espero said. “I think the discussion, when we have it, will be driven by the need for tax revenue,” he said. “Do you want to raise the general excise tax, or raise property taxes? Where are you going to find another source of revenue?” Related Cory Lum/Civil Beat Civil Beat Poll: Let’s Have A Constitutional Convention December 11, 2017 Cory Lum/Civil Beat Civil Beat Poll: Power To The People — Voters Want More Control December 12, 2017 Anthony Quintano/Civil Beat Civil Beat Poll: Support Is Still Strong For Medical Aid In Dying December 13, 2017 Espero figures legalizing pot could result in tens of millions of dollars annually for Hawaii, especially when the tourism market is factored in. But many obstacles remain. In 2013, then-House Speaker Joe Souki introduced the Personal Use of Marijuana Act, which would have allowed adults 21 years of age and older to possess up to an ounce of marijuana “and to cultivate a limited number of marijuana plants in a secure and locked location,” according to Hawaii News Now. Opponents included the Coalition for a Drug-Free Hawaii and the Honolulu Police Department, which cautioned against the possible social cost of people using pot as a gateway to harder drugs. The bill was never heard. The Civil Beat Poll Dec. 2017 — Recreational Marijuana: The post Civil Beat Poll: Voters Just Say No To Legalizing Recreational Marijuana appeared first on Honolulu Civil Beat.

    Civil Beat / 3 d. 17 h. 8 min. ago more
  • How Will Hawaiian Airlines Weather Its Big Transition In 2018?How Will Hawaiian Airlines Weather Its Big Transition In 2018?

    Hawaiian Airlines faces a watershed year in 2018. The company has a new chief executive coming in. It’s forged a new long-term contract with its pilots. The bulk of a new fleet of Airbus jets is scheduled to roll in. And the competitive landscape is shifting, with the demise of the interisland carrier Island Air and the impending arrival of Southwest Airlines, the low-cost carrier known for bringing ticket prices down in markets where it operates. So what’s next year’s big story for Hawaii’s major airline? With a new chief executive, a new fleet of planes, and new competition from Southwest Airlines, Hawaiian Airlines faces a big year in 2018.Cory Lum/Civil Beat “I think it’s pretty much all of the above,” said Mark Dunkerley, Hawaiian’s chief executive, who plans to step down in March. “What the team has done over the last half dozen years is we have established a kind of a business model, and we’ve got things absolutely on the right track.” It is hard to overstate Hawaiian’s importance to Hawaii’s economy. Some 92 percent of the company’s nearly 6,700 employees live in the state, Dunkerley said. And the company is Hawaii’s No. 1 air carrier, transporting approximately 25 percent of the nearly 10 million passengers who flew to Hawaii in 2016. Hawaiian’s investment in nearly 20 new Airbus A321neo airplanes to be delivered over the next couple of years is enormous. “We can’t discuss individual prices of the airplanes,” Dunkerley said. “But I think what’s interesting about it is if you look at the total order book of Hawaiian Airlines over the last several years, it represents an investment in this community that exceeds any other private or public investment in our community.” “We as a private enterprise will invest more in Hawaii’s economic well-being than the cost of the Honolulu rail, for example,” he said. The new, smaller planes will let Hawaiian fly routes year-round that it now flies seasonally, said Peter Ingram, Hawaiian’s chief commercial officer who assumes Dunkerley’s chief executive mantle in March. Hawaiian Airlines chief executive Mark Dunkerley, left, in March will turn over the company’s reins to Peter Ingram, Hawaiian’s chief commercial officer.Cory Lum/Civil Beat “We’ve got a couple of seasonal flights between Oakland and Los Angeles and the neighbor islands that we’re now capable of serving year round because we’ve got an airplane that’s the right size for the demand throughout the year,” Ingram said. “And there’s some stuff that we have planned for further into 2018 we haven’t announced yet.” The company also recently announced daily non-stop service between Maui and San Diego in the new planes, starting in May. With the new Airbus jets – 11 are scheduled for delivery next year – Hawaiian is also bringing new jobs. The company expects to add about 450 local jobs next year, a roughly 7 percent increase in its workforce, Dunkerley said. The job growth is nothing new, Ingram said. “Really the story is that that’s a continuation of a trend that has been going on here for well over a decade,” he said. Will Southwest Bring Fares Down? One of the first big challenges facing Ingram may be how to combat a new player. Southwest Airlines in October announced plans to start serving Hawaii. And although the Dallas-based carrier has been tight-lipped about its plans, one question is whether Hawaii travelers will benefit from generally lower fares — something known as the “Southwest Effect.” According to an August 2017 paper by Alan Beckenstein of the University of Virginia’s Darden School of Business, average market fares are $45 lower when Southwest serves a market nonstop than when it doesn’t, and Southwest produces $9.1 billion annually in domestic consumer fare savings. “A few industry writers have questioned whether the Southwest Effect still exists today, or has it been overtaken by the fares/traffic effect created by other low cost carriers,” wrote Beckenstein and his co-author, Brian M. Campbell. “The answer is clear. The Southwest Effect is alive and well.” Still, Dunkerley and Ingram both said Southwest wouldn’t affect the Hawaii market much because Hawaii already is served by numerous airlines. “The Southwest Effect occurs mainly in markets where prices are not competitive to begin with,” Dunkerley said. “It’s typically one carrier serving it. They charge very high prices. I think when you look at the Hawaii market, we have very competitive prices. Southwest is just going to be another airline amongst half a dozen or more that are going to enter the market.” Southwest won’t share its plans beyond saying it plans to start flying from California some time in 2018, but Ingram said the carrier invariably will end up flying routes where competition is already stiff. Scott McMurren, an aviation analyst and travel columnist for the Anchorage Daily News, isn’t so sure the Hawaii won’t see the Southwest Effect. “To answer your question, Will Hawaiian reduce their fares? I promise they will,” McMurren said. “And I’ll give you $100 if they don’t.” “I don’t think anybody thinks the current airport infrastructure is adequate to the needs of today let alone prospectively for tomorrow.” — Mark Dunkerley, chief executive, Hawaiian Airlines As for the bankruptcy of Island Air, Dunkerley said Hawaiian seeks to serve Hawaii’s transportation needs at fares that cover its costs while staying competitive. And that isn’t likely to change much, he said. Dunkerley likened the current situation to periods when Hawaiian was competing for interisland business with carriers like defunct Aloha and Mesa Airlines’ short-lived Go! “If you look back and see how our behavior has changed over all these different eras you’ll find there’s not been much change at all,” Dunkerley said. Although Hawaiian’s stock has seen stellar growth over the past several years, 2017 has been something a roller coaster. Shares of Hawaiian’s parent, Hawaiian Holdings Inc., were trading at $40 on Tuesday, around 33 percent lower than its share price last December, when the stock reached an all-time high of about $60 per share. Hawaiian was trading at less than $6 a share in October 2013. Adam Levine-Weinberg, an analyst with the Motely Fool investment news site, wrote in a recent column that Hawaiian has been punished recently because of worries about its ability to fend off competition from carriers like Southwest. But Levine-Weinberg said the stock is a good buy because of the company’s solid earnings. Hawaiian reported net income of $191.9 million on operating revenue of just more than $2 billion for the first nine months of 2017, down from net income of $233.5 million on about $1.8 billion in revenue for the same period in 2016. Although the company increased revenue from passengers by 11 percent for the first nine months, the increase was largely offset by higher fuel and labor costs. Hawaiian reported earnings per share of $3.59 for the first nine months of 2017 versus $4.37 last year. Reforming Airport Management As Dunkerley winds down his remarkable 15-year career at Hawaiian, which included turning Hawaiian around following a Chapter 11 bankruptcy reorganization in 2005, he said he plans to stay in touch with Hawaii. Dunkerley said he needs to care for family matters that he simply can’t attend to while running a large airline. He said he has no regrets. “Like anybody, you know, I wish we were faster to do all the things that were successful, and I wish we hadn’t done things that turned out not to be successful,” he said. “But you know as a commercial enterprise we’re a for-risk enterprise, and I think we did things in a very sensible, organized, thoughtful way. Some of them didn’t work out. More did work out than didn’t. And I think that’s about as well as anybody can hope for.” Dunkerly says he does not plan on “walking away” from Hawaii after he steps down in March.Cory Lum/Civil Beat As for his future in Hawaii, Dunkerly said he plans to remain part of the community. “I don’t see myself sort of closing the door and walking away,” he said. One area Dunkerley may stay involved with is a proposal to establish a public corporation to manage Hawaii’s airports. “I don’t think anybody thinks the current airport infrastructure is adequate to the needs of today let alone prospectively for tomorrow,” he said. “So I don’t think that is an issue of controversy anywhere in this community at all.” “The question really isn’t how we got here; it’s what we’re going to do about it going forward,” he added. “I think there is broad support for the notion that an Airport Corporation would be a more effective way of managing the infrastructure of the state’s airports.” As for Ingram, he said a main priority for 2018 is to keep executing the plan that he and Dunkerley have laid out. ”I’m blessed that we’ve got a great frontline team that does terrific work every day keeping the airline on time but also making sure they serve our guests with care and hospitality that distinguishes us,” he said. The post How Will Hawaiian Airlines Weather Its Big Transition In 2018? appeared first on Honolulu Civil Beat.

    Civil Beat / 3 d. 17 h. 8 min. ago more
  • Do You Even Know Who Your Leaders Are?Do You Even Know Who Your Leaders Are?

    Representation — what does it mean to be represented by others? Well, it means they are looking out for your interests and speaking on your behalf. Are you even clear on what your interests are? Maybe, maybe not. Do these people represent you? Do you even know who they are? Let’s begin by seeing if you actually know who is currently representing you. Do you know who speaks on your behalf in the House of Representatives in Washington, D.C.? Well, it’s either Colleen Hanabusa or Tulsi Gabbard. Did you know that Hanabusa will not be running for re-election in 2018? (She’s running for governor.) Do you know who is running for that open seat? How about in the United States Senate? It’s Mazie Hirono and Brian Schatz. How about at the state level? Who is your representative in the state House? Who is your state senator? It’s just a click away: The official website of the state helps inform the electorate. Did you know that you also have a county council member? What issues are discussed and voted on at each of these levels of government? You probably know who the president is, and governor and mayor, right? Now that all of that is out of the way, and you know who represents you, do you know what they stand for? Do you have any idea who is voting against a $15 minimum wage in Hawaii? Is it your representative or state senator? Why hasn’t Hawaii passed a law mandating buffer zones on restricted use pesticides to protect our kids? Why is the payday advance interest rate so high that you or your neighbors may never be able to get out of debt? Do you support safe zones for our houseless ohana? Do you even know what safe zones are? Where do you stand on Native Hawaiian rights? Do you support or oppose vacation rentals? If you do not know much about the issues, I have good news for you. That device you carry in your pocket or purse has a cool little icon on it that connects you to the internet. You can use that device to research anything you want. Write, Attend, Call, Vote Let me ask you this: Are the people who currently represent you — or want to — actually representing you? The elections in 2018 will be pivotal for Hawaii.  The majority of our politicians are running on the Democratic ticket. That does not mean they are in fact Democrats, nor does it mean they represent you. Sitting around bemoaning the situation and saying, “This is why I hate politics” is helping no one. I implore you, beg even, for you to get to know your government officials. Write to them, attend town halls, call their offices and ask for meetings. Ignorance is not an excuse.  You, — yes you —  are keeping them in power. They say they are representing their constituents. If you want them to do something differently, tell them. If you love what they are doing, volunteer for them and support them. Sitting out is no longer an option. I will not tell you how to vote or who to vote for. I will tell you though, that if you do nothing, you are what’s wrong with our community, our state and our country. Get involved. Sitting around bemoaning the situation and saying, “This is why I hate politics” is helping no one. Wake up! Do you need help finding out who represents you and how to contact them? Visit this website. You can enter your street or address to find your state legislators using the “find my legislator” tool on the top right corner. Type your county into the search engine to find info on your council members. Let’s have so many people wanting to engage that the websites crash. Are you with me? The post Do You Even Know Who Your Leaders Are? appeared first on Honolulu Civil Beat.

    Civil Beat / 3 d. 17 h. 8 min. ago more
  • Police arrest suspect in Honokaa stabbingPolice arrest suspect in Honokaa stabbing

    MEDIA RELEASE Michael Varize Jr. Hawai‘i Island police arrested a Hāmākua man in connection with a stabbing incident in Honoka‘a. At 8:24 p.m., Tuesday, (December 12), police responded to the Hale Ho‘ola Hāmākua Emergency Room after a Honokaʻa man arrived by private vehicle with apparent stab wounds to his body. The 34-year-old victim told police he and his assailant were sitting in his (victim’s) vehicle on Kamakawiwoʻole Church Road when he was attacked by the suspect following a disagreement. The victim was later transported by ambulance to the North Hawaiʻi Community Hospital where he remains in guarded condition. At 1:30 a.m., Wednesday morning, (December 13), the suspect, 29-year-old Michael Varize Jr., also of Honokaʻa, was located in Waimea and arrested without incident for second-degree assault. He was taken to the Hilo cellblock while detectives with the Area I Criminal Investigation Section continue the investigation. Anyone who may have witnessed, or have any information about this incident is asked to call the Police Department’s non-emergency line at (808) 935-3311 or Detective Jesse Kerr of the Area I Criminal Investigation Section at (808) 961-2377 or Jesse.Kerr@hawaiicounty.gov.

    Hawaii 24/7 / 4 d. 2 h. 38 min. ago more
  • Police are searching for a Puna man reported missingPolice are searching for a Puna man reported missing

    MEDIA RELEASE Keoni Brian Paulino Hawaiʻi Island police are requesting the public’s assistance in locating a 24-year-old Puna man who was reported missing. Keoni Brian Paulino is described as 5-feet-6-inches, weighing about 180 pounds with hazel eyes, short black hair and a tan complexion. Paulino is known to frequent both the Puna or Kona areas and was last heard from on Saturday, (November 12). Anyone with information on his whereabouts is asked to call the Police Department’s non-emergency line at 935-3311.

    Hawaii 24/7 / 4 d. 7 h. 30 min. ago more
  • Fire in Hilo burns third floor apartment, displaces residentsFire in Hilo burns third floor apartment, displaces residents

    UPDATED (4:38 p.m. on 12/13/2017) HILO, HI: December 13, 2017 – The American Red Cross has closed the shelter at the Butler Building in Hilo, which opened yesterday evening for residents evacuated from their apartment on Ululani Street. Red Cross disaster volunteers went to the scene yesterday to meet with the affected residents to ensure their immediate emergency needs for food, shelter and clothing were met. Caseworkers will continue to follow up with anyone affected in the coming weeks to provide referrals, guidance or additional assistance as needed to help with the recovery process. The Red Cross encourages all families to make a disaster plan to include an evacuation plan with two different routes of escape, a communications plan to help families reconnect after disaster and a disaster supplies kit that is readily available to aid in a quick evacuation. Information on developing a family plan is available to the public at www.redcross.org, or a brochure can be requested by calling 734-2101. By Hawaii 24/7 Staff Fire/rescue crews responded to a 3 p.m. alarm Tuesday (Dec 12) to 270 Ululani Street in Hilo for an apartment fire. Crews arrived to find a third floor apartment with its bedroom engulfed in flames. The fire sent flames into the attic of the three-story apartment building over the neighboring unit. tenants were able to evacuate safely, firefighters had the blaze under control by 3:26 p.m. and it was declared out at 4:02 p.m. Ululani Street was closed to traffic during firefighting operations. The Hawaii State Chapter of the American Red Cross were at the scene to aid displaced residents and set-up a shelter for them at the butler building next to Hilo’s Afook-Chinen Civic Center at 260 Kalanikoa Street off Mamao Street. The shelter opened at 9 p.m. for the tenants who had evacuated the apartment complex for their immediate emergency needs of food, shelter and clothing. The loss in the fire is estimated to be $150,000 and the cause of the fire is under investigation.

    Hawaii 24/7 / 4 d. 17 h. 47 min. ago more
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  • Police are still seeking a Captain Cook girl reported missingPolice are still seeking a Captain Cook girl reported missing

    MEDIA RELEASE Hawaiʻi Island police are still searching for a 16-year-old Captain Cook girl who was reported missing. Irene Hernandez was last seen in Hilo on (December 8, 2016). She is described as Hispanic, 5-feet-one-inch, 150 pounds, stocky build, tan complexion, with shoulder length brown hair and hazel eyes. Police ask anyone with any information about her whereabouts to call the Police Department’s non-emergency line at (808) 935-3311 or contact Detective Calvin Delaries, Jr. at (808) 326-4646, Ext. 304 or Calvin.Delaries@hawaiicounty.g…. Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call the island-wide Crime Stoppers number at (808) 961-8300. All Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.

    Hawaii 24/7 / 4 d. 23 h. 48 min. ago more
  • A taste of Hawaii lands in Costa Mesa at Kapa CollectiveA taste of Hawaii lands in Costa Mesa at Kapa Collective

    The Kapa Collective, a boutique all about Hawaii, has opened in Costa Mesa. The store was created by Ted Cancio and business partner Ryan Kaneshiro.

    Hawaii News / 5 d. 2 h. 38 min. ago
  • Lead Story – Queen Lili‘uokalani Honored at Honpa HongwanjiLead Story – Queen Lili‘uokalani Honored at Honpa Hongwanji

    Front row: Rev. Kevin Kuniyuki of the Buddhist Studies Center; Honpa Hongwanji Hawaii Betsuin chief minister Rev. Toyokazu Hagio; Thomas K. Kaulukukui Jr., trustee and chairman of the board of trustees of the Queen Lili‘uokalani Trust; trustee Claire L. Asam, Queen Lili‘uokalani Trust; retired UH-Hilo Professor and Hawai‘i Island resident Jackie Pualani Johnson as Queen Lili‘uokalani; Honpa Hongwanji Mission of Hawaii Bishop Eric Matsumoto; and members of the family of Hikosuke Fujimoto, chief steward to Queen Lili‘uokalani —Clayton Fujimoto, daughter Edna Nakamoto and Faye Takahashi. Back row: Rev. Yuika Hasebe; Rev. David Nakamoto; Hawaii Youth Opera Chorus leader Nola Nahulu; Dr. Puakea Nogelmeier, UH-Mänoa Hawaiian language professor; Rev. Joshin Kamuro; Rev. Arthur Kaufmann; Rev. Sol Kalu; Rev. Bert Sumikawa; Big Island residents K.T. Cannon-Eger and Barbara Fujimoto; and Rev. Sherman Thompson. Retired UH-Hilo Professor Jackie Pualani Johnson portrays her majesty Queen Lili‘uokalani. The Queen’s May 1901 Visit to Hongwanji Temple is Remembered and Celebrated Kristen Nemoto Jay Special to The Hawai‘i Herald This past Nov. 11 marked 100 years since the passing of Hawai‘i’s last reigning monarch, the beloved Queen Lili‘uokalani. The anniversary of her passing and the legacy she left in stories, her music, and in her acts of generosity and acceptance were commemorated on Oct. 29 at the Honpa Hongwanji Hawaii Betsuin Buddhist temple, where hundreds with mostly Japanese faces and surnames turned out to honor the queen. Many were hearing for the first time the details of her majesty’s visit to Honpa Hongwanji’s early temple on Fort Lane on May 19, 1901, to attend a birthday service for Shinran Shonin, the founder of Jodo Shinshu Buddhism. Her majesty had been invited by Mary Foster, a Buddhist with ties to Foster Botanical Gardens. The queen’s attendance highlighted her acceptance and understanding of the Buddhist community, quickly blurring the lines of racial and religious segregation in Hawai‘i. In honor of the queen’s life and her historic gesture to the Buddhist community, Friends of Lili‘uokalani Gardens from Hilo, Honpa Hongwanji Hawaii Betsuin, community members and other leaders planned a special service that included a re-enactment piece by Jackie Pualani Johnson, newly retired drama professor from the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo. Kahu (The Rev.) Sherman Thompson began the service with an expression of gratitude to all in attendance for celebrating the life of “her majesty . . . with this special service of appreciation.” Brightening the temple were flowers shared by members of the Hawaii Betsuin, Moiliili Hongwanji, Kailua Hongwanji and Jikoen Hongwanji. The congregation rose to sing the Buddhist gatha, or song, “Nori no Miyama,” (“Deep in the Woods of Dharma”) which is believed to have been sung at the May 1901 service that the queen attended. The Rev. Kevin Kuniyuki, director of Honpa Hongwanji’s Buddhist Studies Center, and Dr. Puakea Nogelmeier, professor of Hawaiian language at the University of Hawai‘i at Mänoa, then led a chant of the “Sanbujo,” (“The Three Respectful Callings”) that had been specially composed as “Mele Kähea Buda,” a traditional oli (chant) style based on the English translation of “Sanbujo.” As the sutra “Sanbutsuge” was chanted, incense was offered by Honpa Hongwanji Mission of Hawaii officials and members of the Kailua, Moiliili and Jikoen temples. They were joined by members of the Royal Societies; trustees Claire L. Asam and Thomas K. Kaulukukui Jr. of the Queen Lili‘uokalani Trust; and the Fujimoto family, whose Issei ancestors worked for the queen at Washington Place. The Rev. Eric Matsumoto, bishop of Honpa Hongwanji Mission of Hawaii, presented the dharma message. His words expressed humility, respect and appreciation for the queen as he tried to fathom what the climate of racial and religious prejudices must have been like in the Islands and the world to notice the supreme gesture that the queen made to the local Buddhist temple. Despite the early stages of the annexation, Matsumoto said the queen’s selfless presence had resulted in tremendous publicity and acceptance for religious freedom and practice. He commended her majesty’s quest for peace and harmony despite her own hardships at the time. Kristen Nemoto Jay was born and raised in Waimänalo. She recently left her job as editor for Morris Media Network’s Where Hawaii to pursue a freelance writing career. She also tutors part-time at her alma mater, Kailua High School, and is a yoga instructor at CorePower Yoga. Kristen earned her bachelor’s degree in sociology from Chapman University and her master’s in journalism from DePaul University. To read the rest of this article, please subscribe to The Herald! The Hawaii Youth Opera Chorus, led by Nola Nahulu, participated in the program. Claire Asam, a trustee of the Queen Lili‘uokalani Trust, offers oshoko (incense) while fellow trustee Thomas Kaulukukui Jr. waits for his turn behind her. In her portrayal of the queen, Professor Jackie Pualani Johnson took the congregation back to May 1901 and her majesty’s visit to Honpa Hongwanji’s Fort Lane temple.

    The Hawaii Herald / 6 d. 4 h. 20 min. ago more
  • UJSH Honors 26 New OctogenariansUJSH Honors 26 New Octogenarians

    The United Japanese Society of Hawaii honored 26 Nikkei celebrating their 80th birthday this year with a festive party on Sept. 23 at the Japanese Cultural Center of Hawai‘i’s Manoa Grand Ballroom. The event, UJSH’s annual Nenchosha Ian Engei Taikai (Senior Citizens Festival), is held in conjunction with Japan’s observance of “Respect for the Aged Day,” which is a national holiday. The birthday honorees were treated to a buffet lunch and a program of Japanese and Okinawan music and dance. A lively shishimai performance by Hawaii Okinawa Creative Arts opened the program. It was followed by the Japanese classical dance “Matsu,” meaning “pine,” which was performed by Onoe Kikunobukazu (Howard Asao) of the Kikunobu Dance Company. In Japanese tradition, the pine tree symbolizes long life. Mitsuko Toguchi Nakasone-Sensei and Diana Kawaguchi of the Lanakila Okinawa Nenchosha Club performed the auspicious Okinawan dance, “Kajadifu Bushi.” UJSH president Sheree Tamura welcomed the honorees and their families and friends to the UJSH’s 43rd annual nenchosha program. Each year, UJSH asks the various O‘ahu kenjinkai, senior citizen clubs and community centers to identify its octogenarians and submit their names so that UJSH can recognize them at the Nenchosha Festival. The honorees were introduced individually during the program and presented a certificate. They also had their picture taken with UJSH president Tamura and 2017 Cherry Blossom Queen Heather Omori. Gary Simon represented Gov. David Ige in offering a congratulatory message to the honorees. Messages were also shared by Honolulu Mayor Kirk Caldwell and then-Consul General of Japan Yasushi Misawa. The 2017 honorees were: Barbara Akamine, Stanley Balbuena, Norma Hirata, Jean Ige, Wallace Inouye, Irene Ishiyama, Takako Jenkins, Ethel Kawahara, Chizuko Kawaji, Ann Kobayashi, Donald Koga, Eleanor Miyasaki, Carl Nakamura, Grace Onuma, Nobuko Oshiro, Emmie Otake, Franklin Otake, Elaine Silva, Beatrice Sonoda, Keiko Suzuki, Sachiko Takahashi, Clara Takiguchi, Teruko Towata, Melvin Watarai, Keiko Yoshinaga and Daniel Zukemura, UJSH past president and current member Ann Kobayashi represented her fellow octogenarians in thanking the United Japanese Society for recognizing them on reaching their eighth decade of life. UJSH past president Clyde Matsumoto delivered the congratulatory banzai to the honorees. The program closed with UJSH president Sheree Tamura and the Iwakuni Odori Aiko Kai dancing a lively “Matanashi Dayo Jinsei Wa.” This year’s festival was chaired by UJSH member Karen Kuba-Hori.

    The Hawaii Herald / 6 d. 4 h. 33 min. ago more
  • Community Focus – Chrysanthemum Festival Set for Dec. 2 in WailukuCommunity Focus – Chrysanthemum Festival Set for Dec. 2 in Wailuku

    The 65th Chrysanthemum Festival, a Maui Japanese tradition that raises funds for scholarships and the historical preservation programs of its sponsor, Maui’s Sons and Daughters of the Nisei Veterans, will be held Saturday, Dec. 2, at the Velma McWayne Santos Community Center in Wailuku. Teens from five Maui high schools are vying for the Chrysanthemum Festival crown. Exhibits and entertainment will begin at 4:30 p.m., dinner is at 6 and the program starts at 7. Admission to the festival is free — tickets for the dinner are $15 each. The contestant who raises the most money through ticket sales will be crowned the festival queen. This year’s contestants are: • Kristi Echiverri, 17, of Kahului, a senior at Maui High School and the daughter of Laura and Lucky Echiverri. • Sokha Furumoto, 16, of Ha‘ikü, junior at St. Anthony Junior-Senior High School and the daughter of Laurie and Wesley Furumoto. • Paige Maki Nagahama, 17, of Wailuku, a senior at Seabury Hall and the daughter of Paula Diep and Hank Rapoza. • Jaelynn Nobriga, 17, of Kahului, a senior at Kamehameha Schools Maui and the daughter of James “Jay” Nobriga and Wendy Nobriga. • Makaylen Tadeo, 16, a junior at King Kekaulike High School and the daughter of Bobbie-Jo Moniz-Tadeo and Ricardo Tadeo Jr. For ticket or event information, or to contribute to a contestant’s efforts, call Leonard Oka at 249-2163 or 385-7670. Oka is the president of Maui’s Sons and Daughters of the Nisei Veterans. He is co-chairing the event with Gary Nakama, a past president of the group. Proceeds will support the Sons and Daughters’ historical preservation projects, which are done for the Nisei Veterans Memorial Center, and annual scholarships.

    The Hawaii Herald / 6 d. 4 h. 35 min. ago more
  • Community Focus – Three Cultural Treasures Honored at JCAH “Bunka No HI”Community Focus – Three Cultural Treasures Honored at JCAH “Bunka No HI”

    Omikoshi carriers get their final instructions before heading down Kïlauea Avenue. The Japanese Community Association of Hawaii, based in Hilo, honored three “cultural treasures” at its biennial “Bunka no Hi,” or Japanese Culture Day program, on Nov. 18 at the Sangha Hall. The event was themed “Okage Sama De,” an often-used Japanese phrase of gratitude meaning “I am what I am because of you.” Honored as cultural treasures were: Wailea Mochi Pounding Festival founder Akiko Masuda; judö sensei (teacher) Ronald Takeya, who has been practicing the martial art for over four decades; and 99-year-old Takayoshi Kanda, who is known in the community as the “Keeper of the Waiakea Tsunami Clock.” The day of cultural activities began with an omikoshi (portable Shintö shrine) parade along Kïlauea Avenue to the Sangha Hall. Former Hawai‘i governor George Ariyoshi and his wife Jean were the parade’s grand marshals. The governor led a “talk story” session later in the day. JCAH was established 45 years ago to promote and perpetuate Japanese culture and arts in East Hawai‘i and to foster international relationships with Japanese citizens and organizations.

    The Hawaii Herald / 6 d. 4 h. 39 min. ago more
  • Community Focus – Culture Award Nominees Sought For Japanese Cultural Society of MauiCommunity Focus – Culture Award Nominees Sought For Japanese Cultural Society of Maui

    The Japanese Cultural Society of Maui is accepting nominations for its annual Nihon Bunka Awards, or Japanese culture awards. Winners will be honored at the organization’s shinnen enkai dinner on Jan. 27, 2018, at the Maui Beach Hotel. Each year, JCS Maui recognizes individuals for their excellence and contributions to the Japanese arts and/or culture and for their selflessness in sharing their talents with the community. Nominations should be sent to Lynn Araki-Regan — by mail to 1823 Wells St., Suite 2A, Wailuku, HI, 96793, by fax to (808) 249-2872 or via email at lynn@araki-regan.com. The nomination deadline is Dec. 23. For more information, call Araki-Regan at (808) 280-1299.

    The Hawaii Herald / 6 d. 4 h. 40 min. ago more
  • Community Focus – CorrectionCommunity Focus – Correction

    One person in the photo for the “Journeys to Wellness” story that was published in our Nov. 3, 2017, edition was erroneously identified as the Rev. Dr. Wally Fukunaga. The person should have been identified as Chew Nung Lum. We apologize any inconvenience the error may have caused.

    The Hawaii Herald / 6 d. 4 h. 42 min. ago
  • Journalism – Gordon SakamotoJournalism – Gordon Sakamoto

    At the Helm at the Associated Press Charles Gary Special to The Hawai‘i Herald Reprinted from March 18, 1994 Editor’s note: In his long career in journalism, Gordon Sakamoto rarely got the kind of byline exposure that most print, broadcast — and now web — journalists get for their work. That is the nature of the newswire business, and Sakamoto was one of Hawai‘i’s most experienced in the medium. Sakamoto died Nov. 8 in Honolulu at the age of 82. I “met” Gordon Sakamoto in the late 1970s when I worked for about a year at what was then KHVH Newsradio 99. I had the gawdawful midnight to 6 a.m. on-air shift and was the only person in the entire station, which was located in the former Gas Company building on Bishop Street. I had to deliver two newscasts each hour — each about five minutes long. As if that shift weren’t bad enough, trying to scrape together enough news to read over the airwaves after a slow news weekend, as most were, to fill the overnight newscasts was the absolute pits. Most of the “news” was old copy, some of it even from the past Friday. At about 4:30 a.m., I would call Gordon at UPI’s Honolulu office and beg him to send me some fresh copy to read for my last two newscasts. Remember, there was no internet back then. I didn’t even have access to the morning’s Honolulu Advertiser. Within about 15 minutes, the station’s rickety old teletype machine began spitting out fresh copy, most of it rewrites from the Monday morning Advertiser. But at least it was fresh news. I didn’t meet Gordon in person until a few years later, at the yakudoshi party of a mutual friend. We shared a good laugh about those KHVH days. I am eternally grateful to Gordon for his kindness and professionalism. He was my unsung hero in those KHVH days — and, I’m sure, to so many newsrooms that depended on his reliable wire service reporting. In an effort to help you understand and appreciate Gordon Sakamoto’s contributions to journalism in Hawai‘i, the Herald is pleased to reprise this March 18, 1994, story on Gordon by former Honolulu freelance writer Charles Gary. Charles now lives and works in Los Angeles. There comes a time in a person’s life when making the wrong decision could mean missing the boat. Imagine it’s 1979. You’re Gordon Sakamoto, a Hawai‘i-born journalist working in San Francisco as an overnight editor for United Press International. Night after night, you transmit breaking news about the western United States to a network of competing news organizations around the country. It’s an enormously important and gratifying job. Then imagine that you are offered an opportunity to return to your home in Hawai‘i to head the local UPI bureau. An important decision, to be sure. But Sakamoto needn’t have worried about missing the boat — he already owned it. “I had bought my family this four-person vinyl boat for Christmas (that year),” he recalls. “We liked to go camping and stuff, but we didn’t get to do it very often. So there we were, with this big inflatable raft in our house.” Fortunately, the Sakamotos didn’t have to wait long to use their new toy. “I walked into the office (the next morning). I found a note there saying, “How would you like to work as the Hawaii state editor?” That was 14 years ago. Sakamoto was recently named the new Hawai‘i bureau chief for UPI’s former competitor, The Associated Press. He succeeds Howard Graves, who retired last year. Sakamoto sees his new job as an opportunity to broaden the world’s knowledge of the Western Pacific region, continuing where Graves left off. To read the rest of this article, please subscribe to The Herald!

    The Hawaii Herald / 6 d. 5 h. 5 min. ago more
  • Politics – Rep. Marcus Oshiro Reflects on Legislative CareerPolitics – Rep. Marcus Oshiro Reflects on Legislative Career

    Veteran Wahiawa Lawmaker Joins Hawai‘i Labor Relations Board Richard Borreca Special to The Hawai‘i Herald Born in 1959, the year Hawai‘i became a state seems just the sort of perfect Hawai‘i political note for Marcus Oshiro, who recently ended his 23-year tenure as a member of the state House of Representatives. In late August, Gov. David Ige appointed the Wahiawä sansei as the new chairman of the Hawai‘i Labor Relations Board. His appointment was confirmed by the state Senate a month later when the Legislature convened in special session to pass a rail funding measure. Oshiro, a former House Labor Committee chairman, will serve out the remainder of HLRB chair Kerry Komatsubara’s term and then serve his own six-year term, set to end June 30, 2024. During his time in the Legislature, Oshiro, a Leilehua High School graduate who earned his undergraduate degree from the University of Hawai‘i at Mänoa and his law degree from Willamette University, was a political power in his own right. That makes sense, as he comes from a local Wahiawä family that was a bedrock of the Hawai‘i Democratic Party, headed by his late father, Robert “Bob” Oshiro. The elder Oshiro was nicknamed the “Wizard of Wahiawä,” for his ability to galvanize a political campaign and produce winners. The state that Marcus Oshiro was born into 58 years ago was partially shaped by the elder Oshiro, who was an attorney, state legislator, Democratic Party leader and chairman of the Queen Emma Foundation and Queen’s Health Services. When the senior Oshiro died in 2008, U.S. Sen. Daniel K. Inouye said Oshiro had “. . . contributed much to the social, economic and political advances that transformed Hawai‘i into a more equal and just society.” Forming, designing, building and running Hawai‘i was the heady early history of modern Democratic Hawai‘i, but the state was on the verge of serious change when Marcus Oshiro arrived at the Legislature, representing his father’s old Wahiawä House district. “I think Bob did a good job with Marcus. He has strong Hawai‘i plantation life values,” said former House Speaker Calvin Say. By 2007, when Oshiro was named House Finance Committee chairman, Hawai‘i was enjoying a strong economy. “We had a good year in 2007. I inherited a surplus that I think was $743 million. We could actually help some of the nonprofits (community service charities) and restore their funding. I wanted to re-establish the food tax credit,” Oshiro recalled recently while clearing out his State Capitol office. “In 2008, all hell breaks loose and we go into what is called ‘the Great Recession.’ It was like Father Christmas one year and Mr. Scrooge the next. Everyone was upset,” Oshiro said. Say said that as Finance Committee chairman, it was Oshiro’s job to write the first version of a state budget that would involve cutting jobs, taking away grants and slicing services, all in the name of keeping the state budget balanced. “He knew what we had to do. We had to do some major take backs and exemptions. There was a big push to increase the general excise tax, but Marcus agreed with House leadership to use take backs, but no tax increase. It was very, very difficult,” Say said in an interview. Richard Borreca is a veteran Honolulu journalist. He has worked for the Honolulu Star-Bulletin, KHVH News Radio, KHON-TV, Honolulu Magazine and The Honolulu Star-Advertiser, for whom he now writes a Sunday column. To read the rest of this article, please subscribe to The Herald!

    The Hawaii Herald / 6 d. 5 h. 9 min. ago more
  • Community – “Allegiance” Cast Honors Nisei Veterans and Support GroupsCommunity – “Allegiance” Cast Honors Nisei Veterans and Support Groups

    “Allegiance” “. . . is an American story that has such grave contemporary importance today when we live in a time that is convulsed with division.” — Actor George Takei “Allegiance” Lead George Takei Discusses the Musical’s Broader Message Gregg K. Kakesako Special to The Hawai‘i Herald Actor and civil rights activist George Takei said the story of the 120,000 Japanese Americans who were imprisoned behind barbed wire fences and guard towers in the months following Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor because they looked like the enemy is relevant today “. . . when we have an ignorant, reckless president who is repeating the same thing all over again.” Takei was in Honolulu on Nov. 4 to honor Nisei veterans of the 100th Infantry Battalion and the 442nd Regimental Combat Team — only one Nisei veteran, Ted Tsukiyama, attended the program at the Japanese Cultural Center of Hawai‘i. Takei also used the opportunity to promote the return screening of the film version of the Broadway musical, “Allegiance.” It will be shown in 600 movie theaters throughout the mainland U.S. and Hawai‘i on Thursday, Dec. 7. “Allegiance” is based on the real life experiences of Takei’s family during World War II. The future actor was 5 years old when his family was uprooted from their Los Angeles home and sent to Arkansas, where they were imprisoned in Rohwer Relocation Center. The musical opened on Broadway in October 2015 and ran for five months. Takei starred in the production along with Tony Award-winning actor Lea Salonga. Prior to its closing, the musical was videotaped for later screening in movie theaters. Gregg K. Kakesako worked for the Honolulu Star-Bulletin, Gannett News Service and the Honolulu Star-Advertiser for more than four decades as a government, political and military affairs reporter and assistant city editor. To read the rest of this article, please subscribe to The Herald!

    The Hawaii Herald / 6 d. 5 h. 16 min. ago more
  • Legacy of the Sansei – Paying Forward Our LegaciesLegacy of the Sansei – Paying Forward Our Legacies

    “As our Nisei parents pass away, we are losing direct connections to the lived experience of wartime incarceration. But given our families’ histories, we Sansei have a unique value-added voice to contribute to debates about refugee bans and Muslim registries.” — Stan Yogi Stan Yogi Special to The Hawai‘i Herald Camp. That one-syllable Pandora’s box stuffed with the tangled legacies of our families’ World War II incarceration is, whether we like it or not, an inheritance that connects almost all Mainland Sansei. It’s a deeper tie than sweating together in Nikkei basketball leagues, or savoring smoky teriyaki chicken at obon festivals and church bazaars. Most of us know the camps in which the government imprisoned our families. Mine claimed Manzanar, Jerome and Gila River. Many of us heard our parents’ stories of suffering through violent dust storms, standing in long lines for substandard food, or perhaps gentler accounts of camp baseball leagues and social hall dances. Three years ago, I participated in the annual pilgrimage to Tule Lake, the camp that ultimately became the official “segregation center” for Nikkei that the government considered “disloyal” or “troublemakers.” Camp survivors — now in their 80s and 90s — recounted police officers beating prisoners with baseball bats in the Tule Lake jail, and Nikkei clutching coffee cans filled with the cremated remains of relatives as they left the desert camp to face a hostile postwar America. At the pilgrimage, I realized that during World War II, my grandparents were about the same age I am now. Viewing the camp years through a new lens, I imagined what it must have been like for my middle-aged grandparents to leave camp — with dependent children, no home or job to reclaim, and no savings. When they should have been envisioning retirement, many of our grandparents were having to start over. I wondered if I could muster their grit or emulate their resilience, enduring “Jap” spit at them and doors slammed to homes and jobs. Like our grandparents, our Nisei parents endured hardships. They were determined to provide us middle-class, postwar comforts with a Nikkei twist — piano lessons and karate classes, road trips to national parks and afterschool Nihongo gakko (Japanese language school). They gave us opportunities to channel our over-achieving tendencies, which have translated for many Sansei into professional and economic success. Stan Yogi co-authored the new children’s book, “Fred Korematsu Speaks Up,” and the civil rights history, “Wherever There’s a Fight: How Runaway Slaves, Suffragists, Immigrants Strikers and Poets Shaped Civil Liberties in California.” To read the rest of this article, please subscribe to The Herald!

    The Hawaii Herald / 6 d. 5 h. 21 min. ago more
  • Salvage team sinks fishing boat off Hawaii reefSalvage team sinks fishing boat off Hawaii reef

    A commercial fishing vessel carrying foreign workers that ran aground and later burned and leaked fuel just off the beaches of Waikiki was towed out to sea Thursday and sunk by a team of salvage workers. After being patched up and filled with foam to regain buoyancy, the 79-foot Pacific Paradise was hooked to a tug boat and hauled into deeper water as a crowd of people on the beach cheered.

    Hawaii News / 6 d. 13 h. 43 min. ago more
  • Made in Hawaii Part 2: One-of-a-kind holiday gifts discovered in North HawaiiMade in Hawaii Part 2: One-of-a-kind holiday gifts discovered in North Hawaii

    As the second part in this series, the North Hawaii News elves have found three additional gift options in the region made by Hawaii purveyors who have a story of their own to tell. From handmade granola to superfood powdered tea to unique art tiles, creative artisans can help lessen shopping stress this season.

    Hawaii News / 6 d. 13 h. 43 min. ago
  • Anglers rescued after 24 hours surrounded by sharksAnglers rescued after 24 hours surrounded by sharks

    Two anglers who spent a harrowing night in the ocean surrounded by sharks after being swept to sea on the Hamakua Coast were rescued Friday morning. According to Hawaii Fire Department Battalion Chief Darwin Okinaka, the pair had been fishing at a spot off the 7.5-mile marker of Honokaa-Waipio Road since Thursday when a rogue wave hit the shoreline.

    Hawaii News / 8 d. 14 h. 6 min. ago more
  • Couple arrested in murder of Hawaiian house cleaner, 51Couple arrested in murder of Hawaiian house cleaner, 51

    PICTURED: Couple arrested for killing Hawaiian house cleaner, 51, who was found by vacationers beaten to death with a baseball bat as her daughter, 8, was tied up with a bag over her head Boinville was beaten to death with a baseball bat while her eight-year-old daughter was found tied up in another room Two suspects arrested in the murder of a 51-year-old Hawaiian house cleaner have been identified as a local couple. Stephen Brown, 23, and Hailey Kai Dandurand, 20, were taken into custody late Thursday after Telma Boinville was found beaten to death with a baseball bat inside a Honolulu holiday home.

    Hawaii News / 8 d. 20 h. 18 min. ago more
  • The Hunt for the Missing Hawaiian Crown JewelsThe Hunt for the Missing Hawaiian Crown Jewels

    A military coup in 1893 spelled the end of the Hawaiian monarchy. When the island's new rulers surveyed the royal bounty, they discovered that the former king's crown was missing.

    Hawaii News / 8 d. 22 h. 22 min. ago
  • January is Volcano Awareness Month on HawaiiJanuary is Volcano Awareness Month on Hawaii

    With the hustle and bustle of the holidays upon us, Hawaii Island residents are likely giving little thought to the volcanic terrain beneath their feet. And that's alright - for now.

    Hawaii News / 9 d. 4 h. 56 min. ago
  • Adopt-A-Family: Single mother of three needs help for the holidaysAdopt-A-Family: Single mother of three needs help for the holidays

    Janel has three children. Aleia, 1, loves all sorts of toys, Paige, 5, is a 'fashion diva' and likes Barbie, and Joshua, 3, who loves everything Spiderman.

    Hawaii News / 10 d. 3 h. 5 min. ago
  • A&E Wrap-Up: 12-7-17A&E Wrap-Up: 12-7-17

    Feast on the Beach celebrates its fifth anniversary under the stars at Lava Lava Beach Club at Anaehoomalu Bay at 5:30 p.m. Friday. This popular holiday event features delicious food stations created in conjunction with Paradise Gourmet Catering, along with beer, wine, libations and its signature toes-in-the-sand ambiance.

    Hawaii News / 10 d. 7 h. 12 min. ago
  • West Hawaii coral still in declineWest Hawaii coral still in decline

    Coral is still suffering in West Hawaii, though considerably less following three straight years of bleaching that decimated the entire coastline, claiming 50 percent of the area's coral reefs. The Hawaii state Division of Aquatic Resources , an arm of the Department of Land and Natural Resources, finalized data last Wednesday on 20 research sites throughout West Hawaii.

    Hawaii News / 11 d. 16 h. 24 min. ago more
  • 'America needed Pearl Harbor': The history that led to devastating attack'America needed Pearl Harbor': The history that led to devastating attack

    Pearl Harbor's history didn't end on Dec. 7, 1941. The base remained a supply facility during World War II and a logistics hub for Korea and Vietnam.

    Hawaii News / 12 d. 9 h. 58 min. ago
  • Hawaii prepares to deliver New Year's present to caregiversHawaii prepares to deliver New Year's present to caregivers

    Hawaiians have the highest life expectancy in the U.S., but with that longevity comes an increasing demand on caregiving that has strained the state's younger residents financially, mentally, and physically. After 21 years of trying to pass long-term care legislation, Hawaii this summer became the first state to pass a bill that gives funding to caregivers who assist family members who have become disabled as they age or have cognitive challenges as their brains succumb to dementia or Alzheimer's disease.

    Hawaii News / 12 d. 19 h. 18 min. ago more
  • ThinkTech: Being a CPA as a Career ChoiceThinkTech: Being a CPA as a Career Choice

    Aloha!! Welcome to the Business in Hawaii Show with Reg Baker and Carl Williams. What happens when you get two “very experienced” CPA’s on the same show? Actually, more than you might expect!! Carl Williams who has about 40 years’ experience and I with about 35 years’ experience had a lot of fun chatting about […] The post ThinkTech: Being a CPA as a Career Choice appeared first on Hawaii Reporter.

    Hawaii Reporter / 16 d. 1 h. 15 min. ago more
  • ThinkTech: Business in Hawaii – Making Money Growing PlantsThinkTech: Business in Hawaii – Making Money Growing Plants

    These two fantastic ladies stole the show today!!  Learned so much about growing flowers, plants and all kinds of things here in Hawaii. Watch this show and be prepared to learn!  Aloha, Reg   The post ThinkTech: Business in Hawaii – Making Money Growing Plants appeared first on Hawaii Reporter.

    Hawaii Reporter / 29 d. 3 h. 3 min. ago
  • ThinkTech: Business in Hawaii with Reg Baker – Hawaii Five O Stuntman Shares His StoryThinkTech: Business in Hawaii with Reg Baker – Hawaii Five O Stuntman Shares His Story

    Hawaii Five O stuntman shares his story about getting into the acting business.  Not an easy process and patience is one of the keys to success in acting.  Not to mention knowing people and having some outstanding skills!   The post ThinkTech: Business in Hawaii with Reg Baker – Hawaii Five O Stuntman Shares His Story appeared first on Hawaii Reporter.

    Hawaii Reporter / 36 d. 7 h. 25 min. ago more
  • ThinkTech: Buisness in Hawaii with Reg Baker and The Amazing Hawaii SymphonyThinkTech: Buisness in Hawaii with Reg Baker and The Amazing Hawaii Symphony

    Wow! What a fantastic story! We are so lucky to have Michael Titterton and the Symphony in Hawaii. Truly an amazing story about how a few people in Hawaii was able to make such a huge impact on our community. The post ThinkTech: Buisness in Hawaii with Reg Baker and The Amazing Hawaii Symphony appeared first on Hawaii Reporter.

    Hawaii Reporter / 44 d. 0 h. 35 min. ago
  • ThinkTech: Business in Hawaii with Reg Baker – Hawaii Employment UpdateThinkTech: Business in Hawaii with Reg Baker – Hawaii Employment Update

    If you are having a hard time finding qualified workers you need to watch this!! A powerful secret is revealed to find qualified workers fast. The post ThinkTech: Business in Hawaii with Reg Baker – Hawaii Employment Update appeared first on Hawaii Reporter.

    Hawaii Reporter / 50 d. 5 h. 26 min. ago
  • Think Tech: Business in Hawaii with Reg Baker – Diving with Wounded WarriorsThink Tech: Business in Hawaii with Reg Baker – Diving with Wounded Warriors

    It was so interesting to learn about Darren Fox and his International Diving Academy called Ocean Legends. Starting from nothing he has built a company that serves international clients and is opening additional locations in southern California and Florida (Tampa Bay area). They are the first and only dive company in the US that has […] The post Think Tech: Business in Hawaii with Reg Baker – Diving with Wounded Warriors appeared first on Hawaii Reporter.

    Hawaii Reporter / 64 d. 7 h. 58 min. ago more
  • more news
  • East Oahu Chamber is Open for BusinessEast Oahu Chamber is Open for Business

    East Oahu Chamber is now open for business but not entirely new to the area.  Formerly known as the Hawaii Kai Chamber they have greatly expanded their footprint and has big plans. Listen to how these two very motivated ladies will make the East Oahu Chamber a household name. The post East Oahu Chamber is Open for Business appeared first on Hawaii Reporter.

    Hawaii Reporter / 79 d. 5 h. 20 min. ago more
  • Reg Baker Appointed by Governor Ige to Small Business Review BoardReg Baker Appointed by Governor Ige to Small Business Review Board

    Governor Ige has appointed Reg Baker to the Hawaii Small Business Review Board, effective immediately. Please see appointment letter below. This state of Hawaii appointment, combined with my role on the federal SBA Regulatory Fairness Board will be powerful and allow me to work more effectively at helping small businesses with regulatory challenges at both […] The post Reg Baker Appointed by Governor Ige to Small Business Review Board appeared first on Hawaii Reporter.

    Hawaii Reporter / 79 d. 5 h. 50 min. ago more
  • ThinkTech: Business in Hawaii with Reg Baker – Quarterly CommentaryThinkTech: Business in Hawaii with Reg Baker – Quarterly Commentary

    What a fast paced information packed session this was! We touched on what a forensic audit is and why we need one for the Rail. And the sooner the better!! Otherwise we will continue to make the same mistakes over and over again. Also discussed the foreign bank account reporting deadline (many need to file […] The post ThinkTech: Business in Hawaii with Reg Baker – Quarterly Commentary appeared first on Hawaii Reporter.

    Hawaii Reporter / 85 d. 7 h. 28 min. ago more
  • Hawaii firm harnesses WeChat to target Chinese visitorsHawaii firm harnesses WeChat to target Chinese visitors

    Hawaii-based iTravLocal has set its sights on the growing Chinese travel market, hoping to connect local vendors with visitors who are accustomed to buying products and services via WeChat, the most popular mobile app and commerce platform in China. The company says there were 120 million outbound travelers from The People’s Republic of China (PRC) last year, and predicts there will be 200 million travelers by 2020. Hawaii is a key location for the Chinese traveler, and iTRAVLocal Limited (ITL) says it has found a niche to capture this lucrative market. Founded earlier this year, iTravLocal describes itself as a destinations and activities solution provider that works in collaboration with WeChat, “the Chinese social media platform and super app.” WeChat boasts more than 963 users and its users spend more than 30 percent of their smartphone time within the platform. WeChat users communicate with friends and colleagues, share files, shop online, pay bills, and more. The platform has over 963 million users with over 50% of these users spending 90 minutes a day. WeChat is owned by Tencent, one of the largest companies in the world in terms of market capitalization. iTravLocal hopes to find Hawaii companies looking to draw Chinese visitors and help them implement WeChatPay and AliPay, also a digital wallet provider, or develop mini-programs within WeChat that can target and market to the Chinese traveler more effectively. “People conduct their personal and professional lives differently in China — mobile apps are everything.” explains iTravLocal co-founder and COO Alex Wong. “The majority pays using a digital wallet in China, from street vendors and local wet markets to convenience stores and medical offices.” Wong says approximately 94% of this market is dominated by mobile payments. “The fastest growing segment in tourism is the Chinese,” Wong says. “I’m encouraging Hawaii vendors to implement WeChatPay and potentially develop WeChat mini programs… the key benefit would be increasing business to mainland Chinese customers, who spend more than any other nationality when traveling.” The profit potential is huge, Wong adds, citing a study by consulting firm iResearch that show China mobile payments hit $5.5 trillion — roughly 50 times the size of America’s $112 billion market. “There are an estimated 200,000+ Chinese visiting Hawaii every year [and] research shows they spend far more than Japanese visitors,” he says. “In 2016, Chinese from mainland China spent $260 billion on overseas travel — an increase of $11 billion from 2015.” Wong will be the moderator for the Social Mobile Trends session of the Hawaiian Tourism Authority  Global Summit China on September 20, 2017. iTravLocal and Tencent/WeChat is also hosting an invitation-only gala event aboard the Star of Honolulu cruise ship the next day.  

    Hawaii Star / 91 d. 6 h. 24 min. ago more
  • 
			    		8 takeaways from the state tax system review
			    	8 takeaways from the state tax system review

    Hawaiʻi Tax Review Commission recommendations will form the backbone of House and Senate revenue packages in 2018.

    The Hawaii Independent
  • 
			    		A Thanksgiving guide to indigenous justice
			    	A Thanksgiving guide to indigenous justice

    Resources for important holiday discussions with family and loved ones about race and justice

    The Hawaii Independent
  • 
			    		Why we should oppose agribusiness mergers like Monsanto-Bayer
			    	Why we should oppose agribusiness mergers like Monsanto-Bayer

    Such mergers raise serious antitrust concerns and threaten the democratization of food supplies and global self-determination.

    The Hawaii Independent
  • 
			    		Common sense regulations necessary to create a sustainable agricultural industry in Hawaii
			    	Common sense regulations necessary to create a sustainable agricultural industry in Hawaii

    Is it​ ​possible​ ​to combine​ ​the​ ​power of genetic engineering with the ideals​ ​of​ ​sustainability ​to​ ​revolutionize ​the​ ​agricultural industry​ ​in Hawaiʻi? Only if public policy puts people ahead of corporate profits.

    The Hawaii Independent
  • 
			    		What native insight can teach us about responsible development
			    	What native insight can teach us about responsible development

    The criteria for economic decision-making among indigenous peoples often involves holistic considerations that go beyond simply balancing people, planet and profits.

    The Hawaii Independent
  • 
			    		‘Island Earth’ connects food security, corporate malpractice and the human impact
			    	‘Island Earth’ connects food security, corporate malpractice and the human impact

    What the recent documentary teaches us about pesticides, GMOs and the future of agriculture in Hawaiʻi and around the world.

    The Hawaii Independent
  • 
			    		The Rail tax special session: what happened to our representative democracy?
			    	The Rail tax special session: what happened to our representative democracy?

    How the rumble over Rail has fractured relationships between legislators, between O‘ahu and neighbor island constituents, and dangerously eroded trust in our representative democracy.

    The Hawaii Independent
  • 
			    		Kauai doctor, ACLU, sue over federal restrictions on abortion medication
			    	Kauai doctor, ACLU, sue over federal restrictions on abortion medication

    Lawsuit challenges medically unjustified FDA restrictions that push abortion medication out of reach of those who need it most.

    The Hawaii Independent
  • 
			    		A dreamer’s reality
			    	A dreamer’s reality

    The story of one of Hawaiʻi’s 315 DACA recipients and his family’s struggle to thrive in America

    The Hawaii Independent
  • 
			    		Holding Hawaiian education hostage
			    	Holding Hawaiian education hostage

    OHA is poised to award vital education monies to a non-profit with non-existent expertise in supporting the mission of Hawaiian education and a track record of strong-arming the Hawaiian community into supporting its political views.

    The Hawaii Independent
  • 
			    		Battleship Guam
			    	Battleship Guam

    U.S. militarism has turned islands into targets and peoples into weapons: Only a movement for peace will save the Pacific.

    The Hawaii Independent
  • 
			    		State house reorganizes amid Rail session
			    	State house reorganizes amid Rail session

    The House of Representatives today adopted a resolution formalizing new committee assignments

    The Hawaii Independent
  • 
			    		An open letter to Rep. Hanabusa RE: Israel Anti-Boycott Act
			    	An open letter to Rep. Hanabusa RE: Israel Anti-Boycott Act

    Cynthia Franklin is a Jewish-American scholar and co-founder of the Hawaiʻi Coalition for Justice in Palestine.

    The Hawaii Independent
  • 
			    		Israel lobby’s targeting of BDS would have a chilling effect on political dissent
			    	Israel lobby’s targeting of BDS would have a chilling effect on political dissent

    Far from being about protecting Jewish people from discrimination, proposed legislation that would outlaw the boycott of Israeli-made products and practices over political beliefs is, in fact, a danger to First Amendment rights.

    The Hawaii Independent