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    Google News / 19.11.2017 04:15
  • QB Herbert announced as starter for Oregon against Arizona - USA TODAYQB Herbert announced as starter for Oregon against Arizona - USA TODAY

    USA TODAYQB Herbert announced as starter for Oregon against ArizonaUSA TODAYEUGENE, Ore. (AP) — Justin Herbert was named the starting quarterback for Oregon against Arizona on Saturday, returning after a five-game absence because of a broken collarbone. Herbert was injured in Oregon's 45-24 victory over California on Sept. 30.Oregon hopefully ready for a QB battleThe Register-GuardWhat to watch for when the Arizona Wildcats visit OregonMat-Su Valley FrontiersmanLive updates: Oregon Ducks now tied with Arizona after Justin Herbert interceptionStatesman JournalOregon Daily Emerald -OregonLive.comall 100 news articles »

    Google News / 1 h. 15 min. ago more
  • Richard, Wilkins lead Sun Devils past Oregon St., to bowl eligibility - FOXSports.comRichard, Wilkins lead Sun Devils past Oregon St., to bowl eligibility - FOXSports.com

    FOXSports.comRichard, Wilkins lead Sun Devils past Oregon St., to bowl eligibilityFOXSports.comDemario Richard ran for 116 yards and three scores and Manny Wilkins threw for 167 yards and two touchdowns as Arizona State held off a second-half rally to beat Oregon State 40-24 on Saturday afternoon. Wilkins said in a Pac-12 Network postgame ...Oregon State Beavers lose to Arizona State on senior day: Game at a glanceOregonLive.comFinal: Arizona State 40, Oregon State 24Statesman JournalASU knocks off Oregon State, reaches bowl eligibilityAZCentral.comReuters -Arizona Sports -The State Pressall 53 news articles »

    Google News / 1 h. 19 min. ago more
  • Oregon State Beavers offer in-state football trio - OregonLive.comOregon State Beavers offer in-state football trio - OregonLive.com

    OregonLive.comOregon State Beavers offer in-state football trioOregonLive.comThe Oregon State Beavers used their final home game of the season to host several of the state's top young talents, offering three of them. Here's a look at the three 2019 and 2020 prospects to receive an offer from Oregon State: Screen Shot 2017-11-18 ...and more »

    Google News / 1 h. 25 min. ago more
  • No NCAA trophies for Oregon cross country, but a pair of top-10 finishes. - The Register-GuardNo NCAA trophies for Oregon cross country, but a pair of top-10 finishes. - The Register-Guard

    No NCAA trophies for Oregon cross country, but a pair of top-10 finishes.The Register-GuardLOUISVILLE, Ky. — Oregon produced a pair of top-10 finishes Saturday morning at the 2017 NCAA cross country championships, with the defending national champion women placing fifth in their 6,000-meter race and the men coming in sixth in their ...and more »

    Google News / 6 h. 52 min. ago more
  • Yanez: What Oregon voters need to consider about Measure 101 - Oregon Daily EmeraldYanez: What Oregon voters need to consider about Measure 101 - Oregon Daily Emerald

    Oregon Daily EmeraldYanez: What Oregon voters need to consider about Measure 101Oregon Daily EmeraldHowever, supporters in Oregon's government moved it up to January for a special election. While there isn't much information about why this happened, one might assert that it's because fewer people vote in special elections. If this is true, we need ...

    Google News / 11 h. 10 min. ago more
  • Oregon Beer News, 11/17/2017Oregon Beer News, 11/17/2017

    Happy Friday! It's the last weekend before Thanksgiving next week and there's a fair amount of beery things going on this weekend. Here's the weekend roundup; as usual, I'll be periodically updating this post throughout the day with the latest news, so check back often.

    Oregon News / 12 h. 9 min. ago
  • Ellensburg man involved in fiery fatal Oregon crash arrested in Bellingham - The Bellingham HeraldEllensburg man involved in fiery fatal Oregon crash arrested in Bellingham - The Bellingham Herald

    The Bellingham HeraldEllensburg man involved in fiery fatal Oregon crash arrested in BellinghamThe Bellingham HeraldAn Ellensburg man involved in a fiery fatal crash near a coastal town in Oregon was arrested in Bellingham. Shaypher Lee M. Hendricks, 23, was arrested by Bellingham police during a traffic stop in the 300 block of East Chestnut Street Thursday at 10 p.m..

    Google News / 12 h. 13 min. ago more
  • Oregon lawmaker faces growing calls to resign amid sexual ... - The Register-GuardOregon lawmaker faces growing calls to resign amid sexual ... - The Register-Guard

    Oregon lawmaker faces growing calls to resign amid sexual ...The Register-GuardProminent Oregon politicians, including GOP gubernatorial hopeful Knute Buehler, this week called on Sen. Jeff Kruse of Roseburg to resign after a female ...and more »

    Google News / 17 h. 43 min. ago
  • Oregon State Police Trooper Keeping Hunting Fair in Forest - U.S. News & World ReportOregon State Police Trooper Keeping Hunting Fair in Forest - U.S. News & World Report

    Oregon State Police Trooper Keeping Hunting Fair in ForestU.S. News & World ReportDain Gardner, senior trooper with the Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife Division, began his day at 5 a.m., noting the perfect hunting conditions that included below-freezing temperatures and just enough white on the ground to easily spy a well ...and more »

    Google News / 18 h. ago more
  • Oregon officials seek aid for businesses affected by wildfiresOregon officials seek aid for businesses affected by wildfires

    Economic development officials are considering asking Oregon lawmakers for funds for low-interest loans for small businesses impacted by the summer's harsh fire season during the upcoming short legislative session. Jason Lewis-Berry, who serves as the economic policy adviser for Gov. Kate Brown and is the director of Regional Solutions, told legislators Tuesday that the reduced revenues and cash flow to small businesses during the fire season could affect their credit ratings and access to capital.

    Oregon News / 18 h. 52 min. ago more
  • Authorities: Oregon child porn producer nabbed by FBIAuthorities: Oregon child porn producer nabbed by FBI

    FBI agents arrested a Portland man Thursday for reportedly producing child pornography after a criminal complaint filed against him alleged that he approached 2 young girls via an app. According to the criminal complaint, Juan "Carlos" Ramon is accused of contacting 2 Louisiana girls, ages 6 and 8, via an app called "Musical.ly."

    Oregon News / 23 h. 31 min. ago
  • Oregon could be only school to possess No. 1 recruiting class in basketball and football in same yearOregon could be only school to possess No. 1 recruiting class in basketball and football in same year

    The future of Oregon basketball and football is in great hands. In this era of Duck athletics, Dana Altman and Willie Taggart are bringing some of the best talent in North America to Eugene.

    Oregon News / 23 h. 31 min. ago
  • Oregon's population keeps rising, now at 4.1 millionOregon's population keeps rising, now at 4.1 million

    The state added 64,750 people between July 1, 2016, and July 1, 2017, according to new estimates released by the Population Research Center at Portland State University. The 1.6 percent increase follows a similar gain the year before, pushing Oregon's population to more than 4.1 million.

    Oregon News / 1 d. 1 h. 57 min. ago
  • Capturing Mount Hood With Photographer Andrew HolmanCapturing Mount Hood With Photographer Andrew Holman

    Photographer Andrew Holman was drawn to the Northwest by the prospect of connecting with the outdoors. His passion for capturing stunning landscapes inspired a passion for climbing.

    OPB / 1 d. 2 h. 7 min. ago
  • Oregon Democrats Ask DOJ To Not Withhold Law Enforcement MoneyOregon Democrats Ask DOJ To Not Withhold Law Enforcement Money

    The delegation was responding to a Department of Justice letter sent to Multnomah County, threatening to withhold $3 million in grants because of sanctuary policies.

    OPB / 1 d. 2 h. 36 min. ago
  • Multnomah Falls Lodge Expected To Re-Open Before End Of The YearMultnomah Falls Lodge Expected To Re-Open Before End Of The Year

    Multnomah Falls Lodge is expected to re-open before the end of the year. The Eagle Creek Fire prompted its closure in early September. 

    OPB / 1 d. 4 h. 3 min. ago
  • In Oregon, You Can Now Save for Retirement. Unless You Object. - New York TimesIn Oregon, You Can Now Save for Retirement. Unless You Object. - New York Times

    New York TimesIn Oregon, You Can Now Save for Retirement. Unless You Object.New York TimesOregon is the first state to roll out a plan that covers private sector workers who do not otherwise have access to a savings plan in their workplace. The deduction is an automatic 5 percent of gross pay, unless the worker opts out. Participants can ...

    Google News / 1 d. 5 h. 49 min. ago more
  • Oregon Health Authority | News Roundtable | Sexual Assault ReportingOregon Health Authority | News Roundtable | Sexual Assault Reporting

    Approximately 80,000 kids will lose health coverage if Congress doesn’t reauthorize the CHIP program. Also, our news roundtable takes up some big stories from the week. And a sexual assault reporting program that began in Ashland has received nationwide praise. 

    OPB / 1 d. 6 h. 15 min. ago
  • Crabbing open in Winchester Bay despite surrounding closuresCrabbing open in Winchester Bay despite surrounding closures

    Crabbing is open in Winchester Bay, but closed in other areas along the southern Oregon Coast where high levels of biotoxin were found in crab. Crabbing is open in Winchester Bay, but closed in other areas along the southern Oregon Coast where high levels of biotoxin were found in crab.

    Oregon News / 1 d. 6 h. 47 min. ago
  • Trump Backs Billy Williams To Keep US Attorney For Oregon JobTrump Backs Billy Williams To Keep US Attorney For Oregon Job

    President Donald Trump nominated Interim U.S. Attorney Billy Williams to be Oregon's top federal law enforcement official in the state. He's required to be confirmed by the U.S. Senate. 

    OPB / 1 d. 7 h. 8 min. ago
  • Oregon Lawmakers Call On Sen. Jeff Kruse To ResignOregon Lawmakers Call On Sen. Jeff Kruse To Resign

    Lawmakers in the Oregon Capitol are calling on Sen. Jeff Kruse, R-Roseburg, to resign after a fellow state senator filed a formal complaint against him for sexual misconduct.

    OPB / 1 d. 9 h. 5 min. ago
  • U.S. Rep. Greg Walden (left) and House Majority Leader John Boehner...U.S. Rep. Greg Walden (left) and House Majority Leader John Boehner...

    The U.S. House of Representatives today passed a controversial tax reduction bill on a narrow, mostly party-line vote. President Donald J. Trump has repeatedly said he wants a large tax-cut package signed by Christmas.

    Oregon News / 1 d. 11 h. 50 min. ago
  • Portlandia Lives Up to Parody: "Oregon is facing an epidemic of...Portlandia Lives Up to Parody: "Oregon is facing an epidemic of...

    PORTLANDIA LIVES UP TO PARODY: "Oregon is facing an epidemic of alcohol and drug abuse, according to a new report released by the Oregon Substance Abuse Disorder Research Committee. The report found that one out of every 10 Oregonians struggles with drugs or alcohol and that addiction costs the state about $6 billion a year in everything from policing to health carea The Portland City Club commissioned the report.

    Oregon News / 1 d. 16 h. 38 min. ago more
  • Hebard helps No. 10 Oregon beat No. 19 Texas A&M 83-68Hebard helps No. 10 Oregon beat No. 19 Texas A&M 83-68

    Ruthy Hebard scored a season-high 24 points on 10-for-10 shooting and No. 10 Oregon beat No. 19 Texas A&M 83-68

    ABCNews.com / 1 d. 20 h. 58 min. ago
  • Lawsuit claims Grand Central Bowl charges hidden 2% feeLawsuit claims Grand Central Bowl charges hidden 2% fee

    Kevin Mehrens was perturbed after dining at Grand Central Bowling's bar last month, looking over his receipt and discovering that the business had tacked on an extra 2 percent to his bill. Although the 2 percent amounted to only 40 cents on his $20 check, Mehrens didn't think it was right.

    Oregon News / 1 d. 21 h. 6 min. ago
  • Designer Behind Portland's Pioneer Square And Other Oregon Icons Has DiedDesigner Behind Portland's Pioneer Square And Other Oregon Icons Has Died

    Renowned Oregon landscape architect J. Douglas Macy has died. Macy was part of the legendary team that created Portland's Pioneer Courthouse Square and other Oregon icons.

    OPB / 1 d. 21 h. 37 min. ago
  • Malheur Occupier Duane Ehmer Sentenced To 1 Year In PrisonMalheur Occupier Duane Ehmer Sentenced To 1 Year In Prison

    The man whose horse-riding, flag-carrying images became an icon of the occupation of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge was sentenced Thursday to a year and a day in federal prison.

    OPB / 2 d. 0 h. 28 min. ago
  • Parents sue Oregon school district over transgender policyParents sue Oregon school district over transgender policy

    Parents at a rural Oregon school high school have filed a federal lawsuit against the school district alleging its policy to allow a transgender male student to use the boys' locker room and bathroom violates the civil rights of the rest of the students

    ABCNews.com / 2 d. 0 h. 30 min. ago
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  • Minor White Captures the Ornate Beauty of Portland's PastMinor White Captures the Ornate Beauty of Portland's Past

    Images captured by photographer Minor White in the late 1930s are the only remaining connection to the ornately decorated cast-iron buildings that once lined the streets of Portland.

    OPB / 2 d. 1 h. 45 min. ago
  • Notations from...Donald Harrison (Pt II)Notations from...Donald Harrison (Pt II)

    Part two of Deborah DeMoss Smith's conversation with "Nouveau Swing" saxophone legend Donald Harrison.

    OPB / 2 d. 2 h. 25 min. ago
  • As reports of sex harassment mount, head of Oregon Democrats calls on Kruse to resignAs reports of sex harassment mount, head of Oregon Democrats calls on Kruse to resign

    The head of the Democratic Party of Oregon on Thursday called on state Sen. Jeff Kruse to resign, adding another voice to the list of high-ranking officials calling for Kruse's ouster. Party chairwoman Jeanne Atkins said in a statement that Kruse, a Roseburg Republican, should leave his post because of an increasing number of reports that he sexually harassed women at the Oregon Capitol, including two senators.

    Oregon News / 2 d. 4 h. 1 min. ago more
  • PPS Responds To Skepticism About Re-Opening TubmanPPS Responds To Skepticism About Re-Opening Tubman

    The Portland school district is facing distrust from two sides: parents who are skeptical it can guarantee student health and parents of color who have felt underserved.

    OPB / 2 d. 5 h. 8 min. ago
  • 'OPB Politics Now': Kruse And Kitzhaber Back In The Spotlight'OPB Politics Now': Kruse And Kitzhaber Back In The Spotlight

    We discuss three very different stories of Oregon politicians in the news this week.

    OPB / 2 d. 7 h. 7 min. ago
  • Arizona Wildcats to open 2018 Pac-12 football schedule at Oregon State; full slate here - Arizona Daily StarArizona Wildcats to open 2018 Pac-12 football schedule at Oregon State; full slate here - Arizona Daily Star

    OregonLive.comArizona Wildcats to open 2018 Pac-12 football schedule at Oregon State; full slate hereArizona Daily StarThe Pac-12 has released the 2018 conference football schedule. The Arizona Wildcats will open league play at Oregon State on Sept. 29. Here's the entire UA slate: Sept. 1: vs. BYU; Sept. 8: at Houston; Sept. 15: vs. Southern Utah; Sept. 22: at Oregon ...Beat writer Q&A: Inconsistent Arizona State Sun Devils challenge Oregon State on SaturdayOregonLive.comASU Football: First look at Oregon StateHouse of Sparkyall 68 news articles »

    Google News / 2 d. 7 h. 35 min. ago more
  • Reza Aslan Live At Literary ArtsReza Aslan Live At Literary Arts

    Author Reza Aslan joins us in front of an audience at Literary Arts in downtown Portland. 

    OPB / 2 d. 8 h. 15 min. ago
  • Gigabit internet service coming to 18 small Oregon townsGigabit internet service coming to 18 small Oregon towns

    Wave Broadband said Thursday it will begin offering gigabit internet service in 18 small Oregon communities; Wave said some of those did not already have gigabit service. A gigabit is 1,000 megabits per second, 40 times faster than the federal broadband standard.

    Oregon News / 2 d. 8 h. 45 min. ago
  • OHSU, Adventist Health Strike Deal For Overflow PatientsOHSU, Adventist Health Strike Deal For Overflow Patients

    Oregon Health and Science University has agreed to share patients with Adventist Health. It means less crowding at OHSU’s Portland hilltop campus.

    OPB / 2 d. 10 h. 45 min. ago
  • Oregon Beer News, 11/15/2017Oregon Beer News, 11/15/2017

    Here are the news and events in beer from around Oregon for this Wednesday, November 15. As usual, I'll be periodically updating this post throughout the day with the latest news, so check back often for updates. If you have news to share, please contact me and I can get that updated as well.

    Oregon News / 2 d. 11 h. 11 min. ago
  • Editorials from around OregonEditorials from around Oregon

    People who supported the aims but not the tactics of last year's armed takeover of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge think they've found a way to gain a greater degree of local control over federal lands. Last week the Crook County commissioners adopted a Natural Resources Policy that asserts a doctrine of "coordination" based on federal law.

    Oregon News / 2 d. 16 h. 5 min. ago more
  • No. 18 Oregon State women hit 17 3s, rout Utah Valley 98-41No. 18 Oregon State women hit 17 3s, rout Utah Valley 98-41

    Marie Gulich scored 19 points and No. 18 Oregon State matched a program-best with 17 3-pointers and rolled past Utah Valley 98-41

    ABCNews.com / 2 d. 20 h. 21 min. ago
  • Oregon state senator files sex harassment complaintOregon state senator files sex harassment complaint

    An Oregon state senator has filed a formal complaint against a male senator over allegations of sexual harassment and is demanding his expulsion from the Oregon Senate

    ABCNews.com / 2 d. 23 h. 20 min. ago
  • Tolling People on to Portland’s HighwaysTolling People on to Portland’s Highways

    By John A. Charles, Jr. Earlier this year the state legislature passed a bill requiring the Oregon Transportation Commission (OTC) to apply for federal authorization to implement “value pricing” on two regional highways: I-205, and I-5 from the Washington border to the intersection with I-205. The OTC must apply by December 31, 2018. Although value pricing may sound vague or somewhat ominous, motorists should be happy with this new policy. It has the potential to eliminate traffic congestion and create a revenue stream that will allow us to build the new highways and bridges that we need. First, some background. “Value pricing” is a bureaucratic term for electronic tolling of highways where the toll rates vary based on the density of traffic. Usually, the rates change based on time of day, direction of travel, and day of the week. The rates are set to ensure 45 MPH driving conditions at all times of the day, hence the “value” offered to motorists. There are many possible variations on this theme. In most cases, value pricing is used on new highway lanes, allowing drivers the option of staying in the unpriced, general purpose lanes. That probably will not be feasible in the Portland region because there is no room for an entire new network of priced lanes on I-5. In some ways this is a blessing, because variable tolling will make our current lanes more productive. If priced properly, it’s possible that new lanes will not even be needed, saving us the expense of construction. Value pricing is necessary because our current system cannot address congestion. Our highway network is an open access system, where each trip appears to be “free.” Of course, it’s not free—it’s being paid for by various back-door mechanisms such as motor fuel taxes, vehicle registration fees, and random federal grants. But we think it’s free, so during peak hours we see a “stampede” effect. When too many people try to get on at the same time, per-lane throughput drops substantially. The carrying capacity for most highways is roughly 1,800 vehicles per-hour in each lane. At times of hyper-congestion, this can drop to 900 vehicles or fewer. By using variable pricing, we can clear up the stampede and get per-lane travel back to 1,600 or 1,800 vehicles per-hour. In essence, value pricing allows us to “toll on” more people than we “toll off.” The effect of this was seen recently when tolls on the Port Mann Bridge in Canada were removed on September 1. The Port Mann is a 10-lane bridge over the Fraser River near Vancouver. After tolls were removed, the result was a huge increase in congestion. One driver saw her daily commute increase by 25 minutes each way. She told a news reporter, “Absolutely, it’s terrible. It’s selfish but I want those tolls back on.” In addition to the benefits of free-flow driving conditions, variable tolling will also create the dedicated revenue stream we need for future highway expansion. There is no doubt that we need several new bridges over the Columbia River, plus additional highway lanes elsewhere. Value pricing will tell us where to build, when to build, and who is willing to pay. Fortunately, the Oregon Constitution does not allow toll revenues to be siphoned off for non-highway uses such as light rail construction. Therefore, money paid by motorists will benefit them directly. The new law mandates value pricing on two specific highways but also authorizes the OTC to implement pricing anywhere else. Since the Portland highway network is an integrated system including I-84, I-5, I-405, HW 26, HW 217, and I-205, it would be better to implement value pricing region-wide to ensure that motorists get what they want: free-flow driving conditions, at all times of the day. Most new highways being built around the world are using electronic tolling with variable rates. The new Oregon law is an opportunity for us to learn from that experience and to implement a Portland highway pricing system that truly delivers “value” for motorists. John A. Charles, Jr. is President and CEO of the Portland-based Cascade Policy Institute, Oregon’s free market public policy research organization. A version of this article appeared in the Wilsonville Spokesman on November 1, 2017. Click here for the PDF version: 17-20-Tolling_People_on_to_Portland’s_Highways

    Cascade Policy / 3 d. 0 h. 9 min. ago more
  • Former Oregon governor apologizes, to be fined $1,000Former Oregon governor apologizes, to be fined $1,000

    Former Oregon Gov. John Kitzhaber agrees with the state's ethics commission to pay a $1,000 fine for allegedly violating ethics codes by failing to publicly declare a potential conflict of interest and for claiming airline travel miles for personal use

    ABCNews.com / 3 d. 0 h. 59 min. ago
  • Major storm hitting West Coast with heavy rain, strong windsMajor storm hitting West Coast with heavy rain, strong winds

    One of the strongest storms so far this season is moving onto the West Coast on Wednesday morning, bringing heavy rain to Washington and Oregon.

    ABCNews.com / 3 d. 12 h. 45 min. ago
  • VIDEO: One of the strongest storms so far this season is moving onto the West Coast on Wednesday morning, bringing heavy rain to Washington and Oregon.VIDEO: One of the strongest storms so far this season is moving onto the West Coast on Wednesday morning, bringing heavy rain to Washington and Oregon.

    VIDEO: One of the strongest storms so far this season is moving onto the West Coast on Wednesday morning, bringing heavy rain to Washington and Oregon.

    ABCNews.com / 3 d. 12 h. 45 min. ago
  • Military Families Want Flexible Education Options for Their KidsMilitary Families Want Flexible Education Options for Their Kids

    By Kathryn Hickok EdChoice recently conducted a groundbreaking survey of military-connected families seeking to understand their perspectives on K-12 education and school choice. EdChoice is a nonpartisan research organization that promotes expanded educational options for all children. The survey found that families connected with the military highly value access to better educational environments for their children, want more freedom and flexibility in choosing their children’s schools, and overwhelmingly support school choice programs like Education Savings Accounts. Eighty percent of children in military households currently attend public schools, but only 34% of survey respondents said a public school would be their first choice. Military parents are much more likely than the national average to take “costly and inconvenient steps to secure and accommodate their children’s education.” That includes taking extra jobs, moving closer to schools, and taking out loans. The military lifestyle presents unique challenges to families. The EdChoice report noted that “the quality of educational options available to military families can play a major role in whether a family accepts an assignment or even decides to leave military service altogether.” As a nation we should consider that providing military families with meaningful school choice programs could be a significant boost to the morale of service members by improving the well-being of their families. Making it easier for military kids to get their educational needs met is the right thing to do. Kathryn Hickok is Publications Director and Director of the Children’s Scholarship Fund-Oregon program at Cascade Policy Institute, Oregon’s free market public policy research organization. Click here for the PDF version: 11-15-17-Military_Families_Want_Education_Options

    Cascade Policy / 3 d. 20 h. 14 min. ago more
  • Identity theft scam netted Nigerians $11 million, and prisonIdentity theft scam netted Nigerians $11 million, and prison

    A Nigerian man has been sentenced in Oregon to seven years in federal prison for his role in bilking over $11 million via an identity-theft scheme from the Internal Revenue Service and the Oregon state tax authority

    ABCNews.com / 3 d. 22 h. 19 min. ago
  • Oregon county pays $2.8M in mentally ill inmate's deathOregon county pays $2.8M in mentally ill inmate's death

    The estate of a mentally ill inmate who died in an Oregon jail has reached a $2.8 million settlement in a federal civil rights case

    ABCNews.com / 4 d. 2 h. 29 min. ago
  • Review: Crew of the Oregon fights most ruthless villain yetReview: Crew of the Oregon fights most ruthless villain yet

    Book Review: Juan Cabrillo and the crew of the Oregon fight their most ruthless villain yet in "Typhoon Fury," by Clive Cussler and Boyd Morrison

    ABCNews.com / 4 d. 5 h. 46 min. ago
  • Kate Brown’s Attention Deficit DisorderKate Brown’s Attention Deficit Disorder

    By John A. Charles, Jr. The most serious problem facing Oregon right now is the exploding costs of the Public Employee Retirement System (PERS). The PERS crisis is so severe that the Oregon Legislature should make it the only issue addressed in the February 2018 legislative session. But Governor Brown isn’t interested in reducing the PERS liability. That would take too much work and might offend her public employee union campaign contributors. So instead she has signed two Executive Orders purporting to address “climate change,” ahead of her jaunt to Bonn, Germany next week to attend a United Nations conference on global warming. Her Executive Orders impose a blizzard of costly requirements on new buildings, including requirements for new homes to meet energy efficiency guidelines by 2023, and mandates for new homes to be solar-panel-ready by 2020. New buildings will also have to accommodate electric vehicles, regardless of whether the owners ever intend to own such vehicles. The Governor is also setting a fantasy policy goal that Oregonians own 50,000 electric vehicles by 2020, more than three times the current ownership level. Oregon desperately needs political leadership to avoid a PERS-induced death spiral. Unfortunately, all we’re getting is a Governor flying halfway around the world to escape reality. John A. Charles, Jr. is President and CEO of Cascade Policy Institute, Oregon’s free market public policy research organization. 11-8-17-Kate_Brown’s_Attention_Deficit_Disorder

    Cascade Policy / 10 d. 20 h. 14 min. ago more
  • Oregon’s affordable housing crisis can be attributed to restrictive land use policiesOregon’s affordable housing crisis can be attributed to restrictive land use policies

    By Lydia White Affordable housing advocates are quick to criticize Portland City Council’s use of the $258.4 million affordable housing bond, but their criticism is fundamentally misdirected. Advocates should turn instead to Oregon’s state and local governments to demand an overhaul of restrictive land use policies. Vanessa Brown Calder of the Cato Institute has produced a report which demonstrates a correlation between increased zoning and land use regulations and more expensive housing. One of Oregon’s most restrictive land use policies is the urban growth boundary, a simulated border created to reduce urban development. The Portland Tribune recently reported that, according to Christopher Herbert, the managing director of the Center for Housing Studies at Harvard University, UGBs “have the downside of raising land prices” by restricting access to developable land. While some proponents claim that UGBs protect farmland, most fail to acknowledge the extent of their negative externalities. Calder also suggests government housing subsidies undermine the incentives for states and localities to address what underlies the housing problem—an artificially scarce supply of land—because the aid serves as a substitute for substantial solutions. Advocates continue to underestimate well-intentioned policies’ unintended consequences. To have an effective impact on housing affordability, they should call on legislative officials to address Oregon’s state and local land use policies. Lydia White is a Research Associate at Cascade Policy Institute, Oregon’s free market public policy research organization. 11-1-17-Oregon’s_Affordable_Housing_Crisis

    Cascade Policy / 17 d. 20 h. 14 min. ago more
  • Win $15,000 for a video telling your school choice storyWin $15,000 for a video telling your school choice story

    Choices in Ed Video Competition Entry Deadline is December 1, 2017 Dear School Choice Supporters: Some of you entered Cascade Policy Institute’s 2009 Oregon School Choice Video Contest; sharing your stories of how school choice helped you or your children, or why you wanted more choices in education. Now, the Foundation for Excellence in Education has launched a nationwide Choices in Ed Video Competition.  Based on the sincerity and passion of the videos, eight winners will receive cash prizes from $5,000 to $15,000 each. Enter, and you might be one of them! You’re eligible to enter if you’re a student, parent or guardian, or alumnus of existing choice programs (public school/open enrollment, charter, magnet, private school, virtual/blended, or homeschool), or a person who wants more educational choice in your state. Videos must be under two minutes long, and must be successfully uploaded by 11:59pm EST (8:59pm Pacific time) on December 1, 2017. Be sure to read About the Contest, the Rules and How to Enter. Then, ENTER TODAY. We hope one or more of you will be winners. We would like to share your videos with other Oregonians whether or not you win this national competition. That way, we can help tell your story and use it to move toward more School Choices in our state. Here are three of our favorite videos submitted to our Contest in 2009; two from students and one from a parent Shoes Rylee’s Choice School Choice Coffee Analogy               You can see many other videos submitted to our contest here. They may give you some ideas for framing your Choices in Ed Video Competition submission. Sincerely, Steve Buckstein Senior Policy Analyst and Founder Cascade Policy Institute ▪ School Choice for Oregon Portland, Oregon Office Phone: (503) 242-0900 Email: steven@cascadepolicy.org

    Cascade Policy / 22 d. 5 h. 33 min. ago more
  • The Major Fluoride Risk Study You Never Heard Of
The Major Fluoride Risk Study You Never Heard Of

    A few weeks ago, Willamette Week’s lead story, “What You Don’t Know Can Hurt You,” featured Project Censored, highlighting important stories the media didn’t cover. The headline lends itself perfectly to another story ignored by U.S. newspapers: higher fluoride levels in pregnant women have been linked to lower IQ’s in their children. The levels were well within the range of American women drinking fluoridated water. This was the finding of a major international study published last month, funded by the U.S. National Institutes of Health and led by the University of Toronto school of public health. The study, one of the most robust ever conducted on fluoride’s risks, followed mother-child pairs in Mexico City for over 12 years. For every 0.5 part per million increase in prenatal exposure, children lost 2.5 – 3 IQ points. While noting the study didn’t prove fluoridation lowered children’s IQ’s and more research was needed, the authors cited its strong methodology, including taking into account a dozen possible confounding factors, which didn’t affect the results. As detailed in my Lund Report article, the latest study continues the trend of nearly 200 others in just the past ten years on fluoride’s neurotoxicity. Almost all found fluoride harmed the brain, many at levels at or slightly higher than water fluoridation. There’s no doubt ingested fluoride is neurotoxic. The only questions are the dose, when and how often the exposure occurs, and which individuals – born and unborn - are more susceptible to its toxicity. Once fluoride is added to drinking water, there’s no control over any of these. Last year, the Fluoride Action Network, American Academy of Environmental Medicine, International Academy of Oral Medicine and Toxicology, Food and Water Watch, Organic Consumers Association and several others petitioned the EPA to ban fluoridation chemicals based on their neurotoxicity. Despite the significant, one-sided scientific evidence, the EPA denied the petition, saying it wasn’t conclusive. In response, the organizations filed a lawsuit in federal court, where a decision on the EPA’s motion to dismiss the case is due in a few months. The American Dental Association, the leading pro-fluoridation group, claimed that the study doesn’t apply to fluoridated water in the U.S. Lead author Dr. Howard Hu saw it differently, asserting “This is a very rigorous epidemiology study. You just can’t deny it. It’s directly related to whether fluoride is a risk for the neurodevelopment of children. So, to say it has no relevance to the folks in the U.S. seems disingenuous.” Many others unaffiliated with the study agreed with Hu, including Dr. Linda Birnbaum, director of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, who said “we should pay attention to this” Dr. Leonardo Trasande, a pediatrician at NYU, stated it “raises serious concerns about fluoride supplementation in water." CNN, Newsweek, Medical News Today, Medical Express and even the Reader’s Digest covered the story, as did many media outlets In Canada. In light of these developments, I asked the four largest general audience newspapers in Portland, the Oregonian, Portland Tribune, Willamette Week and Portland Mercury, to do the same. I thought this would be newsworthy, especially considering Portland’s 2012-13 rip-roaring fluoridation battle that generated hundreds of articles and major TV and radio coverage. Local editors felt differently. All four declined or didn’t return messages. Perhaps unpleasant memories were part of the reason. All had concluded the practice was safe and wrote pro-fluoridation editorials, but Portlanders emphatically rejected it 61% - 39%. A Harvard review had just been published finding children, mostly in China, exposed to higher fluoride levels had lower IQ’s in 26 out of 27 studies. World-renowned scientist Philippe Grandjean, one of the co-authors, said that while the study wasn’t conclusive and more research was needed, “Fluoride seems to fit in with lead, mercury, and other poisons that cause chemical brain drain.” But Willamette Week and the Mercury concluded it had no relevance to fluoridation. The Oregonian was especially dismissive, unleashing seven editorials, plus an editorial cartoon depicting fluoridation opponents as a toothless rabble in front of city hall. It branded claims that fluoridation could harm kids’ brains, lower IQ’s and cause other health problems as “crackpottery.” (I didn’t even know such a word existed.) Today, it’s interesting what the Oregonian does think is newsworthy. Recent health articles covered early detection of ovarian cancer, standing desks that helped students lose weight and how staying away from cell phones helps decision-making. These stories all had merit – they’re relevant and interesting. So was another recommending that parents take their babies to a dentist. This begs two questions: Isn’t preventing the potential loss of a child’s intelligence as newsworthy as preventing a cavity? Even more important, pregnant women drinking fluoridated water are, in effect, part of a continuing experiment testing the risk of brain damage in their children – without their consent. How is this ethical? It’s a big experiment. Although most countries reject fluoridation, nearly 75% of the U.S. population has it, including 38 towns in Oregon, Albany, Beaverton, Corvallis and Salem among them. How many studies showing serious harm will it take before the sacred cow of fluoridation is put out to pasture for good? I don’t know, but one thing’s for sure – you have to know about them first. NOTE: For further information on fluoride and neurotoxicity, compare the websites of the two leading organizations on opposite sides of the issue. The American Dental Association’s “premier resource on community water fluoridation” is Fluoridation Facts. Its section on neurotoxicity is less than one page, mainly dealing with one study from 1995. The few citations are all more than 20 years old. Fluoride Action Network has dozens of articles, videos and an interview with the very scientist who did the study cited by ADA. Its research section for professionals, one of the largest depositories in the world, has abstracts of 368 studies on neurotoxicity alone. You can decide for yourself which organization has more knowledge and credibility on the subject.

    BlueOregon / 22 d. 7 h. 53 min. ago more
  • Metro’s New Plan to Keep Voters out of Chehalem Ridge Nature ParkMetro’s New Plan to Keep Voters out of Chehalem Ridge Nature Park

    By John A. Charles, Jr. On October 19 the Metro Council adopted an Access Master Plan for the Chehalem Ridge Nature Park. This is a former industrial tree farm of 1,230 acres that Metro bought from Stimson Lumber Company in 2010. Chehalem Ridge is Metro’s largest land purchase financed through the bond sale program approved by voters in 1995 and again in 2006. However, it’s not clear why it was ever a priority. Located just east of Gaston, Chehalem Ridge is outside the Metro boundaries and far from any urban population. The roads leading to it are narrow and winding, and there is no public transit. The entrance is gated, and the land has never been open to the public. Chehalem Ridge is supposed to be the “crown jewel” of the Metro parks system, but the land itself is unremarkable. According to the Master Plan, prior surveys found “no significant natural areas on site.” Surveys also showed “no historic or archeological materials” and “no cultural resources were found.” In short, this is a generic parcel of overgrown timberland with minimal ecological value and almost no recreational appeal. Nonetheless, the Access Master Plan treats it like the second coming of Yellowstone. Of the 1,230 acres, more than 99% are in some kind of “conservation zone” that limits or prohibits active use by the voters who paid for it. The Plan notes that the property could easily accommodate 29.5 miles of recreational trails, in four different separate-use categories—hiking, cycling, equestrian, and multi-purpose—but only three miles are being planned for by Metro. This will create conflicts between cyclists, horseback riders, and walkers. In comparison, Portland’s revered Forest Park totals 5,157 acres and offers 90 miles of trails. After adjusting for size, Forest Park has seven times more trail miles than Chehalem Ridge will have. Moreover, dogs are allowed in Forest Park, as they are in virtually all local parks in the metropolitan region. Metro has a strict policy prohibiting dogs. Chehalem Ridge will have a single parking lot for 80 vehicles, public restrooms, parking for equestrians, a multi-use shelter and picnic area, and a small lawn area for family activities. If you want greater access to nature itself, it will be disallowed or discouraged. This is consistent with Metro’s over-arching philosophy of buying up vast tracts of green spaces far from where most people live, and then limiting taxpayer use. Other Metro properties near Chehalem Ridge—including Carpenter Creek Natural Area, Wapato View Area, and Penstemon Prairie—are not open to the public, nor is there any plan to do so. Metro went through a multi-year public outreach effort ostensibly designed to learn what people would like with this new property. According to Appendix C of the Master Plan, comments from the Spanish communities emphasized the importance of “gathering places, places to eat, security and most importantly, places for kids to play, exercise and cool off during the summer.” Comments for the English-speaking community emphasized “wanting to hike or walk with their dogs, and both advocacy for more bike-specific trails as well as comments around not wanting to mix bikes, pedestrians and horses on the same trail.” Metro’s Master Plan ignores virtually all these concerns. There will be no playgrounds for kids, few places for families to eat, the trails will create user conflicts, and dogs will be banned. At the public hearing, I was the only witness to criticize the Plan. I encouraged Metro to build at least 30 miles of trails, with separate facilities for hikers, cyclists, and equestrians. I suggested that a long hiking loop be created with possible campsites for use by Scouting groups and others desiring an easy backpacking experience. I also encouraged Metro to plan for more family-friendly elements such as disc golf, sand volleyball courts, picnic areas, and playgrounds for young children. These are the kinds of facilities found at Blue Lake Park, one of the region’s most popular recreational destinations. The Metro Council had zero interest in these ideas. As far as Councilors are concerned, they are letting us use 5.5 acres of the Park and we should be grateful. In his celebratory speech before dropping the gavel, Presiding Officer Tom Hughes proudly defended the status quo by stating, “There will be no ivy and no dogs; both are invasive species.” John A. Charles, Jr. is President and CEO of Cascade Policy Institute, Oregon’s free market public policy research organization. 10-26-17-Metro’s_New_Plan_to_Keep_Voters_out_of_Chehalem_Ridge

    Cascade Policy / 23 d. 13 h. 14 min. ago more
  • Why Protesters of Betsy DeVos Can’t Understand What She’s Talking AboutWhy Protesters of Betsy DeVos Can’t Understand What She’s Talking About

    By Steve Buckstein What would you do if you read an article about an Oregon public high school whose students seemed to be performing well above state averages? If you’re U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos, you’d hop on a plane and come sit in on three senior classes at the school─McMinnville High School. That’s exactly what DeVos did on October 11. She also met privately with some students and friends, including Cascade Policy Institute School Choice Outreach Coordinator and 2012 Oregon Mother of the Year Bobbie Jager. Her visit didn’t go unnoticed by those who incorrectly believe she’s out to destroy public education. Some 200 protesters, including teachers union officials, stood outside the school and let anyone who would listen know that they don’t want the school choice policies DeVos advocates anywhere near what they apparently see as the only educational institutions worthy of taxpayer support. Betsy DeVos is a long-time advocate for letting parents choose where their children get their educations. Time and again she’s tried to make clear that she’s not against public education; she just believes that educating the public isn’t always done best in traditional government schools. Sometimes students do better in public charter schools, private schools, online schools, or even in home school. So why can’t the protesters who showed up in McMinnville last week see what Betsy DeVos sees? Perhaps it’s because, for whatever reasons, their worldviews simply don’t include an understanding of how consumer choice and markets can work together to provide better services at lower prices than can government monopolies. Cascade Policy Institute published a thought piece on these concepts sixteen years ago that still stands as a seminal introduction to these perplexing concerns. Called “Choice Thinking,” here’s the abstract: A powerful, yet flawed perspective grips the public mind such that it ignores, distorts, and rejects school choice facts and arguments. Just as the Church rejected Galileo’s scientific findings, this public school ideology rejects choice supporters’ educational findings and analysis. The public simply cannot fit a market perspective into its understanding of how the world works. We will not make major strides toward school choice if we continue to believe that simply teaching the public about the benefits of market education or tinkering with choice proposals will be enough. A new market perspective can’t be simply taught. It must develop, like any living system develops, out of its more primitive pro-government form. Our challenge is to understand this transformation. We cannot change the public’s thinking if we do not understand it.  So, there you have it. School choice supporters, by and large, don’t understand why people like the Betsy DeVos protesters can’t comprehend what we see as obvious truths. Of course, some of the protesters may very well understand what we are talking about. They have a vested interest in keeping the status quo, so that all the billions of taxpayer dollars being spent to educate the public only flow into the government buildings where they work and teach. The fact that this status quo isn’t working for many children is the reason Betsy DeVos and countless school choice supporters advocate for letting the money follow the child to the school of their family’s choice. Steve Buckstein is Senior Policy Analyst and Founder of Cascade Policy Institute, Oregon’s free market public policy research organization. View the PDF version here: 17-18-Why_DeVos_Protesters_Can’t_Understand_School_Choice

    Cascade Policy / 29 d. 3 h. 26 min. ago more
  • Choice Thinking: Why does the public ignore, distort or  reject school choice facts and arguments?Choice Thinking: Why does the public ignore, distort or reject school choice facts and arguments?

    by Richard Meinhard, Ph.D. and Steve Buckstein September 10, 2001 (contact information updated in 2016)   Abstract A powerful, yet flawed perspective grips the public mind such that it ignores, distorts, and rejects school choice facts and arguments. Just as the Church rejected Galileo’s scientific findings, this public school ideology rejects choice supporters’ educational findings and analysis. The public simply cannot fit a market perspective into its understanding of how the world works. We will not make major strides toward school choice if we continue to believe that simply teaching the public about the benefits of market education or tinkering with choice proposals will be enough. A new market perspective can’t be simply taught. It must develop, like any living system develops, out of its more primitive pro-government form. Our challenge is to understand this transformation. We cannot change the public’s thinking if we do not understand it.   The Problem Voters in state after state continue to defeat school choice initiatives by large margins. Choice supporters respond by debating strategies such vouchers or tax credits, whether large or small steps should be attempted, how we should deal with the critics, and what kind of information and examples should be given to the public. But what if such strategic decisions by themselves have little to do with successfully changing the public’s fundamental point of view regarding choice? What if facts and evidence alone aren’t enough for the public to accept our ideas? What if our principles of choice and competition are not only misunderstood by the public but also actively rejected as dangerous to public education?[1] In his research Andrew Coulson found that five factors lead to excellence in a market education system: choice and responsibility for parents, freedom and competition for providers, and the profit motive.[2] These make wonderful sense to him, to us, and probably to you. But what if they don’t make sense to the public? We believe something quite fundamental, what we call the pro-government perspective, organizes the thought processes of most people and renders them incapable of understanding the facts and evidence that a coherent free market mental perspective provides. Markets simply don’t make sense to them. The logic of market principles is compelling to us but obviously not to most other people. And it’s clear that it does not matter what type of program is proposed. Small tax credits and limited voucher programs for low-income families are tolerated by the public as ways to solve particular problems but they do not convert people to an understanding of a market-based system. Americans enjoy one of the freest and most bountiful market systems in the world yet few can explain how it works. An understanding isn’t necessary to reap its benefits. But markets promise nothing except opportunities and choices, while government can promise much. With little understanding of markets and government monopolies, government promises and market fears can be enough reason for the public to reject market proposals. Neither critics nor choice supporters actually change the public’s underlying perspective on free markets and government. The critic’s rhetoric simply triggers already felt sympathies and a comfort with the government school system. The burden of changing public opinion rests with choice supporters. As a result, critics find it easy to defeat choice initiatives simply by playing on public fears and misunderstanding. The real problem facing choice advocates has more to do with the public’s lack of understanding of governments and markets than it does with how to package choice proposals or what information to provide. We don’t yet fully understand the nature and depth of this problem. Support for choice clearly depends upon changing an underlying pro-government perspective that organizes the public’s thinking. We need to understand this pro-government perspective so we can find ways to transform it into a market perspective.   The Public’s Pro-Government Perspective Choice supporters must admit a hard truth ¾ the public doesn’t yet believe in vouchers or tax credits let alone separation of school and state. We must also admit that we don’t understand much about the pro-government perspective, much less how to change it. We don’t know what controls and protects pro-government thinking, what it is about the logic of pro-government thinking that makes market principles incomprehensible. More importantly, we don’t understand how and why some individuals change their pro-government perspective to adopt a market perspective. Did you always believe in market education, or did you begin with some pro-government notions and then change your views over time? If you think it was simply exposure to new facts, programs, and examples, stop and ask yourself about your underlying values. Did something fundamental change regarding your perspective, or did you always understand the logic and power of markets? Pro-government beliefs form themselves into a self-protective whole; a perspective that is resistant to change in spite of facts or explanations about markets. The pro-government perspective, like any perspective, shapes what people see, think about, decide, value, and advocate about public policy. Here are some recent examples. A newspaper article reported on the congressional debate over reforming federal education policy. Senate Democratic leader Tom Daschle asserted, “We cannot have reform without resources.” A letter to the editor about energy deregulation asserted: “So who could ever suggest it should be priced by an open market just like anything else?” Another letter advocating taxing the wealthy to support affordable housing said, “Opposition to this bill has nothing to do with its effectiveness. The true reason for opposition is simple greed.” The pro-government perspective controls the thought of these people, the facts they observe, and the assumptions that they make — if there is a problem, government should correct it; social problems exist for lack of money for government remediation; some goods and services are privileged and can’t be provided through the market; and so on. On the other side of the debate, a free market perspective carries different assumptions—free markets create opportunity for everyone, the individual is fundamentally responsible for self, free markets create a diversity of goods and services, market exchanges produce increasing efficiencies, and so on. The two perspectives talk different languages, use different code words, see different facts, reason differently, hold different values, and work for different programs. We all recognize these two perspectives. They form one of the most fundamental divisions between people in our society today. Those of us trying to change the pro-government, anti-market perspective need to understand this system of thought just as physicians understand various systems of the body, scientists understand physical and biologic systems, and mathematicians understand math systems. The understanding of systems allows a scientist to explain them and how they arise, and it allows practitioners to change them. Yet surprisingly, there is very little good literature that describes and explains how the pro-government perspective operates or arises in people’s thinking. The pro-government perspective is the problem because it is so compelling that it grips and holds much of the public’s thinking. Unless we discover why this is so and how this perspective evolves into pro-market thinking, the pro-government public will continue to reject our positions, distort our facts, and trounce our initiatives.   Perspectives at Work Let’s look at three examples of how perspectives grip and control thought. The first comes from history; the second from our current educational research; and the third from the perspective many school choice supporters have but many opponents lack. 1. The Aristotelian Perspective Aristotle’s science of falling bodies persisted for 2,000 years, even though scholars contested it with facts some 400 years before Newtonian science finally replaced it. Even the classic experiment of dropping different weights from the Leaning Tower of Pisa was conducted much earlier but ignored and then misattributed to Galileo. While the experimental facts showed that bodies of different weights fell at the same velocities, the Aristotelian scientific perspective was so powerful that these findings were ignored, distorted or rejected as the old perspective protected itself from change. This denial of fact and logic by Aristotelian mechanics forms a famous chapter from the history of science. It is only one of many demonstrations of the gripping power a scientific perspective, even a faulty one, can hold over thought. 2. The Child’s Perspective of weight Even for individual concepts, we can see a gripping power at work that shapes the facts observed and the reasoning used. In experiments famous to educators, psychologists showed how students under the age of seven thought the weight of a clay ball changed when it is rolled out.[3] Young students’ ‘perspective’ of weight convinced them that because the clay was now longer, it must weigh more. When the researchers continued to roll the clay out, astonishingly some of these same youngsters suddenly changed their minds and asserted the weight was now less. When asked why, they said because it is now thin. Teaching, demonstrations, weighing the objects, nothing worked to change their mind. They knew as a fact that they observed that the two objects were a little bit different in weight. Yet months later, they reasoned and saw things differently. Now they knew as a matter of logical necessity that the two clay shapes weighed the same regardless of changes in length and thickness. The two balls had to be the same because nothing was added or taken away. The students’ perspective at first distorted and misperceived facts, but then the development of a more advanced perspective allowed the students to use a different logic and to see different facts in the same experiment. 3. The Perspective of Profit Conduct this inquiry. Ask the typical adult if the profit motive has any place in education. You’re likely to get a resounding, “No!” Then try any manner of facts or examples of for-profit companies providing quality education and see if you have persuaded the person. The pro-government perspective will not let the adult understand that both sides benefit in an economic exchange. Just as young children can’t observe that the weight hasn’t changed in a flattened ball of clay, many adults can’t comprehend that both buyer and seller gain value when they enter into a voluntary exchange. But the logic of the pro-market perspective makes an adult see that a buyer values the good or service received more than the money spent, and that the seller values the money received more than the good or service delivered. The logic of market principles compels us to make these observations, but for those with a pro-government perspective, it makes no sense. In this example profit is what psychologists call a centration. Just as the child centers only on the clay’s length to perceive a change in its weight, adults may center on the producer’s profit to perceive a loss for the consumer. Centrated thought lacks a larger system of reasoning that groups several factors together in order to organize its mental operations. As a result, thought is centered on isolated elements without the necessary relationships among the elements. The relationship of a two-way mutually beneficial exchange is but one of several market and system concepts that seem to be missing from the thinking of many. School choice supporters need to understand both why this is the case and how these concepts develop in people.   When a Perspective is Important As we said, people can use and benefit from markets without understanding them. However, compare the reform of public utilities and government franchised industries with reform of public schools. No basic change in the public’s understanding of system arrangements was required for the deregulation of telecommunications, airlines, trucking, energy, etc. The basic structural relationship between consumer and provider within those markets remained constant under deregulation—consumers still paid the provider for their services. From the public’s point of view, consumers were simply given more choices, basically a good idea. The providers were already economically tied to their customers, and deregulation did not upset the thinking of the general public. No change in perspective was necessary. School reform, however requires changing the basic consumer/provider relationship. In our system of public education, consumers don’t pay for services received, the public does. Families are not really customers. Society purchases educational services on behalf of families using a system of democratically run government schools. For the public to accept market principles in education it must understand and accept a new consumer/producer relationship, a huge change given the public’s low level of market understanding. The public must abandon its rather thoughtless belief that education is a public good, an individual entitlement, and that it is the public’s responsibility to provide education to all children for the common good of society. Within the public’s traditional way of thinking (or lack of thinking) about services, market reforms have no place. The pro-government perspective is the public school ideology at work. Market driven reforms make sense only within the market perspective. Voters realize that vouchers, for example, are not a mere improvement within the box but a fundamental change in the box itself, the very structure of a basic institution. The public seems to sense that vouchers are a basic change and that makes them uneasy; it seems too large, too risky, and possibly hurtful. Advocates underestimate the conceptual change in the public’s perspective that real reforms require. Most previous education reform efforts stay comfortably within the government system box. Take for example the nationally recognized 1983 report on the state of American education, A Nation at Risk.[4] Neither its findings nor the recommendations addressed in any way the failures of central planning, monopolies, government as a method of service delivery, third party funding, lack of consumer voice or choice, or any other system aspects of government versus market systems of delivery. The report took the system itself for granted and only attempted improvements in the performance properties of the system—content, standards, teaching, leadership, fiscal support, etc. However, school choice is not another program improvement. It’s a systemic change, and it requires a huge change in the perspective that takes a government delivery system for granted.   The Think Tank Role Choice advocates can continue to hammer away with think tank papers and media campaigns, oblivious to the nature of the pro-government perspective, or we can turn to research and development in an attempt to first understand the perspective and then to change it. This R&D is a natural function of think tanks. The very heart of the free-market think tank mission — to work toward a free society — brings with it two tasks. First, think tanks must be expert in markets and government systems. Second, as society’s teachers, think tanks must also be expert in understanding and changing the public’s thinking and misconceptions. These tasks form two quite different challenges. As teachers we must not ignore the learner’s current level of understanding and ability to grasp complex concepts. We cannot teach algebra to young children who have yet to understand the whole number system. Likewise, market teachers must understand how market understanding develops out of elementary concepts of producers and consumers to the more advanced explanations of self-regulating, self-elaborating systems of exchange. As teachers of school choice, our job is not simply a matter of presenting new facts or the history of government schooling. It is the public’s pro-government perspective itself that stands in the way of understanding the facts and explanations of how markets would work in education. The public is rejecting our advanced concepts because the pro-government perspective is compelling; it grips thinking and shapes what is seen as fact; it shapes the values and organizes the policy choices in educational systems. The public makes the wrong choices, from our point of view, because it cannot fit market understanding into its pro-government perspective of how the world works.   What Should We Settle For? We don’t yet understand how to change the current pro-government perspective to a free market perspective. But we have clues, we have seen it happen in individuals, and we know how to study the problem and work toward a solution. If fact, there will likely be more than one optimal solution. And we can all contribute something to the effort. Without a shift in the public’s perspective, we may have to settle for the limited successes that Moe’s recent work suggests.[5] Yet years ago Chubb and Moe told us that the intellectual debate about school choice was over. We won. But for the public, the policy debate is far from over. When we understand how the public’s perception of government and markets develops, we will be in a far better position to win the policy debates. Then no teacher union money or old political rhetoric will stop the evolution to a market education system.   ENDNOTES [1] Terry Moe found that information didn’t make much difference in people’s evaluation of vouchers. On p.228 of his new book, Schools, Vouchers, and the American Public (Washington, D.C.: The Brookings Institution, 2001), he says, “As a result, the impact of information on support for vouchers may be positive, or it may be negative, depending on how these other variables come into play.” What he is saying is that there is an underlying “structure of thinking” (pp. 227,234, 253), a “genuine substance” (pp. 350, 358), “surprisingly effective at linking these things together” (p. 244), [2] Andrew Coulson, Market Education: the Unknown History (New Brunswick: Social Philosophy and Policy Center and Transaction Publishers, 1999) pp. 293-306. [3] Jean Piaget and Bärbel Inhelder, Child’s Construction of Quantities, trans. Arnold J. Pomerans (New York: Basic Books, 1974) p. 22-46. This experiment is one of a series. These were not intended to simply describe these amusing misconceptions of students in their early stages of development, but to uncover the cognitive systems that organize and produce them. [4] A Nation at Risk: The Imperative for Educational Reform was guided by the 18-member national Commission on Excellence chaired by David Gardner, President of the University of Utah. The Commission, appointed by Secretary of Education T.H. Bell, released its report in April of 1983 after 18 months of work. Its report was based on commissioned papers and testimony from professional groups, parents, public officials, and scholars. [5] Moe (Schools, Vouchers, and the American Public) uses a variable he terms “the public school ideology” to measure the effect of this perspective on people’s positions and views of vouchers.   Cascade Policy Institute 4850 SW Scholls Ferry Road, Suite 103 Portland, Oregon 97224 (503) 242-0900 info@cascadepolicy.org ▪ cascadepolicy.org   Richard Meinhard, Ph.D. is a developmental psychologist who specializes in the development of cognitive, instructional, and organizational systems. He is a Cascade Policy Institute Academic Advisor. Steve Buckstein is a founder Cascade Policy Institute, Oregon’s free-market think tank. In 2001 he was President and in 2016 he is Senior Policy Analyst. He can be contacted at steven@cascadepolicy.org. Choice_Thinking  

    Cascade Policy / 29 d. 6 h. 6 min. ago more
  • When Is a Health Care Tax Not a Tax?When Is a Health Care Tax Not a Tax?

    By Steve Buckstein Oregon state legislators who voted for you to pay higher health insurance premiums and higher hospital costs don’t want you to think you’ll be paying more because they raised taxes. In their words, they aren’t raising taxes at all; they’re simply putting assessments on these services and letting insurers and hospitals pass on the extra costs to you. Three legislators who don’t want you to pay these higher costs collected more than enough voter signatures to place Referendum 301 on the ballot in January, so you can vote No and stop these new taxes from going into effect.* The problem is, when you see your Voters Pamphlet and ballot, you won’t see the words “tax” or “taxes” anywhere in the official statements. You’ll only read about “assessments.” Apparently, tax supporters think you’re more likely to approve them if you don’t believe they’re taxes at all.  Assessments sound so much more palatable, don’t they? Referendum supporters have asked the Oregon Supreme Court to require that the official statements refer to taxes, not just assessments. Whether this happens or not, hopefully enough voters will understand that they’re being asked to impose new taxes on services that are expensive enough already, and vote No. Learn more at StopHealthCareTaxes.com. *Referendum 301 is now known as Measure 101 on the January 23, 2018 Oregon ballot. Steve Buckstein is Senior Policy Analyst and Founder of Cascade Policy Institute, Oregon’s free market public policy research organization. View the PDF version here: 10-18-17-When_Is_a_Health_Care_Tax_Not_a_Tax-1 http://www.cascadepolicy.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/10-18-17-When_Is_a_Health_Care_Tax_Not_a_Tax.mp3

    Cascade Policy / 32 d. 0 h. 9 min. ago more
  • “Shuffling” Is for Playing Cards, Not School Kids“Shuffling” Is for Playing Cards, Not School Kids

    By Kathryn Hickok Portland Public Schools is redrawing the boundaries of more than a dozen schools and reassigning 5,000 students, ten percent of its enrollment. According to The Oregonian: “To make sure no school ends up understaffed or overcrowded, students must be shuffled.” In government-run school districts, kids are cards in a deck. The bureaucracy gets to deal, assigning students to school buildings based on their residences. And even when parents exercise choice by moving into a neighborhood, gaining access to special school-based programs, or enrolling in charter schools located in underused facilities, the district retains the right to shuffle and deal over. When Oregon enacted an interdistrict open enrollment law in 2012, hundreds of Oregon parents chose schools outside their districts of residence that better met the needs of their children. Empowering parents of every income level to choose schools through open enrollment, more charter schools, and private school choice programs would be more respectful of each student’s dignity—and a better way to address his or her educational needs—than a centrally planned system in which the odds always favor the district “house.” In most aspects of life, Oregonians expect parents to judge what is in the best interests of their children. When it comes to education, the stakes are too high to treat kids like playing cards. Kathryn Hickok is Publications Director and Director of the Children’s Scholarship Fund-Oregon program at Cascade Policy Institute, Oregon’s free market public policy research organization. View the PDF version here: 10-11-17-Shuffling_Is_for_Playing_Cards http://www.cascadepolicy.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/10-11-17-Shuffling_Is_for_Playing_Cards.mp3

    Cascade Policy / 39 d. 0 h. 9 min. ago more
  • $6,000 Oregon Tax Credit for installing solar is ending at the end of 2017
$6,000 Oregon Tax Credit for installing solar is ending at the end of 2017

    I recently learned that the $6,000 Oregon Tax Credit for installing solar is ending at the end of 2017. Because switching from fossil fuels to solar energy will help slow climate change + knowing this information will save people money + this feels like the right thing to do = I am encouraging you to take action NOW! If you're ready to go solar or know someone who is - now's the time to act. Contact a solar installation company in your area and get started with the process - here's how it works: The state tax credit expires at the end of this year. To qualify for the tax credit, you must sign up and make a payment in 2017 and the system must be completed before April 1st 2018. The federal tax credit is claimed on the tax year in which the system in installed. If your project is finished in 2017, then you get the tax credit on your 2017 tax return. If it's finished in 2018, then the credit is claimed on your 2018 tax return, which is filed in the spring of 2019. Here's a Benefit Estimator from Energy Trust Thanks for making the world a better place. Feel free to share this on social media or with any environmental organizations that might find this something they can get behind.

    BlueOregon / 49 d. 6 h. 58 min. ago more
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