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    Google News / 19.11.2017 09:50
  • Report: West Virginia star QB Will Grier to undergo surgery, miss Oklahoma game - CBSSports.comReport: West Virginia star QB Will Grier to undergo surgery, miss Oklahoma game - CBSSports.com

    CBSSports.comReport: West Virginia star QB Will Grier to undergo surgery, miss Oklahoma gameCBSSports.comWest Virginia fell at home to Texas 28-14 on Saturday afternoon and lost its starting quarterback in the process. Junior Will Grier left the game late in the first quarter after injuring his finger diving for the pylon in what was, at the time, a ...Will Grier To Undergo Surgery, Out For Oklahoma And Possibly Bowl GameThe Smoking Musket (blog)all 156 news articles »

    Google News / 2 h. 36 min. ago more
  • WATCH: Oklahoma QB Baker Mayfield's crotch-grab taunt draws ire from ESPN booth - Dallas NewsWATCH: Oklahoma QB Baker Mayfield's crotch-grab taunt draws ire from ESPN booth - Dallas News

    Dallas NewsWATCH: Oklahoma QB Baker Mayfield's crotch-grab taunt draws ire from ESPN boothDallas NewsLAWRENCE, KS - NOVEMBER 18: Quarterback Baker Mayfield #6 of the Oklahoma Sooners prepares to take a snap during the game against the Kansas Jayhawks at Memorial Stadium on November 18, 2017 in Lawrence, Kansas. (Photo by Jamie ...and more »

    Google News / 2 h. 36 min. ago more
  • Spotlight: Oklahoma's Baker Mayfield's mouth — not his play — makes him the center of attention - Los Angeles TimesSpotlight: Oklahoma's Baker Mayfield's mouth — not his play — makes him the center of attention - Los Angeles Times

    Los Angeles TimesSpotlight: Oklahoma's Baker Mayfield's mouth — not his play — makes him the center of attentionLos Angeles TimesOklahoma will play in the conference championship game and quarterback Baker Mayfield likes shaking hands. The No. 4 Sooners clinched a title game spot by beating 1-10 Kansas 41-3. But there was no brotherly love in this game, even though Oklahoma ...College Football: Oklahoma State's Slim Playoff Hopes WitherNew York TimesKansas State upsets No. 13 Oklahoma State, 45-40FOXSports.com5 Takeaways from Oklahoma's win over Kansas: Baker Mayfield's performance clashes with sideline anticsDallas NewsUSA TODAY -Washington Post -Bleacher Reportall 343 news articles »

    Google News / 2 h. 50 min. ago more
  • News Minute: Here is the latest Oklahoma news from The Associated Press at 9:40 p.m. CSTNews Minute: Here is the latest Oklahoma news from The Associated Press at 9:40 p.m. CST

    The attorney for a former state senator charged with producing and transporting child pornography says his client will plead guilty to one count of child sex trafficking in exchange for U.S. prosecutors dropping three...

    KWTV / 2 h. 59 min. ago
  • Former Oklahoma state senator pleads guilty to child sex trafficking charge: report - The Hill (blog)Former Oklahoma state senator pleads guilty to child sex trafficking charge: report - The Hill (blog)

    The Hill (blog)Former Oklahoma state senator pleads guilty to child sex trafficking charge: reportThe Hill (blog)A former Oklahoma state senator has pleaded guilty to a child sex trafficking charge, The Oklahoman reported Saturday. Former state Sen. Ralph Shortey, a Republican, had been accused of offering to pay a 17-year-old boy for "'sexual' stuff" earlier ...Attorney: Ex-Oklahoma senator to plead to child sex chargeSeattle Timesall 8 news articles »

    Google News / 3 h. 2 min. ago more
  • Mayfield Snubbed As No. 3 Sooners Roll 41-3 Win Over KansasMayfield Snubbed As No. 3 Sooners Roll 41-3 Win Over Kansas

    On his way to the bus, Oklahoma quarterback Baker Mayfield stopped outside the visiting locker room at Memorial Stadium to sign a handful of autographs for wide-eyed kids who clearly idolize him.

    News On 6 / 4 h. 1 min. ago
  • Owner Of Truck Involved In Police Chase Speaks OutOwner Of Truck Involved In Police Chase Speaks Out

    The owner of a pickup speaks out about the moments before a woman stole his truck and lead police on a chase.  

    News On 6 / 4 h. 17 min. ago
  • Thompson, Pringle lead Kansas St. past Oklahoma St. 45-40Thompson, Pringle lead Kansas St. past Oklahoma St. 45-40

    Thompson, Pringle lead Kansas State past Oklahoma State 45-40

    ABCNews.com / 4 h. 54 min. ago
  • Tulsa Man: Video Shows 4 Kids Breaking Into ShedTulsa Man: Video Shows 4 Kids Breaking Into Shed

    We are getting a look at surveillance video a viewer says shows four kids breaking into a shed and wandering through the man's neighborhood.

    News On 6 / 5 h. 40 min. ago
  • TCU in good shape to be Oklahoma's Big 12 title game opponent, but here's why it's not clinched yet - Dallas News (blog)TCU in good shape to be Oklahoma's Big 12 title game opponent, but here's why it's not clinched yet - Dallas News (blog)

    Dallas News (blog)TCU in good shape to be Oklahoma's Big 12 title game opponent, but here's why it's not clinched yetDallas News (blog)So we know that Oklahoma is in the Championship Game and TCU is in great shape to join the Sooners. How can that happen? The easiest way for TCU to make the Big 12 title game: Win its rivalry game with Baylor on Friday. If the Horned Frogs win, they're ...and more »

    Google News / 5 h. 48 min. ago more
  • Kansas football fan held up saddest sign during 41-3 loss to Oklahoma - For The WinKansas football fan held up saddest sign during 41-3 loss to Oklahoma - For The Win

    For The WinKansas football fan held up saddest sign during 41-3 loss to OklahomaFor The WinEven though they've only had one win so far this season, the Kansas Jayhawks seemed confident going into their game against No. 5 Oklahoma on Saturday. It didn't go well for the Jayhawks. Oklahoma crushed them 41-3. One fan expressed his feelings in a ...

    Google News / 6 h. 4 min. ago more
  • Thompson, Pringle lead Kansas St. past Oklahoma St. 45-40 - Austin American-StatesmanThompson, Pringle lead Kansas St. past Oklahoma St. 45-40 - Austin American-Statesman

    Austin American-StatesmanThompson, Pringle lead Kansas St. past Oklahoma St. 45-40Austin American-StatesmanHe threw a 14-yard touchdown pass to Dillon Stoner to cut Kansas State's lead to 45-40 with 4:02 to go. The Wildcats went three-and-out to give Oklahoma State a chance to take the lead, but Rudolph missed four straight passes, then Kansas State ran out ...and more »

    Google News / 6 h. 17 min. ago more
  • TPD Reports East Tulsa Crime SpikeTPD Reports East Tulsa Crime Spike

    Tulsa police say they’re seeing an increase in reports of criminal activity in the Mingo Valley area, in east and south Tulsa. 

    News On 6 / 6 h. 20 min. ago
  • Two Men, One Teen Behind Bars After ATM Armed RobberiesTwo Men, One Teen Behind Bars After ATM Armed Robberies

    Two men and one teenager are behind bars after a string of armed robberies at Tulsa ATMs Friday night.

    News On 6 / 6 h. 35 min. ago
  • Oklahoma football: Watch Baker Mayfield grab crotch, yell profanity at Kansas sideline after score - The Oklahoma DailyOklahoma football: Watch Baker Mayfield grab crotch, yell profanity at Kansas sideline after score - The Oklahoma Daily

    The Oklahoma DailyOklahoma football: Watch Baker Mayfield grab crotch, yell profanity at Kansas sideline after scoreThe Oklahoma DailySenior quarterback Baker Mayfield has made it clear he doesn't like Kansas. After Oklahoma scored on a pass from Mayfield to junior tight end Mark Andrews, Mayfield ran back to the Sooners' sideline, grabbed his crotch and yelled "f*ck you" at the ...

    Google News / 7 h. 15 min. ago more
  • Neighbors Of East Tulsa Homicide: It Was Only A Matter Of TimeNeighbors Of East Tulsa Homicide: It Was Only A Matter Of Time

    New information has surfaced on Tulsa's 75th homicide of the year.

    News On 6 / 7 h. 16 min. ago
  • $5,000 Radio, Shotguns Stolen From Car, Jenks Firefighter Says$5,000 Radio, Shotguns Stolen From Car, Jenks Firefighter Says

    A Jenks firefighter says someone stole a radio worth $5,000 and two shotguns out of his car.

    News On 6 / 7 h. 34 min. ago
  • Attorney: Ex-Oklahoma senator to plead to child sex chargeAttorney: Ex-Oklahoma senator to plead to child sex charge

    The attorney for a former state senator charged with producing and transporting child pornography says his client will plead guilty to one count of child sex trafficking in exchange for U.S. prosecutors dropping three other charges against him

    ABCNews.com / 8 h. ago
  • Teams Battle It Out In High School Football Week 2 PlayoffsTeams Battle It Out In High School Football Week 2 Playoffs

    Tahlequah-Seqouyah beat Berryhill 32-30.

    News On 6 / 9 h. 7 min. ago
  • Oklahoma teacher was waiting to have sex with a student in a candle-lit room before arrest, authorities say - NOLA.comOklahoma teacher was waiting to have sex with a student in a candle-lit room before arrest, authorities say - NOLA.com

    NOLA.comOklahoma teacher was waiting to have sex with a student in a candle-lit room before arrest, authorities sayNOLA.comA 22-year-old teacher in Yukon, Oklahoma is accused of having sex with a high school student after the boy's parents reported nude photographs and text messages on their son's phone. The woman was sitting on her living room floor with the lights off ...Oklahoma teacher, married to football coach, accused of sex with studentCBS NewsOklahoma teacher accused of having sex with underage studentAtlanta Journal ConstitutionOklahoma Science Teacher, 22, Charged with Rape of Teenage Student After Police Barge InTIMEFOX31 Denver -KSBW The Central Coast -news9.com KWTV -kfor.comall 77 news articles »

    Google News / 9 h. 55 min. ago more
  • Fallin's veto of budget plan catches GOP leaders off guardFallin's veto of budget plan catches GOP leaders off guard

    Republican leaders in the Oklahoma House and Senate say they're surprised that Gov. Mary Fallin vetoed a budget plan to raid cash reserves and further cut state agency spending.

    KWTV / 11 h. 3 min. ago
  • Suspect At Center Of Manhunt In Pottawatomie County CaughtSuspect At Center Of Manhunt In Pottawatomie County Caught

    It's day two of a manhunt in Pottawatomie County after deputies said a man ripped off several businesses and homes, even shooting at some of his victims.

    News On 6 / 11 h. 25 min. ago
  • NASA Launches Powerful Polar Weather SatelliteNASA Launches Powerful Polar Weather Satellite

    After back-to-back delays earlier this week, a workhorse Delta 2 rocket finally streaked away from the California coast early Saturday carrying a state-of-the-art $1.6 billion weather satellite into an orbit around Earth's poles, the first of four intended to ensure reliable forecasting over the next two decades.

    News On 6 / 13 h. 37 min. ago
  • Group of seniors, disabled file federal suit over servicesGroup of seniors, disabled file federal suit over services

    A group of Oklahoma seniors and adults with disabilities who receive in-home state services to keep them out of nursing homes has filed a federal lawsuit against the two agencies that fund the programs.

    KWTV / 13 h. 47 min. ago
  • Spurs overcome 23-point deficit to beat Thunder, 104-101Spurs overcome 23-point deficit to beat Thunder, 104-101

    LaMarcus Aldridge had 26 points and the San Antonio Spurs overcame a 23-point deficit to beat the Oklahoma City Thunder 104-101

    ABCNews.com / 14 h. 52 min. ago
  • Oklahoma vs Kansas live stream: Watch online, TV channel, time | SI ... - Sports IllustratedOklahoma vs Kansas live stream: Watch online, TV channel, time | SI ... - Sports Illustrated

    Sports IllustratedOklahoma vs Kansas live stream: Watch online, TV channel, time | SI ...Sports IllustratedOklahoma travel to Memorial Stadium to face Kansas on Saturday in a Big 12 matchup. No. 4 Oklahoma (9-1, 6-1 Conf) enters Saturday after defeating No.and more »

    Google News / 15 h. 34 min. ago
  • Real estate notes from The Oklahoman for Nov. 18, 2017Real estate notes from The Oklahoman for Nov. 18, 2017

    Matt Warren and Randy Smith's home at 931 NW 18 will be among those on the Mesta Park Holiday Home Tour Dec. 2-3. [PHOTO BY CHRIS LANDSBERGER, THE OKLAHOMAN] The 40th Mesta Park Holiday Home Tour, Dec. 2-3, will feature five homes, a festive refreshment porch and a tour of Wilson Arts Integrated School.

    Oklahoma News / 18 h. 26 min. ago
  • Oklahoma governor's budget bill veto could bring new sessionOklahoma governor's budget bill veto could bring new session

    Oklahoma Governor Mary Fallin watches from the gallery as the senate considers legislation before adjourning from a special session on Friday, Nov. 17, 2017 in Oklahoma City, Okla. Oklahoma Governor Mary Fallin is joined by members of the House of Legislature as she watches from the senate gallery during the close of a special session on Friday, Nov. 17, 2017 in Oklahoma City, Okla.

    Oklahoma News / 22 h. 56 min. ago more
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  • Oklahoma governor's budget bill veto could bring new sessionOklahoma governor's budget bill veto could bring new session

    Republican Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin has vetoed a bill that would have raided cash reserves and cut deeper into agency funding to balance the state budget

    ABCNews.com / 1 d. 2 h. 7 min. ago
  • Ortiz, Llanusa help No. 21 Oklahoma win hold off SMU 87-75Ortiz, Llanusa help No. 21 Oklahoma win hold off SMU 87-75

    Gabbi Ortiz scored 20 points, freshman Ana Llanusa hit two key 3-pointers down the stretch and No. 21 Oklahoma held on to defeat SMU 87-75

    ABCNews.com / 1 d. 3 h. 13 min. ago
  • Stabbing Reported At Oklahoma County JailStabbing Reported At Oklahoma County Jail

    An ambulance is at the hospital to treat a person who was reportedly stabbed. Authorities have not said how the person was stabbed.

    Oklahoma News / 1 d. 3 h. 22 min. ago
  • The Latest: Gov. Fallin vetoes budget bill with shortfallThe Latest: Gov. Fallin vetoes budget bill with shortfall

    The Latest on a budget bill passed by the Oklahoma Legislature meeting in special session (all times local):

    KWTV / 1 d. 3 h. 48 min. ago
  • Top 20 onshore US petroleum spills since 2010Top 20 onshore US petroleum spills since 2010

    By The Associated Press

    KWTV / 1 d. 7 h. 36 min. ago
  • Oklahoma Hall of Fame inducts 2017 classOklahoma Hall of Fame inducts 2017 class

    From left, 2017 inductees Justice Tom Colbert, Hal Smith, Shannon Miller, Phil Parduhn and Robert A. "Bob" Funk pose for a photo before the induction ceremony for the Oklahoma Hall of Fame at the Cox Convention Center in Oklahoma City, Thursday, Nov. 16, 2017. Photo by Nate Billings, The Oklahoman The Oklahoma Hall of Fame inducted its 2017 class on Thursday.

    Oklahoma News / 1 d. 8 h. ago more
  • Oklahoma Governor Mary Fallin is joined by members of the House of Legislature as she watches from the senate gallery during the close of a special session on Friday, Nov. 17, 2017 in Oklahoma City, ...Oklahoma Governor Mary Fallin is joined by members of the House of Legislature as she watches from the senate gallery during the close of a special session on Friday, Nov. 17, 2017 in Oklahoma City, ...

    Oklahoma Governor Mary Fallin is joined by members of the House of Legislature as she watches from the senate gallery during the close of a special session on Friday, Nov. 17, 2017 in Oklahoma City, Okla. (Steve Sisney/The Oklahoman via AP)

    ABCNews.com / 1 d. 10 h. 58 min. ago
  • Oklahoma Governor Mary Fallin watches from the gallery as the senate considers legislation before adjourning from a special session on Friday, Nov. 17, 2017 in Oklahoma City, Okla. (Steve Sisney/The ...Oklahoma Governor Mary Fallin watches from the gallery as the senate considers legislation before adjourning from a special session on Friday, Nov. 17, 2017 in Oklahoma City, Okla. (Steve Sisney/The ...

    Oklahoma Governor Mary Fallin watches from the gallery as the senate considers legislation before adjourning from a special session on Friday, Nov. 17, 2017 in Oklahoma City, Okla. (Steve Sisney/The Oklahoman via AP)

    ABCNews.com / 1 d. 10 h. 59 min. ago
  • The Latest: Oil spill brings rush of business to tiny townThe Latest: Oil spill brings rush of business to tiny town

    The Latest on a pipeline still that leaked 210,000 gallons of oil in rural South Dakota (all times local):

    KWTV / 1 d. 11 h. 26 min. ago
  • Ex-Oklahoma mayor arraigned in fraud schemeEx-Oklahoma mayor arraigned in fraud scheme

    A former Oklahoma mayor and bank vice president has been arraigned for his alleged involvement in a fraud scheme.

    KWTV / 1 d. 12 h. 45 min. ago
  • Mystery at the new Bible museum: Are its Dead Sea Scrolls fake?Mystery at the new Bible museum: Are its Dead Sea Scrolls fake?

    Small scraps of parchment inscribed with tiny Hebrew letters. They look like countries cut out of a map or lost pieces from a jigsaw puzzle nobody could solve.

    Oklahoma News / 1 d. 12 h. 46 min. ago
  • Oklahoma Senate approves budget bill, sends to governorOklahoma Senate approves budget bill, sends to governor

    The Oklahoma Senate has approved a bill that will cut funding to most state agencies and will spend cash reserves to finish plugging a budget shortfall after lawmakers failed to pass a broad package of tax increases.

    KWTV / 1 d. 14 h. 21 min. ago
  • License-plate scanners planned for OK HwyLicense-plate scanners planned for OK Hwy

    Editorial Analysis: Do Oklahoma citizens really want state government photographing every license plate throughout the state? It’s all for a good cause. District Attorneys have taken some flack for operating as highway robbers – the civil asset forfeiture issue, click here for more, but the DAs say they need more money to pay staff and conduct prosecutions. They are not getting sufficient funds from the legislature, fees and fines so they have found another revenue source.  Ben Botkin for OklahomaWatch.org writes, “Oklahoma has finalized a deal with a Massachusetts company to use license-plate scanners to catch uninsured drivers, and the firm expects to issue 20,000 citations a month starting as early as next year. The program, believed to be the first of its kind in the nation, involves setting up automated high-speed cameras  on highways around the state to detect uninsured vehicles and mailing their owners a citation with a fine of $184, according to the District Attorneys Council. Gatso USA, a Beverly, Massachusetts-based company that specializes in red-light-running and speeding detection systems, will initially get $80, or 43 percent, of each fine. Its cut will decrease to $74 after two years and $68 after five years, according to a contract approved by the state after months of legal review and negotiation. The company could expect to bring in $1.6 million a month, or $19 million a year, if the 20,000 citations are issued monthly. Gatso is a subsidiary of a Dutch company.” By any standard, that is a lot of money, but it assumes that people will pay the tickets when the bill arrives. Obviously, people who drive without insurance are too poor or too criminal to follow the law so why do DAs expect compliance.  Oh wait.  More prosecutions and fines and fees may be possible. Think about this Oklahoma.  You may read the contract online by clicking here.  The Oklahoma Watch story asserts, “drivers who pay the fees will avoid a ‘driving without insurance’ charge on their permanent record.”  That is a motivator. Tim Harris Former-District Attorney Tim Harris is now running to fill the First Congressional District Seat held by Rep. Jim Bridenstine. In a Tulsa Today interview, Harris talked about the incredibly high volume of cases and how he dealt with them as Tulsa County DA, “we filed about 6,000 felonies, an equal number of misdemeanors and 1,700 juvenile cases both deprived and delinquency per year.  We took to the courtroom just over 100 felony cases a year that were tried to a jury, so what happened to the others?… I negotiated many more cases than I ever tried,” Harris said. So generally speaking in Tulsa County Harris dealt with near 13,700 cases per year by taking 100 to court and horse-trading on 13,600 others. Were those decisions deeply thought out after careful investigation based on justice, expediency, available staff or costs? If Oklahoma underfunds the District Attorney Offices can we really expect a fair, careful and balanced system of justice? Botkin notes, “A 2015 Pew Charitable Trusts survey found that 26 percent of all drivers in the state are uninsured – the highest rate in the nation – which can push up insurance premiums and hit-and-run accidents. “But another incentive underlies the program. It will be overseen by the District Attorneys Council rather than law enforcement, and the state’s 27 district attorneys’ offices are expected to receive millions of dollars in citation revenue a year, although no estimates were provided. District attorneys have complained that their revenue sources are diminishing because of state budget cuts and the drop in bounced-check fines.   “The cameras will be deployed on a small scale initially. Vehicles with scanners will be sent into the Oklahoma City and Tulsa areas to get traffic counts, gauge noncompliance and gather data on the first locations for cameras. “Within six months, Oklahoma County, Tulsa County and 13 other counties in those areas will be mapped and studied, with the cameras in place, the company estimates. The mobile enforcement units will then drive to other parts of the state, looking for high-volume areas of noncompliance that could be potential spots for camera installation. Within the first year of the program, about 26 cameras will be in place throughout the two metro areas. Another 10 cameras will be installed throughout the rest of the state. “Additionally, there will be two or three mobile enforcement units mounted on vehicles, bringing the total to nearly 40 cameras statewide. “’The first program of its kind in the country is certain to attract scrutiny,’ Gatso says in its plan. ‘Our program management is designed to limit the number of issued citations in the opening months, in concert with an inclusive and extensive public awareness campaign.’” For more of this story from Oklahoma Watch, click here, but the question to keep in mind:  Is this the way we should fund the Oklahoma District Attorney Offices?

    Tulsa Today / 1 d. 16 h. 33 min. ago more
  • Oklahoma-inspired, $500-million Museum of the Bible will open amid...Oklahoma-inspired, $500-million Museum of the Bible will open amid...

    The $500 million, high-tech Museum of the Bible, inspired by Oklahoma's Hobby Lobby family, opens Saturday just three blocks from the U.S. Capitol. Media from around the world gathered there this week for a preview of the museum, billed as the largest Bible museum in the world.

    Oklahoma News / 1 d. 17 h. 47 min. ago
  • Police arrest Oklahoma teacher after cops pretend to be student in text messagePolice arrest Oklahoma teacher after cops pretend to be student in text message

    Hunter Day of Canadian, Oklahoma was recently arrested after police accused her of having sex with a student and exchanging nude photos. Hunter Day of Canadian, Oklahoma was recently arrested after police accused her of having sex with a student and exchanging nude photos.

    Oklahoma News / 1 d. 22 h. 34 min. ago
  • Pay panel: Slash Oklahoma lawmakers' salary by 8.8 percentPay panel: Slash Oklahoma lawmakers' salary by 8.8 percent

    A state panel in charge of lawmaker pay says Oklahoma state senators and representatives will see their wages cut.

    KWTV / 2 d. 0 h. 26 min. ago
  • Keystone pipeline leak days before Nebraska expansion rulingKeystone pipeline leak days before Nebraska expansion ruling

    The Keystone pipeline has leaked 210,000 gallons of oil in rural South Dakota but officials don't believe it has polluted water.

    KWTV / 2 d. 0 h. 34 min. ago
  • Panel says Oklahoma legislators to get 8.8 percent pay cutPanel says Oklahoma legislators to get 8.8 percent pay cut

    The Legislative Compensation Board, a nine-member appointed panel, voted 4-3 on Thursday to reduce the base pay of Oklahoma legislators by 8.8 percent, effective in November 2018. The pay cut would reduce a legislator's base salary from $38,400 to $35,021.

    Oklahoma News / 2 d. 3 h. ago
  • Man who escaped Oklahoma prison 15 years ago arrested in TennesseeMan who escaped Oklahoma prison 15 years ago arrested in Tennessee

    Knoxville Police say on November 11 around 2:15 p.m., they responded to a disturbance at a business to investigate an individual who was apparently "not who he was claiming to be." During the investigation, authorities discovered the suspect, 63-year-old Augustus King, had escaped from the Oklahoma Department of Corrections in 2002.

    Oklahoma News / 2 d. 7 h. 38 min. ago
  • Keystone pipeline leaks 210K gallons of oil in South DakotaKeystone pipeline leaks 210K gallons of oil in South Dakota

    TransCanada Corp. says its Keystone pipeline has leaked an estimated 210,000 gallons of oil in South Dakota.

    KWTV / 2 d. 9 h. 14 min. ago
  • The Latest: Oklahoma legislators to get 8.8 percent pay cutThe Latest: Oklahoma legislators to get 8.8 percent pay cut

    The Latest on a state board's decision to reduce the salaries of all 149 state senators and representatives (all times local):

    KWTV / 2 d. 9 h. 38 min. ago
  • Man on Oklahoma's 15 most wanted list arrested in TennesseeMan on Oklahoma's 15 most wanted list arrested in Tennessee

    Authorities say a man who was on Oklahoma's 15 most wanted list has been arrested in Tennessee.

    KWTV / 2 d. 11 h. 46 min. ago
  • Section of highway in Oklahoma dedicated to fallen officerSection of highway in Oklahoma dedicated to fallen officer

    A 4-mile (6.44-kilometer) section of U.S. 177 in Oklahoma has been dedicated to a fallen officer.

    KWTV / 2 d. 11 h. 46 min. ago
  • Loophole allows fundraisers during Oklahoma special sessionLoophole allows fundraisers during Oklahoma special session

    Oklahoma legislators have been unable for weeks to reach an a... . FILE - In this Monday, Jan. 9, 2017 file photo, Oklahoma state Rep. Chris Kannady, R-Oklahoma City, looks over his computer during a House Budget hearing in Oklahoma City.

    Oklahoma News / 2 d. 12 h. 19 min. ago
  • What to do in Oklahoma on Nov. 16, 2017: Celebrate Statehood Day at...What to do in Oklahoma on Nov. 16, 2017: Celebrate Statehood Day at...

    Richard Vernon Goetz's . etching "Ramsey Tower" is featured in the Oklahoma City Museum of Art's new special exhibition "The Art of Oklahoma."

    Oklahoma News / 2 d. 17 h. 5 min. ago
  • Gary Jones announces for governorGary Jones announces for governor

    State Auditor Gary Jones Wednesday officially kicked off his bid for the state’s highest office in Tulsa promising to be a Governor for all Oklahomans. “It’s time to reinvent state government so that it is accountable to the people of our great state,” Jones said. “Oklahomans are tired of the political games and want state government to fund core services in an effective and efficient manner. They want elected officials to be responsive to the citizens and not beholden to lobbyists.” A Jones administration will put Oklahomans first – well ahead of the powerbrokers. He has a reputation of being a strong public servant working hard for all constituents. “We need to reform our budget process and our system of ethics,” Jones said. “We’ve made it so that high rollers have an even bigger piece of the pie by allowing even larger donations to dark money groups. The people should hold the purse strings, not the deep pocket activists who wine and dine our legislators.” Jones promises to find solutions to Oklahoma’s short-term money woes and develop a long-range strategy to make our state prosperous. “I’m not someone who is going to kick the can down the road,” Jones said. I’m not afraid of hard work and I won’t turn away from problems or look for an easy fix. Our problems won’t be addressed by leaving things to the next generation to figure out. “I lead by example,” Jones said. “The annual pattern of crisis budgeting meant we had to do some serious work in the State Auditor’s Office to ensure we could sustain budget cuts year after year after year. We did what was necessary by eliminating most administrative positions, reducing travel, and purchasing software that improved both our work product and efficiencies. “Today, we have 20 fewer employees than when I took office and we’re doing a better job identifying waste, fraud, and abuse than ever before,” Jones said. “We need to do that across state government so we can fund education, public safety, and infrastructure improvements.” Jones has been calling for performance audits of state agencies for seven years but it took recent scandals for those calls to be echoed by a majority of legislators. “I know how to fix the problems in our state because I know how to identify them and find cost-effective solutions to right the ship,” Jones said. “If you want more of what we’ve had, there are plenty of other candidates to consider. If you want someone who will tell you like it is and restore honesty and integrity to public office, then I have the proven skills of hard work, determination, and leadership to get things done.” Jones was born in Ft. Sill, the son of a career Army Master Sargent, and grew up in Southwest Oklahoma. Along with his wife Mary Jane, a retired school teacher, they operate a cow/calf operation begun almost four decades ago. They have two children and three grandchildren. For more information, visit www.jonesok2018.com.

    Tulsa Today / 2 d. 17 h. 42 min. ago more
  • Early considerations in the Lt. Governor raceEarly considerations in the Lt. Governor race

    Oklahoma’s Lt. Governor Race 2018 features four announced Republicans and no Democrat. GOP contenders include former Oklahoma Republican Party Chair Matt Pinnell, current Oklahoma Corporation Commissioner Dana Murphy, State Senator Eddie Fields and Dominique Damon Block, Sr. In an analysis of ethics reports for the period ending October 31, it appears that this race may well be one of the more interesting in the upcoming cycle.   Matt Pinnell Matt Pinnell reported a total of $472,253.23 in donations. These contributions come from individuals throughout Oklahoma and nationwide. Pinnell has never held elected office, but served in President Trump’s campaign as the National Republican Committee’s State Coordinator. Matt Pinnell was raised in the Sooner State and lives in Tulsa with his wife, Lisa, and their four children. A graduate of Oral Roberts University, Matt speaks of its founder’s challenge to “make no little plans here.” It was central to the DNA of the university- and it’s been central to how he’s lived his life ever since he declares. At this point eight years ago, current Lt. Gov. Todd Lamb raised $301,550.75, but Lamb had served in the Oklahoma Legislature so Pinnell is setting a record pace for a first time candidate. Dana Murphy Corporation Commissioner Dana Murphy has raised $85,162.90. For someone with 16 years of experience running statewide, Murphy reports are surprisingly low and a concern for supporters. Campaigning statewide, Murphy focuses mostly on Corporation Commission issues. In the technical aspects of the many regulatory functions of the Commission, Murphy excels as a subject matter expert. Murphy was born in Woodward, Oklahoma to a family involved in farming, ranching and the petroleum industry. Her career began as a Petroleum Geologist for over 10 years. She worked as a law clerk while attending night law school at Oklahoma City University then served as an administrative law judge, a consulting geologist, and ran a private law practice in Edmond, Oklahoma. Since 2009, Murphy has served as a Oklahoma Corporation Commissioner. Murphy’s race for Lt. Governor in 2018 is advanced by a rollover of $638,821.71 existing in her campaign account from her 2016 Corporation Commission race. Murphy’s opponent in that race withdrew before ballots were printed, so she was elected without contest and not on the ballot in November 2016 with funds collected largely unspent. Eddie Fields State Senator Eddie Fields is further down the fundraising scale having gathered $37,621. This number is no doubt affected by the time Sen. Fields is spending in debate during the ongoing Legislative Special Session and could well jump as he focuses more on the race. Eddie Fields was born in a military family and graduated from Wynona High School with a Bachelor of Science in Agri-Business from Oklahoma State University. He is a third-generation Osage County cattle rancher and businessman. This was the first full quarter for Murphy and Fields to raise money. In comparison, Pinnell’s first quarter saw an inflow total of $304,990.78 – impressive by any standard. Of the new money Murphy has raised specifically for the 2018 Lt. Governor’s race, at least $33,000 of that appears to come from individuals identified as active or retired from energy or utilities both in Oklahoma and nationally. Thus roughly 40% of Dana Murphy’s contributions come from the industries she currently regulates as a Corporation Commissioner.  Murphy has accepted the maximum donation from registered lobbyist and her former Corporation Commission opponent Jim Roth, now registered to lobby the Commission. Corporation Commissioner Dana Murphy In Murphy’s 2008 race against him, she attacked Roth’s campaign for being funded by the industry he regulated. After being in office for nearly 10 years, Murphy is now doing the very thing she criticized her opponent for. In that 2008 race, Murphy charged Roth with accepting money from those who “have regularly had cases in front of him. What are they paying for” she asked at the time in a story reported by Mike McCarville for Tulsa Today. Murphy was also strongly critical of the Corporation Commissioner Patrice Douglas who ran for a seat in Congress without resigning from the Commission. That disputed was covered by Tulsa Today (click here for more) and later justified an Election Disendorsement of Patrice Douglas in that race (click here for more). Several have noted the irony as Murphy follows the same pattern the race for Lt. Governor. Murphy also accepted a $1,000 contribution from registered lobbyist and former Corporation Commissioner Jeff Cloud. Cloud is registered to lobby the Corporation Commission and formerly served on the Corporation Commission with Murphy. Dominique Damon Block Dominique Damon Block, Sr. raised $696.32 in the last reporting cycle bringing his total to date to $798.32 in contributions to himself from himself – no other contributor is listed. Republican Block notes his hometown is Oklahoma City and lists an A.S. in Public Service from OSU, a B.B.A. in Organizational Management from Langston, M.A. in Criminal Justice Management & Administration from the University of Central Oklahoma and is a candidate for M.S./Ph.D. in Forensic Psychology at Walden University. Nationally, Oklahoma has been won by Republican candidates in each of the past five presidential elections. The widest margin of victory was Republican Populist Donald Trump’s 36 percent margin in 2016 while the narrowest was George W. Bush’s 22 percent margin in 2000. In a state long considered populist, Democrats controlled Oklahoma until recent election cycles. Democrats controlled the state legislature since its establishment in 1907 until Republicans took the House in 2004 and the state Senate in 2008. Now not a single county in Oklahoma has voted Democrat in a presidential election since 2000 – some suggest because, after 100 years, their history is legend. Oklahoma Democrats engaged in the largest government corruption in U.S. History, a County Commissioner Scandal which saw 230 convictions or guilty pleas. While no commissioners in Tulsa County were involved, the scandal touched 60 of the state’s 77 counties and finally ended in 1984. While the Lt. Governor’s race is not Oklahoma’s top leadership position; it holds considerable visibility as a spokesperson and would assume leadership in the case a governor is unable or unavailable. In function, the Lt. Governor is tasked historically in state tourism and economic development.

    Tulsa Today / 6 d. 7 h. 57 min. ago more
  • St. Gregory’s to suspend operationsSt. Gregory’s to suspend operations

    SHAWNEE – The Board of Directors of St. Gregory’s University made the difficult, but necessary, decision on Wednesday to suspend operations of the university at the end of this semester, following the denial of their loan application to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Without this component in the financial plan, the ability to sustain the university at this point is not possible. The Board of Directors continues to work actively to resolve financial difficulties and to explore possible partnerships in order to move forward.   “With great sadness, the Board of Directors of St. Gregory’s University voted today to suspend operations effective at the close of the fall semester 2017,” said Fr. Don Wolf, Chairman of the Board. “Our main concern at this moment is for our students, staff, and faculty who will be profoundly impacted by this decision. The University is working with several colleges to facilitate student transfers in an attempt to minimize disruption in our students’ lives. Please keep them in your prayers,” Fr. wolf added. Established in 1875, St. Gregory’s is a private liberal arts college and Oklahoma’s only Catholic university located 40 miles east of Oklahoma City. “My heart breaks for the profound disruption in the lives of our wonderful students, staff, and faculty as the Board of Directors voted to suspend operations of one of Oklahoma’s iconic institutions of higher learning. We will do everything possible to ease the transition as we work with other colleges to place our students. My heart also breaks at the suspension of Catholic liberal arts education in Oklahoma,” said Dr. Michael Scaperlanda, President of St. Gregory’s University. The university will finalize a provisional plan with the Higher Learning Commission. Once the plan is approved by HLC, students will be notified of the plan. Teach-out agreements and transfer opportunities are underway with area universities. Over the next few weeks, transfer fairs and job fairs will be scheduled on campus. “I am grateful for our excellent staff and faculty who have labored for years under severe financial constraints, dedicated to providing the best education for our students. “They have provided generations of students a framework to live joy-filled lives in service to others. I am also grateful for the dedication and sacrifice of the monastic community, the Board of Directors, the Citizen Potawatomi Nation, the Catholic Church of Oklahoma and countless others who have prayed for St. Gregory’s and given of their resources to help sustain the university,” President Scaperlanda said. Rt. Rev. Lawrence Stasyszen, Abbot and Chancellor of St. Gregory’s expressed that “The monks of St. Gregory’s Abbey are deeply concerned by this turn of events. We are especially concerned for the families who will be impacted by this development. Our community has made one of our highest priorities the mission of education since coming to Indian Territory in 1875. “We are grateful to the countless people who have been partners with us in this ministry, especially the Citizen Potawatomi Nation and many dedicated colleagues and donors. We maintain our commitment to pray for all who have attended and supported St. Gregory’s over the years, and will explore new ways of contributing to the culture of Oklahoma.” The Abbey will continue serving the Catholic community. “Like so many small liberal arts colleges, St. Gregory’s has struggled financially for years. We are grateful to St. Gregory’s Abbey, the Citizen Potawatomi Nation, and the Archdiocese of Oklahoma City for providing bridge funding as the university worked to create a financially sustainable business model,” Rt. Rev. Stasyszen added. For more information and updates, visit www.stgregorys.edu.

    Tulsa Today / 9 d. 17 h. 51 min. ago more
  • Tulsa Republicans rebuke State LegislatureTulsa Republicans rebuke State Legislature

    David McLain, Republican Party of Tulsa County Tulsa Today Exclusive: David McLain, Chairman, Republican Party of Tulsa County released a letter Monday to party insiders calling to task Oklahoma lawmakers for “massive, permanent, tax increases.” McLain wrote, “I call upon our Republican Governor and Legislature to adhere to the Republican Party Platform, on which they were elected” adding “There are opportunities for spending reductions in bloated, top-heavy agencies and duplications of services.”    Titled “Republicans of Tulsa County Oppose State Tax Increases” McLain wrote: To meet a short-term budget problem, our Republican Governor, House and Senate Legislatures proposed massive, permanent, tax increases on services, gasoline, tobacco, oil and utilities. They dismiss proposals to reduce spending. Meanwhile, our State Treasurer announced in September that, “Gross receipts from the past 12 months…are more than those of the prior 12 months by 2.3 percent, or just over $250 million.” The revenue crisis has passed, but officials still want to raise taxes. The insistence on increasing taxes is splitting the Party and damaging the Oklahoma Republican brand. I talk to Republicans daily, knock on doors for our Republican candidates running in special elections and frequently consult with elected officials at the local and state levels. Oklahoma Republican voters are dismayed at this fixation on tax increases. A News9/Newson6 poll conducted October 26 by SoonerPoll.com shows the majority of the state’s likely voters oppose tax increases (52.7 percent opposed the measure, 44.7 percent “strongly opposed; Republicans opposed at 55.2 percent, Democrats opposed at 50.1 percent). Nationally, President Trump is purposing the most aggressive TAX CUT in the history of the United States. Somehow, Oklahoma is out of sync. I call upon our Republican Governor and Legislature to adhere to the Republican Party Platform, on which they were elected. The Platform states: D1) We support reductions, when feasible, of both taxes and government spending as a general rule of government; D2) We oppose new taxes and fee increases; D27) We urge the Governor and Legislature to review all existing government programs and agencies with the intent of abolishing duplicate programs and agencies. There are opportunities for spending reductions in bloated, top-heavy agencies and duplications of services. Spending cuts are difficult, but the voters expect leadership to do what they have been elected to do, work together and find fiscally conservative solutions to this budget shortfall. They are not alone as our Tulsa County Precinct Officers will carry a conservative message to voters and explain solutions developed by constructive conversations with officials, that reduce governmental burdens on the people. In this, we will build a stronger Party and live up to the promise of our brand. As Chairman of the Republican Party of Tulsa County, my mission to ensure that the Party continues to grow, remains focused and adheres to our convention approved Platform. We will support officials and candidates who articulate and demonstrate conservative principles and high moral values. We have a duty to hold accountable those who win office as Republicans. We do not expect to agree on every issue, but our officials and candidates risk losing support if they violate key principles. I write this letter not to ruffle feathers, but to let Tulsa County Precinct Officers, Governor Mary Fallin and Republican State Senators and Representatives know that Tulsa County Republicans will defend Conservative Principles and adhere to the Party Platform.   McLain ended the declaration with an invitation for elected officials to join Tulsa County precinct officials at the next Tulsa County Committee Meeting January 25 for what is likely to be a spirited exchange. In short, the Republican base in Tulsa County has declared open revolt with more Midwestern charm than President Trump, but to the same affect upon the OK GOP establishment. 

    Tulsa Today / 18 d. 18 h. 14 min. ago more
  • Com. Doak applauds order on health plansCom. Doak applauds order on health plans

    Trump signs an executive order in the Roosevelt Room of the White House with Rand Paul, Mike Pence, Rep. Virginia Foxx, and Secretary of Labor Alexander Acosta. Oklahoma Insurance Commissioner John D. Doak is applauding President Donald Trump’s signing of an executive order that could expand the health insurance options for millions of Americans. Specifically, President Trump has directed federal agencies to amend rules to expand access to association health plans by allowing employers to form groups across state lines and to return oversight of short-term limited duration plans to the states.      Oklahoma Insurance Commissioner John D. Doak “I commend President Trump for taking action to help the people who have been hurt by Obamacare,” Doak said. “Expanding the use of association health plans will allow Oklahomans to band together to find the stable, affordable coverage that they need. “In 2012, I pushed for legislation in Oklahoma that encouraged the use of association health plans in our state, and I’m thrilled that these plans could expand even more under the Trump administration.” The executive order also directs other federal agencies to take steps to address regulations that hinder consumer choices. These actions will include proposing rules to allow employers to fund tax-advantaged accounts to cover out-of-pocket expenses for employees via health reimbursement arrangements and producing a report outlining any state and federal laws that may impede competition and choice for health insurance and healthcare consumers. “Taken together, these actions could go a long way toward returning competition to our health insurance markets and could provide consumers with choices they may not have had before,” Doak said. The Oklahoma Insurance Department, an agency of the State of Oklahoma, is responsible for the education and protection of the insurance-buying public and for oversight of the insurance industry in the state.

    Tulsa Today / 36 d. 17 h. 21 min. ago more
  • OK shows growth: income, sales & energyOK shows growth: income, sales & energy

    September Gross Receipts to the Oklahoma Treasury provide evidence of economic recovery in Oklahoma, as total collections top those from the same month of the prior year for a sixth consecutive month, State Treasurer Ken Miller announced Wednesday. Gross receipts for September are $1 billion, ahead of collections from last September by $72.4 million, or 7.7 percent. Gross receipts from the past 12 months, at $11.2 billion, are more than those from the prior 12 months by 2.3 percent, or just over $250 million, Miller said. “Economic momentum in the state is going up,” Miller said. “In September, gross receipts show increased income and consumption, attributable at least in part to increased oil field activity during the past several months.” All major revenue streams, except for motor vehicle taxes, are up over the prior year in September. The gross production tax on oil and natural gas is ahead of last September’s receipts by almost 60 percent. Gross income tax collections are up by more than 5 percent, and sales tax is higher by more than 10 percent. Motor vehicle receipts are off from last year’s receipts by 6.7 percent. The 12-month picture shows continued, steady growth. Only corporate income tax payments are shown as lower than those from the previous 12-month period. Growth in individual income, sales, gross production and motor vehicle taxes show increases ranging from 0.5 percent to 41.8 percent. New revenue boosts bottom line New revenue resulting from legislation enacted earlier this year is boosting monthly receipts. The tax commission attributes a total of $23.8 million in September to those law changes. The largest amount, $11.1 million, came from a new 1.25 percent state sales tax on motor vehicles. A $5 fee on motor vehicle registration increased collections by $1.5 million for the month. Changing the 1 percent horizontal drilling gross production tax rate to 4 percent generated $6.9 million during the month. Elimination and suspension of gross production rebate payments added $3 million to gross collections. Ending a discount for businesses that remit sales tax added $1.3 million for the month, and a new fee assessed on professional sports tickets contributed $102,473. Since August, the law changes have yielded $40.5 million in new gross revenue. Other indicators Oklahoma’s seasonally-adjusted unemployment rate rose by one-tenth of a percentage point to 4.5 percent in August, according to figures released by the Oklahoma Employment Security Commission. State jobless numbers improved by one-half of a percentage point over the year. The U.S. jobless rate was set at 4.4 percent for the month. After dropping below growth neutral in July, the Oklahoma Business Conditions Index topped growth neutral in August and September. The September index was set at 62.7 up from 56.2 in August. Numbers above 50 indicate anticipated positive economic growth in the next three to six months. The index has been above 50 during eight of the past nine months. September collections September gross collections total $1 billion, up $72.4 million, or 7.7 percent, from September 2016. Gross income tax collections, a combination of personal and corporate income taxes, generated $368 million, an increase of $18.6 million, or 5.3 percent, from the previous September. Individual income tax collections for the month are $297.5 million, up by $14.1 million, or 5 percent, from the prior year. Corporate collections are $70.5 million, an increase of $4.5 million, or 6.7 percent. Sales tax collections, including remittances on behalf of cities and counties, total $384.2 million in September. That is $35.8 million, or 10.3 percent, more than September 2016. Gross production taxes on oil and natural gas generated $50.2 million in September, an increase of $18.7 million, or 59.4 percent, from last September. Compared to August reports, gross production collections are up by $6.4 million, or 14.6 percent. Motor vehicle taxes produced $60 million, down by $4.3 million, or 6.7 percent, from the same month of last year. Other collections, consisting of about 60 different sources including use taxes, along with taxes on fuel, tobacco, and alcoholic beverages, produced $149.6 million during the month. That is $3.6 million, or 2.5 percent, more than last September. Twelve-month collections Gross revenue totals $11.2 billion from the past 12 months. That is $251.8 million, or 2.3 percent, more than collections from the previous 12 months. Gross income taxes generated $4 billion for the October 2016-September 2017 period, reflecting a decrease of $39.4 million, or 1 percent, from the October 2015-September 2016 period. Individual income tax collections total $3.6 billion, up by $16.2 million, or 0.5 percent, from the prior 12 months. Corporate collections are $403.5 million for the period, a decrease of $55.6 million, or 12.1 percent, over the previous period. Sales taxes for the period generated $4.3 billion, an increase of $81.9 million, or 1.9 percent, from the prior year. Oil and gas gross production tax collections brought in $484.8 million during the past 12 months, up by $142.9 million, or 41.8 percent, from the previous 12-month period. Motor vehicle collections total $756.1 million for the period. This is an increase of $6.2 million, or 0.8 percent, from the trailing period. Other sources generated $1.6 billion, up by $60.2 million, or 3.8 percent, from the previous 12 months. About Gross Receipts to the Treasury Since March 2011, the Office of the State Treasurer has issued the monthly Gross Receipts to the Treasury report, which provides a timely and broad view of the state’s macro economy. It is provided in conjunction with the General Revenue Fund allocation report from the Office of Management and Enterprise Services, which provides important information to state agencies for budgetary planning purposes. The General Revenue Fund receives less than half of the state’s gross receipts with the remainder paid in rebates and refunds, remitted to cities and counties, and placed into off-the-top earmarks to other state funds.

    Tulsa Today / 44 d. 17 h. 38 min. ago more
  • more news
  • Call for Republicans to cut, not taxCall for Republicans to cut, not tax

    OK Gov. Mary Fallin with David Arnett, Tulsa Today Editorial: It is difficult when someone you have supported for years betrays foundational honor. It can cause divorce, end friendships and, in politics, generate great distain. Sadly, as years of punditry accumulate, this writer is less likely to allow betrayal to pass without comment. The good news is that more diplomatic Republican leaders are telling the current cluster of elected how cows eat hay.   The story in the Oklahoman today quotes a letter to Republican leadership from former U.S. Sen. Tom Coburn with former Gov. Frank Keating and former Secretary of State Larry Parman warning that “Government is the problem” and “the problem is that government spends too much.” Former U.S. Senator Tom Coburn (R-OK) All three are greatly experienced honored Conservative Republicans well and truly gifted in solving complex legislative policy and political issues. They are too kind to mention that our grassroots Oklahoma Republicans are about ready to go into full revolt. Balloting revolts are possible in Oklahoma not because (as Democrats dream) we want less freedom and more taxes, but because the current elected have failed miserably to cut government functionality to a level we can afford or to communicate specifically how they have advanced any Conservative reforms. Pay attention dear pompous pontificating potentates.  Oklahoma suffered 100 years under Dem-O-Rat crony control and voters are waiting for elected Republicans to fix that. Reduce government and it’s crushing burden on our struggling people or voters will turn every dunderhead out.  Clear enough? Ronald Reagan 40th President of the United States. It is said that Democrats fall in love, Republicans fall in line, but this writer asserts the line of the grassroots in the upcoming election cycle is forming well to the right of the current crop of elected Republicans. We know who has failed in part and in whole their public and personal honor. Time to do right, vote right or move out. The Oklahoman notes: Coburn, Keating and Parman urged Republicans to reconsider their opposition to cuts and to shrink state government rather than tax further. “Sound and fiscally conservative policy must always consider reforms and prioritizing spending,” they wrote. “The people of Oklahoma have spoken clearly in favor of this approach.” Coburn, Keating and Parman argued the Republican losses are instead evidence that “when policymakers break promises” and have “moral failings,” their political allies lose elections. “During this special session, those who claim the principles and label of Ronald Reagan must act on their promises,” they wrote. “Those principles reject all tax increases and efforts to generate more revenue during times like these.” Click here for the story in the Oklahoman.

    Tulsa Today / 45 d. 17 h. ago more
  • OK Seniors can get smart about MedicareOK Seniors can get smart about Medicare

    The Oklahoma Insurance Department is hosting a series of free events to help seniors prepare for Medicare Open Enrollment. The education and counseling seminars will start on Oct. 4. “Medicare is in place to help our citizens, but we want to make sure they are getting the right plan for their needs,” Oklahoma Insurance Commissioner John D. Doak said. “These events are great for people who are new to Medicare or even seniors who want to know how Medicare will work with their current coverage. Our trained counselors will be there to answer any questions.” Oklahoma Insurance Commissioner John D. Doak The Medicare Open Enrollment period runs from Oct. 15 through Dec. 7. During this time, beneficiaries can review their current medical and prescription drug coverage, as well as explore new options available that could provide better coverage at a reduced cost. The Oklahoma Insurance Department’s Medicare Assistance Program is hosting four educational and counseling events in Oklahoma City. They are free and open to the public. After a presentation, there will be a limited number of slots available to speak one-on-one with a trained counselor. One-on-one counseling appointments are also available on other days. Education and Counseling Events: Wednesday, Oct. 4 Friday, Oct. 6 Monday, Oct. 9 Thursday, Oct. 12 All events will be held at the Oklahoma Insurance Department, Five Corporate Plaza, 3625 NW 56th St., Suite 100, Oklahoma City. The presentation will take place at 1:00 p.m. Individual counseling sessions are from 2:00-4:00 p.m. Registration is required to attend. Call 800-763-2828 to reserve a seat. Partner agencies around the state are hosting similar education events before the start of Medicare Open Enrollment. To find an event in your area, call 800-763-2828. The Oklahoma Insurance Department, an agency of the State of Oklahoma, is responsible for the education and protection of the insurance-buying public and for oversight of the insurance industry in the state. While the US Senate continues to pass some healthcare updated, a September 7 story about Commissioner Doak’s testimony to congress posted on newsok.com seems today remarkably prophetic as he noted then that the ACA in Oklahoma ‘can’t be sustained’ Commissioner Doak …Oklahoma Insurance Commissioner John Doak told a Senate committee Wednesday that the Affordable Care Act has led the state along a “flawed path” that cannot be repaired with minor fixes alone. “What is happening now can’t be sustained and we expect that eventually Oklahomans will have no marketplace options,” he told the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions. Over three hours of testimony and questioning, Doak staked out the most conservative position on health care of the five commissioners, lambasting the ACA and doubting whether bipartisan proposals can rescue Oklahoma’s health insurance system from collapse. “I am not convinced that Obamacare waivers are going to be the solution to our problems,” he said. “What we really need is an innovative long-term solution that truly returns power back to the states to implement ideas tailored to fit each state’s specific needs for health insurance.” Click here for more of that report on Newsok.com.

    Tulsa Today / 58 d. 16 h. 17 min. ago more
  • Line-item budgeting legislation filedLine-item budgeting legislation filed

    Seven members of the Oklahoma State Senate have co-authored legislation aimed at increasing transparency and accountability in exactly how tax dollars are being used by the agencies receiving the vast majority of state appropriations each year. Senate Bill 875 requires the Legislature to approve line-item budgets for agencies appropriated over $100 million in state funds. Sen. Roger Thompson, R-Okemah, is the principal author of the legislation, co-authored by Sen. AJ Griffin, R-Guthrie; Sen. Stephanie Bice, R-Oklahoma City; Sen. Jason Smalley, R-Stroud; Sen. Marty Quinn, R-Claremore; Sen. Lonnie Paxton, R-Tuttle; & Sen. Julie Daniels, R-Bartlesville. Thompson, who chairs the Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Finance, said the legislation would give legislators and their constituents a clearer understanding of exactly how agencies are using their state appropriated resources, and an opportunity to redirect how those resources are allocated to prioritize the needs of citizens. “The biggest responsibility the Legislature has is writing and passing the budget. One way or another, it impacts every single person in our state,” Thompson said.  “By digging deeper and really examining all the programs, services and other expenses these major agencies are funding, the public is going to be more fully informed about how those dollars are being used, and lawmakers will have the ability to be better stewards of those dollars,” Thompson added. Agencies that would be subject to this legislation include the Department of Education; CareerTech; Department of Transportation; the Oklahoma Health Care Authority; the Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse; the Department of Human Services; and the Department of Corrections. While annual appropriations to Higher Education are more than $100 million, the state constitution restricts the Legislature from specifying how the appropriation is allocated. “Line item budgeting is not a new concept.  It was done through 2009 and then was ended in order to give agencies more flexibility in times of limited resources,” Thompson said.  “But the bottom line is lawmakers are the representatives of the people—we are making decisions on their behalf and are accountable to them in ways state agencies are not.  This is our responsibility, especially as we face continued budget challenges.”      

    Tulsa Today / 88 d. 12 h. 32 min. ago more