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    Google News / 17.01.2018 04:00
  • WRAL.com Voters' Choice Awards: Your picks for best Triangle businesses, entertainment, peopleWRAL.com Voters' Choice Awards: Your picks for best Triangle businesses, entertainment, people

    The winners in more than 100 categories have been announced.

    WRAL / 15 min. ago
  • Wake jurors weighing fate of man charged in capital double murder caseWake jurors weighing fate of man charged in capital double murder case

    A Wake County jury on Tuesday began deliberating the fate of a man charged with two counts of first-degree murder, even though prosecutors and defense attorneys agree that the defendant … Click to Continue »

    NewsObserver.com / 25 min. ago
  • Pilot carves message into frozen lake for sky-high proposalPilot carves message into frozen lake for sky-high proposal

    A pilot from Minnesota took to the air to propose to his longtime girlfriend.

    ABC 11 / 29 min. ago
  • Wake County Board of Education names interim superintendentWake County Board of Education names interim superintendent

    The Wake County Board of Education announced Tuesday evening the appointment of Dr. Del Burns as interim superintendent of the Wake County Public School System.

    ABC 11 / 47 min. ago
  • Will historic Goldsboro tree be cut down to boost downtown development?Will historic Goldsboro tree be cut down to boost downtown development?

    A symbolic tree planted in the middle of downtown Goldsboro is facing demolition because it could stand in the way of the next phase of the city's downtown development.

    WRAL / 51 min. ago
  • Wake County school board names interim superintendentWake County school board names interim superintendent

    Del Burns, who previously led Wake County schools for four years, will serve as interim superintendent, starting next month. The Wake school board made the announcement Tuesday evening. Current superintendent … Click to Continue »

    NewsObserver.com / 52 min. ago
  • Former leader named interim superintendent of Wake County schoolsFormer leader named interim superintendent of Wake County schools

    The Wake County school board on Tuesday night announced an interim superintendent to take the helm next month.

    WRAL / 57 min. ago
  • Forecast snow totals increase; Gov. Cooper declares State of EmergencyForecast snow totals increase; Gov. Cooper declares State of Emergency

    ABC11 is in First Alert Mode as snow is expected to move into the area Wednesday morning.

    ABC 11 / 58 min. ago
  • NC DOT, business owners prepare for Wednesday's winter weatherNC DOT, business owners prepare for Wednesday's winter weather

    As school districts began canceling Wednesday classes and much of central North Carolina was placed under a winter storm warning or a winter weather advisory, city employees were preparing the roads for winter weather.

    WRAL / 1 h. 7 min. ago
  • Can your boss fire you for not showing up on a snowy day?Can your boss fire you for not showing up on a snowy day?

    If you wake up Wednesday morning and decide it's unsafe to get out on the roads to go to work, you'd better hope your boss agrees.

    ABC 11 / 1 h. 10 min. ago
  • Javiera Caballero Named to Durham City CouncilJaviera Caballero Named to Durham City Council

    After a 5-1 vote, Javiera Caballero has been selected to fill a vacant at-large seat on the Durham City Council. The seat opened up after Steve Schewel was elected mayor.…

    Indy Week / 1 h. 12 min. ago
  • How Chapel Hill, area school systems are preparing for the expected snowstormHow Chapel Hill, area school systems are preparing for the expected snowstorm

    The town of Chapel Hill and all three area school systems announced schedule changes for Wednesday because of the snowstorm that is expected to hit the Triangle on Wednesday. Durham … Click to Continue »

    NewsObserver.com / 1 h. 15 min. ago
  • Classes canceled, state of emergency issued ahead of Wednesday's snow storm Classes canceled, state of emergency issued ahead of Wednesday's snow storm

    Several counties in central North Carolina were under a winter storm warning or a winter weather advisory as an approaching weather system with the potential to drop several inches of snow moved closer to the Triangle.

    WRAL / 1 h. 16 min. ago
  • Hour by hour: Snow to fall through Wednesday afternoonHour by hour: Snow to fall through Wednesday afternoon

    WRAL tracks the impending snow storm hour by hour.

    WRAL / 1 h. 35 min. ago
  • Trinity House, Duke's newest dormitory, is now open and the first residents are enjoying the fancy digsTrinity House, Duke's newest dormitory, is now open and the first residents are enjoying the fancy digs

    Residence hall comes with a fully equipped kitchen, arcade, several commons areas and a movie theatre. Energy efficient and filled with artwork spring semester students will be first to inhabit the East Campus building. … Click to Continue »

    NewsObserver.com / 1 h. 37 min. ago
  • Duke Energy prepared for outages ahead of snow stormDuke Energy prepared for outages ahead of snow storm

    Duke Energy crews will be in storm mode as snow moves into the Triangle on Wednesday, staged and ready to respond to power outages.

    ABC 11 / 1 h. 47 min. ago
  • NC Governor declares state of emergency ahead of winter stormNC Governor declares state of emergency ahead of winter storm

    North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper declares a state of emergency in North Carolina in advance of a winter storm expected to dump several inches of snow in areas of the state. Cooper encouraged North Carolinians to stay off the roads. … Click to Continue »

    NewsObserver.com / 1 h. 52 min. ago
  • Nearby assault puts Wilson hospital on lockdownNearby assault puts Wilson hospital on lockdown

    Wilson Medical Center and affiliated facilities were locked down Tuesday afternoon after an assault nearby, police said.

    WRAL / 1 h. 55 min. ago
  • New Durham City Council member is 1st LatinaNew Durham City Council member is 1st Latina

    The City Council has its first Latina after members voted to appoint Javiera Caballero on Tuesday night. The council is now majority women. Caballero is a program coordinator and PTA … Click to Continue »

    NewsObserver.com / 2 h. ago
  • NC DACA recipients: We are the hard-working people the U.S. wants as immigrantsNC DACA recipients: We are the hard-working people the U.S. wants as immigrants

    The hard-working children of ambitious parents are the very kind of people the U.S. should want as immigrants, two DACA recipients who grew up in the Triangle area said Tuesday. … Click to Continue »

    NewsObserver.com / 2 h. 10 min. ago
  • Bodies of missing Durham man, unidentified woman found in Falls LakeBodies of missing Durham man, unidentified woman found in Falls Lake

    The bodies of missing Durham man Carl Adams and a woman yet to be identified have been recovered from Falls Lake, near the Hickory Hill Boating Access. Adams' body was discovered Monday afternoon shortly after 3:15 p.m.

    ABC 11 / 2 h. 29 min. ago
  • Teen charged with break-in at Fayetteville elementary schoolTeen charged with break-in at Fayetteville elementary school

    A Fayetteville teenager was arrested Monday after he was caught breaking into Montclair Elementary School, authorities said.

    WRAL / 2 h. 39 min. ago
  • Bodies of missing Durham man, unidentified woman found in Falls Lake - WRAL.comBodies of missing Durham man, unidentified woman found in Falls Lake - WRAL.com

    WRAL.comBodies of missing Durham man, unidentified woman found in Falls LakeWRAL.comDurham, N.C. — The body of a Durham man missing for almost a month has been found in Falls Lake, along with the body of an unidentified woman, police said Tuesday. Carl Lynnberg Adams, 70, was last seen on Dec. 19 on Sprucewood Drive. Family members ...Durham couple went missing before Christmas. Police think they have found them.News & ObserverBody of missing Durham man pulled from Falls LakeWNCNall 4 news articles »

    Google News / 2 h. 41 min. ago more
  • Classes canceled, state of emergency issued ahead of Wednesday's snow storm - WRAL.comClasses canceled, state of emergency issued ahead of Wednesday's snow storm - WRAL.com

    WTVD-TVClasses canceled, state of emergency issued ahead of Wednesday's snow stormWRAL.comRoy Cooper on Tuesday evening declared a State of Emergency throughout North Carolina ahead of the storm. The National Weather Service alerts include a Winter Storm Warning for Wake, Durham, Cumberland and Johnston counties that begins at 4 a.m ...Gov. Cooper issues State of Emergency ahead of winter weatherWTVD-TVall 10 news articles »

    Google News / 2 h. 46 min. ago more
  • Winter Storm Warning Winter Storm Warning

    ABC11 First Alert Weather Forecast for the Triangle, Raleigh, Durham, Fayetteville, Cary

    ABC 11 / 3 h. 3 min. ago
  • Durham couple went missing before Christmas. Police think they have found them.Durham couple went missing before Christmas. Police think they have found them.

    The bodies of two people who were reported missing before Christmas have been found, police reported Tuesday. Police said Carl Adams was found in Falls Lake, near the Hickory Hill … Click to Continue »

    NewsObserver.com / 3 h. 8 min. ago
  • State representatives discuss flu epidemic in NCState representatives discuss flu epidemic in NC

    Members of the General Assembly discussed the flu season in North Carolina on Tuesday. There have been 26 deaths linked to the virus after four more deaths were reported two weeks ago.

    ABC 11 / 3 h. 23 min. ago
  • 2 Triangle-area manufacturers announce layoffs2 Triangle-area manufacturers announce layoffs

    During a two-week time span, two Triangle-area manufacturers have disclosed mass layoffs to the state. And the cuts are adding up. As of Jan. 16, a total of 843 layoffs had been reported to the state in 2018, with Wake County leading its peers at 325 employees affected. Compare that to layoffs impacting 629 employees in all of January 2017. Wake County Flextronics Americas disclosed 138 layoffs at its 1000 and 1200 Innovation Ave. locations in Morrisville. The company, which goes by the name Flex,…

    Bizjournals.com / 3 h. 26 min. ago more
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  • Longtime UNC broadcaster Woody Durham named to NSMA Hall of Fame - WRALSportsFan.comLongtime UNC broadcaster Woody Durham named to NSMA Hall of Fame - WRALSportsFan.com

    WRALSportsFan.comLongtime UNC broadcaster Woody Durham named to NSMA Hall of FameWRALSportsFan.comChapel Hill, N.C. — Woody Durham, the longtime radio voice of University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill basketball and football, is one of the newest members of the National Sports Media Association Hall of Fame. Durham, Thomas Boswell, Bryant ...and more »

    Google News / 3 h. 31 min. ago more
  • State officials say flu 'very virulent' this yearState officials say flu 'very virulent' this year

    This year's flu season has gotten off to an early start and will only get worse in the coming weeks, North Carolina Secretary for Health and Human Services Dr. Mandy Cohen said Tuesday.

    WRAL / 3 h. 35 min. ago
  • NC schools announce snow day Wednesday ahead of winter storm - News & ObserverNC schools announce snow day Wednesday ahead of winter storm - News & Observer

    News & ObserverNC schools announce snow day Wednesday ahead of winter stormNews & ObserverNorth Carolina school systems began announcing a snow day for Wednesday starting Tuesday afternoon, as forecasts for an approaching winter storm took a turn. [Winter storm warning: Some parts of central NC could see up to 6 inches of snow]. In the ...and more »

    Google News / 3 h. 54 min. ago more
  • NC schools announce snow day Wednesday ahead of winter stormNC schools announce snow day Wednesday ahead of winter storm

    North Carolina school systems began announcing a snow day for Wednesday starting Tuesday afternoon, as forecasts for an approaching winter storm took a turn. [Winter storm warning: Some parts of … Click to Continue »

    NewsObserver.com / 3 h. 56 min. ago
  • Switzerland bans boiling live lobstersSwitzerland bans boiling live lobsters

    Switzerland has banned boiling live lobsters citing animal cruelty as a primary motivation.

    ABC 11 / 3 h. 58 min. ago
  • Company led by former Parata CEO starts commercializationCompany led by former Parata CEO starts commercialization

    Morrisville-based Spencer Health Solutions, which rebranded from HAP Innovations, is no longer solely focused on research and development.

    Bizjournals.com / 4 h. 50 min. ago
  • It’s Going to Snow. Don’t Freak Out.It’s Going to Snow. Don’t Freak Out.

    When you wake up tomorrow, there will be snow on the ground. It’s OK. Everything will be fine.…

    Indy Week / 4 h. 58 min. ago
  • Warm Up With a New Sylvan Esso Song, "PARAD(w/m)E"Warm Up With a New Sylvan Esso Song, "PARAD(w/m)E"

    Apparently, snow's about to hit the fan, so why not cozy up with a new Sylvan Esso tune? The Durham duo premiered "PARAD(w/m)E" (pronounced "parade") last week on Jimmy Kimmel Live. The track is nice and bouncy, but despite its bubbly beat and catchy refrain, the song's lyrics dig into darker stuff.…

    Indy Week / 5 h. ago more
  • Kim Kardashian West and husband Kanye welcome baby girlKim Kardashian West and husband Kanye welcome baby girl

    It's a girl for Kim Kardashian West and her husband, Kanye West, via surrogate.

    WRAL / 5 h. 3 min. ago
  • Downtown Durham warehouse near DBAP soldDowntown Durham warehouse near DBAP sold

    A warehouse in downtown Durham has sold to a Texas real estate firm for $1.69 million.

    Bizjournals.com / 5 h. 3 min. ago
  • Raleigh plans two-way street within a street for bicycles downtownRaleigh plans two-way street within a street for bicycles downtown

    The city of Raleigh has been creating bike lanes on streets all over town, but they’re nothing like what it has planned for five blocks of West Street downtown. This … Click to Continue »

    NewsObserver.com / 5 h. 21 min. ago
  • Notices reveal new details about Sam's Club stores closing in N.C.Notices reveal new details about Sam's Club stores closing in N.C.

    Layoff notifications filed with the state of North Carolina reveal new details about how Wal-Mart’s Sam’s Club store closures impact the Triangle. Two stores in the state have closed, affecting more than 300 employees: 187 in Morrisville and 149 in Lumberton, according to Wal-Mart. “We expect the employment separations to be permanent,” Brandon Murray, market manager, stated in a notification submitted to the state. Employees at both locations were notified around the same time the news…

    Bizjournals.com / 5 h. 38 min. ago more
  • BB&T to invest up to $50 million in fintech companiesBB&T to invest up to $50 million in fintech companies

    BB&T Corp. (NYSE: BBT) said Tuesday it will spend up to $50 million to invest or acquire emerging digital tech companies.  The initiative is part of a digital transformation BB&T has undergone since 2015. The Winston-Salem bank said in a statement that investing in digital technology will benefit clients and lower operating costs.  "This sizable investment in financial technology companies represents an important strategic milestone in our digital business transformation," said CEO Kelly King."We're…

    Bizjournals.com / 6 h. 11 min. ago more
  • "Dinner with Friends" at Alley Twenty Six Will Raise Money All Year for Jose Andres's Efforts to Feed the World"Dinner with Friends" at Alley Twenty Six Will Raise Money All Year for Jose Andres's Efforts to Feed the World

    Cocktails are often an afterthought when thinking about your next dinner indulgence. Durham's Alley Twenty Six opened a full kitchen in February 2017, hoping to change that. Today, the cocktail bar and restaurant announced a monthly dinner series, "Dinner with Friends," that will raise money for World Central Kitchen, the nonprofit run by famed chef José Andrés. It also gives chef Carrie Schleiffer free rein to concoct a menu inspired by monthly guests who are making a mark on the national cocktail scene.…

    Indy Week / 6 h. 47 min. ago more
  • 3 reasons small businesses should be using marketing automation3 reasons small businesses should be using marketing automation

    Once upon a time, the term “marketing automation” was an enterprise darling. It was synonymous with very expensive lead nurturing software. A holy grail of marketing technology designed to grow your business. But why should those benefits be exclusive to large companies? Thanks to a number of emerging marketing automation platforms in recent years, small businesses can play, too. Let’s get into three key reasons your small business should be using marketing automation. First, the lead and…

    Bizjournals.com / 6 h. 59 min. ago more
  • Former Shaw University president Talbert O. Shaw diesFormer Shaw University president Talbert O. Shaw dies

    Talbert O. Shaw, who helped to restore the financial health of Shaw University while serving as its president for a decade and a half, has died, the university announced Tuesday. … Click to Continue »

    NewsObserver.com / 7 h. 27 min. ago
  • Well, this is odd: Some students are begging for Wake County schools to stay openWell, this is odd: Some students are begging for Wake County schools to stay open

    Some Wake County students are begging for school to stay open in the face of expected snow that could disrupt this week’s high school final exams and cut into the … Click to Continue »

    NewsObserver.com / 7 h. 41 min. ago
  • Here's why America's biggest boardrooms still cater to men – for nowHere's why America's biggest boardrooms still cater to men – for now

    Business leaders have long highlighted gender diversity as a top priority, particularly when it comes to populating board rooms and the power center commonly known as the C-suite. Alas, women remain woefully underrepresented among the upper echelons of Corporate America. A Business Journals analysis of some 3,000 publicly traded companies with at least $100 million in market capitalization found the absence of women directors particularly pronounced among two classes of companies: those with relatively…

    Bizjournals.com / 7 h. 52 min. ago more
  • Serial entrepreneur: What's next for my new video game startupSerial entrepreneur: What's next for my new video game startup

    For Tim Huntley, the serial entrepreneur behind Durham-based video game startup Centervention, 2018 could be a defining year.

    Bizjournals.com / 8 h. 8 min. ago
  • Another case of using prop ‘money’ made for movies surfaces in Wake CountyAnother case of using prop ‘money’ made for movies surfaces in Wake County

    Using prop “money,” made for movies and television, to buy real items has led to a second arrest in Wake County this month. Monday, Holly Springs police arrested 30-year-old Lenwood … Click to Continue »

    NewsObserver.com / 8 h. 11 min. ago
  • Natty Greene's founder: 'One way or the other, we're moving'Natty Greene's founder: 'One way or the other, we're moving'

    The owner hopes the project will be ready for groundbreaking in 45 days.

    Bizjournals.com / 8 h. 48 min. ago
  • January 24 Event Offers Helpful Info for People Who Owns Farms and Forest Land in Wake CountyJanuary 24 Event Offers Helpful Info for People Who Owns Farms and Forest Land in Wake County

    Can anything, or anyone, slow the march of sprawl in Wake County? Dale Threatt-Taylor, the long-time director of Wake Soil and Water Conservation District, says it can be done. According to Threatt-Taylor, Wake County has more farm acreage than 58 of North Carolina counties.…

    Indy Week / 9 h. 12 min. ago
  • Study: Supermarkets near a Lidl set prices 9.3% lower on averageStudy: Supermarkets near a Lidl set prices 9.3% lower on average

    Grocery stores located near Lidl stores set their prices for key staples, like milk and bread, up to 55 percent lower than in markets where a Lidl does not exist, according to a study by researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

    WRAL / 10 h. 26 min. ago
  • The Cooper Administration Wants Work Requirements for Some Medicaid RecipientsThe Cooper Administration Wants Work Requirements for Some Medicaid Recipients

    This post is excerpted from the INDY’s morning newsletter, Primer. To read this morning’s edition in full, click here.…

    Indy Week / 10 h. 31 min. ago
  • The Federal Government Could Shut Down Friday, and You Can Thank Donald Trump’s RacismThe Federal Government Could Shut Down Friday, and You Can Thank Donald Trump’s Racism

    This post is excerpted from the INDY’s morning newsletter, Primer. To read this morning’s edition in full, click here.…

    Indy Week / 10 h. 35 min. ago
  • What is gentrification, and why does it matter anyway? a " Mark SchultzWhat is gentrification, and why does it matter anyway? a " Mark Schultz

    And it is. We're pretty good at telling you how the city council voted Monday night or, at least online, who won the game.

    Durham News / 10 h. 53 min. ago
  • Vegan Flava Cafe opens in Durham - WRAL.comVegan Flava Cafe opens in Durham - WRAL.com

    WRAL.comVegan Flava Cafe opens in DurhamWRAL.comDurham, N.C. — Vegan Flava Cafe recently opened on Guess Road in Durham, near Northgate Mall. As a nearly lifelong vegetarian, I was so excited to check it out. The menu has all kinds of comfort food, from curried lentils and rice to red beans and ...

    Google News / 11 h. 11 min. ago
  • Durham shopping center fetches $13MDurham shopping center fetches $13M

    A shopping complex between Durham and Chapel Hill has a new owner.  A subsidiary of Brown Investment Properties, of Greensboro, purchased the 13.2-acre Oak Creek Village shopping center for $13.1 million. The 116,186-square-foot space sits at the corner of Durham-Chapel Hill Boulevard and Garrett Road. Officials from Brown Investment Properties did not immediately return a call for comment. As of the third quarter of 2017, the shopping center was 80 percent leased, according to Triangle Business…

    Bizjournals.com / 11 h. 36 min. ago more
  • Gov. Cooper declares state of emergency: Parts of central NC could see 6 inches of snowGov. Cooper declares state of emergency: Parts of central NC could see 6 inches of snow

    The forecast of snow in the Triangle grew and grew on Tuesday, and now meteorologists expect anywhere from 2 to 5 inches to fall. The National Weather Service in Raleigh … Click to Continue »

    NewsObserver.com / 13 h. 50 min. ago
  • Light snow and flurries tonight, snow adding up through tomorrow eveningLight snow and flurries tonight, snow adding up through tomorrow evening

    Camp Hill Borough continues to deny public records requests about towing practices, recently labeling requests from two ABC27 reporters as " DURHAM, N.C. - Raasean Davis had 18 points and 11 rebounds, Pablo Rivas added 15 points and North Carolina Central beat Morgan State 77 ANN ARBOR, Mich. - Michigan has hired Sherrone Moore to coach tight ends.

    Durham News / 20 h. 8 min. ago more
  • Apartments proposed for growing Durham neighborhoodApartments proposed for growing Durham neighborhood

    The Durham City Council is expected to consider Tuesday a request to rezone a vacant 5.65-acre parcel behind the Lakewood Shopping Center so a developer can build 78 one- and two-bedroom apartments. At least a quarter of the units in the proposed development on House Avenue would be designated as "workforce housing" aimed at city and county employees and local teachers.

    Durham News / 1 d. 0 h. 42 min. ago more
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  • King Day speakers in Durham call to reject a voices that would divide usaKing Day speakers in Durham call to reject a voices that would divide usa

    The Greater Durham Community Unity March and Rally downtown Durham, recognizing the Life and Legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. The Greater Durham Community Unity March and Rally downtown Durham, recognizing the Life and Legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. The Greater Durham Community Unity March and Rally downtown Durham, recognizing the Life and Legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Speakers at Durham's annual Martin Luther King Jr. Day march and noon service urged listeners to "keep fighting" and not let the gains of the Civil Rights Movement be reversed. Sen. Floyd McKissick, who represents Durham in the N.C. Senate, recalled the threats that his family faced when they helped integrate Durham's schools in the 1960s.

    Durham News / 1 d. 0 h. 42 min. ago more
  • Rash of grass fires along I-40 brings Durham firefighters to highwayRash of grass fires along I-40 brings Durham firefighters to highway

    Westbound traffic on Interstate 40 near the Page Road interchange bunches up as drivers slow to pass a fire truck on Monday, Jan. 15, 2018. Grass fires broke out at several spots along the highway in late morning.

    Durham News / 1 d. 5 h. 16 min. ago
  • Rash of grass fires along I-40 brings Durham firefighters to highway - News & ObserverRash of grass fires along I-40 brings Durham firefighters to highway - News & Observer

    News & ObserverRash of grass fires along I-40 brings Durham firefighters to highwayNews & ObserverFirefighters were sent to several locations along on westbound Interstate 40 late Monday morning to put out a string of small grass fires that sprang up next to the highway. The cause of the fires was unknown. Firefighters from several departments used ...

    Google News / 1 d. 7 h. 33 min. ago more
  • Are black students more likely to be suspended in your child's NC school district?Are black students more likely to be suspended in your child's NC school district?

    News and Observer) - As Americans mark Martin Luther King Jr. Day, new report cards have been released showing the state of racial equity in North Carolina's public schools. The Youth Justice Project of the Southern Coalition for Social Justice says the project reveals significant racial gaps in how students from different groups are treated.

    Durham News / 1 d. 7 h. 42 min. ago more
  • Curtis Media Group VP of Radio & WQDR PD Lisa McKay Passes AwayCurtis Media Group VP of Radio & WQDR PD Lisa McKay Passes Away

    Lisa McKay , VP of Radio for North Carolina's Curtis Media Group and PD of Country WQDR -FM/Raleigh has died after a brief battle with cancer. In a statement to WTVD -TV in Durham, NC, Curtis Media Group President/COO Trip Savery said, "It is with very heavy hearts that we share the news of Lisa's passing.

    Durham News / 1 d. 10 h. 11 min. ago
  • Woman burned, 2 other victims inhale smoke in Durham apartment ... - WNCNWoman burned, 2 other victims inhale smoke in Durham apartment ... - WNCN

    WNCNWoman burned, 2 other victims inhale smoke in Durham apartment ...WNCNThe woman from a first-floor apartment was treated for second and third-degree burns.and more »

    Google News / 2 d. 2 h. 25 min. ago
  • Virginia vs #16/18 Duke (1-14-18 at Durham, NC (Cameron Indoor Stadium)) - GoDuke.comVirginia vs #16/18 Duke (1-14-18 at Durham, NC (Cameron Indoor Stadium)) - GoDuke.com

    Virginia vs #16/18 Duke (1-14-18 at Durham, NC (Cameron Indoor Stadium))GoDuke.comPlay-by-Play Virginia vs #16/18 Duke 1-14-18 3:02 PM at Durham, N.C. (Cameron Indoor Stadium) 1st PERIOD Play-by-Play (Page 1) HOME TEAM: #16/18 Duke TIME SCORE MAR VISITORS: Virginia ...and more »

    Google News / 2 d. 2 h. 59 min. ago
  • Property owner takes over Semprius grant repayments, optimistic for new businessProperty owner takes over Semprius grant repayments, optimistic for new business

    The property owner of a building site is now looking to the next business to come in, after a leaser failed to create jobs it originally committed to. Between 2011 to 2012, Durham-based solar panel company Semprius sought more than $3.74 million worth of grants to start its first manufacturing facility in Henderson.

    Durham News / 3 d. 6 h. 57 min. ago
  • NC Museum of Art to highlight female artistsNC Museum of Art to highlight female artists

    The North Carolina Museum of Art has launched a new initiative, Matrons of the Arts, which highlights female-identified artists in both the Museum's permanent collection and around the world. Matrons of the Arts is a museum-wide, ongoing project that presents programs, exhibitions, and acquisitions by and about women artists.

    Durham News / 3 d. 20 h. 19 min. ago
  • Child shot in Durham gas station parking lot - WTVD-TVChild shot in Durham gas station parking lot - WTVD-TV

    WTVD-TVChild shot in Durham gas station parking lotWTVD-TVA young girl sitting in a car in the parking lot of a Durham gas station was shot Friday night. WTVD. Friday, January 12, 2018 11:26PM. DURHAM, NC (WTVD) --. The Durham Police Department is investigating a shooting that left a child injured Friday ...and more »

    Google News / 3 d. 23 h. 1 min. ago
  • Activists Who Pulled Down Confederate Statue in Durham, North Carolina Will Not Face Felony Charges - The RootActivists Who Pulled Down Confederate Statue in Durham, North Carolina Will Not Face Felony Charges - The Root

    The RootActivists Who Pulled Down Confederate Statue in Durham, North Carolina Will Not Face Felony ChargesThe RootImmediately after the hearing, Durham County District Attorney Roger Echols said, “We won't try them on the felonies, only the misdemeanors.” The eight activists are represented by North Carolina Central University law professor Scott Holmes, who also ...and more »

    Google News / 3 d. 23 h. 3 min. ago more
  • She helped Durham students pay down their lunch debt, now her parents need your helpShe helped Durham students pay down their lunch debt, now her parents need your help

    The parents of the "Durham Lunch Lady" lost their home in a fire Tuesday, Jan. 9 and she is asking the community to help them put their lives back together. The home of Cathy and David Meek was heavily damaged in a fire Tuesday, Jan. 9. The couple also lost their beloved dog Maya in the blaze.

    Durham News / 4 d. 0 h. 47 min. ago
  • Teacher's aide Elizabeth Young (left) asks a question of her students ...Teacher's aide Elizabeth Young (left) asks a question of her students ...

    Teacher's aide Elizabeth Young asks a question of her students during an English lesson at the Maureen Joy Charter School in Durham on Dec. 20, 2016. A new study says charter schools are costing Durham Public Schools between $500 and $700 per student.

    Durham News / 4 d. 5 h. 13 min. ago
  • Who Will the Durham City Council Pick to Join Their Ranks? Read Our Play-By-Play of the Five Finalists’ Interviews.Who Will the Durham City Council Pick to Join Their Ranks? Read Our Play-By-Play of the Five Finalists’ Interviews.

    The Durham City Council interviewed five finalists for a vacant at-large seat Thursday night. Each candidate was questioned for about forty-five minutes during the public meeting. The interviews gave the council an opportunity to see how the applicants perform in person, rather than in writing, and see how they interact with members who could be their colleagues as soon as next week. The five finalists seeking the seat, which opened up when Steve Schewel was elected mayor, are Pilar Rocha-Goldberg, Kaaren Haldeman, Pierce Freelon, Javiera Caballero, and Sheila Arias. Topics ranged from how candidates have handled embarrassing moments to their take on the diversity of the council.…

    Indy Week / 4 d. 5 h. 22 min. ago more
  • Norv Turner Could Be Exactly the QB Whisperer Cam Newton Needs—Or NotNorv Turner Could Be Exactly the QB Whisperer Cam Newton Needs—Or Not

    Last Sunday, the Carolina Panthers season ended with a close playoff loss and a near-unanimous consensus that the team needs to find more help for their gifted, beleaguered superstar quarterback Cam Newton. That process began in earnest yesterday, as the team fired longtime offensive coordinator Mike Shula and quarterback coach Ken Dorsey and brought in the long-tenured NFL veteran Norv Turner to run the offensive show. Turner’s four-decade odyssey in the NFL has spanned multiple eras and sweeping changes within the sport.…

    Indy Week / 4 d. 6 h. ago more
  • Music Industry Heavy-Hitters Come to Raleigh Tomorrow for the 2018 Dreamfest Living the Dream ConferenceMusic Industry Heavy-Hitters Come to Raleigh Tomorrow for the 2018 Dreamfest Living the Dream Conference

    Monday is Martin Luther King, Jr., Day, and it feels like this year, especially, most Americans need to take the time to reflect on King's esteemed legacy as a civil rights leader. This weekend, Community Initiatives of NC is hosting a conference in Raleigh to honor King and continue his messages of empowerment and social justice. The conference heavily features music industry figures, but you don't have to be a big music fan to appreciate their knowledge and experience—they're bound to share some lessons with big applications. One of the main events is a live Q&A between Mathew Knowles—Beyoncé and Solage's dad, and founder of Music World Entertainment—and ABC11 anchor Joel Brown.…

    Indy Week / 4 d. 6 h. 43 min. ago more
  • Firefighters have battled a series of house fires recently. Herea s how to stay safe.Firefighters have battled a series of house fires recently. Herea s how to stay safe.

    Home fires are more prevalent in winter than in any other season. This is due in part to an increase in cooking and heating fires.

    Durham News / 4 d. 9 h. 54 min. ago
  • You’ll Soon Be Getting Less News in Your Facebook News FeedYou’ll Soon Be Getting Less News in Your Facebook News Feed

    This post is excerpted from the INDY’s morning newsletter, Primer. To read this morning’s edition in full, click here.…

    Indy Week / 4 d. 11 h. 1 min. ago
  • Donald Trump Is a Stone-Cold Racist, Full StopDonald Trump Is a Stone-Cold Racist, Full Stop

    This post is excerpted from the INDY’s morning newsletter, Primer. To read this morning’s edition in full, click here.…

    Indy Week / 4 d. 11 h. 8 min. ago
  • Shortage of IV bags from Puerto Rico has area hospitals scrambling to care for patientsShortage of IV bags from Puerto Rico has area hospitals scrambling to care for patients

    A national shortage of IV fluid bags has Triangle hospitals scrambling to keep patients medicated through a patchwork of improvisations and workarounds that are more expensive, time-consuming and could increase the risk of medical error. Local hospital executives say the nation is in the midst of one of the most severe medical product shortages they have experienced in their careers, and it comes as flu cases are on the rise.

    Durham News / 4 d. 14 h. 41 min. ago more
  • Felonies to be dropped in Confederate statue toppling caseFelonies to be dropped in Confederate statue toppling case

    Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens acknowledges he was "unfaithful" in his marriage but denies allegations that he blackmailed the woman he had an extramarital affair with to stay quiet. A federal judge has likened the nation's opioid epidemic to the deadly 1918 flu pandemic while noting the drug crisis is "100 percent manmade."

    Durham News / 4 d. 19 h. 17 min. ago
  • Reverend Barber Slams Thomas Farr in Time Magazine; NCGOP Calls It "Race-baiting"Reverend Barber Slams Thomas Farr in Time Magazine; NCGOP Calls It "Race-baiting"

    The Rev. William Barber II again took up his campaign against Raleigh lawyer Thomas Farr's nomination to a federal court seat Thursday, this time using the pages of Time magazine to criticize as "moral poison" President Donald Trump's choice of Farr. Former state NAACP chair Barber, a Goldsboro pastor, is increasingly operating on a national platform.…

    Indy Week / 5 d. 1 h. 20 min. ago more
  • An Open Letter to Roy Williams’s HatersAn Open Letter to Roy Williams’s Haters

    I overhear you at Sutton’s lunch counter and around the long communal table at Merritt’s. I read your interminable threads on social media, spewing your misinformed vitriol. I can’t avoid the grumblings of the disgruntled as we shuffle out of the Dean Dome in a post-loss haze.…

    Indy Week / 5 d. 5 h. 35 min. ago
  • Take your community heart wherever you goTake your community heart wherever you go

      Editor’s Note: Lu Xu is a 10-year veteran Chinese broadcast journalist who, for the last two years, has been studying communications at the UNC-CH School of Media and Journalism, where she is a visiting international scholar. In her final semester at Chapel Hill, she joined the MEJO 459 “Community Journalism” class and became a part of the Durham VOICE staff and family. Here, “LuLu” looks back at the semester.   Why I chose this class in Community Journalism I still remember how excited I was when I first looked at the course schedule and was informed of having the chance to attend some of the classes. Scrutinizing the schedule from beginning to end several times, I was astonished by the subtle classification and the foresight of the curriculum. Carlton Koonce, workforce coordinator for Partners for Youth Opportunity, proudly points out stories and photos generated by his PYO interns. (Staff photo by Xu Lu) I saw something I was quite familiar with—Writing, Editing and Audio Production; I also saw something that perfectly fit in our time—-Digital Journalism, Data-Driven Journalism, Interactive Communication Technology. And I found something I’ve been confused about and had no clear thoughts since the first day of being a journalist: Ethics and Gender Issue based on various cultures. However, I skipped something which I didn’t realize how it would influence me in the future — Community Journalism. Before choosing my last semester’s course, I kept recalling people enjoying the farmers’ market in Carrboro with full baskets of fresh local plants and dairy, people in the Root Cellar chatting with each other with cheerful voices, flyers about recent events or non-profit organizations posted on billboards on Franklin Streets or Starbucks. I still remember three or four elderly ladies peacefully holding signs at the corner of Elliot Road in support of civil rights — and young kids in front of the public library selling cupcakes to collect money to help their high school newspaper. All of these sights impressed me deeply. I don’t think I would have found coverage of these local events in the Wall Street Journal or the New York Times, but for me they are the key to getting to know the country; they are real life of the place; they are mirrors of the society. I finally realized what I wanted to learn in the last four months of my time in U.S. was local news, local journalism, or namely community journalism. I’m neither a journalism graduate nor an academic scholar. I know little about the situation of community journalism in academic circles or in nationwide scope. In my 10 years as a working experienced journalist, community journalism is still an unfamiliar thing for me. Before and while the attending this semester’s class, I always kept these questions in my mind: What is community journalism, why do people value community newspapers (and online sites) in the U.S. and why does community journalism matter? With the willingness to get involved in the society and to find answers to these questions, I walked into Jock’s class, met “Ferk,”  his co-teacher, and those talented young students —which turned out to be one of my most valuable experiences in U.S.   What I learned It’s a totally different classroom environment, and very different from my experiences, both in China and in the past 18 months in U.S. The instructors and those junior and senior students compose a team and a family, and they do things together. I, as an observer, got a bunch of opportunities to join them, go to Durham with them, meet people and get to know this society from a completely different perspective— that of the committed community journalist. The differences between our two cultures always brings up questions. In some situations, questions I was curious about seemed entirely normal for most Americans — especially civic engagement. ‘Civic engagement’ is the term I learned from Jock, ‘That means every citizen realizes his or her importance in the system, in the community, in the neighborhood — and then acts upon that realization.” In the past four months, I saw people who contribute their time to help build up their community. I also met veteran North Carolina journalists who have devoted their whole lives to community journalism. What these guest speakers have accomplished and their beliefs helped me to define the term of ‘civic engagement’ and, to some extent, answer almost all my questions. In my point of view, civic engagement is one of the core values of American culture, which helps to explain why community journalism is still flourishing in America. Just after Thanksgiving, I had the privilege of interviewing Carlton Koonce, the workforce development director for the youth development NGO, “Partners for Youth Opportunity.” Koonce and Jock have been working together on the VOICE since its beginning, almost nine years ago. Introducing the work of PYO, Koonce showed me the perfect example of how citizens can devote their time to their community and how that community rewards its citizens. As a mainstream Chinese journalist working in a state-owned news agency, it’s kind of a tradition for me to ask questions relating to government. ‘So, Koonce, what’s the relationship between PYO and the local government?’ I asked. “Personally, we try to stay away from government.” Koonce answered honestly. See? Here is the thing: I might have expected answers like, ‘Our government is so supportive and they have lots of policies to encourage our work…’ But I totally forgot that I’m in a different country with absolutely a different culture and beliefs. It turns out that PYO depends on the whole community for its support.. “The community knows better (than we do) what we need.” Koonce said. That’s how I learned all the financial support for PYO comes from personal and corporate donations as well as from grants. During the interview, I was surprised by the trust that PYO has built in the community, Koonce told me, for instance, if there is a kid who is short $300 dollars for her scholarship, what Koonce does is go directly to a known PYO donor, and he’ll come back with a $300 check.  “They trust us,” he says. Koonce is a hard-core fan of the VOICE. When opening the newspaper, he can name almost every person in the photographs. It’s a strong sense of belonging, something like, ‘I’m so proud of these people, I like this family.’ There was a moment I envied him being a member of this family. I think the relationship between him and the paper might be the epitome of the relationship between readers and community newspaper in the U.S. There is no other way to teach community journalism better than to produce a community newspaper. Jock told me one of the purposes of the VOICE is to get down to the civic engagement. “I think every time we do a story on somebody in the paper, that gives them a sense of  ‘Hey, if they do story on me,  maybe I’m ok.’  It can lift people up, one by one.’ Additionally, Jock said the other responsibility of community journalism is to encourage civil discourse. He told the class, “In the present volatile, partisan political climate in the U.S., a civil discourse is more important now than ever.” I wonder whether free speech leads to civic engagement, or whether civic engagement results in free speech. Jock told me it’s a yin-yang relationship. I think he is right.   How About China There is no free speech in China, which affects the development of community journalism directly. If people are not allowed to speak freely, then they may become indifferent and indolent sooner or later. Instead of being a part of something larger than ourselves as a part of society, we Chinese prefer to focus on family, real family. The lacking of civic engagement leads to some phenomena here that I am curious about: the American tradition of donating, praising personal value, flourishing non-profit organizations and a sense of belonging to the community All these things seem to be a basic part of American daily life. Given the differences in our two cultures, I think it’s understandable why there is so little success for community newspapers in China. For me, one of the charms of community journalism is the mutual trust — readers give credit to the newspaper, and the newspaper serves readers sincerely. Since it’s highly unlikely that such an American model would work at my mainstream Chinese news agency, I’m still thinking about whether or not it can apply in some other way. Just like what Jock said to me the other day when we talked about the influence of technology, “Fiber is not the issue,” he said, “The issue is great local reporting, which we need now more than ever.” Why don’t we take advantage of social media and other interactive tools to build up community beyond geographic limitations and serve people with the same beliefs and pursuits?   In Conclusion There have been other occasions in the past that I have heard other J-school students and professors talking about the trending in media industry. ‘Have you heard about BOT?’ or ‘Did you see how they report news by using of VR?’ There is no doubt that these are eye-opening experiences for me. But on the other hand, the more information I get about the future, the more lost and anxious I can feel. I want to get back to the roots of journalism to find out what makes journalism valuable, and I think this class has given me the answer — being a part of our society, being a part of something larger than myself, caring about people — and seeking and telling the truth. I was deeply touched by one student in this class at the end of this semester. He said that after reporting on peoples’ lives in Northeast Durham, his attitude toward this community has changed; he couldn’t bear to hear people say bad things about this place. The same change happened to me, too. I think this is what Jock called “community heart.”    

    The Durham Voice / 41 d. 5 h. 17 min. ago more
  • Durham’s Ronald McDonald House: A house of blessingsDurham’s Ronald McDonald House: A house of blessings

      In 1973, when Philadelphia Eagles tight end Fred Hill learned about his daughter’s leukemia diagnosis, he and his wife noticed the inconveniences parents had to go through to support their sick child while in the hospital. They teamed up with a local McDonalds to purchase and restore a house near the hospital where these families could stay, and the first Ronald McDonald House was born. Josh (right) prepares to return home after a successful transplant for leukemia. (Staff photo by Julian Keeler) Durham’s Ronald McDonald house was the first in North Carolina. It has been a staple in the community for 37 years, known for the warm hospitality they offer guests and visitors. Located on 506 Alexander Ave., the house in Durham opened its doors on Feb. 1, 1980. It was the 13th one built in the nation. Mitzi Viola has been the Director of Development at the Durham location for five years. She’s in charge of fundraising, marketing, and external relations. “It’s a blessing to be here,” Viola said. “When I come to work I feel very grateful for this opportunity. I look at it as more of a calling than a job.” The house offers a program called the Ronald McDonald Family Room. The family rooms provide housing and meals for around 69 families on a nightly basis. Most families who stay in the home have traveled from other states and possibly other countries. The Durham location partners with Duke University Hospital. “Our respite programs allow us to serve almost 40,000 families a year,” Viola said. “The family of every pediatric patient is welcome to come to the family room to receive food, support, take a shower, do laundry, or whatever they may need to make things a bit easier on them.” The Ronald McDonald House Charities are big on volunteering and community service. They offer many volunteer jobs for schools, teams, organizations, and everyday citizens to come help and be a part of something special. “We have volunteer groups that come in to cook, groups that volunteer to come clean, volunteer groups that do arts and crafts,” Viola explained. “There are so many ways to get involved here and we really appreciate the help.” The Durham Ronald McDonald House has aided many families nationally but also many in the local community as well. The number of people they build relationships with is amazing. “It’s wonderful being a part of these journeys that people are on,” Viola said. “No one expects for their child to be ill, and for us to be present, stand witness, and be supportive to those families is really an honor.” There are now 350 Ronald McDonald houses worldwide.   Sources: https://www.rmhdurhamwake.org/ Caption: Josh (right) prepares to return home after a successful transplant for leukemia. (Staff photo by Julian Keeler) The Ronald McDonald House, located on 506 Alexander Ave in Durham. (Staff photo by Julian Keeler)    

    The Durham Voice / 41 d. 6 h. 55 min. ago more
  • African heritage dance class uplifts and energizesAfrican heritage dance class uplifts and energizes

      Every Monday night, for just $5 a session, dance enthusiasts gather for the African heritage dance class at the Hayti Heritage Center. The class, with live drummers, starts off with stretching, and deep breathing. On a recent Monday the substitute instructor, McDaniel Roberts, explained the importance of breathing through the muscles and building up stamina. Live drums bring an upbeat tempo and energy to the dance studio. (Staff photo by Tiayana Ford) As the drums switched beats to inspire different movements, the energy in the room flowed. Dance provides many benefits beyond increasing strength and flexibility. Many sources cite the benefits to one’s emotional health and stress relief. The instructor demonstrated each movement more than once, while the class was separated into three groups. Next, the groups copied the move as they danced across the dance studio. Roberts has been teaching dance for about 15 years. On this night, he was subbing for the regular instructors, Tony Hall and Ivy Birch. “I was on tour with Chuck Davis’s African American dance ensemble and while on tour we do lecture demonstrations as well as workshops,” said Roberts. “I started to become a leader in those workshops which moved me to opportunities once I came home to teach different classes.” The late Chuck Davis has always been one of his biggest inspirations. “He taught me and groomed me for certain classes, how to teach, how to engage your students and through West African dance and movement, it’s such a free spirit of movement and music and as well as a marriage between the two. It’s just a great inspiration to teach.” Daniels has taught the Heritage Rhythm dance class several times before. Because all instructors trained under Chuck Davis, they have the same teaching style. The class is every Monday at 6:30 to 8:00 on the second floor in the Chuck Davis Dance Emporium. There’s also a class called African Movement with high impact that’s held on Wednesday at 6:15 to 7:15 at W.D. Hill Recreation Center. https://hayti.org/programming/classes/    

    The Durham Voice / 41 d. 7 h. ago more
  • New Creation is making a difference in the Durham communityNew Creation is making a difference in the Durham community

      New Creation United Methodist Church has shone a positive light on its members and the entire Durham community ever since the church held its first meeting at the church’s Durham location on the corner of Angier Avenue more than five years ago. But today, Pastor Albert Shuler and Lay Leader Fran Lynch worship at a new location. Pastor Albert Shuler and Lay Leader Fran Lynch discuss the history and future of New Creations United Methodist Church (Staff Photo by Collin Ellis) City ordinances forced the church to lose their parking lot and the older members were having increased difficulty walking up the large staircase to the church, so “it became necessary for us to look for a new home,” Lynch said. New Creation now holds service at 806 Clarendon St. But despite the change in location, New Creation United Methodist Church continues to shine a positive light on the Durham community with its charitable works. Every Friday morning, members of the church prepare meals for the homeless and Lynch recently took a group of volunteers on a mission to a women’s correctional facility in Raleigh. Lynch says the work they do is all about showing people “love and affection. And hopefully God’s grace.” “It is very hard for people to look beyond, ‘I’m starving, I’m homeless. I don’t know where I’m going to lay my head. I don’t know where my next meal is coming from.’ If you can’t help them think beyond that moment, they’re never going to [make it to church],” Lynch said. “To me, faith is of no value if action does not accompany it. We could all be in the pew on Sunday. Big deal. It’s what you do with what you hear on Sunday for the rest of the week.” New Creation is coming out of what Pastor Shuler calls the Wesleyan movement, started by Tom Wesley. He believes that Methodists should always be involved in missions and that wherever there’s a need, that a Methodist church should be there. “One of [Wesley’s] best phrases were that, ‘If you’re heart beats with my heart, give me your hand.’ Because it’s not about what you are or where you came from, it’s all about the fact that you are a child of God. And we may think differently but the bottom line is that we’re all God’s children,” Shuler said. Shuler says that helping the community and doing charity work is a part of the “several histories” of the church. New Creation was created when the two churches Asbury Temple and Reconciliation Church merged together. The Reconciliation was started back in 1998. And the former Asbury Temple was started in the early 1950s. Those two congregations came together in 2011 to form New Creation. Lynch says that the merger was a “wonderful coming together of people who really took Christ’s mission seriously”. She also said that the churches’ diverse background and congregation are what drew her in from the beginning. “Our doors needed to be opened to all, regardless of ethnic background, racial disposition, and gender identity. We wanted all people, all children of God to be welcome in our congregation,” Lynch says. New Creation has always had a policy of non-discrimination and “being open to all persons and in particular the LGBT community.” Shuler and Lynch said that having LGBT members is “not an issue for our congregation.” “I remember when I first got to New Creation, we shared our joys and concerns. One of the gentleman stood up in the choir that Sunday and said that he and his partner had gotten married over the weekend. And I wasn’t quite sure how the congregation [would react],” Shuler recalled with a smile and a laugh. “But there was this big round of applause, you know. And they greeted and congratulated them after.” Shuler says that love “speaks volumes. It’s the kind of church we are.” “To me, [New Creation offers] a chance and an opportunity to reflect God’s grace and his love into places that might not see the light of day and may not see the grace and the mercy and the blessings that I have had,” Lynch says. “We humans are all born and learn through our life different viewpoints and different perspectives and pick up opinions. And its only through God’s grace and spending time with him that you learn to set those aside and give someone a chance to be who they are.” As for the future of the church, Lynch and Shuler believe that the possibilities are limitless. They want the church to continue to inspire love in the community. “I see the church as a vehicle that encourages and helps me spend time with God that helps me in going out and trying to have a positive impact on the community,” Lynch said. “I have grandchildren that motivate me highly. Because I want the world to be a better place for them than it is right now.” Weblinks: http://www.newcreationumcdurham.org/ http://asburyunitedmethodist.com/  

    The Durham Voice / 41 d. 7 h. 4 min. ago more
  • Rod’s RedirectionRod’s Redirection

      The principal of Pearsontown Elementary made a decision during his undergrad college studies that would change the course of his life and career forever. Rodriguez Teal, originally from Bennettsville, S.C., pursued his undergraduate education at N. C. Central University, graduating in 1986. At NCCU, he majored in public administration and studied vigorously for the LSAT in hopes to get accepted into NCCU’s Law school. “I didn’t come to Central to be an educator; I wanted to be a lawyer,” Teal said. “The game-changer for me was when my professor, Clarence Jones, gave me the assignment to create an afterschool program for our final grade.” Teal created a program at W.G Pearson elementary school that targeted first-grade African-American boys. His program focused on athletics, academics and entertainment. Teal’s work left an impact on the first graders and the entire school. “After I finished my last day there, the entire school gave me a huge party,” Teal said. “The kids grabbed me and said, ‘Please don’t go.’ I couldn’t look them in the face and leave them.” Teal said that he then made the decision that he wasn’t going to take the LSAT, and instead, went back to school to get certified to teach. Teal served as an educator in Durham for 25 years and has been an administrator for 22 years and counting. “Durham raised Rod,” Teal said. “I have spent more time in Durham more than anywhere else in the world. I came here in 1986, and I haven’t left since. I tried to go to D.C. I tried to move to Atlanta, but my love for the kids here in Durham has kept me.” Teal is also the founder and CEO of the Brother to Brother program.  The Brother to Brother Mentoring Group mission is to nurture the academic, social, spiritual and emotional growth of young black men and women. “I have been blessed to around a lot of good people that help show me the way,” Teal said. “The support that I received from Durham means the world to me. Brother to Brother is my of way giving back to Durham by pouring myself into the youth.” Teal said that young men that have been through the program come back and spend time as if they never left. “I have young men that graduated college and started families come back and show me their accomplishments,” Teal said. “It gives me a humbling feeling and it lets me know that I am doing something right.” Teal said that building relationships are the most important thing to him. “Once you understand relationships and how important they are then people begin to trust you,” Teal said. “If you don’t build that relationship and that brotherhood nobody no one would trust you. If someone is genuine and true you will feel it.” Bobby Davis Jr., Teal’s mentee, said that Teal is an asset to any scene that he is on. “He is  hardworking, thorough and  professional,” Davis said. “I hope to one day possess the confidence that he has. He has never failed to look out for me and ensure that I am going on the right path.” Ja’Von Williams, Teal’s mentee, described him as one of the hardest-working men that he knows. “Teal is passionate with whatever he puts his time in,” Williams said. “I have learned a great deal just by being in his presence. I know for sure that his name rings bells in the Durham community and that the love he shares for this area runs deep.” Teal is a member of Kappa Alpha Psi fraternity, Incorporated. “Achievement is what I live by, Teal said. “With retirement around the corner, I still plan to finish my doctorate and expand the Brother to Brother program.” Teal was the 2013 Durham Public Schools principal of the year, Spectacular Magazine Man of the Year and has a prestigious service award from the Muhammad Islamic center. (NCCU staffwriter Carl Wesley Smith also contributed to this story.)   Links: https://www.facebook.com/b2bmentoring/ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n1His9USfAA      

    The Durham Voice / 41 d. 7 h. 9 min. ago more
  • Doug Speight carries on family legacy in Durham with new positionDoug Speight carries on family legacy in Durham with new position

      The Speight family has been a staple of Durham commerce for decades dating back as far as the 1930s with places like Speight’s Auto Service, a business that is still active today. Doug Speight, whose grandfather, Theodore, started Speight’s Auto Service, is attempting to carry on that family legacy for the next generation of entrepreneurs in Durham. “That’s a big thread in our family,” Speight said. “I still feel it today.” Part of that family legacy is education. While Speight attributes most of his grandfather’s skills to self-teaching as a young farm boy in eastern North Carolina, his father Melvin Speight is a graduate of North Carolina A&T University where he majored in automotive technology. Doug also earned his bachelor’s degree from his father’s alma mater in industrial technology and computer aided design. Speight jokes about how they would test him at home on what he was learning, both in tech and business. “After my first couple of semesters, I’d come back on breaks and my father and grandfather would pepper me with questions about ‘have you learned this, have you learned that, have you learned about operating margins,’ and I was like, ’they don’t have that in engineering.” Roughly 10 years after graduating from NC A&T, Speight returned to North Carolina to get his MBA from the Kenan-Flagler Business School at UNC-Chapel Hill. Speight realized that with his studies, he wanted “a great blend of technical and business.” He says he was able to achieve this through the programs at NC A&T and UNC. Speight has put both his technical skills and business skills to work throughout his career, founding his own companies and even working as a subcontractor for NASA. His most recent venture is Cathedral Leasing, an equipment leasing company that he started while living with his family in Tennessee. It was around this time that Speight knew he wanted to move back closer to his family in North Carolina. After spending six months living in Charlotte, Speight decided that it was not the environment he was looking for and relocated his family from Tennessee back to his hometown of Durham in late 2015. “Charlotte, as a community, is still very corporate, still very compliance oriented, and it’s not a really robust startup community for those reasons,” Speight said. “Knowing about Durham, I knew this was the perfect place for us to move.” Since the move, Speight has been reacclimating to the area’s startup ecosystem. His sister, Joye Speight, is also an entrepreneur in town. She owns Virtue Events Planning and Consulting Inc., a full service events planning company. Joye had long been a tenant of American Underground, a startup incubator in downtown Durham. Speight credits her with bringing him back up to speed. “When I moved back, so much had changed about the city that I couldn’t really grasp just on visits back to see the parents. She was instrumental in telling me, ‘alright, here’s the landscape now,’ and helping me develop this baseline of what the community looks like.” Shortly after the move, he earned the opportunity to become the second entrepreneur-in-residence for American Underground. The EIR program is a year-long fellowship created in partnership with Google for Entrepreneurs and CODE2040, a nonprofit based in San Francisco that aims to “ensure the full representation and leadership of Black and Latino people in the innovation economy by creating pathways to their educational, professional, and entrepreneurial success in tech,” according to their website. Each fellow, aside from working on their own company, is tasked with cultivating minority business development in their region, one of American Underground’s missions as a community.   Now, after two years in the American Underground, he will take over as executive director at American Underground, succeeding Adam Klein, the company’s current director. Phillipe Charles, Director of Communications at AU, says he’s sad to see Klein go but couldn’t think of a better person to take his place. “At first, when I heard Adam [Klein] was leaving, that seemed to me like the world was ending,” Charles said both in jest and with sincerity. “But then he immediately followed that with Doug [Speight] was taking his place. For me, I had never considered that but I was like ‘oh, yeah, that’s perfect.’” Charles looks at Speight’s history as an entrepreneur and his ability to build relationships as being keys to his success in the new position. “There’s something to be said about a person in the role who has lived through the challenges that we’re trying to fix. In that way, Doug embodies some of the aspects of the AU mission just by who he is and his career.” Speight is excited to take on the challenge of leading Durham’s entrepreneurial community forward. He considers how his own family has made a living here for generations and wants to provide opportunities for others to do the same. “That’s one of the reasons why this work at AU is so important to me because I really feel like this is giving back to the community that made us.”   Weblinks Doug Speight interview about EIR program: https://www.exitevent.com/2017/05/doug-speight-reflects-on-his-year-as-durhams-code2040-entrepreneur-in-residence/ Management shift at American Underground, Biz Journal: https://www.bizjournals.com/triangle/news/2017/11/09/management-switch-at-american-underground-klein-to.html   Durham Voice story on Speight’s Auto Service: https://durhamvoice.org/speights-auto-service/ Joye Speight’s business: http://virtueevents.com/about-us/    

    The Durham Voice / 41 d. 7 h. 13 min. ago more
  • more news
  • Teacher by day, rapper by nightTeacher by day, rapper by night

      Durham Public Schools kindergarten teacher Antonio Cowart sticks to his morals even when not around his students. After working for a moving company for a short time, the bubbly 27-year-old found his voice in rapping by using age-appropriate lyrics for children. Most people who hear his music consider him a “Christian rapper.” However, Cowart thinks otherwise but he doesn’t go against the label because he is not ashamed of it.   YouTube link:    

    The Durham Voice / 41 d. 7 h. 28 min. ago more
  • Durham’s Professor Toon brings together NC artists at “Release Party”Durham’s Professor Toon brings together NC artists at “Release Party”

    There is no denying that North Carolina is on the come-up in terms of hip-hop, and Durham is in the heart of it. Baltimore-born, Durham-bred rapper Toon Rice, better known as Professor Toon, had his EP Release Party for his new project “Release,” Dec. 2, at Motorco Music Hall in Durham. Professor Toon performed songs from Release at Motorco Music Hall, 723 Rigsbee Ave, Durham, NC 27701 . (Staff photo by David Fee) “He’s a lively person on stage,” said Phillip Wiggins, an executive at Durham’s Playground Studios where Toon records. “His flow is very original and he’s got a fresh sound. It’ll make you think.” “Durham is crazy, there are so many creative gems out there.” Wiggins said. One of those Durham artists was Ebony Nicholson, 20, who warmed up the crowd with her original R&B songs from her newest recording “The Feel.” Opening for the release party was prominent North Carolina rapper Deniro Farrar from Charlotte. “This is my kind of vibe,” Farrar said while surveying the Durham audience from onstage. “My kind of tribe.” While many consider hip-hop from the triangle to be a different scene than that of Charlotte, Toon and Farrar have formed a unique partnership that spans the two cities. It’s been more than two years since the rappers have shared the same stage. Aspiring Durham rapper Jay Parish, 15, with her favorite rapper Deniro Farrar. (Staff photo by David Fee) “Deniro is fire,” said Toon. “He’s way more famous than me. Deniro doesn’t need to open a show for me, but that’s my homie. And he is here with support from Charlotte.” Farrar is also known as the “Leader of Cult Rap.” Cult Rap is a genre of music that connects with its listener through social commentary. Cult Rap is a Reality Rap, more reality than rap. “This next one is something y’all probably know about,” Farrar said onstage. “It’s called ‘Gentrification.’” “Is what it is, baby life move on/Gotta love struggle cause it made me strong/Whole Foods in the hood now the rent got raised/But I’m still living off minimum wage” he rapped. “Gentrification” is one of Farrar’s most popular tracks from his Red Book, Vol. 1 E.P. While Farrar is known for giving his heavy-hitting bars on important social issues, he also has his heart-throbbers. “There’s a lot of women out there, so I should probably perform this song,” Farrar said. “It’s called, ‘Tell Me.’” Farrar rapped his romantic track, dedicating various lyrics to female fans in the crowd. One was Jay Parish, 15, a Durhamite Farrar fan who knew the lyrics to every song. “Deniro Farrar is one of my favorite rappers,” she said. “I want to be a rapper myself, so he is very inspirational.” Professor Toon kept up the high-energy show after Farrar left the stage, performing lead singles off Release, which is scheduled to come out in January.  His club-worthy single “OkOk” is rumored to feature popular Durham Rapper G Yamazawa. Toon also rapped his fans’ favorite songs from his 2016 release Take Notes.             “There’s the history that you’re taught, and there’s a history that happened,” The Professor said on WUNC public radio. “It’s your job to take an extra set of notes.” Like Farrar, Toon’s raps aim to change the narrative of race in America and in their communities.             “My daughter is in kindergarten.” Toon said. “They still teach that Christopher Columbus discovered America. He discovered a place where people were literally standing to greet him. My notes are wrong by definition if he “discovered” this place where people were already.” Many of his songs draw from his experiences growing up in Durham. “Originally I’m from Cheek Road but moved to Southside, but I’ve been around a lot,” Toon said. “Basically all the blood neighborhoods.” Toon hopes to continue to build the North Carolina hip-hop platform to gain its much deserved national attention. “We’ve all been working hard to raise it up,” Toon said. “Its going to take the whole Triangle to really put on. It’s going to take a Rhapsody from Raleigh, a native of Chapel Hill, and me to really make it pop.”    

    The Durham Voice / 43 d. 7 h. 22 min. ago more
  • Few Gardens’ project childFew Gardens’ project child

      Growing up as a teen in Few Gardens during the ’70s, you were not getting out of any organized street fights. If Louis, leader of the “Few Crew,” decided to test your loyalty, anything went. Jeffrey Harris awaits his sausage pizza at Mellow Mushroom during his lunch break. (Staff photo by Autavius Smith) Aunts, mothers, cousins and brothers would take the weapons away and circle around the folks duking it out in the neighborhood. Raised on Morning Glory Avenue in arguably the most violent housing project in Durham, fighting didn’t doom 10th grade dropout Jeffrey Harris to a life in and out of prison. Like many families in Few Gardens, it was no secret that Harris’ family was underprivileged, making it especially tough to survive. He has spent some time in and out of jail, but he’s a free man, making his way now. The backdoor to his house was six-feet away from the neighborhood dumpster. Whenever the garbage man didn’t come for pick up, maggots would crawl all over thrown away mattresses and other homeware items. Now at 46 years old, Jeffrey Harris sat outside Mellow Mushroom restaurant recently, picking sausage from his pizza before talking about his childhood in the projects. “My first crime ever, my momma gave me a lighter and told me to set the dumpster on fire before we got sick,” Harris said. He didn’t know when he moved close to the dumpster that he’d contract, bacteria causing him to have stomach ulcers at age 14. Harris threw up blood for three days. Margret, his mom, thought nothing of it at first, but after Harris threw up on her gown, he was taken to the hospital. Doctors claimed if he went one day longer without treatment he would have bled from the inside and died. That was the ghetto for you, no concern for the health of mothers or children. The Federal Housing Act of 1949 created three federally funded programs allowing Few Gardens to be Durham’s first public housing project in 1952-53. The 240-unit low-rent housing project located in East Durham was named in honor of the late Dr. W.P. Few, former president of Duke University. The first wave of gang presence in Durham has been traced back to Few Gardens by North Carolina Gang Investigators Association. “I wouldn’t have made it if I didn’t find violence usable because I was tried at every point,” said Harris.  “It wasn’t Bloods or Crips it was just a serious neighborhood that wanted to see what was in you. I never agreed with it, I was in the band in middle school. I was the only one coming home with a saxophone. Then when I got to high school I got in ROTC.” Currently, Harris manages the African American News journal, a collection of historic newspaper columns dating back to 1861. He is also the producer of The Peoples Channel, a call-in radio show he hosts using information from books he’s avidly read. He credited his friends from ages two, three, five and six as his mentors in getting through day-to-day hassles. “Jat was one of the ones that watch me grow up, he was OG, he made sure that nobody would touch us, nobody would bother us – Nobody bothered nobody because if you did you had to deal with his one-hundred-sixty-pound brother, about 5’9″ with the reputation of a 7’7″ four-hundred-pound boogie man,” Harris said. Harris’ best friend, “Red,” had an aunt named Paulette who’d often psychically set the record straight with children — even grown men — who were misbehaving in the community. “The hardest-hitting person out there was Red Bone’s aunt. She had to be from warrior-princess DNA. She was 6’1″, wore Daisey dukes, built like Jackie Joyner-Kersee, gap in her teeth, never did her hair and if you talked to her customer she would let y’all fight,” Harris said. Red and another mutual friend, Mookie, were put in charge of Few Crew’s secondary gang. Red banned drug and alcohol use after seeing the demise of Louis and several of his friends from drug and alcohol abuse. “We did a lot of fighting back then, fighting was just the thing, people would lose fights and say, ‘Oh I was drunk.’ No, you just got your ass beat,” Red explained. Harris calls Red his “blood brother;” the two even acquired their first job doing paper routes as 8-years-olds while gambling for a nickel on the sidewalk. “I went to school to eat. I had two lunch periods, we were starving in America, in the ’80s, in the projects, that’s when they (government) used to bring us blocks of cheese,” Harris said. Harris would con one of his friends who’d tear the edges off slices of bread at the lunch table in school. “It took me years to realize Few Gardens was a fortress. Yeah, we had our crime issues, but that was because of people coming in there buying drugs, if nobody bought drugs they wouldn’t have sold none of it,” Harris said. According to Harris, in the ’80s a state trooper was beat and had his gun stolen after a visit to Few Gardens to make an arrest went wrong. He says that for years the Durham Police Department was hesitant to respond to reports linked to Few Gardens. Both Red and Harris mentioned at one point there was a substation to secure the neighborhood, but it eventually was shot up when no cop patrolled the station. In 2003 with a long history of brutal beatings, hour-long fights and drug infestation, Few Gardens was demolished by the city. “It broke my heart, it killed me because everything we touched was destroyed, where I lived, my schools, everything that showed that I existed (the city government) got rid of it,” Harris said.  

    The Durham Voice / 48 d. 8 h. 10 min. ago more
  • Global Scholars preparing to step upGlobal Scholars preparing to step up

      The transition from middle school to high school can be a heavy load for teenagers everywhere. A sudden thrust into a different environment with new surroundings, more freedom, and a faster-paced curriculum are just some of the few things that these adolescents have to deal with. Faculty and staff at Global Scholars Academy in Durham want the parents of these anxious eighth-graders to have their scholar as prepared as possible, which is why the first 8th Grade Parent Meeting of the year was held at the school on Nov. 16. “I think it’s great to expose our children to not only good colleges, but high schools as well,” said Ashley McCray, the guidance counselor at Global Scholars Academy. Throughout the calendar academic year, students in the eighth grade will be taken on tours to different high schools across the county, but McCray encourages parents to take up that initiative for their child. “We will take the students to a few (schools) but it’s really beneficial for the child if the parent can do that as well,” said McCray. According to McCray, the things to consider when selecting a high school for their scholar is: school environment, size, diversity, student/teacher ratio, school culture/reputation, and transportation. “You want to find the high school that fits your scholar, and not try to make the scholar fit the high school,” added McCray. Global Scholars Academy Principal Jason Jowers echoed her sentiments almost exactly. “Most schools that your child will qualify for specialize in specific areas,” commented Jowers. “Pick a school that has the best interest for your child.”     Principal Jason Jowers and Guidance Counselor Ashley McCray look on as other faculty speak during the 8th Grade Parent Meeting. (Staff photo by Keynari Brown)    

    The Durham Voice / 48 d. 8 h. 29 min. ago more