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    Google News / 19.11.2017 04:22
  • Oversized sandbox opens in Littleton to inspire future buildersOversized sandbox opens in Littleton to inspire future builders

    LITTLETON — Dylan Ray still has 17 years remaining until he can legally obtain his commercial driver’s license, but luckily the 4-year-old is content driving trucks his own size. “My favorite toy is a cement truck,” the pre-K student answered before deciding to end the interview early. “I want to go play in the sand now.” Kids Dig is Dylan’s new favorite hotspot. The indoor play area is an 825-square-foot sandbox filled with 40 tons of sand and dozens of toy trucks, located north of Southwest Plaza Mall. It’s a hands-on environment for kids ages 3 to 10 to learn about the construction trade. The play area had its grand opening Saturday, and of course, Dylan was among the kids in attendance. Dylan lives with his mother, Jenn Ray, in an apartment in Littleton that doesn’t have a backyard. “The second we left we were already planning our next visit,” said Jenn, who had visited Kids Dig two days in a row. “He wouldn’t leave unless he could come back.” Dylan, who wants to be a firefighter when he grows up, is on the autism spectrum, and his mother said that physical play such as that provided at Kids Dig is what Dylan’s body craves. “Carrying stuff and sand play just works really well for what his body needs,” she said. “He really needs all this heavy work.” Jenn first noted Dylan’s love for getting dirty when they visited family on the East Coast a couple of weeks ago. “We were at the beach, and it was really hard getting him to leave,” she said. But Kids Dig offers more than a fun play environment for kids to be physically active, it also provides learning opportunities important to kids’ development such as learning how to follow rules, what they mean and why they’re important, along with learning how to share the toys. “All these tools are brilliant because they require coordination and thought process,” Jenn said. “And they show the kids cause-and-effect, so even as a mom it’s really cool watching their little brains working and figuring all the equipment out. … It’s so great to watch them develop socially in places like this.” The business is among the first of its kind in the state and one of just a few in the country, according to a news release. Owner Garry Wolff said he got his idea, which he decided to make a reality in December, from “all the apartments and condos that you see all over the place.” “That’s what I think when I drive by now: Where are these kids playing?” Wolff spent several years building houses himself after working for a builder when he was in high school. “They’re at that age, 3 to 10 years old, where (they) might start developing what they might want to do,” Wolff said. He also commented on kids’ lack of exposure to trades such as construction due to budget cuts in schools. Plus, physical and social interaction is important to the parents who frequent Kids Dig. Related ArticlesNovember 18, 2017 Ask Amy: Baby might not bring troubled siblings together November 16, 2017 Excited for their day in court: Families adopted 44 kids during Denver Adoption Day November 15, 2017 His brother died mysteriously when they were toddlers in England. Years later, a photo changed everything. November 15, 2017 Virginia parents of 4-year-old with cancer can’t buy ACA plan to cover her hospital care November 15, 2017 How young is too young for cellphones in school? “It’s different playing an application construction game and actually touching something and interacting with it,” said Dianne Wolff, co-owner of Kids Dig. Jennifer Meister of Thornton made the trek with her son Charlie, who turns 4 in February, after hearing about Kids Dig on social media. Jennifer and Charlie said they’re always looking for something to do indoors that doesn’t involve jumping on trampolines or a play area inside a fast-food restaurant. “This is just a great idea; there’s just nothing like this anywhere,” Jennifer said. “Anything to keep him interested and he’s not sitting in front of the TV or his tablet.” “When it gets cold and the weather’s bad, they can just come here and the kids can still have fun and still be in an outdoor-ish environment,” Dianne said. “If your child likes adventure, they’ll like Kids Dig.”

    Denver Post - Arapahoe County / 37 min. ago more
  • University of Colorado plans $15000 online degree programs - The Denver ChannelUniversity of Colorado plans $15000 online degree programs - The Denver Channel

    The Denver ChannelUniversity of Colorado plans $15000 online degree programsThe Denver ChannelDENVER (AP) — University of Colorado officials are backing the creation of online programs that could let students earn college degrees for $15,000. Colorado Public Radio reports that the Board of Regents backed the plan this week and approved $20 ...and more »

    Google News / 57 min. ago more
  • Eaglecrest throttles Cherry Creek to advance to Class 5A football semifinalsEaglecrest throttles Cherry Creek to advance to Class 5A football semifinals

    There were plenty of moments in Eaglecrest’s 26-7 quarterfinal win over Cherry Creek on Saturday that signaled the Raptors — off the heels of a second straight undefeated regular season — were ready for their close-up against Class 5A’s most storied program. But the most telling of Saturday’s moments at Legacy Stadium came late in the first half, when the Bruins were in the red zone, still searching for their first points. Cherry Creek faced a fourth-and-1 and elected to go for it, sending the jumbo package out in an attempt to bruise its way past the sticks. The Eaglecrest defense, en route to three-plus quarters of shutout football, had none of it. Linebackers Elijah Anderson-Taylor and Kyante Christian led a gang of Raptors into the backfield to meet the handoff at the mesh point, forcing a fumble and turning the ball back over to the Raptors. Gut-check passed. Physicality test, passed. These Raptors — unlike teams of the program’s recent past that relied almost exclusively on skill talent — proved on that play, and in the win overall, that they are ready to punch their way to the title. “That was a beautiful play, and those types of plays happen because our guys play hard every snap and they’re hungry,” Eaglecrest coach Mike Schmitt said. “Today was a testament to that, because to win a game like this where defensively we could stop a big, physical team — and for us to be able to run the ball and get first downs in key moments — is really where we’ve changed the culture at Eaglecrest.” The first half featured bend-but-don’t-break showings by both defenses, as 27- and 29-yard field goals by senior Theryne Sandoval-Jimenez gave the Raptors a scant 6-0 lead heading into the locker room. But the way the Eaglecrest continued to flex its muscle in the second half — junior Barrett Miller and the defensive line wreaked havoc in the pocket for Cherry Creek junior quarterback Alex Padilla, who tossed fourth-quarter interceptions to Raptors seniors Jon Huepel and Corey Corbin — turned a close game into a rout. .@ESwag2120 talks #Eaglecrest‘s defensive domination in Class 5A quarterfinal win over Cherry Creek: “Our confidence brings out the dog in us.” #copreps @raptorathletics pic.twitter.com/vOrxDEYfU1 — Kyle Newman (@KyleNewmanDP) November 18, 2017 “We have some speed in the secondary — (Bruins star wideout) Dimitri Stanley is a fast track kid, but we have our 4×100 team in the defensive backfield,” Schmitt said. “We thought we could cover them, but the biggest deal was that I didn’t know if we could stop their run with our front guys. One of their backs (Jayle Stacks) was hurt, so that made a big difference, but we just came to play up front.” Senior quarterback Jalen Mergerson and the Raptors offense, in turn, found their rhythm in the second half. Mergerson’s dual-threat ability kept Cherry Creek on its toes, and two touchdown passes of more than 20 yards to senior Victor Garnes, coupled with a Kenny Wantings touchdown run, stretched the lead to 26-0. Padilla finally connected with junior wideout Marcus Miller to make it 26-7 late in the fourth quarter, but it was too late as Wantings and the Raptors ran the clock out to the victory. “We got bogged down in third quarter and never could get out of it,” Cherry Creek coach Dave Logan said. “It started with a field goal blocked at the end of the first half, and when you play at this level, this late in the season against really good teams, you can’t afford to have things like that happen.” The Raptors face Columbine in the semifinals next week, while Pomona and Grandview meet on the other side of the bracket for a chance to play for the championship on Dec. 2 at Sports Authority Field. Relive the explosive second half:

    Denver Post - Arapahoe County / 1 h. 15 min. ago more
  • Colorado men struggle to eighth-place finish at NCAA cross country championships; CSU ninth - The Denver PostColorado men struggle to eighth-place finish at NCAA cross country championships; CSU ninth - The Denver Post

    The Denver PostColorado men struggle to eighth-place finish at NCAA cross country championships; CSU ninthThe Denver PostWhen Colorado cross country coach Mark Wetmore made the decision in September to sit out John Dressel because of injury, he knew it would be a huge blow to the team's hopes for contending for a podium spot at the NCAA championships. Nevertheless ...and more »

    Google News / 1 h. 38 min. ago more
  • Brighton Police Department investigates broad daylight shootingBrighton Police Department investigates broad daylight shooting

    The Brighton Police Department is seeking information about a drive-by shooting that happened Saturday afternoon in Brighton. According to witnesses, the shooter was a heavy-set Hispanic man wearing a black baseball cap who fired multiple shots into a red Dodge Durango parked on the corner of Brighton Street and North 11th Court. The man drove away in a silver-colored sedan with a cracked front windshield, damage to the front bumper, and a bent rear license plate, according to a news release. The vehicle was last seen heading south on 12th Avenue from Brighton Street. Related ArticlesNovember 17, 2017 Pueblo teen could be tried as adult in fatal shooting November 17, 2017 Ex-soldier convicted in Colorado Springs road-rage shooting November 16, 2017 One dead, one wounded in northeast Denver shooting November 16, 2017 New Colorado school board member served time for murder November 16, 2017 Denver man charged with murder after allegedly shooting man following argument Contact Detective Micah Acker at (303) 655-2356 with information.

    Denver Post - Adams County / 1 h. 55 min. ago more
  • Emergency life flights rise in Colorado with thrill-seekers - Aspen TimesEmergency life flights rise in Colorado with thrill-seekers - Aspen Times

    Aspen TimesEmergency life flights rise in Colorado with thrill-seekersAspen TimesIn this Monday, Nov. 6, 2017 photo, pilot Shawn McFarland readies the Flight for Life helicopter as they help to serve those in need of medical attention and to be airlifted to hospitals including the St. Francis Memorial Hospital in Colorado Springs ...

    Google News / 2 h. 13 min. ago
  • Bicyclists seriously injured after crash with car at Colfax Avenue and Lincoln StreetBicyclists seriously injured after crash with car at Colfax Avenue and Lincoln Street

    A bicyclist was seriously injured in a crash with a vehicle at Colfax Avenue and Lincoln Street Saturday afternoon. The Denver Police Department tweeted about the accident at 2:43 p.m. The department warned drivers to expect traffic delays. Police spokesman Tyrone Campbell said he did not have the bicyclist’s or the driver’s name or gender but said officers are heading to the scene to conduct an investigation #Traffic #DPD officers are on-scene @ Colfax Ave & Lincoln, with a Serious Injury Bicycle vs Vehicle crash. Please expect temporary traffic delays in that area. #Denver pic.twitter.com/UjRRwSVJsJ — Denver Police Dept. (@DenverPolice) November 18, 2017 Related ArticlesNovember 17, 2017 Report: Just 43 percent of potentially deadly Takata air bags have been replaced November 16, 2017 3-year-old boy dies of injuries from Lakewood chain-reaction crash that killed his mother November 15, 2017 Driver dies in crash involving semi-truck in Boulder County November 15, 2017 Woman who wrecked string of vehicles in Thornton sentenced to probation, mental health treatment November 15, 2017 Loveland man dies in Johnstown traffic crash

    Denver Post: Crime / 2 h. 28 min. ago more
  • To Save Their Water Supply, Colorado Farmers Taxed Themselves - NPRTo Save Their Water Supply, Colorado Farmers Taxed Themselves - NPR

    NPRTo Save Their Water Supply, Colorado Farmers Taxed ThemselvesNPRThe Western U.S. is just starting to recover after a prolonged, 16-year drought. A lack of water can force people to take a hard look at how they use it, and make big changes. That's what happened in southern Colorado, where farmers have tried a bold ...and more »

    Google News / 2 h. 39 min. ago more
  • Over 100 animals seized in southwest Colorado cruelty case - FOX31 DenverOver 100 animals seized in southwest Colorado cruelty case - FOX31 Denver

    FOX31 DenverOver 100 animals seized in southwest Colorado cruelty caseFOX31 DenverDURANGO, Colo. — Officials in southwest Colorado say they have seized more than 100 animals after an investigation of animal cruelty. The La Plata County Sheriff's Office and the La Plata County Humane Society haven't identified the person cited for ...100+ animals seized in Colorado in animal cruelty investigationKKTV 11 Newsall 13 news articles »

    Google News / 3 h. 8 min. ago more
  • Wright's Buzzer-Beater Lifts Colorado Past Quinnipiac, 70-69 - CBS LocalWright's Buzzer-Beater Lifts Colorado Past Quinnipiac, 70-69 - CBS Local

    CBS LocalWright's Buzzer-Beater Lifts Colorado Past Quinnipiac, 70-69CBS LocalWright rebounded a missed free throw, raced to the other end of the court and made a 3-pointer as time expired Friday, giving Colorado a 70-69 victory against Quinnipiac in the relocated Paradise Jam. It was moved from St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands ...and more »

    Google News / 4 h. 38 min. ago more
  • Virginia woman catches record fish while vacationing in Colorado - FOX31 DenverVirginia woman catches record fish while vacationing in Colorado - FOX31 Denver

    FOX31 DenverVirginia woman catches record fish while vacationing in ColoradoFOX31 Denver“Colorado Parks and Wildlife certified the fish as the new state record, weighing in at 4.15 pounds and 23.5 inches in length, breaking the previous record of 3.75 pounds and 20.5 inches, caught in Dillon Reservoir in 1994 by Marshall Brenner,” the ...

    Google News / 5 h. 45 min. ago
  • Colorado grocers have begun buying out liquor-store licenses - 9NEWS.comColorado grocers have begun buying out liquor-store licenses - 9NEWS.com

    9NEWS.comColorado grocers have begun buying out liquor-store licenses9NEWS.comDENVER BUSINESS JOURNAL - Nearly a year and a half after Gov. John Hickenlooper signed into law a measure allowing Colorado grocery chains to get more than one full-strength liquor license, two metro-Denver stores have bought out existing liquor ...

    Google News / 7 h. 39 min. ago
  • Emergency life flights rise in Colorado with thrill-seekersEmergency life flights rise in Colorado with thrill-seekers

    In this Monday, Nov. 6, 2017 photo, Paul Oldfield, a registered nurse, right, plugs in his headset as he readies for the trip in the Flight for Life helicopter for a short trip above Penrose Hospital before returning back to St. Francis Memorial Hospital, in Colorado Springs, Colo. The Flight of Life crew help to serve those in need of medical attention and to be airlifted to hospitals.

    Colorado News / 14 h. 32 min. ago more
  • Why sexual harassment training doesn’t stop harassmentWhy sexual harassment training doesn’t stop harassment

    AP Photos, FileThis combination photo shows, top row from left, film producer Harvey Weinstein, former Amazon Studios executive Roy Price, director James Toback, New Orleans chef John Besh, middle row from left, fashion photographer Terry Richardson, New Republic contributing editor Leon Wiseltier, former NBC News political commentator Mark Halperin, former Defy Media executive Andy Signore, and bottom row from left, filmmaker Brett Ratner, actor Kevin Spacey, actor Jeremy Piven and actor Dustin Hoffman. In the weeks since the string of allegations against Weinstein first began, an ongoing domino effect has tumbled through not just Hollywood but at least a dozen other industries. Shannon Rawski first got the idea for her dissertation after listening to her former colleagues – business school professors who study human resources and recognize sexual harassment as a problem – complain about having to attend, well, sexual harassment training. “My university announced they needed to have it because they hadn’t in three years, and the buzz in the hallway was ‘Why do I have to go to this? This is a waste of my time,’ ” says Rawski, now an assistant professor at the University of Wisconsin at Oshkosh. “Yet these are the very faculty who are promoting that people should go to this kind of training.” That response got Rawski thinking about why such programs are often met with disdain – even by those who help develop them – and wondering whether they work. She set out to study it. What she found surprised her: Only a handful of scientific studies have tested the effectiveness of sexual harassment training, which is nearly ubiquitous in American workplaces and intended to help protect workers as well as minimize an employer’s own legal and financial risks. “We don’t really have a whole body of work,” Rawski said. That may seem unsettling as a staggering wave of women and men divulge unwanted advances and illegal behavior in what seems like an epidemic of sexual harassment allegations. From Hollywood to the halls of Congress, suddenly no American workplace seems safe. And the topic of harassment training has taken center stage. Speaker Paul D. Ryan, R-Wis., said Tuesday that the House would make training mandatory for members and staffers after female lawmakers described pervasive, unwanted sexual comments or advances. It’s been the subject of late-night comedy, too, with Cecily Strong on “Saturday Night Live” playing an exasperated, Purell-slurping “Claire from HR” who quizzes Colin Jost about appropriate workplace behavior. (“Remember, there’s no wrong answers here. Just super-wrong answers.”) And employment lawyers say they’re hearing from clients who want to make sure their training and coaching are up to speed. “We’ve definitely had an uptick in requests for this kind of work in the last couple of months,” said Kevin O’Neill, a principal at the employment law firm Littler Mendelson who leads sexual harassment training. “It’s been this slow buildup – each example builds off the next – until you have this explosion.” Yet as Rawski found, researchers don’t have much evidence that sexual harassment training is effective at certain key goals: Reducing the number of incidents in a workplace, or helping to shift its culture toward one that takes the issue seriously. Last year, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission published a report that found only two research papers based on large-scale studies of anti-harassment training in workplaces (rather than in lab settings). The research showed that the training does have benefits – particularly in increasing awareness of what constitutes sexual harassment and how it should be reported. But it also showed that some efforts had a negative effect, such as a study where male participants were more likely to blame the victim and less likely to report harassment. “In most cases, employers are creating these policies more to protect themselves than to protect employees,” said Lauren Edelman, a professor at the law school of the University of California at Berkeley. “We don’t know when harassment training is effective, and we have reason to believe that maybe it’s counterproductive in some cases.” Experts say the training has traditionally been done more as a legal defense. In 1998, following two Supreme Court cases, more companies began adopting sexual harassment policies and training as an “affirmative defense.” It has several parts. To help minimize their liability for hostile work environments, employers must prove that they offered policies, training and complaint procedures. And then, that they responded to complaints promptly and thoroughly. “It was sort of a get-out-of-jail-free card to companies,” said Debra Katz, a Washington lawyer who represents plaintiffs in sexual harassment cases. After the 1998 decisions, she said, “there was like a cottage industry of trainers who went in and provided training. Most of those efforts were geared toward trying to protect themselves from liability as opposed to creating a sea change in the culture.” As a result, the training became something of an imposition to employers. Some companies willing to spend millions of dollars on talent development will balk at spending tens of thousands on harassment training, Littler’s O’Neill said. Today, five states have a mandate for harassment training for private and public employees (another 22 require it for some or all public-sector workers), according to the National Women’s Law Center. The Society for Human Resources Management found in a 2010 survey that only 20 percent of employers said they offered no sexual harassment training and 59 percent said they offered it every year or every other year. The survey has not been updated since. That check-the-box mentality can show up in the quality. Eden King, an associate professor at Rice University, has testified before the EEOC that face-to-face training that lasts more than four hours and includes active participation with a supervisor is more likely to be effective. Still “much of it is rather cartoonish in character,” Berkeley’s Edelman said. “They have unrealistic scenarios – some of it suggests that the woman is complicit, encouraging the man to harass.” Many companies today use online tutorials, thanks to the cost and logistical complications of in-person training, even though some are skeptical. “I think people are just racing through it,” said Henry Perlowski, an employment lawyer based in Atlanta. As a result, training that University of Georgia sociologist Justine Tinkler calls a “bureaucratic necessity” can actually serve to reinforce gender biases. In her research, after going through training in a lab setting, students tended to more strongly associate men with higher power and status and women with lower power and less competence. After being asked to read the university’s sexual harassment policy, students also more strongly associated men with careers and women with family in an implicit bias test. “Nothing about my research makes me think we shouldn’t have [policy] training,” Tinkler said. “But we should think carefully about the type of it we do.” Rawski’s dissertation, which has been peer-reviewed but has not yet been published, looked at the reactions of employees to harassment training. Immediately afterward, she asked participants whether it made them feel valued or devalued. Those who felt devalued, or experienced what psychologists call “identity threat,” were more likely – not less – to say they would do things like tell sexual jokes. “Since the training is threatening who you are, a defense mechanism is to say this is illegitimate,” she said. Rawski believes one answer may be more “bystander training.” The EEOC suggested the same. Valerie Hoffman, a lawyer with Seyfarth Shaw in Chicago, said she sees few companies trying this approach. “Most organizations put little pressure on others to intervene or report harassment,” she said. Training is effective for people who are open to modifying their conduct, but not to those who “don’t want to get it.” Lisa Scherer, a professor at the University of Nebraska at Omaha whose 2001 research found that male participants were more likely to blame the victim, argues that “training can only do so much” – it’s not clear how well it can change basic values in adults. Elizabeth Owens Bille, general counsel for the Society for Human Resource Management, said companies are realizing that training should be part of a more holistic approach: “The understanding that simply having a policy and doing training on the basics of sexual harassment was not enough really began about two years ago – and really in the past year.” Related ArticlesNovember 17, 2017 Trump often condemns Democrats, defends Republicans on harassment allegations November 17, 2017 Ohio governor candidate boasts of sexual history with “approximately 50 very attractive females” November 17, 2017 New accusations emerge about Rep. Paul Rosenthal following sexual harassment complaint November 17, 2017 TED talks empire has been grappling with sexual harassment complaints November 17, 2017 Franken apologizes to woman who says he kissed, groped her Others say that promoting more women into leadership roles could help. In a recent Harvard Business Review article, professors Frank Dobbin and Alexandra Kalev write that harassment is more common in workplaces where men hold most managerial roles or “core” jobs. “We already know how to reduce sexual harassment at work, and the answer is actually pretty simple: Hire and promote more women,” they write. Perhaps most promising, O’Neill said, is that top executives have grown more receptive to one-on-one coaching. The #MeToo social media campaign, in which women shared their stories of harassment, as well as the high-profile allegations that have ensnared industry titans, has more executives open to it. That may be in part because the recent headlines have been a reminder of the financial risks at stake. Advertisers fled Fox News host Bill O’Reilly’s show after harassment allegations, and the Weinstein Co. has sold distribution rights to “Paddington 2” in the aftermath of high-profile accusations against producer Harvey Weinstein. The EEOC’s report noted that since 2010, employers have paid a total of $699 million to employees alleging harassment via its pre-litigation process and cited an estimate of settlements and court judgments in 2012 that racked up more than $356 million in costs. These don’t include indirect costs such lower productivity or higher turnover.

    Denver Post: Business / 18 h. 43 min. ago more
  • Ultra-wealthy win in Senate tax bill, other face hikesUltra-wealthy win in Senate tax bill, other face hikes

    WASHINGTON — The ultra-wealthy, especially those with dynastic businesses — like President Donald Trump and his family — do very well under a major Republican tax bill moving in the Senate, as they do under legislation passed this week by the House. Want to toast the anticipated tax win with champagne or a beer — or maybe you’re feeling Shakespearean and prefer to quaff mead from a pewter mug? That would cheer producers of beer, wine, liquor — and mead, the ancient beverage fermented from honey. Tax rates on their sales would be reduced under the Senate bill. On the other hand, people living in high-tax states, who deduct their local property, income and sales taxes from what they owe Uncle Sam, could lose out from the complete or partial repeal of the deductions. And an estimated 13 million Americans could lose health insurance coverage over 10 years under the Senate bill. Some winners and losers: WINNERS — Wealthy individuals and their heirs win big. The hottest class-warfare debate around the tax overhaul legislation involves the inheritance tax on multimillion-dollar estates. Democrats wave the legislation’s targeting of the tax as a red flag in the face of Republicans, as proof that they’re out to benefit wealthy donors. The House bill initially doubles the limits — to $11 million for individuals and $22 million for couples — on how much money in the estate can be exempted from the inheritance tax, then repeals it entirely after 2023. The Senate version also doubles the limits but doesn’t repeal the tax. Then there’s the alternative minimum tax, a levy aimed at ensuring that higher-earning people pay at least some tax. It disappears in both bills. And the House measure cuts tax rates for many of the millions of “pass-through” businesses big and small — including partnerships and specially organized corporations — whose profits are taxed at the owners’ personal income rate. That’s potential cha-ching for Trump’s far-flung property empire and the holdings of his daughter Ivanka and her husband, Jared Kushner. The Senate bill lets pass-through owners deduct some of the earnings and then pay at their personal income rate on the remainder. — Corporations win all around, with a tax rate slashed from 35 percent to 20 percent in both bills — though they’d have to wait a year for it under the Senate measure. Trump and the administration view it as an untouchable centerpiece of the legislation. — U.S. oil companies with foreign operations would pay reduced taxes under the Senate bill on their income from sales of oil and natural gas abroad. — Beer, wine and liquor producers would reap tax reductions under the Senate measure. — Companies that provide management services like maintenance for aircraft get an updated win. The Senate bill clarifies that under current law, the management companies would be exempt from paying taxes on payments they receive from owners of private jets as well as from commercial airlines. That was a request from Ohio Sens. Rob Portman, a Republican, and Sherrod Brown, a Democrat, whose state is home to NetJets, a big aircraft management company. Portman voted for the overall bill. Brown opposed it. Related ArticlesNovember 18, 2017 Tax filers in most states claim deduction targeted by GOP November 17, 2017 CSU prof says workers won’t benefit from Trump’s corporate tax cut November 16, 2017 The House just passed its big tax bill. Here’s what is in it. November 16, 2017 On Republican tax bill, Donald Trump and Paul Ryan nudged skeptic Ken Buck into the “yes” column November 16, 2017 As U.S. House tax reform vote nears, Colorado’s Ken Buck could be the rare Republican voice of caution LOSERS — An estimated 13 million Americans could lose health insurance coverage under the Senate bill, which would repeal the “Obamacare” requirement that everyone in the U.S. have health insurance. The projection comes from the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office. Eliminating the fines is expected to mean fewer people would obtain federally subsidized health policies. — People living in high-tax states would be hit by repeal of federal deductions for state and local taxes under the Senate bill, and partial repeal under the House measure. That result of a compromise allows the deduction for up to $10,000 in property taxes. — Many families making less than $30,000 a year would face tax increases starting in 2021 under the Senate bill, according to Congress’ nonpartisan Joint Committee on Taxation. By 2027, families earning less than $75,000 would see their tax bills rise while those making more would enjoy reductions, the analysts find. The individual income-tax reductions in the Senate bill would end in 2026.

    Denver Post: Business / 18 h. 47 min. ago more
  • Fewer than 44% of eligible Boulder County voters cast ballots in electionFewer than 44% of eligible Boulder County voters cast ballots in election

    Rob Menzies, left, and Wes Soule pull a ballot for the Risk Limiting Audit being performed at the Boulder County Clerk and Recorder's Office on Friday.

    Colorado News / 19 h. ago
  • College basketball: McKinley Wright IV stars for Colorado in epic ... - NCAA.comCollege basketball: McKinley Wright IV stars for Colorado in epic ... - NCAA.com

    NCAA.comCollege basketball: McKinley Wright IV stars for Colorado in epic ...NCAA.comOne coaching decision at a school that has nothing to do or isn't even close to Colorado could change the direction of the Buffaloes program for the next four ...Colorado Buffaloes Basketball: McKinley Wright saves the day - The ...Ralphie Reportall 10 news articles »

    Google News / 19 h. 1 min. ago more
  • Advocacy groups: Killings of transgender people increaseAdvocacy groups: Killings of transgender people increase

    NEW YORK — At least 25 transgender people in the United States have been homicide victims so far this year, the highest annual total on record, according to advocacy groups that have been monitoring the grim phenomenon and seeking ways to reduce the toll. The Human Rights Campaign, in a report released Friday, calculated that 102 transgender people have been killed in the U.S. over the past five years — including 25 this year. Its report, jointly sponsored by the Trans People of Color Coalition, was issued ahead of Monday’s annual Transgender Day of Remembrance observations, commemorating the hundreds of transgender people killed worldwide each year. Another monitoring group, the National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs , has tallied 26 homicides of transgender and gender-nonconforming people in the U.S. so far this year. Both groups say their counts may be incomplete because transgender victims are sometimes misidentified in police and news reports. In some cases, it has taken weeks or months for friends and family to publicly clarify the gender identity of a victim who had transitioned from the gender given in initial police accounts of the death. The Human Rights Campaign provided a statistical breakdown of the 102 killings since January 2013. It said that 88 of the victims were transgender women, and that nearly all of them were black or Hispanic. Nearly three-quarters were under age 35, including four minors. And 55 of the victims were killed in the South, including 16 of this year’s victims. “Their killings were committed by lovers, acquaintances, family members, neighbors and strangers,” the report said. “While every story highlighted in this report is unique and tragic, they all also reflect a legacy of intolerance, hate and discrimination that transgender people must navigate and surmount every day.” The report noted that most states do not have laws prohibiting discrimination against transgender people. Documenting Hate Share your stories of hate crimes and discrimination with The Denver Post and ProPublica through the nationwide Documenting Hate project. “Indeed, in many states, anti-transgender bias is ingrained and systematically enforced in nearly all aspects of life, including in laws and government agencies, schools, housing, health care and employment,” the report said. The result, said the report, is a disproportionately high rate of poverty — 30 percent — among transgender people. “Many of those living in poverty rely on the underground economy to survive, including sex work, drug sales and other currently criminalized work,” the report said. “These dangerous situations may put transgender people at a higher risk of police harassment, sexual assault and fatal violence.” While many of the transgender homicides draw no more than scant local news coverage, two recent cases have attracted national attention. Related ArticlesNovember 15, 2017 Australians overwhelmingly endorse gay marriage, clearing the way for Parliament November 13, 2017 Hate crimes in the United States increased last year, the FBI says November 11, 2017 As Trump attempts a transgender military ban, Germany celebrates its first trans commander November 11, 2017 George Takei, Richard Dreyfuss and Gary Goddard accused of sexual misconduct November 10, 2017 More than 100 people sleep outside to raise money for Boulder-based homeless youth organization In Missouri, LGBT activists have asked the state attorney general to oversee an investigation of the death of a transgender teenager whose body was mutilated and burned in September. Activists have raised concerns about the response of the local sheriff and prosecutor to the death of 17-year-old Ally Lee Steinfeld. The local officials insist the slaying wasn’t a hate crime. The U.S. Justice Department sent a federal hate crimes lawyer to Iowa to help prosecute a man charged with killing a transgender teenager last year, an unusual decision by Attorney General Jeff Sessions even as he takes other steps to weaken the rights of transgender people. A jury on Nov. 3 convicted Jorge Sanders-Galvez, 23, of first-degree murder in the fatal shooting of 16-year-old Kedarie Johnson in Burlington, Iowa, in March 2016. A trial for a second man charged with murder in the case, Jaron Purham, 25, is set for Feb. 20, 2018. Sessions says the Justice Department no longer considers transgender people shielded from workplace discrimination under federal law, and he has issued sweeping guidance on protecting religious freedom that undercuts protections for LGBT people.

    Denver Post: Crime / 19 h. 16 min. ago more
  • Louisville's Door to Door Organics delivers its last orderLouisville's Door to Door Organics delivers its last order

    Louisville's Door to Door Organics abruptly shut down Friday, saying that there was no way forward in a message to its customers posted on its web site.

    ColoradoHometownWeekly.com / 19 h. 47 min. ago
  • Louisville astronaut Jack Fischer visits Lafayette's Centaurus after return from spaceLouisville astronaut Jack Fischer visits Lafayette's Centaurus after return from space

    Centaurus High students had already watched a live video feed as astronaut Jack Fischer boarded the International Space Station, then later asked him questions while he was still in space.

    ColoradoHometownWeekly.com / 19 h. 54 min. ago
  • Nissan execs taking pay cuts over bogus vehicle inspectionsNissan execs taking pay cuts over bogus vehicle inspections

    TOKYO — Nissan Motor Co. Chief Executive Hiroto Saikawa and other executives of the Japanese automaker are returning a part of their salaries to show remorse over illegal vehicle inspections at the automaker’s plants in Japan. Saikawa did not say how big the pay cuts would be or who else would take them. He said “voluntary return of a part of his pay” started last month and will continue through March 2018, the end of the fiscal year. Earlier Friday, Nissan submitted to the government a report on its investigation into the scandal. It said the investigation found workers in training, not authorized to carry out inspections, were routinely conducting the tests, borrowing and using the “hanko,” or traditional Japanese seals that often are used in lieu of signatures, of certified personnel. The faulty inspections affect only vehicles sold in Japan, not exports. Because of the problems, Nissan is recalling more than a million vehicles for further inspections Saikawa said it was puzzling why the practice was routine for decades, beginning as early as 1979. He said plant workers knew what they were doing was illegal and covered it up, including when government regulators came to check on the plants and the inspections. He also said it was “deplorable” that higher management was so out of touch. “The style of our management was such that we did not fully understand the real situation on the ground,” Saikawa told reporters. But Saikawa denied the scandal was related to Nissan Chairman Carlos Ghosn’s well-known management style of cost-cutting drives and ambitious targets. Related ArticlesNovember 17, 2017 Report: Just 43 percent of potentially deadly Takata air bags have been replaced November 16, 2017 Tesla to enter trucking business with new electric semi November 13, 2017 2 wheels good, 4 wheels bad? ATV owners protest in Greece November 3, 2017 British supercar McLaren revs up in Colorado with Highlands Ranch showroom November 2, 2017 Homebuilders gloomy, asset managers relieved over tax plan Ghosn came from Nissan’s French alliance partner Renault SA in 1999 to lead a turnaround at a near-bankrupt Nissan. When asked by reporters how else managers were going to take responsibility, Saikawa said managerial changes to fix the deeply embedded inspection problems were coming by March 2018. He declined to elaborate. The company, which makes the Leaf electric vehicle, March subcompact and Infiniti luxury models, is checking to see if dubious practices applied to other plant operations. Nissan plans to add more inspectors, Saikawa said. He said the company’s investigation found workers were wary of whistleblowing, fearing their complaints would go unheard. The problematic inspections are not expected to result in quality problems because they are a final step before vehicles are shipped out, but dealers are being deluged with cancellations of orders.  

    Denver Post: Business / 20 h. 21 min. ago more
  • Report: Just 43 percent of potentially deadly Takata air bags have been replacedReport: Just 43 percent of potentially deadly Takata air bags have been replaced

    DETROIT — A new report on recalls of potentially deadly Takata air bag inflators shows that automakers have replaced only 43 percent of the faulty parts even though recalls have been under way for more than 15 years. The report, issued Friday by an independent monitor who is keeping tabs on the recalls, also shows that auto companies are only about halfway toward a Dec. 31 goal of 100 percent replacement of older and more dangerous inflators. The slow completion rate comes even though the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration began coordinating the recalls and phasing them in two years ago. Before that, the automakers were obtaining parts and distributing them on their own. Normally automakers fix 75 percent of vehicles within 18 months after the recall is announced. The report brought criticism from a U.S. senator in Florida, whose state has seen three deaths caused by the problem and where automakers have fixed 41.7 percent of the 3 million affected inflators. Takata uses the chemical ammonium nitrate to create a small explosion and fill air bags quickly in a crash. But the chemical can deteriorate when exposed to high humidity and temperatures and burn too fast, blowing apart a metal canister designed to contain the explosion. That can hurl hot shrapnel into unsuspecting drivers and passengers. At least 19 people have been killed worldwide and more than 180 injured. The problem touched off the largest series of automotive recalls in U.S. history, with 19 car and truck makers having to recall up to 69 million inflators in 42 million vehicles. It also brought a criminal conviction and fine against Takata and forced the Japanese company into bankruptcy protection. The report by independent monitor John Buretta says that as of Sept. 15, automakers have recalled 43.1 million inflators. Of those, only 18.5 million have been replaced, even though Takata recalls date to 2001. In his report, Buretta concludes that there is “much room for improvement” in the Takata recalls. But he says that manufacturers are starting to make meaningful progress toward “developing sound strategic approaches.” The automakers, he writes, are using different communications methods to reach owners such as door-to-door canvassing. They also are offering mobile repair and trying to use third parties such as independent repair facilities to speed up the process. Sen. Bill Nelson, D-Florida, blamed the slow pace on a lack of leadership at NHTSA, which has been without its top administrator since the end of the Obama administration in January. “We still don’t have any leadership at NHTSA to ensure this stuff actually gets done by the automakers,” he said in a statement. “Until the agency gets a permanent administrator this recall is going to continue to drag on while the injury and death toll mounts.” NHTSA said in a statement that the Takata recalls are unprecedented in size and complexity and have resulted in groundbreaking lessons that will help automakers reach their repair goals. The agency said it is monitoring the automakers’ progress and working to expand best practices to boost completion rates. The agency also has the authority to fine automakers that don’t make recall repairs in a timely manner. Related ArticlesNovember 17, 2017 Nissan execs taking pay cuts over bogus vehicle inspections November 16, 2017 Tesla to enter trucking business with new electric semi November 13, 2017 2 wheels good, 4 wheels bad? ATV owners protest in Greece November 3, 2017 British supercar McLaren revs up in Colorado with Highlands Ranch showroom November 2, 2017 Homebuilders gloomy, asset managers relieved over tax plan “NHTSA will rely on its broad array of enforcement authorities and will take further action as appropriate,” the statement said. Completion rates vary wildly by automaker, according to a separate document posted by NHTSA. Tesla was best at 78.6 percent, followed by Honda at 64.8 percent. Mercedes-Benz was the worst at 2.3 percent, followed by Karma at 9.9 percent. Automakers initially were slowed by a lack of replacement inflators as Takata and other manufacturers ramped up manufacturing. But for many such as Honda, Takata’s largest customer, ample parts are now available. NHTSA coordinated the parts distribution, sending them first to southern states with higher temperatures and humidity. The recalls will be phased in over roughly the next three years.

    Denver Post: Business / 20 h. 39 min. ago more
  • Summit County to pay out nearly $4 million in settlements over jail inmate death, assaultSummit County to pay out nearly $4 million in settlements over jail inmate death, assault

    Hugh Carey, Summit DailyOutside a holding cell at the Summit County Jail, where a man died of a heart attack while in alcohol withdrawal. The county government agreed to pay his family $3.5 million in the second settlement tied to jail misconduct allegations in four months. Summit County has reached a preliminary $3.5 million settlement with the family of a man who died of alcohol withdrawal while in jail in 2013, suffering a heart attack after three days of symptoms with no medical care. The settlement is the second in four months reached by the county government over allegations of mismanagement at the Summit County Jail. The county has also agreed to pay James Durkee $200,000 over claims that jail staff did not separate him from an inmate who had threatened him and failed to provide adequate care after the inmate assaulted him. “This speaks to serious problems in the Summit County Jail,” said David Lane, the Denver attorney who handled both cases. “How many little counties in Colorado are paying out close to 4 million dollars in settlements on cases involving abusing inmates?” Related ArticlesNovember 17, 2017 Judge orders jail to stop holding inmates who can’t pay $55 fee November 17, 2017 Summit County to pay $3.5M to settle inmate death lawsuit November 16, 2017 Vail widow sued for husband’s $5.3 million Ponzi scheme November 15, 2017 Disney stole “Pirates of the Caribbean” screenplay, Colorado writers claim in lawsuit November 14, 2017 CDOT’s I-70 deal with private partner will cost an estimated $2.2 billion over 30-plus years, documents show A federal civil rights lawsuit brought on behalf of Zackary Moffitt’s family alleges that jail staff “watched as Mr. Moffitt became increasingly delirious, yet did nothing to provide Moffitt with the medical attention he so desperately needed (before he died).” After three days of vomiting, hallucinations and suicidal thoughts, Moffitt had a heart attack in a jail holding cell on July 9, 2013. He was placed on life support and died four days later, on July 13. Read the full story at SummitDaily.com.

    Denver Post: Crime / 21 h. 44 min. ago more
  • Anadarko Petroleum says it will up investment in Colorado’s Denver-Julesburg Basin in 2018Anadarko Petroleum says it will up investment in Colorado’s Denver-Julesburg Basin in 2018

    Anadarko Petroleum, the state’s largest oil and gas producer, plans to spend $950 million next year developing oil and gas wells in the Denver-Julesburg Basin, an increase over the $840 million it budgeted this year, according to an update the company provided to investors this week. Anadarko, based near Houston, plans to run five rigs and three completion crews in the basin northeast of Denver and forecasts its oil sales volume will jump 30 percent in 2018 from 2017. Colorado will continue to receive a larger investment allocation than the Delaware Basin in Texas, but not by much. The popular oil and gas play near the New Mexico border is targeted for $900 million in capital investment. Related ArticlesNovember 8, 2017 Noble Energy sells another of its Weld County oil and gas holdings to SRC November 7, 2017 Oil hits two-year high, which bodes well for Colorado producers — in the short-term The biggest single target of capital spending, at $1.1 billion, remains deepwater operations in the Gulf of Mexico. How much the company actually invests next year, however, will depend on oil prices, which have risen in recent weeks. Anadarko shut down more than 3,000 wells in Colorado following a explosion of a home in April in Firestone that killed two men. Investigators linked the blast to natural gas that escaped from an uncapped flow line connected to a well the company owned near the home.

    Denver Post: Business / 23 h. 1 min. ago more
  • New details emerge in 11-month-old Colorado boy's death linked to marijuana - The CannabistNew details emerge in 11-month-old Colorado boy's death linked to marijuana - The Cannabist

    The CannabistNew details emerge in 11-month-old Colorado boy's death linked to marijuanaThe CannabistNew details emerge in 11-month-old Colorado boy's death linked to marijuana. "We're not saying definitively that marijuana caused the myocarditis," said Dr. Christopher Hoyte, one of two doctors who authored a now-controversial case report on the boy's ...Report from Colorado doctors finds possibility of first death attributed to marijuanaABC15 ArizonaColorado doctors claim baby boy is first marijuana overdose deathReno Gazette JournalColorado doctors claim first marijuana overdose death in 11-month-old babyWTHRWashington Post -9NEWS.com -eScholarship -The Denver Channelall 104 news articles »

    Google News / 23 h. 33 min. ago more
  • Colorado's acting U.S. attorney one step closer to getting the job...Colorado's acting U.S. attorney one step closer to getting the job...

    Colorado's acting U.S. attorney one step closer to getting the job for good as Trump lags on nomination Trump has begun in the past several weeks to fill a myriad of open crucial federal positions for Colorado and the region Bob Troyer poses for a portrait in his office on Aug. 31, 2016. Troyer became Acting U.S. Attorney following the departure of U.S. Attorney John Walsh.

    Colorado News / 23 h. 39 min. ago more
  • Dual mergers will nearly double South Metro Fire Rescue’s reachDual mergers will nearly double South Metro Fire Rescue’s reach

    South Metro Fire Rescue, which provides fire and emergency services to 203,000 residents across Denver’s southern suburbs, hopes to nearly double its reach through a pair of major mergers with neighboring fire protection districts. Littleton Fire Protection District on Friday announced it has agreed to join forces with South Metro, though an election in May is still required before the deal is finalized. If approved by voters, the merger would go into effect on Jan. 1, 2019. Littleton Fire Protection District serves 80,000 residents in Arapahoe, Douglas and Jefferson counties. South Metro covers Centennial, Parker, Greenwood Village and other suburban cities. Meanwhile Cunningham Fire Protection District, which serves 75,000 residents in Arapahoe County, also agreed this week to join forces with South Metro in a deal that doesn’t require voter approval. That merger will go into effect on Jan. 1. The dual mergers would bump up the number of people in South Metro Fire Rescue’s service area from 203,000 to more than 350,000. This week’s announcements follow several years of major fire district consolidations in the metro area, including the merger of the Englewood Fire Department with the Denver Fire Department in 2015 and the unification of the Wheat Ridge Fire Protection District with West Metro Fire Rescue the following year. Related ArticlesOctober 27, 2017 Judge keeps alive fire district’s lawsuit against Parker urban renewal authority Earlier this year, South Metro and Littleton Fire Rescue, which covers 220,000 people in and around the city of Littleton and Highlands Ranch, were talking about a tie-up. Those discussions continue, South Metro spokeswoman Kristin Eckmann said Friday. South Metro fire chief Bob Baker said the merger with Littleton Fire Protection District gives both districts “an opportunity to work together to provide the best possible care to our communities in the most economical and sustainable way as possible.” South Metro has 17 fire stations and 397 firefighters, while Cunningham has three stations and 76 personnel. Littleton Fire Protection District has three stations, and through a contract, is served by 140 Littleton Fire Rescue firefighters. Joel Heinemann, president of the Littleton Firefighters Association, said in a release that firefighters from both districts are behind the consolidation. Only those living in the Littleton Fire Protection District will be voting on the merger.

    Denver Post - Arapahoe County / 1 d. 0 h. 17 min. ago more
  • TED talks empire has been grappling with sexual harassment complaintsTED talks empire has been grappling with sexual harassment complaints

    SAN FRANCISCO – When Gretchen Carlson, a former Fox News anchor who now campaigns against sexual harassment, took the stage at a TED event this month, she described 2017 as a tipping point in the fight against workplace misconduct. But behind the scenes, TED owner Chris Anderson and other senior officials had been grappling with accusations for much of the year that their own conferences, famed for turning short speeches by leading figures into viral videos, had not been a safe place for women – and that the atmosphere of predatory male behavior was getting worse. At least five people, including a past main stage speaker, told TED officials that they were harassed or groped during the organization’s flagship conference in Vancouver in April, according to interviews and email correspondence seen by The Washington Post. The nonprofit’s general counsel Nishat Ruiter said in an April email to TED’s senior leadership that she, too, had been “touched inappropriately but let it go.” She added she was finding it difficult to believe the issue was being “addressed by TED effectively. We are clearly not doing enough.” In a statement to The Post, TED acknowledged that several incidents had occurred at the Vancouver conference and said it had taken action. “We did hear from a small number of women attendees at TED2017 about harassment. As a result, two men were immediately disinvited and won’t be returning,” TED said. TED also said: “Creating a safe and welcoming environment is critical to the success of our conferences, and we have no tolerance for harassment of any kind. As soon as we heard there were issues at our conference in 2017 we took immediate action to address the specific allegations, then worked with leading experts to upgrade our code of conduct. Today we make the code of conduct extremely clear to all TED conference attendees, and encourage our community to report violations.” In the decades since TED’s original owners got the idea of turning 18-minute talks by world leaders, chief executives, academics, artists and others into a business under the slogan “ideas worth spreading,” the conferences and spinoff events have become known as a meeting place for the global elite, particularly leaders in the technology industry. The Sapling Foundation, Anderson’s private foundation, acquired TED in 2001. The gatherings are regarded as a place where the likes of former Microsoft chief executive Bill Gates, scientist Richard Dawkins and former vice president Al Gore could be encountered in the hallways, and the organization’s talks have been watched online more than 1 billion times worldwide. Most people pay $10,000 to attend and must apply for tickets. The Post reviewed email exchanges among senior TED officials at the time of the April conference, sparked by a complaint by a longtime attendee, who complained of sexual harassment and being offered “every drug known to man.” The problem was so bad that the woman decided to pack her bags and leave, telling Anderson that it would be her last TED conference. Anderson forwarded the complaint to his leadership team, saying, “I don’t want to overstate what’s here (until we can find more) but I do think we’ll need to think seriously about what more we can do.” Tom Rielly, the organization’s director of partnerships whose satirical monologues are the traditional closing event of the conferences, wrote in response that harassment had occurred in past years. “I’m afraid as difficult as it is to talk about, experiences like this have been going on for years, to varying degrees,” Rielly wrote. “I agree this is absolutely heartbreaking and stomach turning.” He also suggested that alcohol could be fueling the misconduct. Ruiter, the general counsel, said that she had heard of more such incidents at this year’s conference. “I heard from so many women unprompted about the type of advances that were everywhere, and that felt ‘different’ from years past,” Ruiter wrote. “This included a TED Prize winner and two TEDsters who spoke to me about this and more than one staff member.” Ruiter then quoted complaints she had heard from other women at the conference. “I was literally jumped on, grabbed, and held,” Ruiter wrote. “Guys are taking major liberties.” And it went on. “Don’t say anything . . . but please change this,” one woman pleaded with Ruiter, according to the email she sent to her colleagues. TED did not make Anderson, Rielly or Ruiter available for interviews. The three did not respond to personal inquiries. Nilofer Merchant, an author and former Apple executive whose 2013 TED talk received nearly 3 million views, said in an interview that sexual harassment is not a new problem for the TED conferences. “The same thing was happening five years ago. It’s still happening,” she said. “What’s different now is we’re sharing our stories.” At the April conference, Merchant said a longtime attendee pressed his erection against her at a bar. She recalls mouthing to her friend who was nearby: Help me. “In this awkward moment, you’re trying not to make it an issue,” she said in an interview. “I’m trying to spend my time at TED, which I paid $10,000 to attend, talking to people about ideas and not worry about the guy with his boner pressed against me.” Merchant said she saw the same man approach two of her friends, who were talking to a TED newcomer in her early twenties, and say, “Oh, three black women together. What should I do with that?” She reported the incidents to TED officials. She said she was only told Thursday that the man she had reported had been banned. In their email exchanges, Anderson, Rielly and others discussed ways to address such problems, including whether to make an announcement from the stage about an anonymous hotline, created in November of 2016, that would forward complaints to TED leadership. They discussed communicating a zero-tolerance policy for sexual harassment of attendees, creating clear guidelines and penalties for behaviors that constitute harassment, and coming up with a formal process to handle complaints. The TED officials also expressed worries about the complaints becoming public. “It seems 51 percent chance or more that there will be at least social media posts about the issue if not articles (What is our response),” Rielly wrote. Still, Rielly also wrote that the first step to addressing the issue could be to “Admit we have a serious problem.” TED told The Post that in November 2016 it had inserted language to its code of conduct for attendees that specifically prohibited harassment “in any form” and added a reporting process for incidents. In the summer, TED included additional language that banned “sexual harassment of any kind, including unwelcome sexual attention and inappropriate physical contact.” It also began to promote the policy actively to attendees, mentioning it from the stage. Big corporate conferences, including TED, present a particular challenge in setting standards of appropriate behavior because of the blend of work and socializing and because attendees are not direct employees. In Silicon Valley, such events are seen as crucial to cultivating relationships that could lead to business deals. TED says its conferences are for “high-level relationship building,” and forbid direct sales pitches. Jess Ladd, a TED fellow and founder of Callisto, a nonprofit dedicated to fighting sexual assault, said conferences often involve alcohol and off-site networking, which can open the door to improper interactions. “If your boss harasses you, you know you can go to HR,” she said. “But if it’s a powerful investor or an academic in your field, it’s really hard to know what to do and what your options are.” Conferences approach the problem in different ways. The World Economic Forum’s annual gathering in Davos, Switzerland, said it screens attendees who are not heads of state or chief executives, and revokes invitations if it learns of misconduct. Some conferences have been updating their policies in light of recent high-profile sexual harassment scandals. Summit, which attracts an elite technology industry crowd, updated its sexual harassment policy this year to include language that explicitly bans “unwelcome sexual attention,” “inappropriate physical contact” and “sexual images in public spaces.” South by Southwest, the annual gathering in Austin, referred a reporter to its code of conduct, which does not specifically mention a ban on sexual harassment by attendees (it bans harassment of all kinds). On its website, DEF CON publishes a similar code of conduct. The Aspen Ideas Festival said it has no published harassment policy for attendees, but it encourages staff to report incidents. Internally, TED also has faced sexual harassment complaints against its own managers. Jordan Reeves, a former junior staffer, said in an interview that while he was working at the organization, he was harassed by Rielly in 2014. Rielly told him “incredibly” explicit jokes at work and told him that his “ass looked nice” in jeans. “I was hearing from everybody, men and women alike, about misconduct,” Reeves said. “It seemed so systemic that I was overwhelmed.” Reeves said he complained about the incidents to Anderson and another executive, telling them that “if things don’t change systemically I’m going to leave.” Anderson replied that Rielly was only joking and asked Reeves to keep the conversation between them, according to Reeves. Reeves, who said he cried during the meeting, gave notice about six months later. TED said in its response: “There was indeed an unhappy staff departure in 2014, but it’s not correct that the situation was not investigated. We believe it was dealt with appropriately.” In 2014, TED offered to settle a sexual harassment case with a young woman who worked on one of the organization’s digital marketing teams for about $31,000, according to documents obtained by The Washington Post. The woman’s lawyer told Anderson that the woman’s boss had repeatedly asked her about her sex life, according to a May 2014 complaint she filed to TED, which was obtained by The Post. After she reported the misconduct, her boss took her off some accounts she had developed – a move she saw as retaliatory, according to the complaint. That document also alleges that TED had initially asked her to keep working under her boss. TED did not comment on the settlement. The accusations against TED come at a time when allegations of sexual harassment and abuse by powerful men are roiling Hollywood, Silicon Valley and Congress. The heightened awareness of sexual misconduct in the workplace and other professional settings was sparked in part by Carlson, who reached a $20 million settlement with Fox in 2016 after suing her old boss Roger Ailes for sexual harassment. “Right now is the tipping point,” Carlson said at the TEDWomen conference in New Orleans this month, choking up at points throughout her 14-minute speech. “We are watching history happen. More and more women are coming forward and saying, ‘Enough is enough.’ ” The conversation between the leadership of TED in April was set off by an email from Brooke Hammerling, the founder of Brew Media Relations. On April 27, as the annual conference was underway in Vancouver, she wrote an email to Anderson, saying she had felt “fearful as a female” at the event and had decided to leave a day early. “This is my last TED,” she wrote, according to the messages viewed by The Post. “I was told by different people many married that for example I was hot, my figure was awesome, did I sleep with” – she named a technology celebrity – “and I was asked why I wasn’t married because I was ‘hot’ so should be able to land a dude,” Hammerling wrote. “I was offered every drug known to man . . . I was pushed. Literally pushed.” “Wow, this just about made me throw up,” Anderson responded. After Anderson told Rielly about Hammerling’s complaint, Rielly told the TED leadership team that Brooke is a “great person” whom he knows has experienced unwanted attention in the past. “If she left it must’ve been really bad,” Rielly wrote. Related ArticlesNovember 17, 2017 Why sexual harassment training doesn’t stop harassment November 17, 2017 Trump often condemns Democrats, defends Republicans on harassment allegations November 17, 2017 Ohio governor candidate boasts of sexual history with “approximately 50 very attractive females” November 17, 2017 New accusations emerge about Rep. Paul Rosenthal following sexual harassment complaint November 17, 2017 Franken apologizes to woman who says he kissed, groped her In an interview Friday, Hammerling said: “I was really uncomfortable and disturbed by it, as were other women who were in the vicinity.” She praised the initial response by Anderson as “wonderful” and said she had been reimbursed for her attendance. “He was upset about it and responded to me immediately,” she said. “We got together on the phone, and I gave them my suggestions.” After that: “I never heard anything,” she said. “TED it is meant to be a different experience,” Hammerling said. “It’s meant to be a collective of thoughtful people who have taken time – at great expense – to learn and expand, to be part of something really beautiful. It’s supposed to be a safe environment.”

    Denver Post: Business / 1 d. 0 h. 24 min. ago more
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  • Intruders shoot service dog defending her owner in Wheat Ridge motel robberyIntruders shoot service dog defending her owner in Wheat Ridge motel robbery

    A man and a woman broke into a Wheat Ridge motel room, pistol whipped a guest and shot the victim’s service dog, who was trying to protect her owner. The incident happened at about 11:30 p.m. Nov. 10 at the American Motel, just off Interstate 70 and Kipling Street, police said. The assailants stole personal belongings from the victim before fleeing the motel. Wheat Ridge PoliceA man and a woman broke into a Wheat Ridge motel room, gun whipped a guest and shot the victim's service dog, who was trying to protect her owner. This is the male suspect.Wheat Ridge PoliceA man and a woman broke into a Wheat Ridge motel room, gun whipped a guest and shot the victim's service dog, who was trying to protect her owner. This is the female suspect.Wheat Ridge PoliceNallaWheat Ridge PoliceNallaShow Caption of Expand The 10-year-old service dog, named Nalla, survived the shooting but had to have her front left leg amputated. Nalla continues in her recovery after surgery. A gofundme page has been set up to help fund veterinary expenses and continuing care costs. The page has a goal of raising $4,000. As of Friday at about 8:30 p.m. it had raised $3,706 from 84 contributors over three days. Related ArticlesNovember 13, 2017 Coroner identifies suspected Denver bank robber shot by officer November 10, 2017 Subject of Colorado manhunt, police chase sentenced to 35 years in prison November 7, 2017 Man who posed as a Craigslist buyer to commit crime pleads guilty to robbery November 7, 2017 Formal charges filed against seven accused in September shooting death in Denver November 6, 2017 Smash-and-grab robbers at Brighton gun shop assault man and flee in a red Jeep, police say Anyone with information on the break-in, robbery and shooting, or who recognizes the man and woman in the photographs, is asked to call police at 303-237-2220.

    Denver Post: Crime / 1 d. 1 h. 5 min. ago more
  • Colorado’s Organa teams up with cannabis firms Canopy Growth and Green House on joint venture in CanadaColorado’s Organa teams up with cannabis firms Canopy Growth and Green House on joint venture in Canada

    Three well-known players in the cannabis industry have partnered in the operation of an Ontario indoor cultivation facility, a site they say could serve as a springboard for international expansion. Canadian cannabis conglomerate Canopy Growth Corp. plans to share the ownership stake in its Agripharm Corp. business — a 20,000-square-foot indoor grow facility in Creemore, Ontario in Canada — as part of a joint venture with Green House Holdings, the North American arm of the Dutch cannabis seeds company of the same name, and Colorado’s Organa Brands, the operator of extracts brands such as O.penVape and Bakked. Under the terms of the joint venture, Canopy will keep a 40 percent ownership stake in Agripharm and Green House and Organa Brands will own stakes of 40 percent and 20 percent, respectively, the companies announced Friday. Green House and Organa will handle the oversight of the facility, with Green House managing the day-to-day operations and Organa providing technologies for cannabis extraction, the companies said. Officials say that the joint venture could leverage the respective companies’ strengths — Canopy’s existing distribution platform within Canada and seven international markets, Green House’s experience in breeding, and Organa’s focus in extractions — to vault the partnership toward international success. “Together, the (joint venture) is positioned to take sought-after genetics, insert those genetics into consumer-friendly ingestion formats, and put them on stores’ shelves across (Canada), and abroad,” officials for the companies said in Friday’s news announcement. Read the rest of this story at TheCannabist.co

    Denver Post: Business / 1 d. 1 h. 39 min. ago more
  • Public interest is high, so why is it “not in the public interest” to release details of Colorado’s Amazon bid?Public interest is high, so why is it “not in the public interest” to release details of Colorado’s Amazon bid?

    Public interest is running high over details of Colorado’s bid for a second Amazon headquarters — such as which locations the state recommended and how much it offered in taxpayer-funded financial incentives. But officials involved in crafting the proposal, without a hint of irony, say releasing that information is not in the public interest. The state released a copy of its bid this week with those key details blurred out. In selected emails and documents related to the bid that the state provided to The Denver Post and Denver7 in response to a public-records request, specifics on locations and incentives were redacted. “We think that it all should be public,” said Greg LeRoy, executive director of Good Jobs First, a national policy resource center for corporate and government accountability that has criticized public incentives. “In our opinion, because Amazon is running this like a public auction, everything about it should be public.” Elsewhere in North America, major cities from Chicago to Philadelphia to Washington, D.C., spilled details of their quests to get Amazon to pick them. Massachusetts published its proposal online, mentioning more than $410 million in tax credits and infrastructure improvements is available for major employers considering moving to the state. Washington, D.C., which called its campaign #Obviously D.C., also posted its proposal online. While it offered no specifics on its “generous tax incentives,” the nation’s capital named four locations and showed multiple properties available. “We shared those locations publicly to showcase the people who live and work in our neighborhoods and to enlist them as partners in our bid,” said Chanda Washington, a spokeswoman for the DC Office of Deputy Mayor for Planning and Economic Development. “Because, in the end, it is the spirit of Washingtonians that gives the DC proposal its heart and soul.” Amazon HQ2 proposals made public Boston Camden, NJ Chula Vista, CA Colorado (redacted) Fresno, CA Massachusetts New Hampshire New York City Puget Sound, WA Philadelphia San Francisco Bay Area Washington, D.C. Source: Cities, states and Muckrock.com In putting its proposal together, Colorado relied on the private Metro Denver Economic Development Corp., which is part of the Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce. In doing so, certain documents weren’t made public in The Post’s open-records request while others were redacted. Messages between state economic development staff and others that were shared showed a massive and quick collaboration between public officials, educators and private companies. In its response, the state said details were withheld because they were part of the “deliberative process privilege” or considered “confidential commercial information” that is exempt under the Colorado Open Records Act. That “privilege” is probably because the state feels that revealing incentives or sites would affect its Amazon bid, said Jeff Roberts, executive director of the Colorado Freedom of Information Coalition. “If the public is going to put up tax dollars to incentivize Amazon to come here, isn’t that in the public interest? That’s the way I’d look at it. There are other governments that are set up in the same way, as a private economic development. But they’ve decided that it’s OK to put this out,” Roberts said. “Why is it in the public interest in other states but not in Colorado? … What’s going to happen to housing (near the sites)? Or traffic? Of course it’s in the public interest.” Metro Denver CEO J.J. Ament said that the sites were left out because the state “wants to protect the client’s ability to negotiate” with landowners. The state’s economic development team typically keeps locations and companies confidential using a series of code names when discussing incentives. “We don’t want to do anything to jeopardize the company, in this case Amazon but any company, we don’t want to jeopardize their ability to execute their strategy in our state in a successful way. It’s important for that part of the process to remain confidential and proprietary about actual locations and real estate negotiations,” he said. Very few people even know what the state offered. While hundreds participated, fewer than 10 saw the final proposal, said Sam Bailey, Metro Denver EDC’s vice president. Officials have said details of the bid won’t be forthcoming even after Amazon makes its selection, which could come early next year. Chamber CEO Kelly Brough said in a letter to board members that release of details is not in the public interest. “Releasing confidential and proprietary information contained in the actual proposal impairs our ability to compete with other locations, puts in jeopardy Amazon’s ability to execute their own strategy if Colorado is selected, and is not in the public interest.  We never release confidential and proprietary information, and Amazon is being treated no differently than we treat any company working with us,” she wrote. Related Articles Colorado releases its proposal pitching the Denver area as Amazon’s second headquarters Colorado digs deep for data to support Amazon bid, and one number comes up short Denver not a top-five choice for Amazon HQ2, despite breweries, Wall Street Journal says Editorial: Transparency critical in Colorado’s proposal for Amazon headquarters Faustian bargain? Amazon HQ2 hiring would create jobs but push up housing costs The highly public way Amazon announced its search for a second headquarters by posting criteria on its site had cities and states scrambling for attention. Some made their offers very public, including New Jersey and its $7 billion in potential credits. “The old game is you’re not supposed to ask about competing bids. You’re just supposed to be quiet and put as much cash on the table as possible,” LeRoy said. “The old rules should not apply. Otherwise, Amazon gets it both ways. They get a winner and they get to keep all that meaningful paperwork confidential.” LeRoy cautioned that with the lack of transparency, the public won’t know when state officials are offering more than the regular law-abiding incentives, such as passing new legislation that benefits a company. Or whether any of the select land sites were picked because of political connections. He pointed to the example of the state of Michigan, which passed legislation in July to encourage job creation by allowing certain businesses to keep a portion of the income tax generated by their employees. That wasn’t enough for Michigan to beat out Wisconsin to attract a Foxconn Technology Group manufacturing plant, even with an incentive offer of $3.8 billion. In the Colorado proposal, Amazon could qualify for job growth and performance incentives exceeding $100 million, officials have said, but a few other offerings could boost that number much higher. Each community with a location “has developed a custom incentive package … to support the build out of Amazon HQ2,” reads page 49 of the proposal. Former Colorado Gov. Richard Lamm, who has argued against taxpayers footing the bill for corporate mega-deals, said Amazon is playing cities against each other and will profit mightily from the competition. That said, he noted he’s not against all incentives, like modest job training amounts. “In Amazon’s case, with our low unemployment rate, large numbers of people will be recruited,” he said. “It costs state and local government between $25,000 and $35,000 per relocated family. Sewer rates go up. Water rates go up. Streets, schools, etc., are expensive. Even if the state offered no incentives, Denver would have substantial expense in this relocation.”

    Denver Post: Business / 1 d. 1 h. 46 min. ago more
  • Person fatally shot in northeast Denver identified as a teenagerPerson fatally shot in northeast Denver identified as a teenager

    A person fatally shot in Denver on Thursday night was identified Friday as a teenager. Ivah Hamilton, 17, was shot at about 7:45 p.m. and taken from the 3200 block of Colorado Boulevard by ambulance to Denver Health Medical Center where he was pronounced dead, according to the Denver Office of the Medical Examiner. Hamilton died of multiple gunshot wounds and his manner of death is a homicide, the coroner’s office said. Related ArticlesNovember 17, 2017 Advocacy groups: Killings of transgender people increase November 16, 2017 One dead, one wounded in northeast Denver shooting November 16, 2017 Ex-con, wife charged in carjack killing of University of Utah student November 13, 2017 Pueblo police investigate man’s shooting death November 9, 2017 Two men shot, killed at illegal marijuana grow in Elbert County Hamilton and another person were shot in the 5100 block of East Thrill Place, according to police. The second victim was described as being in “stable” condition. No suspect information has been released. An investigation is ongoing. Police did not release a motive in the shooting. The second victim has not been identified.

    Denver Post: Crime / 1 d. 2 h. 4 min. ago more
  • Denver-based cannabiz MassRoots: “right team and right plan” in place for growthDenver-based cannabiz MassRoots: “right team and right plan” in place for growth

    MassRoots Inc.’s new CEO on Thursday sought to put a “weak” quarter and previous leadership in the rear-view mirror, telling investors that he’s optimistic for the road ahead — including potential ventures into arenas such as delivery and digital currency. Interim CEO Scott Kveton addressed the company’s third-quarter results during a conference call with investors, reiterating that the company’s performance was a contributing factor to the departure of chief executive Isaac Dietrich in October. “We’ve got the right team and the right plan to move forward,” he said. Recent conversations with existing and new investors have been encouraging, Kveton said, expressing optimism that the company would be able to increase revenue and raise additional funds to continue operating beyond the current quarter. The recent launches of a dispensary-finder platform and a WordPress-based website create greater flexibility for revenue generation, he said. Read the rest of this story at TheCannabist.co

    Denver Post: Business / 1 d. 2 h. 11 min. ago more
  • Ed McMahon was the face of a failed attempt at fraud in AspenEd McMahon was the face of a failed attempt at fraud in Aspen

    Provided by the Aspen Police DepartmentThe license that was faxed to an Aspen jewelry store. An Aspen jewelry store owner denied a telephone customer’s request to a buy a gold chain earlier this month after he faxed her a copy of his alleged driver’s license with a picture of the late Ed McMahon on it, sources said Wednesday. “I recognized him as some actor,” said Katherine Whipple, owner of Katherine LeGrand Custom Goldsmith. “The guy (on the phone) sounded foreign and young and here’s this picture of an elderly Caucasian man. “(I thought), ‘Oh, my gosh, how could he be so silly to do this?'” McMahon, who died in 2009, was former “Tonight Show” host Johnny Carson’s longtime sidekick and also hosted “Star Search” and “America’s Bloopers and Practical Jokes” with the late Dick Clark. The customer called Whipple on Nov. 9 and wanted to buy a 14-karat-gold chain for $3,800 plus a $120 shipping fee, according to a police report. Whipple said the man was calling from a Riverside, Calif., area code and identified himself as “Jack Harry.” However, the credit card the man gave Whipple was declined, she said. He then provided another credit card he said was tied to his “call center” business in Utah, she said. “There were just so many red flags all over the place,” Whipple said. To read more of this story go to aspentimes.com

    Denver Post: Crime / 1 d. 2 h. 30 min. ago more
  • Hundreds were ready to join search for missing Golden girl, but not all were welcomeHundreds were ready to join search for missing Golden girl, but not all were welcome

    In the hours after 10-year-old Madeleine Malloy disappeared from her home in Golden late Thursday, Jefferson County sheriff’s officials called out for volunteers to help search for the girl. But they also made it clear not every volunteer was welcome. Before joining the search — spanning an area from North Table Mountain to Long Lakes — volunteers first had to undergo a vetting process. The policy was developed in December 2013, a month after Austin Sigg was sentenced in the kidnapping and murder of another 10-year-old Jefferson County child, Jessica Ridgeway. The Ridgeway case made it clear that a speedy, broad response to a child disappearance was badly needed, said Steve Davis, spokesman for the Lakewood Police Department. The Lakewood Police Department spearheaded a project that resulted in the formation of the Jefferson County Child Abduction Response Team, which rapidly brings together a broad spectrum of experts not only in law enforcement, but also city mapping experts and RTD and Xcel Energy employees, Davis said. The team mobilized about 200 local, state and federal agents in a matter of hours Thursday night. It was about the eighth mobilization since the team was formed, Davis said. Sheriff’s Office spokeswoman said Jenny Fulton said the CART team and community responded exceptionally well on Friday. Hundreds of volunteers were gearing up when the search was called off because Madeleine was found safe in Aurora. The girl left her home in Golden after an argument with her step mom and stowed away in the back of a family friend’s car. The driver unknowingly drove her to Aurora. Madeleine then left the vehicle after it was parked. She walked to a nearby residence around 7 a.m. Friday, knocked on the door and asked the strangers for food. The neighbor called police. Related ArticlesNovember 17, 2017 Missing 10-year-old Golden girl stowed away in family friend’s car to travel 27 miles November 17, 2017 Hungry and lost, missing 10-year-old Golden girl found safe 27 miles from home While many people are willing to help when a child is reported missing, Davis said, care needs to be taken about who is needed and who is not. “Anyone with a felony conviction was not going to be allowed to search for a missing child,” Fulton said. Also, no children are allowed to participate, she said. Besides felons, people with any conviction involving a child or who have misdemeanor convictions for unlawful sexual conduct also cannot participate. Also, anyone with an arrest warrant or an active protection order won’t be allowed. “You may even have a suspect among the volunteers,” Davis said. The Jefferson County sheriff’s office asked prospective search volunteers to first watch a video in which District Attorney Peter Weir explained who couldn’t participate. The video was posted on YouTube on Dec.18, 2013, a month after 18-year-old Sigg was sentenced to 86 years in prison for the murder of Jessica Ridgeway, who was snatched as she walked to school from her home in Westminster.

    Denver Post: Crime / 1 d. 2 h. 56 min. ago more
  • Colorado’s acting U.S. attorney one step closer to getting the job for good as Trump lags on nominationColorado’s acting U.S. attorney one step closer to getting the job for good as Trump lags on nomination

    Acting U.S. Attorney Bob Troyer can officially drop the “acting” from his title thanks to an appointment this week by U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions that sets up a scenario under which he could get the position permanently if Donald Trump hasn’t nominated a replacement in the next three months. Sessions appointed Troyer — who has served as Colorado’s acting U.S. attorney for more than a year — to the role in the interim. If Trump does not nominate a replacement for Troyer in the next 120 days, the U.S. District Court in Colorado is tasked with making the interim job a permanent one — or at least until Trump makes a nomination that is confirmed by the U.S. Senate. Trump has come under fire for being slow to nominate people to fill federal posts across the U.S. But in the past several weeks, he was begun to fill crucial open positions in Colorado. Related ArticlesNovember 17, 2017 Advocacy groups: Killings of transgender people increase November 17, 2017 Allegations against Alabama’s Roy Moore dividing GOP women November 16, 2017 Moore defiant as GOP braces for extended clash in Alabama November 16, 2017 Op-ed: Five years after Amendment 64, Colorado’s marijuana crop is getting greener November 15, 2017 Blake: Why Jeff Sessions may be the GOP’s only option in Alabama He nominated Daniel D. Domenico, Colorado’s former solicitor general, to fill an open slot on the state’s federal bench in September and on Friday, David Weaver, a Douglas County Commissioner, was tapped to serve as Colorado’s U.S. Marshal. Doug Benevento, a utility executive who led the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, last month was named regional head of the Environmental Protection Agency. Troyer became acting U.S. attorney for Colorado when his predecessor, Barack Obama-nominee John Walsh, stepped down in August 2016. Troyer also has been appointed to the National Crime Gun Intelligence Governing Board, becoming the first federal prosecutor to serve on the panel.

    Denver Post: Crime / 1 d. 3 h. 21 min. ago more
  • Forgetting, then remembering, Colorado's great Belle TurnbullForgetting, then remembering, Colorado's great Belle Turnbull

    When it comes to decisions about which historical figures we should remember and honor, and how we should conduct the "honoring" part, our nation has been floundering. Meanwhile, a bunch of Coloradans has just offered the nation a nearly perfect - let's be honest, an entirely perfect - demonstration of how to do this right.

    Colorado News / 1 d. 4 h. 28 min. ago
  • Louisville’s Door to Door Organics delivers last orderLouisville’s Door to Door Organics delivers last order

    Louisville’s Door to Door Organics abruptly shut down Friday, saying that there was no way forward in a message to its customers posted on its website. “It is with a heavy heart that we reach out to you today to share that effective Friday, November 17th, Door to Door Organics will cease operations,” the website said. This year marked the firm’s 20 year anniversary. The closure came just weeks after Door to Door CEO Mike Demko told the Daily Camera and Times-Call that the company had a bright future and that it was in the midst of raising $20 million to continue growing. Officials at Door to Door did not immediately respond to requests for comment Friday morning. Related ArticlesNovember 13, 2017 Amazon or Walmart? Some retailers are choosing alliances November 12, 2017 Walmart Pay threatens to surpass Apple in U.S. mobile payments November 10, 2017 Independent toy stores kick off holiday shopping season with their own special day November 9, 2017 Chapel Hills Mall in Colorado Springs in foreclosure November 8, 2017 “Unboxing” this year’s hot toy, the LOL Big Surprise But its website note to customers referenced difficulties raising additional money. Read the full story on DailyCamera.com.

    Denver Post: Business / 1 d. 4 h. 43 min. ago more
  • Englewood police respond to explosion, find dead man at scrap-metal yardEnglewood police respond to explosion, find dead man at scrap-metal yard

    A man was killed at an Englewood recycling yard Friday morning in what police say may have been an industrial accident. The death occurred at All Recycling, 1775 W. Wesley Ave., in Englewood. Police, firefighters and paramedics were dispatched to the facility at 8:30 a.m. on reports of an explosion and found one man dead. The victim’s identity has not been released. Investigators are trying to figure out what caused the accident and killed the man. “We just don’t know,” Sgt. Chad Read with the Englewood police said. “Our investigators are up there working with their staff.” All Recycling claims to be the largest scrap metal processor in the Rocky Mountain region. The Englewood facility is its main yard. Safety officials with the company did immediately respond to a request for comment on this story Friday morning. Related ArticlesNovember 12, 2017 Man dies after being hit by pickup truck as he tried to save his dog November 9, 2017 Grilled cheese sandwich suspected in New York boy’s death November 4, 2017 Florida State fraternity pledge found dead after party November 4, 2017 Breckenridge man dies while biking near Moab November 3, 2017 A 3-year-old shot two toddlers in home day care. A Detroit area couple now faces charges.

    Denver Post - Arapahoe County / 1 d. 6 h. 46 min. ago more
  • Reported sex assaults at Fort Carson rise sharply, Pentagon saysReported sex assaults at Fort Carson rise sharply, Pentagon says

    Reported sexual assaults have skyrocketed at Fort Carson since 2013, an increase that commanders say shows that soldiers are more willing to report attacks. The number of reported assaults more than doubled from 43 in 2013 to 114 in 2016, a Pentagon report released Friday morning says. Smaller increases were reported at Peterson and Schriever Air Force bases, according to the first-of-its-kind report. Peterson had 15 reported sexual assaults in 2013 and 21 last year. Schriever went from 14 in 2013 to 15 last year. Fort Carson’s large number of assaults leads local military bases, but that’s not a big surprise. The post, with nearly 25,000 soldiers, is as large as the Pikes Peak region’s four other military bases combined. Related ArticlesNovember 17, 2017 Advocacy groups: Killings of transgender people increase November 17, 2017 Trump often condemns Democrats, defends Republicans on harassment allegations November 17, 2017 Ohio governor candidate boasts of sexual history with “approximately 50 very attractive females” November 17, 2017 TED talks empire has been grappling with sexual harassment complaints November 17, 2017 Selective outrage: Trump criticizes Franken, silent on Moore Fort Carson’s sexual assault reports peaked in 2015 with 125 before falling to 114 last year. Read the full story at Gazette.com.

    Denver Post: Crime / 1 d. 7 h. 36 min. ago more
  • Donald Trump nominates David Weaver, a Douglas County Commissioner, to serve as Colorado’s U.S. MarshalDonald Trump nominates David Weaver, a Douglas County Commissioner, to serve as Colorado’s U.S. Marshal

    WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump on Friday nominated Douglas County Commissioner David Weaver to serve as Colorado’s next U.S. Marshal. Denver Post fileThen-Douglas County Sheriff David Weaver. If confirmed by the Senate, Weaver — a former Douglas County sheriff — would take charge of an office that was shaken up in May by the reassignment of several top officials, including then acting U.S. Marshal Ken Deal. KUSA-Channel 9 reported at the time that the transfers followed complaints about a crude and critical email that made the rounds in the office. Weaver served as sheriff from 2005 to 2014 as part of a 33-year career with Douglas County, according to a release sent by the White House. Related ArticlesNovember 18, 2017 AP sources: Trump Tower meeting in 2016 draws more scrutiny November 18, 2017 Tax filers in most states claim deduction targeted by GOP November 17, 2017 Ultra-wealthy win in Senate tax bill, other face hikes November 17, 2017 Trump delays new policy on importing elephant parts November 17, 2017 Trump often condemns Democrats, defends Republicans on harassment allegations The U.S. Marshals Service is the nation’s oldest federal law enforcement agency and its duties include protecting judges and hunting federal fugitives.

    Denver Post - Douglas County / 1 d. 9 h. 8 min. ago more
  • Colorado's ski history through picturesColorado's ski history through pictures

    Winter Weather Advisory issued November 16 at 3:37PM MST expiring November 18 at 5:00AM MST in effect for: Archuleta, Dolores, Gunnison, Hinsdale, La Plata, Montezuma, Montrose, Ouray, San Juan, San Miguel Winter Storm Warning issued November 16 at 3:37PM MST expiring November 18 at 5:00AM MST in effect for: Delta, Eagle, Garfield, Gunnison, Mesa, Montrose, Pitkin Winter Storm Warning issued November 16 at 3:37PM MST expiring November 18 at 5:00AM MST in effect for: Eagle, Garfield, Moffat, Rio Blanco, Routt Winter Storm Warning issued November 16 at 2:57PM MST expiring November 18 at 5:00AM MST in effect for: Chaffee, Conejos, Lake, Mineral, Rio Grande, Saguache Winter Weather Advisory issued November 16 at 2:57PM MST expiring November 18 at 5:00AM MST in effect for: Chaffee, Lake, Mineral, Rio Grande, Saguache High Wind Warning issued November 16 at 2:52PM MST expiring November 17 at ... (more)

    Colorado News / 1 d. 9 h. 28 min. ago more
  • Projects funded by Colorado tourism program give updates, and one has little to showProjects funded by Colorado tourism program give updates, and one has little to show

    A couple walks down the Historic Arkansas Riverwalk of Pueblo on July 23, 2013. Pueblo planned to expand and improve its riverwalk area after being awarded $14.8 million from the Regional Tourism Act.

    Colorado News / 1 d. 14 h. 26 min. ago
  • Truex and team balanced numerous setbacks in dream seasonTruex and team balanced numerous setbacks in dream season

    Martin Truex Jr. has just 1 race left to close out a dream season for the driver and his Colorado-based Furniture Row Racing team

    ABCNews.com / 1 d. 17 h. 6 min. ago
  • Landeskog's hat trick lifts Avalanche over Capitals, 6-2Landeskog's hat trick lifts Avalanche over Capitals, 6-2

    Gabriel Landeskog scored three goals _ one on a penalty shot _ for his first NHL hat trick, Nathan MacKinnon had a goal and four assists and the Colorado Avalanche made it a successful return from Sweden with a 6-2 win over the Washington Capitals

    ABCNews.com / 1 d. 18 h. 24 min. ago
  • Hillary Clinton says Colorado is 'state that is really about the future'Hillary Clinton says Colorado is 'state that is really about the future'

    Hilary Clinton addresses the audience about her new book, "What Happened" on Nov. 16, 2017 at the Bellco Theatre at the Colorado Convention Center. Hillary Clinton , in a Denver appearance Thursday night, called Colorado a "state that is really about the future," urging Democrats - and women in particular - to keep up their activism and push back against the political polarization that dominated last year's presidential election.

    Colorado News / 1 d. 18 h. 57 min. ago more
  • Three workers suffer severe burns in oil well fire in Weld CountyThree workers suffer severe burns in oil well fire in Weld County

    An oil well fire in northeastern Weld County on Thursday injured three workers, two of whom had to be airlifted to a hospital, the Weld County Sheriff's Office said in a news release.

    DailyCamera.com / 1 d. 19 h. 52 min. ago
  • Voters in precincts around CU Boulder aided municipalization's late surgeVoters in precincts around CU Boulder aided municipalization's late surge

    An analysis of when voters in Boulder's 88 precincts cast their ballots shows that precincts with high concentrations of young people — and particularly those at or bordering the University of Colorado — pushed ballot measure 2L to its election win last week.

    Colorado Daily / 1 d. 19 h. 58 min. ago
  • Colorado will begin Netflix tax decision process in early 2018Colorado will begin Netflix tax decision process in early 2018

    The Colorado Department of Revenue early next year will take up the issue taxing digital goods, including the Netflix video streaming service, something that Loveland city leaders have wanted.

    DailyCamera.com / 1 d. 22 h. 24 min. ago
  • Man Arrested, Accused Of Porn Emails, Threatening Female AthletesMan Arrested, Accused Of Porn Emails, Threatening Female Athletes

    Hillary Clinton Brings Book Tour To Bellco Theater Hillary Clinton is in Denver to discuss her new memoir named "What Happened" at the Bellco Theater on Thursday. Man Arrested, Accused Of Porn Emails, Threatening Female Athletes A Minnesota man has been arrested, accused of cyber stalking female athletes at the University of Colorado in Boulder and other states.

    Colorado News / 1 d. 23 h. 31 min. ago more
  • Colorado Springs still rolls coal in heart of city, but may shut Drake plant by 2025 as residents fumeColorado Springs still rolls coal in heart of city, but may shut Drake plant by 2025 as residents fume

    COLORADO SPRINGS – One of the nation’s last coal-fired power plants in the middle of a city may shut down a decade sooner than planned as Colorado Springs leaders contemplate climate action and urban revitalization along a creek. Environmental groups led by the Sierra Club welcomed the prospect of swifter removal of the 80-year-old Martin Drake Power Plant, following closures of coal-fired facilities in Boulder, Atlanta, Chicago and Denver. This is happening as residents of Colorado Springs (pop. 465,000) increasingly raise concerns about sulfur dioxide (SO2) and other pollution. On Thursday, residents pressed state health officials to reject a proposal to declare Drake “in attainment” of federal air quality standards for SO2, a toxic gas that mixes with other pollutants and hangs over the city against mountains, with the potential to cause asthma, heart disease and other lung problems after even brief exposure. Colorado Springs Utilities plant operators this year deployed “scrubbers” to clean emissions, and federal Environmental Protection Agency overseers this week said average monthly SO2 emissions decreased to 31 tons a month, down from 330 tons a month in 2015. But Colorado air quality control commissioners voted 8-1 against re-designating Drake as a facility in compliance with federal air quality requirements, acknowledging public health concerns and calls for cleaner air. Moving to Colorado Springs from Arizona six years ago seeking a healthier environment, Ashlette Lopez told the commissioners she was dismayed to see “a huge increase in my son’s asthma issues” — Lopez blamed Drake emissions — requiring daily use of an inhaler and less time outdoors. “It’s hard,” she said. “He is a 6-year-old boy and wants to run.” Taking time off school, Haven Coleman, 11, testified that “having asthma attacks is no fun. It is scary…. Kids should know that adults are working to protect their right to breathe. … The air quality commission is supposed to protect us from poisons, not give us more.” Bruce Finley, The Denver PostColorado Springs residents express views at a Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment hearing Thursday about pollution from the Drake coal-fired power plant in the middle of the city. The air concerns coincide with brainstorming by the Colorado Springs council members and developers about using the site of the Drake plant, downtown along Fountain Creek, for green space and a museum celebrating the Olympics. For years, Colorado Springs has served as the home of the U.S. Olympic Committee and a training center for athletes. City council members have directed the municipal utility to analyze possibilities for ramping up the 2035 date for closing the plant to 2025, council president Richard Skorman told The Denver Post. And council members are mulling possibilities for shutting one of the two remaining generators in the plant sooner, by 2023, Skorman said. “Some of us would like to move it just because it is a huge blight on the downtown environment,” he said. “We have the ability to create a great green-way connection down there. … If we could move it out of downtown, we could use that site for urban redevelopment.” Related ArticlesNovember 15, 2017 This group thinks Trump hasn’t done enough to unravel environmental rules November 11, 2017 U.S. cities, states defy Trump, still back Paris climate deal November 3, 2017 Nations to work on curbing climate change despite Trump November 2, 2017 Energy chief Perry: Fossil fuels can prevent sexual assault October 31, 2017 Trade board urges tariffs, quotas on solar imports The new scrubbers have reduced the SO2 that may have caused problems in the past, he said, but city officials also are interested in cutting emissions of carbon dioxide, the heat-trapping greenhouse gas, another product of burning coal to generate electricity. “Nobody really wants a power plant in the middle of downtown and the valley,” Skorman said. Sierra Club advocates are encouraging this move, and on Thursday also urged the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment not to re-designate the Drake plant. They argued that CDPHE has not collected enough data to be able to guarantee that standards have been attained. They cite SO2 emissions in central Colorado Springs as one of dozens of examples nationwide where EPA officials have allowed potentially dangerous air pollution at excessive levels by using “un-classifiable” designations instead of declaring plants in violation of clean air laws. “While we have argued for more accurate and protective designations, the EPA has largely proposed ‘un-classifiable’ designations. The Sierra Club is actively working in Colorado, and across the nation, to ensure that the major contributors to SO2 pollution — coal-fired plants — are held accountable to protect our public health, ” Sierra Club Beyond Coal Campaign representative Zach Pierce said. Pierce and Center for Biological Diversity attorney Robert Ukeiley backed up residents, telling commissioners that classifying Drake as compliant based on average SO2 emissions levels would mask potentially deadly spikes. The amount of SO2 spewing out of Drake’s towers in an hour, while generally lower than in previous years, can surge up to three times higher than an hourly limit that equates to roughly 300 pounds, Ukeiley said. Federal authorities have determined SO2 at high levels can constrict airways after exposures as brief as five minutes. “Now is the time when Colorado Springs Utilities should be taking advantage of federal tax credits for wind and solar, before they may phase out,” Pierce said. “Drake is the only remaining coal plant in the heart of an urban area. Other utilities, like Xcel, are making it clear that wind and utility-scale solar are the least-cost resources available. And they are moving swiftly to lock in renewable energy that still benefits from federal tax credits,” he said. “Shifting to clean energy also helps meet Governor Hickenlooper’s clean energy executive order.” Coal-fired power plants and other industrial facilities nationwide have faced scrutiny amid concerns about climate change and pollution. Colorado Springs Utilities environmental services officer Dave Padgett acknowledged residents’ worries. He emphasized the big cuts in S02 pollution after the installation of scrubbers. A CDPHE decision declaring the plant in attainment of health limits would have given greater certainty to residents and businesses looking to move to Colorado Springs that the air is safe, Padgett said. “We will continue to operate the plant in a manner that continues the reduction of SO2 emissions.”

    Denver Post - Adams County / 1 d. 23 h. 34 min. ago more
  • 22-year-old accused of shooting at Thornton police is charged with felonies22-year-old accused of shooting at Thornton police is charged with felonies

    Provided by Thornton PoliceDarren Ross Hoffman Multiple counts of attempted first-degree murder were filed Thursday in Adams County District Court against a man suspected of firing shots at Thornton police officers. Darren Ross Hoffman, 22, is charged with two counts of attempted first-degree murder after deliberation and three counts of attempted first-degree murder with extreme indifference, according to the district attorney’s office. On Monday night, officers responding to a report of a burglary in progress in the 1800 block of Rowena Street were fired on, according to a news release. Hoffman is suspected of firing at officers pursuing him and at a residence. No one was hit by the gunfire, and officers did not return fire. Related ArticlesNovember 13, 2017 Coroner identifies suspected Denver bank robber shot by officer November 13, 2017 Thornton police arrest man who fired several gunshots at them November 10, 2017 Off-duty Denver police officer shoots suspected intruder at Littleton home; suspect dies November 10, 2017 Denver police officer shoots man accused of robbing a bank on the 16th Street Mall; suspect dies at hospital November 9, 2017 Denver police officer cleared after shooting suspect in the face Hoffman, who was taken into custody Monday night, was advised Thursday of the charges against him. Bail was set at $100,000. A preliminary hearing is scheduled for Dec. 6.

    Denver Post - Adams County / 2 d. 0 h. 29 min. ago more
  • Longmont and Boulder County cone zones: Friday, Nov. 17, 2017Longmont and Boulder County cone zones: Friday, Nov. 17, 2017

    Quail is closed between Martin Street and Junction Drive during a reconstruction, widening and water and sewer mains installation project that is expected to last through Dec. 17.

    ColoradoHometownWeekly.com / 2 d. 0 h. 48 min. ago
  • FILE - This undated file photo provided by the Salt Lake County Jail shows Austin Boutain. The ex-convict accused of gunning down a University of Utah student with a weapon stolen from a slain ...FILE - This undated file photo provided by the Salt Lake County Jail shows Austin Boutain. The ex-convict accused of gunning down a University of Utah student with a weapon stolen from a slain ...

    FILE - This undated file photo provided by the Salt Lake County Jail shows Austin Boutain. The ex-convict accused of gunning down a University of Utah student with a weapon stolen from a slain Colorado man was charged with aggravated murder, robbery

    ABCNews.com / 2 d. 2 h. 4 min. ago
  • Federal watchdog finds Colorado VA facilities used 'unofficial wait lists' for mental health careFederal watchdog finds Colorado VA facilities used 'unofficial wait lists' for mental health care

    VA officials in Colorado violated agency rules by using unofficial waitlists to track the status of patients who needed referrals for mental healthcare, according to a new report by internal watchdogs at the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.

    DailyCamera.com / 2 d. 2 h. 30 min. ago
  • Agency: Improper wait list used for vets' mental health careAgency: Improper wait list used for vets' mental health care

    Watchdog agency confirms whistleblower claim that Colorado facility kept improper wait lists for veterans' mental health care

    ABCNews.com / 2 d. 3 h. 11 min. ago
  • Boulder County courts to celebrate National Adoption Day Boulder County courts to celebrate National Adoption Day

    Adoptive families, foster care families, and members of the public are invited to attend a celebration of National Adoption Day at the Boulder County Justice Center on Friday.

    Colorado Daily / 2 d. 3 h. 21 min. ago
  • Agency: Improper wait list used for vets' mental health care in ColoradoAgency: Improper wait list used for vets' mental health care in Colorado

    A watchdog arm of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs said Thursday that the agency's Denver-area hospital violated policy by keeping improper wait lists to track veterans' mental health care. Investigators with the VA Office of Inspector General confirmed a whistleblower's claim that staff kept unauthorized lists instead of using the department's official wait list system.

    Colorado News / 2 d. 4 h. 9 min. ago more
  • Federal watchdog finds Colorado VA facilities used "unofficial wait lists" for mental health careFederal watchdog finds Colorado VA facilities used "unofficial wait lists" for mental health care

    VA officials in Colorado violated agency rules by using unofficial waitlists to track the status of patients who needed referrals for mental healthcare, according to a new report by internal watchdogs at the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. The investigation, made public Thursday , found that VA workers in Denver, Golden and Colorado Springs did not follow procedure when keeping tabs on patients who sought treatment for conditions such as post-traumatic stress disorder.

    Colorado News / 2 d. 4 h. 9 min. ago more
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  • Police ID suspect in North Boulder Recreation Center assault, robberyPolice ID suspect in North Boulder Recreation Center assault, robbery

    Boulder police have identified a suspect in an armed robbery and assault outside the North Boulder Recreation Center last week and believe he also is connected to crimes in the Denver area.

    Colorado Daily / 2 d. 4 h. 59 min. ago
  • New Colorado school board member served time for murderNew Colorado school board member served time for murder

    A man recently elected to a school board in southern Colorado served more than a decade in prison in North Carolina for murder

    ABCNews.com / 2 d. 5 h. 44 min. ago
  • Colorado releases its proposal pitching the Denver area as Amazon’s second headquartersColorado releases its proposal pitching the Denver area as Amazon’s second headquarters

    Colorado’s pitch to entice Amazon for a second headquarters is a mere 23 pages, excluding the 52-page appendix — a surprisingly concise document that officials believe is just enough for the Seattle conglomerate to make its decision, according to the proposal released publicly Thursday. Read the full document below or at this link. “It is not over the top. It is appropriate and that is what we were striving for,” said J.J. Ament, CEO of Metro Denver Economic Development Corp., the private agency that handled the state’s proposal to Amazon. Related Articles Public interest is high, so why is it “not in the public interest” to release details of Colorado’s Amazon bid? Colorado digs deep for data to support Amazon bid, and one number comes up short Denver not a top-five choice for Amazon HQ2, despite breweries, Wall Street Journal says Editorial: Transparency critical in Colorado’s proposal for Amazon headquarters Faustian bargain? Amazon HQ2 hiring would create jobs but push up housing costs The proposal, shipped to Amazon in a custom wooden crate, like a gift, includes 12 pages of the best Denver-area sites for Amazon to plop down all or part of a potentially 8 million square foot headquarters and up to 50,000 employees. But 11 of those pages were blurred out because Metro Denver felt that sharing specific details would hurt its relationships with the landowners or affect its non-disclosure agreement with Amazon. Also blurred out was the potential value of financial incentives that the state plans to offer Amazon. “We really do impair a private landowner’s ability to market his property or her property in the way they want to if we are disclosing what may or may not be there,” Ament said. “I came from investment banking. I think of it as insider trading of stock. We’re in possession of material, non-public information. In my business, you’d go to jail if you started talking.” Colorado is limited by law as to what it can offer financially in tax credits and other incentives. Neither the governor, the state legislature nor Metro Denver can promise more, Ament added. The state’s proposal named some possible incentives, including the job growth tax credit; job training grants of up to $1,200 per employee; enterprise zone program offering income-tax credits for companies locating in distressed areas; in-state tuition benefits for employees; and local city incentives that every community “under consideration has developed a custom incentive package … to support the build-out of Amazon HQ2.” In a past interview, Sam Bailey, Metro Denver EDC’s vice president of economic development, said incentives could be “in excess of $100 million.” On Thursday, Bailey said the state focused on talent, not incentives, and looks forward to Amazon’s contribution to the state if it picks Colorado. Amazon has said it could make $5 billion in capital expenditures in the new community. “For us to bring in a corporate citizen (like Amazon) will help us focus on some challenges we have, such as expanding our affordable housing. This may be a call to action to further expand our mass transit. The thought leadership this company brings also could ignite follow-on small business,” Bailey said. “You’ve seen through this process the companies big and small that we worked with to get this project done. Imagine a company like Amazon, with 50,000 jobs, that could really ignite the economy.” Tamara Chuang, Denver PostColorado’s official pitch to Amazon to lure the Seattle conglomerate’s second headquarters to the state was released publicly on Nov. 16, 2017. The proposal starts with a letter from Gov. John Hickenlooper to Amazon founder Jeff Bezos with a brag that Denver has more live music venues than Nashville and Austin, cities also vying for the HQ2. But it quickly touches on Colorado’s natural amenities, including its 58 peaks over 14,000 feet, and entertainment options, like Red Rocks Amphitheatre. A map of hospitals and healthcare facilities plus colleges and universities locations gets you to page five. A large chunk of the appendix are letters from university leaders plus case studies of existing and recent corporate imports or home-grown talent, from Arrow Electronics to Ibotta and Google. By comparison, Massachusetts released its entire proposal online, a 182-page tome. The San Francisco Bay Area’s pitch is about 160 pages. Washington D.C.’s offered about 70 pages. Two pages of Colorado’s proposal focus on the region’s accessibility to Seattle and the rest of the world because of Denver International Airport. “DEN is the fifth busiest airport with the third-largest domestic air service network in the nation,” reads the proposal, which included a chart showing how the Denver airport has more daily flights to New York and Washington, D.C., than the Seattle airport does. There are also two paragraphs about public transportation in Metro Denver and a nod to the Colorado Department of Transportation’s innovation efforts with autonomous vehicles like Otto, the self driving truck that delivered beer to Colorado Springs. While eight locations were featured because they met Amazon’s requirement of being within 30 miles of a population center and 45 minutes to an international airport, all 30 sites submitted by cities and developers were included, if only as a list. “We wanted to highlight and provide the information of all the other sites that could be adaptable for an HQ2, as well as a follow-on investment,” Bailey said Thursday. Three areas in particular did not meet the cut. But, Ament said, Metro Denver reached out to economic development officials in Castle Rock, Fort Collins and Weld County to help advise the project. “We got more than 30 different locations and more than 400 documents that are professional staff here reviewed along with the professional staff that works with the governor,” Ament said. “No political person picked a location. It was all done by professional staff.”

    Denver Post - Douglas County / 2 d. 6 h. 24 min. ago more
  • DUI enforcement campaign starts Friday across ColoradoDUI enforcement campaign starts Friday across Colorado

    As Thanksgiving motorists flock to Colorado roads to celebrate with friends and family, the Colorado Department of Transportation , Colorado State Patrol and statewide law enforcement agencies will ramp up DUI enforcement efforts to keep Colorado roads safe from impaired drivers. Starting Friday, Nov. 17 through Monday, Nov. 27, 111 agencies will participate in the campaign, which could include checkpoints, saturation patrols or an increased number of patrols.

    Colorado News / 2 d. 6 h. 33 min. ago more
  • Man shot and killed in southern Colorado home, teen suspect turns himself inMan shot and killed in southern Colorado home, teen suspect turns himself in

    Pueblo police say a teenager suspected in a homicide in a home on Pueblo's east side has turned himself in. Officers identified 15-year-old Johnny Dennel as a suspect.

    Colorado News / 2 d. 8 h. 53 min. ago
  • Colorado family discusses long legal battle to ensure son gets meaningful educationColorado family discusses long legal battle to ensure son gets meaningful education

    Jennifer was sitting on a plane at Denver International Airport last March when she got an email on her phone that made her want to scream with joy. It was official. She and her husband Joe had won their long-running case against the Douglas County School District with a unanimous decision from the highest court in the land. The landmark ruling — coming less than three months after Jennifer and Joe watched oral arguments in the U.S. Supreme Court’s chambers in Washington, D.C. — raised the standard schools must meet in educating students with disabilities. It had been a decade since the couple’s frustrations first welled up over their older son Endrew’s stalled progress in elementary school and six years since they’d filed suit against their suburban Denver district in a case known as Endrew F. v. Douglas County School District. Jennifer and Joe recently sat down with Chalkbeat to discuss the case, their first lengthy interview with a news organization. They asked that their last name not be used to preserve their family’s privacy, in keeping with their wishes throughout the court case. Related ArticlesNovember 17, 2017 Why Hickenlooper wants to give some charter schools $5.5 million November 16, 2017 Colorado parents to Betsy DeVos: We are not a poster child for your school choice agenda November 14, 2017 7 Denver schools compete to use building vacated by shuttered elementary November 13, 2017 Parents in one Colorado school district are frustrated by a decision to end parent-teacher conferences November 7, 2017 Stolen trucks, babysitting younger siblings: School social worker tackles student absences one case at a time Over the years, there had been reams of paperwork, multiple losses in the lower courts and lots of waiting. But on that Wednesday morning as Jennifer and her younger son were departing for a spring break trip to Texas, a brief email from the family’s lawyer changed everything. Read the full story at Chalkbeat Colorado. Chalkbeat Colorado is a nonprofit news organization covering education issues. For more, visit chalkbeat.org/co.

    Denver Post - Douglas County / 2 d. 9 h. 44 min. ago more
  • Colorado parents to Betsy DeVos: We are not a poster child for your school choice agendaColorado parents to Betsy DeVos: We are not a poster child for your school choice agenda

    Jennifer and Joe, a Douglas County couple whose teenage son attends a private school for students with autism, don’t want to be portrayed as a school choice success story. But that’s exactly how they feel they were represented during a high-profile visit to the Denver school this fall by the nation’s top education official, Betsy DeVos. The U.S. secretary of education, known for her support of charter schools and private school vouchers, didn’t name the Douglas County couple during her September speech to reporters, parents and school staff. But she talked about the landmark special education case they’d brought against their suburban Denver school district — the same district embroiled in a separate court battle over its plan to offer private school vouchers. She described how the couple had pulled their son Endrew out of public school and placed him at Firefly Autism House, where he’d thrived. “The district essentially dared them to sue, so they did and they won,” DeVos told the audience. “Endrew’s parents showed courage in rejecting the low bar set for their son.” Related ArticlesNovember 14, 2017 Pressure mounts for Betsy DeVos to address the backlog of 87,000 student debt relief claims November 12, 2017 Lawsuit seeks new recourse on for-profit college fraud November 3, 2017 Republican tax bill furthers DeVos’ push for school choice November 3, 2017 Why this year’s Denver school board election has become so combative October 31, 2017 Editorial: Voters should reject dishonest, hateful attacks in Denver’s school board race DeVos never mentioned vouchers directly, but her plug for school choice — with Joe, Jennifer and their son Endrew as protagonists — was clear. Read the full story at Chalkbeat Colorado. Chalkbeat Colorado is a nonprofit news organization covering education issues. For more, visit chalkbeat.org/co.

    Denver Post - Douglas County / 2 d. 11 h. 5 min. ago more
  • D.U.I. Arrests: How Weld and Larimer Counties RankD.U.I. Arrests: How Weld and Larimer Counties Rank

    The areas with the fewest D.U.I.'s or D.W.A.I.'s in Colorado this year are With a population of just over 100,000 and 884 filings this year, they top the list with a 9 arrests per 1000 people. counties which makes up Judicial District 8, pans out on the list: 10th most D.U.I. arrests out of 22 on the list, tied with an area along Colorado's eastern border that includes Baca, Cheyenne, Kiowa, and Prowers counties.

    Colorado News / 2 d. 11 h. 18 min. ago more
  • Louisville oven fire damages interior of homeLouisville oven fire damages interior of home

    An oven fire caused heavy damage to the interior of a Louisville home on Wednesday afternoon.

    ColoradoHometownWeekly.com / 2 d. 19 h. 28 min. ago
  • Boulder decides not to restrict housing options for sexual 'predators'Boulder decides not to restrict housing options for sexual 'predators'

    The City Council was nearly unanimous in its agreement with the consensus of experts on the issue, who say that housing restrictions for sex offenders do not in fact improve public safety. Councilman Bob Yates was the only one interested in restrictions.

    Colorado Daily / 2 d. 19 h. 28 min. ago
  • One person killed in Boulder County crash involving semi-truckOne person killed in Boulder County crash involving semi-truck

    The driver of a passenger vehicle died at the scene of a two-vehicle crash involving a semi-truck driver on Colo. 128 in Superior on Wednesday afternoon.

    ColoradoHometownWeekly.com / 2 d. 19 h. 50 min. ago
  • Boulder County sees increase in hate crime reportsBoulder County sees increase in hate crime reports

    Boulder County saw an increase in the amount of hate crimes reported last year, which is in line with increases in bias-motivated incidents across the country.

    Colorado Daily / 2 d. 19 h. 50 min. ago
  • Crestone protests violation notice for venting well near Erie schoolCrestone protests violation notice for venting well near Erie school

    Denver oil company Crestone Peak Resources is disputing that it violated state regulations by venting gases near an Erie school during the plugging of a well site.

    ColoradoHometownWeekly.com / 2 d. 19 h. 52 min. ago
  • Colorado business leaders call on Congress to protect DACA immigrantsColorado business leaders call on Congress to protect DACA immigrants

    Colorado business leaders on Wednesday added their voices to a national chorus calling on Congress to act to protect young immigrants brought to the U.S. by the parents from deportation before the end of 2017.

    DailyCamera.com / 2 d. 22 h. 28 min. ago
  • Theater review: In troubling times, rom-com “Beau Jest” is a simpatico distractionTheater review: In troubling times, rom-com “Beau Jest” is a simpatico distraction

    Such a sweet, broad farce, “Beau Jest,” you shouldn’t hear a critical word. You should only go, enjoy and forgive the cloying tone of this old-fashioned comedy about a Jewish girl secretly dating outside the religion. Although set in Chicago in 1982, the premise feels uncomfortably retro in 2017. But under M. Curtis Grittner’s direction, this is a fine production, pleasing for audiences seeking ultra-light comedy that steers clear of anything challenging. “Beau Jest” is the tale of a nervous twenty-something daughter, stunting her soul while devoting her life to pleasing her parents. Apparently she grew up without the education of Disney movies encouraging her to be true to herself. Because her parents disapprove of her gentile boyfriend — they’d consider “interfaith” a dirty word– she attempts to fool them by hiring an actor from an escort service to play her nice Jewish boyfriend. A doctor! In the entirely predictable twist, she develops romantic feelings for said actor, despite the fact that, contrary to her request, he isn’t Jewish, either. Let alone a doctor. The stereotypes fly fast and furiously, the bickering parents seem imported from the original “Goldberg’s” radio serial, and a seder in the second of three acts lasts nearly as long as a real one. How subtle is the humor? The ex-boyfriend’s name is Chris Cringle. That said, the performances are better than James Sherman’s script. Rachel Turner exudes manic energy as Sarah, the nervous daughter so bent on meeting parental expectations that she has lied to the people she loves. Austin Lazek is endearing as Bob, the actor/escort who’s passing as Dr. Steinberg, calling on his knowledge of “Fiddler on the Roof” to get through the Jewish occasion. Sharon Kay White is spot on, cliche-wise, as the overbearing, meddling Jewish mama, Miriam. (Her daughter is not getting any younger!) Josh Levy is convincingly put-upon as Abe, Sarah’s father who regularly makes an entrance kvetching about parking. Related ArticlesNovember 16, 2017 “Titanic” is returning to Denver theaters for one week November 15, 2017 Theater review: On its 20th anniversary, “Rent” returns to Denver as relevant as ever November 14, 2017 How a slow-going musical could save the old soul of Broadway, scene of “Frozen” and “Mean Girls” November 8, 2017 Theater review: Opera Colorado stages “La Bohème” at Ellie Caulkins in Denver November 7, 2017 Theater review: Examining wartime photography, “The Body of An American” finds haunting negatives And Damon Guerrasio is appealing in the limited role of Joel, Sarah’s brother the therapist. This therapist takes a long time to crack the ruse, but he delivers words of wisdom before it’s all over. (The not-so-poetic phrase “self-actualizing” is right there in the dialog.) Credit the Cherry Creek Theatre and the Mizel Arts and Culture Center with presenting a well-produced silly romantic comedy that may be an appropriate antidote to the current flood of heavy, disheartening headlines. 3 stars (out of 4) Romantic comedy. By James Sherman. Directed by M. Curtis Grittner. With Rachel Turner, Kyle Steffen, Austin Lazek, Damon Guerrasio, Sharon Kay White, Josh Levy. At the Cherry Creek Theatre at the MACC Pluss Theatre, 350 S. Dahlia, through Dec. 10. Tickets at 303-800-6578 or cherrycreektheatre.org

    Denver Post - Arapahoe County / 2 d. 22 h. 40 min. ago more
  • Boulder man accused of sexually assaulting woman he met at barBoulder man accused of sexually assaulting woman he met at bar

    Police arrested a 39-year-old Boulder man Tuesday after a woman accused him of sexually assaulting her in September after they met at a downtown bar.

    Colorado Daily / 2 d. 23 h. 43 min. ago
  • Boulder solicits ADU information from residents, but won't rule out using it against themBoulder solicits ADU information from residents, but won't rule out using it against them

    As the City Council prepares to consider loosening local laws on accessory housing units, Boulder is inviting people to share feedback and their own experiences to help inform possible policy changes.

    Colorado Daily / 2 d. 23 h. 43 min. ago
  • West Jeffco crime blotter: A mysterious note is left underneath a windshield wiperWest Jeffco crime blotter: A mysterious note is left underneath a windshield wiper

    A mysterious note. Deputies were dispatched Oct. 31 to the 13000 block of West Arlington Place, Littleton, in reference to a suspicious incident. According to a report, a resident told deputies he found a note tucked under his car’s windshield wiper that said, “You messed with the wrong guy. I know where you live.” The resident told deputies he did not know who might threaten him and speculated the note could be a Halloween prank. He asked police to document the incident. Scan and scout. On Oct. 29, deputies were dispatched to the 6000 block of South Field Street, Littleton. According to a report, two residents who live in the apartment complex said they watched a black SUV with Florida license plates enter the parking lot several times. The driver and passengers pointed at cars, then drove away, repeatedly, according to a police report. The residents told deputies they believed the driver and passengers were “scouting” the cars in the parking lot. Related ArticlesNovember 7, 2017 West Jeffco Crime Blotter: Front door left open at a Littleton residence October 31, 2017 West Jeffco Blotter: SpongeBob finds new digs near a stop sign October 25, 2017 West Jeffco Crime Blotter: Stranger found sleeping in a garage Lots of litter. Deputies were dispatched Oct. 29 to the 9000 block of Marauder Drive, Conifer. Deputies were told someone had allegedly dumped trash, including Styrofoam, pallets, plastic wrapping and cardboard, in the area of Marauder Drive and Wallow Court. The reporting party told deputies he and his neighbor cleaned up the trash before deputies arrived. A bottle leaves a dent. Deputies were dispatched Nov. 4 to respond to “an incident” near the intersection of Barkley Road and Highway 73, Conifer. A woman told deputies she was driving south on Colorado 73 when a car began to allegedly tailgate her. When the car eventually passed her, she told police, a passenger threw a bottle at her car, which dented her car’s door.

    Denver Post - Arapahoe County / 3 d. 0 h. 2 min. ago more
  • With methods borrowed from Montessori, a Colorado organization looks to help people with Alzheimer’sWith methods borrowed from Montessori, a Colorado organization looks to help people with Alzheimer’s

    Residents of Aspen Hills Assisted Living in Littleton know Meghan Morrissey as the “activity lady.” It’s a nickname she wishes her mother had been able to call someone. Morrissey said her mother had Alzheimer’s disease and passed away in 2008 after living her largely uneventful, final years at an assisted living center where staff members did not know how to stimulate residents with Alzheimer’s. So, she started a nonprofit organization, Sensory Outings Co., in 2013 to introduce Montessori methods to people living with Alzheimer’s and dementia in hopes of giving them more fulfilling lives. Sensory Outings started as a program individuals could visit at Harvard Gulch Recreation Center in Lakewood, but now it’s switching things up — the program is going to the people. The organization launched a “sensory engagement” program in May that takes Montessori activities to about 30 assisted living facilities, residential memory care homes and private homes, including sites in Denver, Westminster, Lakewood and Lone Tree. Staff members specialize in working with people who have Alzheimer’s or dementia. Montessori is an education method that revolves around self-directed activity and hands-on learning. It teachers cognitive, social and functional skills by “breaking down tasks into steps that progress from simple to complex and from concrete to abstract,” according to a report funded by the U.S. Administration on Aging. The method is growing in popularity among caregivers of people with Alzheimer’s disease and dementia. “When they are able to function with their hands, it gives them a mindset of how to get a task accomplished,” Morrissey said. Sensory Outings has coed and gender-based activities, including cooking, painting, card games, word games, woodworking, flower arranging, weaving and ceramics. Participants’ moods noticeably improve during activities, teachers say. Take Don Burrell, for example. . Burrell has Alzheimer’s and lives in the assisted living facility at MorningStar at RidgeGate in Lone Tree. Sensory Outings regularly visits MorningStar. On one visit, Burrell was noticeably upset because he had lost his wallet, Morrissey said, but he still wanted to play a game of cards and spell out words with her. “She is beating me,” Burrell said. He laughed and smiled widely, the frustration over his wallet now in the past. Sensory Outings aims to empower people by demonstrating how to accomplish a task, such as painting an object, rather than giving a verbal step-by-step lesson. Its teachers believe people with Alzheimer’s or dementia need activities that engage their minds, actions they will remember and enjoy. Related ArticlesNovember 13, 2017 Bill Gates gives $50 million to combat Alzheimer’s November 4, 2017 A Minnesota couple spent years planning to live with Alzheimer’s disease. The GOP tax bill may upend those plans. November 2, 2017 Do I have Alzheimer’s? My journey with a disease that is complex to diagnose October 25, 2017 People with Down syndrome get fewer cancers, but CU researchers need more funding to understand why October 23, 2017 Florida woman accused of scamming Boulder County woman with Alzheimer’s “We treat these folks with dignity and respect. These are adults and not children, and there is no pressure when we’re doing this. It is all fun and happiness and smiling,” said Terry Moldovan, Sensory Outing’s marketing consultant. Sensory Outings is funded through donations and the $40-$75 hourly fees paid by destinations, such as assisted living centers. Patty McIlvaine, a marketing director at Aspen Hills Assisted Living, said she wanted to arrange visits by Sensory Outings because she saw its effectiveness at the Harvard Gulch Recreation Center. “(Sensory Outings) really understands how to engage people with memory loss in an activity,” she said, adding that Aspen Hills residents “really do enjoy it.” “You can tell when people with dementia are enjoying an activity,” she said.

    Denver Post - Arapahoe County / 3 d. 0 h. 8 min. ago more
  • Gunman gets life sentence for fatal shooting in Adams County hotel parking lotGunman gets life sentence for fatal shooting in Adams County hotel parking lot

    A man convicted of a fatal shooting in a motel parking lot in Adams County was sentenced Wednesday to life in prison. Adams County SheriffJose Ocampo. Jose Alfredo Ocampo, 39, who was convicted by a jury of first-degree murder in October, was sentenced by Adams County District Judge Don Quick, according to the district attorney’s office. Ocampo fatally shot Michael House, 29, on May 4, 2016, in the parking lot of the Super 8 Motel at 5888 Broadway. Ocampo fired multiple shots at House from a vehicle after the two had argued. Kenneth Bastidos, 31, who was driving the Jeep from which Ocampo fired the fatal shots, has pleaded guilty to second-degree murder. He is scheduled to be sentenced Dec. 22. Related ArticlesNovember 6, 2017 Scott Ostrem charged with 6 counts of murder, 30 counts of attempted murder in Thornton Walmart shooting November 3, 2017 Woman who left her 2-year-old son in car overnight during snowstorm pleads guilty, faces up to 10 years November 3, 2017 Alleged Walmart shooter to be charged with murder Monday November 2, 2017 Panicked people, shoppers drawing guns created chaos, delayed investigation into Thornton Walmart shooting November 2, 2017 Suspected Thornton Walmart gunman Scott Ostrem scheduled for first court appearance

    Denver Post - Adams County / 3 d. 1 h. 18 min. ago more
  • Boulder County cities among leaders in recycling ratesBoulder County cities among leaders in recycling rates

    Boulder County cities accounted for four of the top five recycling communities in the state of Colorado, according to a new study released by Eco-Cycle and the Colorado Public Interest Research Group.

    ColoradoHometownWeekly.com / 3 d. 1 h. 29 min. ago
  • Former Westminster High School teacher sentenced to seven years for sex assault of studentFormer Westminster High School teacher sentenced to seven years for sex assault of student

    Courtesy of Westminster Police DepartmentBenjamin Forbes. A former Westminster High School teacher has been sentenced to seven years in prison for sex assault of a child. Benjamin Forbes was sentenced Wednesday in Adams County after pleading guilty earlier to one count of attempted first-degree assault and attempted sexual assault on a child, according to the district attorney’s office. Both counts are felonies. Forbes, a math teacher and soccer coach at the school, had a sexual relationship with a 16-year-old female student from August to December 2016, according to the district attorney’s office. He was arrested and charged in December. Forbes was sentenced by Adams County District Judge Sharon Holbrook. Related ArticlesNovember 17, 2017 Advocacy groups: Killings of transgender people increase November 17, 2017 Trump often condemns Democrats, defends Republicans on harassment allegations November 17, 2017 Ohio governor candidate boasts of sexual history with “approximately 50 very attractive females” November 17, 2017 TED talks empire has been grappling with sexual harassment complaints November 17, 2017 Reported sex assaults at Fort Carson rise sharply, Pentagon says

    Denver Post - Adams County / 3 d. 2 h. 3 min. ago more
  • Check out these 5 south metro independent yoga studios for some extra balanceCheck out these 5 south metro independent yoga studios for some extra balance

    If you’re starting to feel the pressures of the holiday season, yoga is one way to unwind and realign and find your inner peace. The south metro area is flush with locally owned studios started by yogis who share their own ways of offering, practicing and thinking about yoga. Consider dropping in on a class near you when you need to restore balance in your life. Ashva Yoga Address: 723 N. Wilcox St., Castle Rock Hours: Daily yoga classes (see schedule for details) Contact: 719-351-9837; ashvayoga.com The scoop: Ashva Yoga’s equine focus is unlike any other south metro yoga studio. Owner Danny Chapparo had a horseback riding accident about 14 years ago, and to avoid surgery she gravitated to yoga. “Experiencing the profound health benefits on my own body made me want to learn and explore more,” Chapparo said. “I am passionate about yoga. I am also passionate about horses. There is such a huge connection between yoga and horses, which led me to teach equestrian yoga. Our emotional state and energy is mirrored by the horse. Yoga means ‘union,’ the connection between you and your horse.” Full Circle Larkspur Address: 127 W. Colorado Ave., Larkspur Hours: Pilates: 6-11 a.m Monday-Thursday, yoga: 6-7:15 p.m. Monday-Thursday, massages by appointment Contact: 303-681-4323, fullcirclelarkspur.com The scoop: Full Circle Larkspur offers Pilates, yoga and massage in a 2,000-square-foot studio with wood floors and vaulted cedar ceilings. It overlooks a pine forest. Yogis have been spied on by deer, turkeys and foxes. “My desire is to offer a sanctuary away from the moments of everyday life to choose your favorite modality in order to restore, calm or energize the physical body,” said owner Sandy McKeown. “Any choice — pilates, yoga or massage — is the right choice to move and live with greater ease and awareness.” Full Circle Larkspur is in downtown Larkspur. Related ArticlesNovember 14, 2017 President of Universal Society on Hinduism criticizes retail yoga at DIA, questions Denver’s intentions November 10, 2017 14 game-changers for your wellness routine November 6, 2017 Four must-try Adams County rec centers that bring outdoor sports indoors November 6, 2017 Four must-try Aurora and Centennial rec centers that bring outdoor sports indoors Maha Soul Address: 5739 S. Curtice St., Littleton Hours: 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Monday-Friday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday Contact: 720-484-4288, mahasoul.com The scoop: Maha Soul opened in October 2015 in downtown Littleton as a soulful yoga studio and healing center. Last August, they moved three blocks in order to expand the space. Owner Tracy Lawson said the studio’s energy sets it apart. “We are downtown Littleton’s soulful yoga studio,” Lawson said. “We do shamanic healing in our healing center, and we also have a lot of fun, funky retail. There’s a lot of goddess energy here. You can just feel it.” ONE Yoga Address: 8101 E. Belleview Ave., Greenwood Village Hours: 9 a.m.-9 p.m. Monday, 6 a.m.-9 p.m. Tuesday-Friday, 8:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Saturday, 9 a.m.-7 p.m. Sunday, Contact: 303-221-7000, oneyogadenver.com The scoop: Around 2012, owner Karey Goebel left her job as a software executive, moved to an organic farm in Castle Rock and became a yoga teacher. She grew up in Boulder and practiced yoga with her mom when she was a kid. “I fell in love with yoga really early, and it’s been a part of my life for many, many years,” Goebel said. “I knew I wanted to own my own studio one day.” She started at ONE Yoga as a member, became a teacher, and then bought the studio from the previous owner in January. “We have this amazing community of people who come from every skill level imaginable,” she said. “There’s a class here for everyone.” Outlaw Yoga Address: 2590 W. Main St., LIttleton Hours: Hours vary; classes run 6 a.m.-8:30 p.m. weekdays, Saturday mornings and Sunday afternoons and evenings Contact: outlawyoga.com The scoop: Justin Kaliszewski, founder of Outlaw Yoga, said he believed that yoga studios throughout the Denver metro area needed a contemporary upgrade, and that’s what he sought to create. “Outlaw Yoga is a physically challenging, but technically simple form of the practice where community is the priority,” Kaliszewski said. “Every class starts with time to connect to our fellow humans, and our studio has a huge couch instead of a front desk to facilitate this. We just figure that you’re going to sweat your butt off, and if the person next to you gets some on you, you’ll be far more likely to laugh it off if you know a little something about them. We also feature live music in many of our classes and have a heck of a lot of fun.”

    Denver Post - Arapahoe County / 3 d. 3 h. 3 min. ago more
  • Jeffco commissioner Don Rosier stepping down to head Sterling Ranch buildout in Douglas CountyJeffco commissioner Don Rosier stepping down to head Sterling Ranch buildout in Douglas County

    Jefferson County commissioner Don Rosier will step down from his position in January to take over as general manager of the Sterling Ranch Community Authority Board, where he will oversee operations at the 12,000-home master-planned community in Douglas County. Rosier, a Republican who was elected commissioner in 2010 and re-elected in 2014, is term-limited next November. The vacancy committee of the Jefferson County Republican Party will choose a successor to fill out his term. Don Rosier, seen in 2013 reading to children at the Lakewood Library, is stepping down from his position as a Jefferson County commissioner to oversee operations at Sterling Ranch. Rosier, a fifth-generation Coloradan who grew up in Arvada, is a civil engineer by trade. He spent 25 years in the private sector doing civil engineering design, project management, acquisition, entitlement, land development, construction and management with a number of firms. “Throughout my career I have accomplished a track record of success in managing complex design projects, acquisitions, entitlements, land development and construction projects,” Rosier said in a news release issued Wednesday. “Accepting (this) position… equates to a city manager position in a medium-size town.” The 3,400-acre Sterling Ranch mixed-use project in northwest Douglas County broke ground in 2015 after years of courtroom battles over its water portfolio. The community could have as many as 33,000 residents by the time it is completed 20 years from now. In the position of general manager, Rosier will work with contractors, homebuilders and home buyers as the community is built out in phases. Sterling Ranch will be made up of nine villages, including a town center, 2 million square feet of commercial space and 30 miles of trails. Related ArticlesNovember 17, 2017 U.S. home construction reaches strongest pace in a year November 14, 2017 Home Depot’s post-hurricane boom comes at expense of profit November 13, 2017 Metro Denver living costs lower than in California, but not a bargain November 13, 2017 Jefferson County is locking up veterans in special jail unit to break the cycle of incarceration November 10, 2017 Business groups typically allied with GOP not all on board fast tax train

    Denver Post - Douglas County / 3 d. 3 h. 7 min. ago more
  • River Run Park on the South Platte has improved life for fish and surfersRiver Run Park on the South Platte has improved life for fish and surfers

    It was surf’s up along the South Platte River this year. New and experienced river surfers from across the state came to South Platte River Run Park between Englewood and Sheridan, just west of Broken Tee Golf Course, to take advantage of the South Platte’s first full season of rideable waves. Two man-made waves were created in August 2016 as part of an effort to both restore the environment and increase recreation. “We only had two weeks during our first season last year before the water was clamped down and then we weren’t able to surf,” said David Riordon, a Denver resident and recreational river surfer. “This past summer was a really, really good summer for us. We surfed out here almost every weekend, starting from about mid-May until mid-August.” On a recent day at the end of October, Riordon, 53, was on the river with friend Eric Halborg, 43. Both men are members of a local group called Colorado River Surfers, which advocates for better and safer river surfing conditions in Colorado and especially metro Denver. The two took turns surfing Benihana’s, the first wave at River Run Park — a 4-foot, freestanding cascade.  “Every now and then, you get these weird, late-season flows out here like this,” said Halborg, who has been river surfing since August. “But it’s really determined by the CFS flow (cubic feet per second) and how much water is let out of Chatfield Reservoir. The water is only at 122 CFS today, which is barely rideable — but we’re doing it.” Slow flow was the initial intention of an $11 million-project to improve the fish habitats and ecosystems in the river in north Arapahoe County. The waves in the South Platte were designed for about 200 CFS. Do surfing waves help restore habitat? Related ArticlesNovember 8, 2017 The heartfelt history behind the renaming of a neighborhood park in Globeville November 7, 2017 Commerce City parks and recreation construction blitz shows off “hidden gem” November 6, 2017 Four must-try Adams County rec centers that bring outdoor sports indoors November 6, 2017 Four must-try Aurora and Centennial rec centers that bring outdoor sports indoors October 31, 2017 Lakewood resources director earns state award “Surfing is kind of flashy and viewed (as) a novelty, especially here in Colorado, but the surf wave is better for the fish habitat, better for fishing and fish movement because of its size and flow,” said Ben Nielsen, project engineer for River Run Park.  “And creating value for a river through recreation and experience makes it matter more,” he said. “If the community goes there and says, ‘This means something to me,’ then that’s a really important aspect of advocacy for environmental causes and keeping water in our rivers.” The project restored half a mile of the river and improved the local ecosystem and flood conveyance. The drop structure used to create Benihana’s used to be three or four times higher. Fish couldn’t freely move up and down the river. The number of fish and their overall health has improved since the drop was lowered and flow was slowed. “I’ve noticed really great improvements to the river in just a year,” Riordon said. “The water is better, it smells fresher, and there are so many fish. We’ve seen birds fishing in here, too. We saw people panning for gold in here the other day. There’s just a lot more activity everywhere.” Kathryn Scott, YourHubVisitors to River Run Park on the South Platte River have been using the man-made surfing waves for the first full season on Oct. 25 in Englewood. Construction continues upstream on more waves for use by kayakers, tubers, and boogie boarders which is slated to open next spring. That activity isn’t just water-based. The surrounding River Run Park and open spaces near the river also received millions of dollars worth of improvements in the last couple of years. There’s a developed park and public restrooms. “It was designed to really slow down the water that was there in the Platte for the fish, but also to create a fun feature at low flows later in the summer, which is something that was sorely missing,” said Joe Busto, a scientific researcher with the Colorado Water Conservation Board. “Usually, you have a gush of water in the spring, and things are fun, but then you have nothing to play with anytime later. This project extended the recreation period later into spring and summer and made it more playful.” And it’s just the beginning. Construction crews are enmeshed in the final phases of the river restoration project. Four more man-made waves for tubers, kayakers and surfers are being developed a little upstream of Benihana’s. The final phase will open in spring. “It’s getting busy already. During the summertime, the line out here got really long,” Riordon said. “We’ll have people lined up 15 on this side and 15 on the other side waiting for their turn. But the waves go so fast that you actually move the line pretty fast. It’s unlike ocean surfing where people are hassling you for the wave, instead they are sharing this one.” The attraction is making waves in the local river surfing community. “Even guys who play on big, beautiful rivers up in the mountains are coming down to use this feature in the metro area,” Busto said. “So guys from Summit County and Clear Creek County will drive to Denver to surf the Platte, which is amazing.” Partners for River Run Park included the cities of Englewood, Littleton and Sheridan; the Arapahoe County Open Spaces Department; the South Suburban Parks and Recreation and Urban Drainage and Flood Control District; and the Colorado Water Conservation Board.  “There’s been so much use in the park,” Nielsen said. “The project is really about engaging the community as a whole with the river. There’s a lot of surfers now, but there are still far more people who will enjoy it from the shore while using the trails and other amenities around it. We’ve certainly seen that hold true for us.”

    Denver Post - Arapahoe County / 3 d. 3 h. 18 min. ago more
  • Historic Irondale neighborhood is the focus of major upgradesHistoric Irondale neighborhood is the focus of major upgrades

    One of Commerce City’s founding settlements is getting its first significant face-lift in its nearly 130 years of existence. And, while longtime residents say improvements are overdue, it’s new economic development interests that are behind the investment in Irondale, roughly bordered by 88th and 80th avenues, Interstate 76 and the Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge. The area’s outdated infrastructure couldn’t accommodate all the proposed projects, including the Intsel Steel industrial park. So, the City Council directed city planners to identify needed improvements. “The Irondale area clearly has drainage issues. It lacks crucial infrastructure, so some of those projects were not being able to be completed because of the investment that was required,” said city planner Jenny Axmacher. A $120,000 planning effort underway in collaboration with consultants Ayres Associates, will wrap up in spring. While the city broadly plans to improve infrastructure and alter land use designations, all manner of change is on the table. “We don’t have any preconceived notions,” Axmacher said. “We want to improve the neighborhood so it’s the kind of place that the residents want it to be.” Debra Bullock, secretary of the Commerce City Historical Society, grew up in Irondale. The recent economic interest in the neighborhood is a far cry from the agricultural town she remembers from her childhood. Improvements such as wider roads and new sewage pipes are long overdue, she said. Kathryn Scott, YourHubCrews work on the rail line at E. 80th Ave., one of the streets accessing the community of Irondale on Nov. 7, 2017 in Commerce City. Commerce City is beginning to host a series of open house conversations with residents and business owners in Irondale as they plan future neighborhood improvements. Most improvements will center around infrastructure including roads and utilities. “I think it’s nice because of all of (in) Commerce City, there really hasn’t been a lot done there,” Bullock said. Irondale was one of the five original settlements in the area, alongside Derby, Dupont, Rose Hill and Adams City. It was settled in 1889 and planned as a factory town where the Kibler Stove Works employees would live and work. The town’s name is derived from the foundry that produced the iron for wood stoves made in the factory. Related ArticlesNovember 1, 2017 California buyer of historic Loretto Heights campus in Denver promises to preserve landmarks October 31, 2017 Former Red and Jerry’s evolving into less entertaining, but sought-after, business October 27, 2017 A 216-unit affordable housing project to sprout in Commerce City October 27, 2017 Judge keeps alive fire district’s lawsuit against Parker urban renewal authority October 25, 2017 Sheridan hopes to transform defunct pool into something special for community The neighborhood’s past is a topic of current planners. The original plats are 50 square feet — “teeny tiny” in Axmacher’s words — and designed for the cramped living quarters of late 1800s workers. “Replatting that and consolidating things into usable parcels has been difficult,” Axmacher said. Irondale was incorporated in 1924 but swiftly unincorporated in the 1930s. The area remains a mix of unincorporated Adams County and Commerce City, which can lead to confusion regarding zoning and building requirements. Further complicating the neighborhood is a “patchwork quilt” of land uses. The 54-acre Intsel Steel site occupies a large chunk of the neighborhood. It will continue to shape its future as a rail spur extends from the neighboring BNSF Railway to the facility. Several residential pockets are tucked in among industrial sites. “Good zoning practice is to not have those noisy industrial uses directly adjacent to residential, so it’s a potential conflict we want to look at the best way to deal with,” Axmacher said. The BNSF Railway to the east and the Union Pacific Railroad to the west are key to the renewed economic development interest in Irondale. But trains also can cause traffic problems — as can visitors to the historic 88 Drive-In Theatre. People can get stuck on the neighborhood’s main thoroughfares, Rosemary Street and 80th and 88th avenues. “That road, when the theater is open, you can’t even get down it,” Bullock said. “It’s a mess.” Residents, business owners and property owners are invited to help shape the neighborhood’s future by attending planned community meetings. The first was Nov. 2. Two others will be scheduled. Axmacher said about 50 people attended the first meeting, and she was pleased with the feedback. Once key infrastructure, zoning and other issues are determined, the city will create a multiyear plan to tackle the improvements. Project money could come from grants and city funds. City communications manager Julia Virnstein said the city’s capital improvement program could fund Irondale improvements. While Irondale’s history, location and land uses create a distinct challenge for city planners, Axmacher sees it as representative of the issues she deals with throughout the “funky shaped” Commerce City. “It’s indicative of the planning challenges throughout city,” she said. “It’s a microcosm of everything we deal with all in one area.”

    Denver Post - Adams County / 3 d. 3 h. 31 min. ago more
  • FILE - This Oct. 26, 2017, file photo shows Hildale, Utah, sitting at the base of Red Rock Cliff mountains, with its sister city, Colorado City, Ariz., in the foreground. A polygamous group's ...FILE - This Oct. 26, 2017, file photo shows Hildale, Utah, sitting at the base of Red Rock Cliff mountains, with its sister city, Colorado City, Ariz., in the foreground. A polygamous group's ...

    FILE - This Oct. 26, 2017, file photo shows Hildale, Utah, sitting at the base of Red Rock Cliff mountains, with its sister city, Colorado City, Ariz., in the foreground. A polygamous group's dwindling control of Hildale, a remote Utah-Arizona border

    ABCNews.com / 3 d. 3 h. 43 min. ago
  • Second Colorado lawmaker now faces sexual harassment complaintSecond Colorado lawmaker now faces sexual harassment complaint

    Paul Rosenthal, a three-term Democratic state lawmaker from Denver, is the subject of a sexual harassment complaint filed this week about an incident from 2012. Rosenthal told the Post that he is “shocked” by the allegations and denied doing anything inappropriate.

    DailyCamera.com / 3 d. 3 h. 44 min. ago
  • Colorado digs deep for data to support Amazon bid, and one number comes up shortColorado digs deep for data to support Amazon bid, and one number comes up short

    State and local economic development officials asked developers to provide in-depth details on their locations and scrambled to see how many graduates the region could provide Amazon.

    DailyCamera.com / 3 d. 4 h. 1 min. ago
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  • Woman who wrecked string of vehicles in Thornton sentenced to probation, mental health treatmentWoman who wrecked string of vehicles in Thornton sentenced to probation, mental health treatment

    A  woman who stole a vehicle after she rear-ended it before side-swiping at least four other vehicles has been sentenced to one year of probation and ordered to receive mental health treatment. Adams County District Court Judge Don Quick also fined Deborah Jean Daniels, 59, $100 and ordered her to pay nearly $40,000 in restitution for damage to the vehicles. Daniels pleaded guilty to one count of driving while ability impaired and one count of careless driving. The damage caused on May 17, 2016, on Washington Street in Thornton was egregious, Quick told Daniels. “This is about as aggravated a traffic case as you are going to find,” he said. “Your crime spree was very serious.” Daniels rear-ended a Cadillac Escalade at Washington Street and East 104th Avenue. When the driver got out to check the damage, Daniels got into the Escalade and drove away. Related ArticlesNovember 18, 2017 Bicyclists seriously injured after crash with car at Colfax Avenue and Lincoln Street November 17, 2017 Report: Just 43 percent of potentially deadly Takata air bags have been replaced November 16, 2017 3-year-old boy dies of injuries from Lakewood chain-reaction crash that killed his mother November 15, 2017 Driver dies in crash involving semi-truck in Boulder County November 15, 2017 Loveland man dies in Johnstown traffic crash She then side-swiped at least four other vehicles and wrecked the car further north on Washington Street. The judge said he imposed probation and treatment because Daniels has accepted responsibility for the crashes and has sought treatment since her arrest. “But if you wind up back here again, I will have a different reaction.”

    Denver Post - Adams County / 3 d. 4 h. 49 min. ago more
  • FILE - From left are file photos showing NCAA college basketball coaches Frank Martin of South Carolina, Tad Boyle of Colorado, and Danny Manning of Wake Forest. Martin's Gamecocks will stay in their ...FILE - From left are file photos showing NCAA college basketball coaches Frank Martin of South Carolina, Tad Boyle of Colorado, and Danny Manning of Wake Forest. Martin's Gamecocks will stay in their ...

    FILE - From left are file photos showing NCAA college basketball coaches Frank Martin of South Carolina, Tad Boyle of Colorado, and Danny Manning of Wake Forest. Martin's Gamecocks will stay in their home state with this week's Puerto Rico Tip-Off re

    ABCNews.com / 3 d. 7 h. 4 min. ago
  • Mary Young to challenge Suzanne Jones to become next Boulder mayorMary Young to challenge Suzanne Jones to become next Boulder mayor

    Councilwoman Mary Young will challenge Suzanne Jones to become Boulder's next mayor, she announced during Tuesday's City Council meeting.

    Colorado Daily / 3 d. 12 h. 33 min. ago
  • Man shot in Commerce City taken to Denver HealthMan shot in Commerce City taken to Denver Health

    A man who was shot in Commerce City on Tuesday evening was taken to Denver Health medical center. The shooting happened about 6:40 p.m. in the 7200 block of East 72nd Avenue, according to the Commerce City Police Department. Police received two calls on reports of shots fired. When officers arrived they found the victim had suffered gunshot wounds to his lower extremities. Witnesses told police the man had been confronted by “unknown suspects” in a vehicle, according to a news release. The injuries are not life-threatening, police said. An investigation is ongoing. A description of the vehicle was not released.

    Denver Post - Adams County / 3 d. 18 h. 25 min. ago more
  • Boulder will abolish dormant tax on booze manufacturersBoulder will abolish dormant tax on booze manufacturers

    Boulder will abolish the roughly $3,000-per-year "liquor occupation tax" on local booze manufacturers, which hasn't been enforced for decades, anyway.

    Colorado Daily / 3 d. 20 h. 43 min. ago
  • Good Samaritan saves blind man from oncoming trainGood Samaritan saves blind man from oncoming train

    A Good Samaritan is credited with stopping a blind man from stepping onto the tracks in front of an oncoming train at a light rail station in Colorado.

    ABCNews.com / 3 d. 20 h. 52 min. ago
  • Boulder library briefly on lockdown because of gun callBoulder library briefly on lockdown because of gun call

    Boulder police briefly placed the Boulder Public Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., on lockdown Tuesday afternoon after receiving a report of an intoxicated man brandishing a firearm.

    Colorado Daily / 3 d. 21 h. 19 min. ago
  • Colorado track will test super-speedy transit that could be offered at toll-road priceColorado track will test super-speedy transit that could be offered at toll-road price

    The world's next evolution in hyper-speed commuting will start west of the Denver International Airport and ultimately could cost local drivers the same price they pay to travel Colorado's toll roads.

    DailyCamera.com / 3 d. 21 h. 21 min. ago
  • Juvenile with loaded handgun arrested at Chaparral High School in ParkerJuvenile with loaded handgun arrested at Chaparral High School in Parker

    A juvenile with a loaded gun was arrested Tuesday afternoon on the grounds of Chaparral High School. The school resource officer responded to a “suspicious subject” about 2:15 p.m., according to the Douglas County Sheriff’s Office. One juvenile taken into custody today at Chapparal High after loaded gun found in backpack. Charges pending @dcsdk12 https://t.co/tyXORBDkjv pic.twitter.com/KbGYYBHwVX — DC Sheriff (@dcsheriff) November 15, 2017 The juvenile walked away from the officer but eventually was restrained. After being taken into custody, a loaded handgun, stolen in Pueblo, was found in the juvenile’s backpack. The suspect, who is not a Chaparral student, was taken to the Juvenile Assessment Center in Centennial. Charges are pending.

    Denver Post - Douglas County / 3 d. 22 h. 20 min. ago more
  • CDOT’s I-70 deal with private partner will cost an estimated $2.2 billion over 30-plus years, documents showCDOT’s I-70 deal with private partner will cost an estimated $2.2 billion over 30-plus years, documents show

    Financial terms released Tuesday for the controversial Interstate 70 expansion through northeast Denver show that a partnership agreement will cost the Colorado Department of Transportation an estimated $2.2 billion over the course of more than 30 years. For the first time, state transportation officials are detailing the figures that resulted from recently wrapped negotiations with Kiewit Meridiam Partners for a complex public-private partnership contract on the Central 70 project. CDOT in August selected the team from among four consortiums that bid to finance, design and build the $1.2 billion construction project, and then operate and maintain the widened 10-mile stretch for three decades. The freeway project’s construction tab hasn’t changed much ahead of a groundbreaking that’s expected in early to mid-2018, although financing costs will push the total to nearly $1.3 billion. But in addition to shouldering just over half of that upfront project cost — $687 million — CDOT will be responsible over the long term for sizable annual payments to Kiewit Meridiam Partners. Those annual checks mostly will repay KMP for its significant equity and borrowing, but they also will compensate KMP for operation and upkeep of the highway — costs that CDOT notes it would pay for normally, through its annual budget, after a more traditional project was built. Related ArticlesNovember 9, 2017 Judge denies request by I-70 expansion opponents to cut off CDOT funding for Denver drainage projects August 24, 2017 CDOT picks Kiewit Meridiam Partners to lead $1.2 billion I-70 expansion, as project’s controversy simmers July 10, 2017 Two new lawsuits challenge I-70 project ahead of legal deadline January 19, 2017 I-70 project through northeast Denver receives final approval from Federal Highway Administration An arm of CDOT will oversee tolling on new express lanes in each direction and pocket the money, although those tolls will help fund the annual payments to KMP. KMP, for its part, is contributing $610 million to the project upfront, including $65 million of its own equity. And KMP will receive some portions of CDOT’s project contribution only when it meets five project milestones. CDOT officials say projections show KMP will earn a 9.5 percent return on that $65 million investment over the life of the deal. In most cases, KMP agreed to shoulder the cost of overruns or project delays. “This (partnership) maximizes the value for the public in part because we’re putting up a smaller upfront capital cost,” said David Spector, director of CDOT’s High Performance Transportation Enterprise. He, accompanied by project director Tony DeVito and other CDOT officials, detailed the terms to The Denver Post. The High Performance Transportation Enterprise and Colorado Bridge Enterprise boards  unanimously approved the contract terms Wednesday, marking the “commercial close” of the deal. KMP’s team then will finalize financing agreements by the end of January. The Post analyzed figures released by CDOT to come up with the total cost to the state, since CDOT says it typically does not include financing or operating costs in its project estimates. But The Post’s calculation is comparable to another recent large public-private partnership deal: Denver International Airport’s 34-year contract for its terminal. That deal, which combines a terminal renovation with 30 years of private management of new concession spaces, is projected to cost DIA $1.8 billion. The Denver PostMap of I-70 expansion As CDOT seeks ways to take on large highway expansions despite tight funding, officials have pursued partnership deals to widen and add express toll lanes on U.S. 36 as well as a similar project on C-470 that’s underway. But the I-70 project is the largest to incorporate such heavy private-sector involvement. KMP, in its winning bid, projected that it could deliver the project for $71 million less in construction costs than CDOT’s original estimate. It also estimates it will build the project in four years — at least six months faster than CDOT had expected, given the delicate operation needed and CDOT’s edict that no lanes will be closed during peak traffic hours. CDOT is about two-thirds done acquiring properties in Elyria-Swansea, mostly on the north side of an aging 1.8-mile viaduct that the project will remove. Construction could begin by late spring, officials say. The project calls for rebuilding a portion of the six-lane freeway and widening it between Brighton Boulevard in Denver and Chambers Road in Aurora to add a managed toll lane in each direction; a future phase could add a second toll lane. Between Brighton and Colorado boulevards, the viaduct will be replaced by a lowered highway. In the largest of several community concessions being provided by CDOT, KMP will build a 4-acre parkland cap over part of that section next to Swansea Elementary. Still, the project remains controversial. A handful of lawsuits are targeting the project on environmental and neighborhood-harm grounds, threatening to delay or scuttle the project. But so far, opponents have lost court rulings that could hinder the project. Kiewit Meridiam PartnersKiewit Meridiam Partners, the project team selected to expand Interstate 70 through northeast Denver and Aurora, has divided the freeway into three segments with overlapping schedules for widening work. The west area includes the digging of a trench north of the current viaduct for a lowered highway. How the I-70 costs break down for CDOT CDOT’s costs are staggered over the life of the contract: Construction: CDOT is putting up $687 million, or just over half of the $1.3 billion project cost, although KMP will pay $25 million to offset some of the preliminary work CDOT already has performed. But $319 million of CDOT’s contribution will be split into milestone payments that KMP receives upon finishing four segments and then substantially completing the project. Equity payments: Once the project is done — expected in 2022 — CDOT will pay KMP $28.4 million a year in today’s dollars as capital performance payments, to repay KMP’s borrowing and investment. In 2022, the estimated value will be $31.4 million, and it’s set to increase 2 percent each year — totaling $1.26 billion over 30 years. Operating payments: Similarly, CDOT will pay KMP $7.1 million a year in today’s dollars as operations, maintenance and rehabilitation payments. When this payment begins in 2022, it’s estimated at $7.9 million, and it will be adjusted with inflation — totaling $317 million over 30 years. For its upfront costs, CDOT will tap $457 million from the Colorado Bridge Enterprise, funded by annual vehicle registration fees; $180 million from a CDOT capital fund; and $50 million in federal dollars provided through the Denver Regional Council of Governments. CDOT’s annual payments later in the contract will come from a mix of toll revenue, CDOT money, the bridge enterprise — consuming about a quarter of its annual revenue — and the city of Denver’s $37 million project contribution, officials said. KMP’s $610 million upfront contribution will come from $404 million in borrowing through the federal Transportation Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act loan program, which provides low-interest financing for certain public projects; $141 million in bonds; and its $65 million equity investment. Critics of public-private partnerships say they provide less transparency, and in this case, KMP considers the financial modeling it used during negotiations to be proprietary, CDOT officials say. But according to CDOT’s new project materials, KMP has estimated it will spend more than $150 million to operate and maintain I-70 during the term of the contract and more than $100 million to replace pavement and keep the highway up to CDOT’s standards. Before turning the highway’s operation back over to CDOT in 2052, KMP’s team faces “handback” terms requiring it to fix I-70 up to an agreed-upon condition. It also must set aside money in a reserve fund equal to the value of those improvements, as a backup. “The fact that (KMP is) putting in and borrowing upfront helps us,” Spector said of the contract’s terms. “Had we borrowed, we’d be obligated to repay the debt service no matter what — if construction’s late or something happens. Here, we only pay them if they’re doing a good job. They have to pay their lenders no matter what. We feel like, on this project, which has some engineering challenges, that that was a good risk transfer.” Here is a summary of the financial terms of the I-70 project: CDOT provided this summary of the project agreement:

    Denver Post - Adams County / 3 d. 23 h. 19 min. ago more
  • Denver not a top-five choice for Amazon HQ2, despite breweries, Wall Street Journal saysDenver not a top-five choice for Amazon HQ2, despite breweries, Wall Street Journal says

    While Amazon has been mulling 238 proposals it received from metropolitan areas across North America in response to its open call for sites for a second headquarters, the Mile High City has been slipping in the eyes of outside observers.

    DailyCamera.com / 3 d. 23 h. 44 min. ago
  • Colorado city settles case over warrantless police searchesColorado city settles case over warrantless police searches

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    ABCNews.com / 4 d. 1 h. 24 min. ago
  • Steve Lebsock says he's being blackmailed to resign, denies sexual harassment allegationsSteve Lebsock says he's being blackmailed to resign, denies sexual harassment allegations

    Shaking and tearful, state Rep. Steve Lebsock went on camera Tuesday to deny he sexually harassed three women who came forward in The Denver Post and claim he was being blackmailed to resign by an unknown person.

    DailyCamera.com / 4 d. 3 h. 18 min. ago
  • Top Colorado Democrat faces call for resignation, independent probe amid Lebsock sexual harassment scandalTop Colorado Democrat faces call for resignation, independent probe amid Lebsock sexual harassment scandal

    Colorado's top Democratic lawmaker is under fire for how she handled a sexual harassment complaint against Rep. Steve Lebsock amid a call for an independent investigation.

    DailyCamera.com / 4 d. 3 h. 24 min. ago
  • Rollover crash in Thornton construction zone on I-25 kills driver, critically injures workerRollover crash in Thornton construction zone on I-25 kills driver, critically injures worker

    THORNTON, Colo. — Police in Thornton are investigating a fatal crash that also critically injured a worker inside a construction zone on Interstate 25 at West 144th Avenue Tuesday morning. Police say the male driver of a northbound vehicle on I-25 lost control while exiting onto the West 144th Avenue off-ramp, causing the vehicle to roll several times, striking a construction worker. The driver of the vehicle, which landed on its top near a backhoe, was pronounced dead at the scene. The construction worker was transported to the hospital in critical condition. The identities of the victims have yet to be released. An investigation into the cause of the crash is ongoing. Related ArticlesNovember 9, 2017 Voters across Colorado OK tens of millions of local tax dollars for schools, streets and water systems November 8, 2017 One lane reopens after trash truck bursts into flame on southbound I-25 ramp at Belleview Avenue October 30, 2017 Overnight southbound lanes closure on I-25 north of Denver this week October 30, 2017 A Denver nonprofit has built 270 bridges in impoverished places around the world. Now it’s turning to its backyard in RiNo. October 27, 2017 Two-month closure of High Line Canal Trail at C-470 begins Monday Read more at TheDenverChannel.com.

    Denver Post - Adams County / 4 d. 5 h. 42 min. ago more
  • Housing restrictions not answer on 'sexually violent predators,' Boulder staff tells councilHousing restrictions not answer on 'sexually violent predators,' Boulder staff tells council

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    Colorado Daily / 4 d. 19 h. 36 min. ago
  • Republicans hit big issues - oil and gas and marijuana - in a Colorado gubernatorial debate in Fort LuptonRepublicans hit big issues - oil and gas and marijuana - in a Colorado gubernatorial debate in Fort Lupton

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    DailyCamera.com / 4 d. 19 h. 58 min. ago
  • Eldora's opening day bumped to Thanksgiving as ski area hurts for snowEldora's opening day bumped to Thanksgiving as ski area hurts for snow

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    Colorado Daily / 4 d. 21 h. 4 min. ago
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    DailyCamera.com / 4 d. 21 h. 10 min. ago
  • Top Colorado lawmakers call for added protections against sexual harassmentTop Colorado lawmakers call for added protections against sexual harassment

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    DailyCamera.com / 4 d. 23 h. 3 min. ago
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