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    Google News / 17.01.2018 04:01
  • After Denver hired homeless people to shovel mulch and perform other day labor, more than 100 landed regular jobsAfter Denver hired homeless people to shovel mulch and perform other day labor, more than 100 landed regular jobs

    Jeffrey Maes didn’t expect to live on the streets in his 50s. He had started several businesses, but he says the last one, a remodeling company, went south just as he was stretched thin on four properties. He lost them all, he said, and ended up without a home — along with the realization that he was considered unemployable. But last year, he heard about a Denver-sponsored day-labor program that had helped friends get back on their feet. After nearly four years of homelessness, Maes gave it a shot. And on Tuesday, he spoke about how the Denver Day Works program has helped restore his pride — and helped him find a full-time job retrofitting lights at the city’s Central Library —  as city officials announced the expansion of the program in the coming year. During a news conference at the library, Mayor Michael Hancock and others said the first-year numbers exceeded most of their goals. RJ Sangosti, The Denver PostRegina Pizarro, who was homeless cries after talking about how Denver’s Day Works program changed he life on Jan. 16, 2018 in Denver. The program announced an expansion in 2018. In the first year after the program’s launch in November 2016, Denver Human Services says 284 people worked at least a day — with all but 10 sticking around longer — performing landscaping duties in parks, helping out at the Denver Elections Division, aiding public-works crews and other job assignments. Of those participants, Maes was among 110 who found full-time work, with 15 landing permanent or project-based city jobs and the rest finding work with dozens of outside private and public employers. “When you take a good person (who’s) down, broken, discouraged, and you give them an opportunity to be proud of their self — to stand up and do something for their self — that’s one of the greatest gifts anybody can give to anybody,” said Maes, 57. “And for that, I’d like to say thank you.” Denver Day Works, run by contractor Bayaud Enterprises, has organized work crews three days a week. Next month, it will add a fourth day, with a fifth shift planned later in the year. That will allow an increase in capacity that may reduce the waitlist that stretched to eight weeks at times in 2017. The city also plans to get more departments involved, offering varied work opportunities that might better attract women, minorities and the disabled as participants. Related ArticlesJanuary 14, 2018 Crimes against homeless people up 42 percent in Denver and suburban cops say that’s pushing transients into their towns January 7, 2018 Tiny home village moves to new location: “It’s costing us about $25,000 and it is displacing villagers” March 7, 2017 Denver Parks and Recreation now hiring homeless as full-time seasonal workers November 2, 2016 Pilot program provides same-day work for Denver’s homeless ​The program, while robust, isn’t a panacea for Denver’s expansive homelessness problem, which has put pressure on city officials to address not only the need for job assistance but also housing and mental health services. But Hancock and others see the work program’s results as encouraging. As part of Denver Day Works, Bayaud has helped connect participants with housing providers and, if eligible, public-assistance programs. It also supplies lunches for the workers, sometimes donated by restaurants. At the end of each shift, they are paid wages of more than $12 an hour. Hancock initiated Denver Day Works in late 2016 after reading a news report about a similar city day-labor program in Albuquerque. He budgeted $400,000 for the first year, about half of that for Bayaud’s administrative costs. That amount has increased to $696,300 for 2018. Andy Cross, The Denver PostHomeless workers Rita Robledo, left, and Kirk Foyle, center, work with Denver Parks and Recreation Forestry worker Paul Cancik, third from left, to fill in a newly planted crabapple tree in front of the City and County Building on Nov. 2, 2016. As part of the Denver Day Works program, Robledo later was hired full time to work in the city of Denver’s greenhouse. The program’s success “shows what we’ve known all along — that people experiencing homelessness are no different” from other city residents, Hancock said. “They are hungry for the opportunity to work hard to achieve their personal dreams and to take their self-sufficiency in their own hands.” Some of the figures and data from the program’s pilot year point to challenges, as highlighted in an outside evaluation by the University of Colorado Denver’s Center on Network Science. A striking statistic: Just 57 of the 110 participants who were hired into regular jobs out of the program retained those jobs for more than 90 days. A researcher said this highlighted the need for the program to help participants adapt to those transitions. “One of the things that we learned was how difficult it is for folks to transition from being homeless to … being expected to be at work five days a week, when you may not even have a place to put your stuff every day,” said Danielle Varda, an associate professor at CU Denver. Maes was among three former Denver Day Works participants on hand Tuesday who for months have worked on a project crew that’s retrofitting all of the Central Library’s fluorescent lights with LEDs. Another participant, Regina Pizarro, 46, teared up while talking about her experience in the day-labor program. She now has a job providing customer service at a call center, and she credits Denver Day Works for putting her on that path. “It didn’t matter whether I was shoveling mulch, working at Denver Votes — it didn’t matter what I was doing, because I had a job,” she said, adding about her Bayaud supervisors: “They have a lot of compassion and understanding. They don’t look down on us because we’ve been on the streets.”

    Denver Post: Business / 20 min. ago more
  • Frontier, pilots union meet with federal mediators as Denver airline continues contract negotiationsFrontier, pilots union meet with federal mediators as Denver airline continues contract negotiations

    While it has been expanding its destination network and celebrating the purchase of more than 130 new aircraft for its fleet, Denver’s Frontier Airlines has also been in the throes of negotiations with its pilots union. The latter is pushing for a new contract with higher pay rates to replace the collective bargaining agreement it agreed to in 2009 when Frontier was tangling with bankruptcy. Representatives with the Air Line Pilots Association’s Frontier unit met with the National Mediation Board Jan. 10 to discuss the negotiations, union officials say. That meeting is being viewed as the next step toward resolving the contract dispute that prompted the airline’s more than 1,200 pilots to vote in September to strike if negotiations — which have been underway for nearly two years — fall apart before a new deal is struck. Frontier officials confirmed they met with the mediation board in a separate meeting Tuesday, though the airline did not offer details about what was discussed in that meeting. The two meetings come after the Air Line Pilot’s Association wrote a letter to the board in December urging the federal agency to get more involved in the dispute over what the association dubbed “the industry’s last surviving pilot bankruptcy contract.” “ALPA has exhausted every avenue to reach a new agreement that contains non-bankruptcy, market-standard pay and benefit terms and conditions,” the letter reads. “Management has plainly failed ‘to exert every reasonable effort’ to promptly settle this dispute, as required by the Railway Labor Act.” Union officials have said the current agreement has Frontier pilots working on contracts that are 40 percent below market rates. Frontier officials have said the airline has no intention of letting its pilots walk off the job, which cannot happen while federal mediation is ongoing.

    Denver Post: Business / 26 min. ago more
  • Man fatally shot in Denver on Sunday evening identifiedMan fatally shot in Denver on Sunday evening identified

    The Denver coroner’s office has identified the person shot to death Sunday night as a 29-year-old man. Jeramy Montano was shot multiple times in the 800 block of South Federal Boulevard at 7:10 p.m., according to Steven Castro, spokesman for the Denver coroner’ office. Paramedics took Montano to Denver Health Medical Center where he was later pronounced dead. The coroner’s office determined that the manner of death was a homicide.

    Denver Post: Crime / 31 min. ago more
  • Suspect in Arvada officer-involved shooting died of self-inflicted wound, police saySuspect in Arvada officer-involved shooting died of self-inflicted wound, police say

    A man who died in an officer-involved shooting turned his gun on himself after being shot by an officer, police said. The fatal shooting happened Sunday night in a shopping mall parking lot west of Kipling Street near Interstate 70. On Tuesday the man was identified as 25-year-old Erick Michael Deleon. He died of a self-inflicted gun wound, according to the Jefferson County coroner’s office. On Sunday night, police responded to the area on a report of a “suspicious person.” Police contacted Deleon, who gave officers identification. A background check revealed Deleon was wanted out of Denver on a felony warrant for domestic violence and stalking and that he was considered “armed and dangerous,” according to an Arvada police news release. “Before police could arrest Deleon, he fled in his car,” the release said. Deleon crashed the vehicle on the south side of a Target parking lot and fled on foot. He was spotted walking south on West Kipling near the I-70 frontage road. Related Articles Greeley birthday party ends with one man shot, another stabbed 38 homicides make 2017 the second deadliest in El Paso County history Go in or walk away? Shooting that killed Douglas County deputy underscores danger officers face when confronting mental illness California man shoots his mom in the head during tantrum over video games, police say Thornton mother struggles with plea deal in daughter’s shooting death at party When confronted by officers, a second time, Deleon was carrying a handgun, police said. “Deleon raised the weapon in the direction of Arvada officers,” the release said. “An officer fired … striking the suspect. Deleon then turned his weapon on himself and shot himself in the head.” Deleon died at the scene. The shooting is being investigated by the Jefferson County district attorney’s office and a county law enforcement team comprising multiple agencies.

    Denver Post: Crime / 35 min. ago more
  • Colorado sees increase in Obamacare signups - Washington ExaminerColorado sees increase in Obamacare signups - Washington Examiner

    Washington ExaminerColorado sees increase in Obamacare signupsWashington ExaminerColorado's open enrollment deadline ended Jan. 12, nearly a month after the Dec. 15 deadline for healthcare.gov. The plan selection total is not final, because enrollments remain open through March 1 for anyone whose 2017 health plan was not offered ...

    Google News / 53 min. ago
  • VA hospital in Aurora gets August 11 opening date as thorny congressional hearing looms WednesdayVA hospital in Aurora gets August 11 opening date as thorny congressional hearing looms Wednesday

    WASHINGTON — After years of delays, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs plans to open a new hospital in Aurora on Aug. 11 — although Tuesday’s announcement is unlikely to spare the agency from criticism when several of its top officials appear Wednesday before Congress to talk about the troubled project. The unfinished hospital already is long overdue and $1 billion over budget, and, according to documents obtained last week by The Denver Post, there’s plenty of work left to do before it can treat patients. Hundreds of tasks remain unfinished — such as replacing weak walls that can’t hold mounted X-ray machines — and it’s unlikely the VA will be able to hire enough workers to fully staff the hospital when it opens, which could cause a reduction in services. The U.S. House Committee on Veterans’ Affairs is expected to raise these issues Wednesday at 8 a.m. Mountain time when it meets with several top VA leaders, including Stella Fiotes, one of its top construction officials. Related ArticlesJanuary 12, 2018 Overdue and $1 billion over budget, Aurora VA hospital is still incomplete and will likely be understaffed, document says October 12, 2017 Dozens of surgeries at Denver VA hospital put off because of doctor shortage December 13, 2016 Aurora VA hospital: Justice Department considers probe of perjury allegations September 23, 2016 U.S. lawmakers formally request perjury probe over Aurora VA hospital “For tomorrow’s oversight hearing, I will be prepared to ask the tough questions in order to get to the bottom of what remains a plagued hospital construction project,” Republican U.S. Rep. Mike Coffman of Aurora, who sits on the committee, said in a statement. On Tuesday, Coffman wrote on Twitter that he “just got notification” from the VA about the Aug. 11 opening. Just got notification from the @DeptVetAffairs that they plan to open the #VAHospital in #Aurora on 8/11/18. Stay tuned for tomorrow’s oversight hearing. #CO06 — Rep. Mike Coffman (@RepMikeCoffman) January 16, 2018 Testimony that Fiotes plans to give Wednesday also makes mention of an August opening. The project’s expected price tag will be $1.7 billion for construction and about $340 million to outfit the facility with furniture and medical equipment.

    Denver Post: Business / 55 min. ago more
  • $40 million expansion project of Denver Dumb Friends League shelter to bring sanctuary to homeless animals$40 million expansion project of Denver Dumb Friends League shelter to bring sanctuary to homeless animals

    By 2020, there will be fewer stray animals on the streets of metro Denver and more living in their “forever homes” — at least, that’s the goal of Denver Dumb Friends League. Last year, the organization helped place more than 15,000 animals in homes through adoption, staying true to its mission to end pet homelessness. Much-needed renovations of the Dumb Friends League Denver shelter at 2080 S. Quebec St. have been a topic of conversation among the organization’s leaders, workers and volunteers for several years. The first concrete step toward bringing those ideas to fruition came last April when DDFL launched its Building a Better Way Home campaign. The shelter was considered a state-of-the-art facility when it debuted in 1974, but key areas have remained largely untouched for more than 43 years. A $40 million project will renovate the most heavily-used areas of the center over the next three years, including the dog holding and adoptions area, the pet admissions lobby and the veterinary services department. Construction is underway on the dog holding area, which Dumb Friends League representatives say will receive the most extensive makeover. The new layout will provide dogs with individual rooms as opposed to the side-by-side kennels previously used. The kennels created an overstimulating and sometimes stressful environment for the animals, staff members say. Renovations to the veterinary department will double the shelter’s ability to perform surgeries and other vital medical services, eliminating long wait times, speeding up animals’ recovery and allowing more room for incoming pets. “This renovation really embodies the center’s mission, which is doing the best we can for the animals we serve and the community we serve,” said Joan Thielen, a communication specialist for DDFL.  To date, the Building a Better Way Home campaign has raised almost $10 million in grant money and donations. Leslie and John Malone of The Malone Family Foundation have committed to match up to $20 million for the project. Recently, the campaign received a $300,000 grant from the Petco Foundation, which gives $30 million annually to animal welfare initiatives throughout the country. “We look for an organization that is making a substantial difference in their community and saving lives… we want to make sure we are making a significant, life-saving impact with our investment,” Susanne Kogut, executive director for the Petco Foundation, said of the organization’s financial distributions. Denver Dumb Friends League works with a number of area Petco locations to assist in the adoption of cats, dogs and small companion animals. “I think they’re always progressing to that next step, and that’s what we like to see in those organizations,” Kogut said of DDFL. The shelter estimates renovations will be complete in early 2020. Square footage will increase from 84,521 to 110,000. The number of dog kennels will jump from 154 to 212 and the number of cat kennels from 464 to 646.  Construction of a dedicated area for behavioral rehabilitation is included in the renovation plans. The addition will be a stress-free, isolated environment for shy or fearful animals. Volunteer Nancy Fornaro spends much of her time in the behavioral unit working with cats that need help socializing. She said a stronger focus on the behavioral unit will speed up the adoption process and boost the number of animals DDFL helps. “It’s all about making these pets adoptable,” she said. Fornaro has been volunteering with Dumb Friends League about twice a week for the last 12 years. The shelter has more than 1,000 volunteers, and 50-75 people donate time there on any given day. “I feel like I’m really doing something for the community and for these pets. I think everyone who works here feels that way. We wouldn’t be here if it weren’t for these guys,” she said, looking fondly at a 14-year-old brown tabby cat named Speck. “I feel a lot of gratification from it. I love it.” DDFL is actively welcoming donations for this campaign. “It requires the rest of the community to take part,” Kogut said. “We encourage everyone to give to their local animal shelter, and we hope our investment can encourage people. (DDFL is) going to need more than just us.” INFORMATION Denver Dumb Friends League 2080 S. Quebec St., Denver 303-751-5772, ddfl.org 

    Denver Post: Business / 56 min. ago more
  • Federal Heights woman charged with murder after allegedly killing her dad and encasing his body in concreteFederal Heights woman charged with murder after allegedly killing her dad and encasing his body in concrete

    A woman who allegedly killed her father and then buried him in concrete in the crawl space of the Federal Heights home they shared has been charged with first-degree murder, Adams County authorities say. Federal Heights PoliceDayna Michele Jennings Dayna Michele Jennings, 43, is in custody in the Adams County jail, accused of killing 69-year-old William Mussack, according to Sue Lindsay, spokeswoman for Adams County District Attorney Dave Young. Investigators executed a search warrant at the home, 10022 Eliot Circle, on Wednesday and found human remains when they broke up some concrete in the crawl space. Jennings, who was being interviewed at the Federal Heights police station, confessed after investigators received a text message informing them of the discovery, admitting “to pouring concrete in the crawlspace where the human remains were located,” according to a search warrant affidavit. An autopsy confirmed that the remains were those of Mussack and that he was the victim of a homicide. Concerned family members contacted police on Dec. 28 because they hadn’t been able to contact Mussack. Jennings told police that her father no longer lived at the home and that she hadn’t seen him in several weeks, the arrest affidavit says. She also said he had gone to the mountains with his girlfriend. But when a Federal Heights police officer searched the home on Dec. 29, he noticed the stench of something that was rotting. The house also smelled like sewage. He also said he saw women’s clothing on Mussack’s bed. Federal Heights PoliceWilliam Mussack The officer returned to the home the next day and noticed construction materials that had been stacked on the driveway had been moved. Jennings told the officer that her father’s cellphone and rent money had been taken. This time Jennings refused to let the officer search the home. Mussack’s girlfriend told police the last time she heard from him was on Dec. 8, when agreed to attend a Christmas party with her the next day. He didn’t show up. Rubbish Works dropped a roll-off dumpster in Jennings’ driveway on Dec. 11. They picked it up on Dec. 15 and dropped a second one the same day. The second dumpster was picked up on Dec. 22. Both dumpsters were taken to the Commerce City transfer station at 6091 Brighton Blvd. On Dec. 23, Jennings told John Cappadocia, a man police interviewed, that she saw her dad a few days before, when he stopped by to pick up his cellphone. But pings on cellphone towers indicated the cellphone was still near the house, the arrest affidavit said. Several relatives had been trying to reach Mussack, including his son, Brian Mussack, who lives in California. Brian Mussack, told police that his father told him in a phone call that after Jennings gave him a back rub on Dec. 7 he had felt like he had been drugged and slept for 15 hours in his recliner. Family said he was normally up at the crack of dawn. Brian Mussack said Jennings sent a text message saying their dad was being abusive to her. He and other family members said this was out of character for Mussack. Related Articles 38 homicides make 2017 the second deadliest in El Paso County history Denver police investigating homicide on South Federal Boulevard 38 homicides make 2017 the second deadliest in El Paso County history Teen will spend 5 years in youth corrections for killing 16-year-old at Thornton homecoming party Puerto Rico fears post-Maria murder surge: 11 days, 32 slain On Jan. 5, Jennings told Cappadocia that her father was in Arizona enjoying the sun. But family members told police Mussack didn’t know anyone in Arizona. When DA Investigator Patrick Ness contacted a Wells Fargo bank branch, the manager said there had been unusual activity on Mussack’s bank account in December. Mussack’s name was signed on a check made out to Jennings for $500. But the signature did not match Mussack’s prior signatures. There had been six Amazon purchases for Jennings during the month. Joel Jennings’, Jennings’ ex-husband, said Jennings’ massage business was closed in November. It was her only source of income. He said he believed his former wife had killed her father. He added that her second husband, Chris Newton, moved out of the Mussack home in November and got married on Dec. 9.

    Denver Post - Adams County / 1 h. 32 min. ago more
  • Boulder County coroner ID's woman who died in Superior after possible 'huffing' incidentBoulder County coroner ID's woman who died in Superior after possible 'huffing' incident

    The Boulder County Coroner's Office has identified the 31-year-old woman who died after a possible "huffing" incident last week as Elizabeth Mann, of Denver.

    ColoradoHometownWeekly.com / 2 h. 34 min. ago
  • Lyft left $63 million mark on Denver in 2017 thanks to passenger spendingLyft left $63 million mark on Denver in 2017 thanks to passenger spending

    A new study released Tuesday by ridesharing service Lyft found that after getting a ride in Denver, Lyft passengers spent $63 million at restaurants and other local businesses last year. The company also invested an undisclosed amount in paying local drivers and opening a new Driver Hub facility in the Sun Valley neighborhood. Its presence in Colorado is growing, said Gabe Cohen, general manager for the Colorado operation, which employs 27 people. “This is the first year Denver has been included in the Economic Impact Report released by Lyft,” he said, of the annual report. The national report found that Lyft drivers in 2017 completed 375 million rides and earned $3.6 billion, excluding tips, which was double the driver earnings from 2016. Tech news site TechCrunch reported that Lyft had 23 million different passengers, a 92 percent increase from the prior year. Lyft has operated in Denver since at least 2013, several months before Colorado became the first state to regulate ridesharing services. In 2014, Lyft beat rival Uber to be the first ridesharing service working with the Denver International Airport. Neither have shared how many drivers are in Colorado but both became embroiled in a state Public Utilities Commission crackdown of unqualified drivers. Uber is currently protesting a $8.9 million penalty for allowing 57 people with past criminal or motor vehicle offenses drive for the company. Lyft paid the PUC at last $224,375 in civil fines for its violations. Related Articles Colorado regulators fine Lyft more than $200,000 for using driver with serious felonies On Tuesday, Lyft also shared the makeup of its Denver-area drivers: one-third identify with a minority group, one-third are female and 16 percent are over 50 years old. The vast majority — or 92 percent — drive less than 20 hours per week, while 70 percent say they are the primary earners of their household.

    Denver Post: Business / 2 h. 55 min. ago more
  • 3 suspects in Lafayette hash-oil explosion sentenced3 suspects in Lafayette hash-oil explosion sentenced

    All three suspects in a Lafayette hash-oil explosion last year have now been sentenced after accepting various plea deals in their respective cases.

    ColoradoHometownWeekly.com / 2 h. 58 min. ago
  • Man found dead from gunshot wound at base of Boulder's Flatirons Man found dead from gunshot wound at base of Boulder's Flatirons

    Boulder County sheriff's Cmdr. Mike Wagner said that the body of a man was found on the Woods Quarry Trail by a hiker around 10:30 a.m. today. He was dead from a gunshot wound.

    Colorado Daily / 2 h. 59 min. ago
  • Driver facing vehicular-assault charge in Boulder crash that seriously injured CU studentDriver facing vehicular-assault charge in Boulder crash that seriously injured CU student

    A 20-year-old University of Colorado student was seriously injured — his scalp partially torn off — in a three-car crash in Boulder late Friday night that police say was caused by a drunk driver.

    Colorado Daily / 3 h. 48 min. ago
  • Ex-USA Gymnastics doctor’s victims recount sex abuse as young gymnastsEx-USA Gymnastics doctor’s victims recount sex abuse as young gymnasts

    LANSING, Mich. — One after one, gymnasts and other victims of a disgraced former sports doctor stepped forward in a Michigan courtroom Tuesday to recount the sexual abuse and emotional trauma he inflicted on them as children, including one who warned that girls eventually “grow into strong women that return to destroy your world.” Nearly 100 victims are expected to address the court during the four-day sentencing hearing for 54-year-old Larry Nassar. Many cried as they told their stories on the hearing’s first day, and some requested anonymity. Others unleashed. “I testified to let the world know that you are a repulsive liar and those ‘treatments’ were pathetically veiled sexual abuse,” victim Kyle Stephens said to Nassar, who often bowed his head and closed his eyes or looked away as she and others spoke. Stephens, the first victim to speak, said Nassar repeatedly abused her from age 6 until age 12 during family visits to his home in Holt, near Lansing. She said he rubbed his genitals on her and digitally penetrated her, among other abuse. She said Nassar denied it, and her parents initially believed him. Stephens said she largely blamed her father’s suicide on the shame and self-loathing he felt for defending Nassar. “Perhaps you have figured it out by now, but little girls don’t stay little forever,” Stephens said. “They grow into strong women that return to destroy your world.” The judge consoled the 29 women and girls who spoke or had their statements read on Tuesday, saying they should not blame themselves. More victims will speak on Wednesday. Nassar has pleaded guilty to molesting females with his hands at his Michigan State University office, his home and a Lansing-area gymnastics club, often while their parents were in the room. He also worked for Indianapolis-based USA Gymnastics, which trains Olympians. Another statement came from Donna Markham, who told of how her 23-year-old daughter Chelsey killed herself in 2009, years after Nassar sexually abused her during a medical examination. “It all started with him,” she said, describing her daughter’s downward spiral into drug abuse. Victims described experiencing “searing pain” during the assaults and having feelings of shame and embarrassment. They said it had changed their life trajectories — affecting relationships, causing them to be distrustful and leading to depression, suicidal thoughts, and anger and anxiety about whether they should have spoken up sooner. “He touched the most innocent places on my body,” said 17-year-old Jessica Thomashaw, recounting how she was sexually assaulted at ages 9 and 12. “I couldn’t be just a normal girl anymore, and I forever lost a big piece of my childhood due to his abuse.” Ingham County Circuit Judge Rosemarie Aquilina, who is expected to order a sentence on Friday, said the system had failed them. “You shouldn’t be angry with yourself,” she told a 31-year-old victim, who said she was assaulted almost 20 years ago. “You went to him for pain and healing, and you didn’t know. No one faults you or any other victim for that. You were a child.” Prosecutors are seeking at least 40 years in prison for Nassar, who has already been sentenced to 60 years in federal prison for child pornography crimes. Olympic gold medalists Simone Biles, Gabby Douglas, McKayla Maroney and Aly Raisman have said they, too, were victims. Raisman tweeted Monday that she would not attend the sentencing “because it is too traumatic for me. My impact letter will be read in court in front of Nassar. I support the brave survivors. We are all in this together.” Nassar admitted in November that he digitally penetrating 10 girls, mostly under the guise of treatment, between 1998 and 2015. As part of plea deals in two adjacent Michigan counties, he said his conduct had no legitimate medical purpose and that he did not have the girls’ consent. The criminal cases followed reports last year in The Indianapolis Star about how USA Gymnastics mishandled complaints about sexual misconduct involving him and coaches. Women and girls said the stories inspired them to step forward with detailed allegations of abuse. Melissa Imrie told the judge she was assaulted in 1997, when she was 12, after breaking her tailbone. She described years of severe depression, sleeplessness and other issues. “Everybody’s story that I listened today is just an echo of everything that I’ve went through. They’re just speaking like it’s my voice,” Imrie said. She said she wants young athletes “to be safe from sexual predators, from this kind of abuse.”

    Denver Post: Crime / 4 h. 8 min. ago more
  • 18 state attorneys general back Colo. Rep. Ed Perlmutter’s marijuana banking bill18 state attorneys general back Colo. Rep. Ed Perlmutter’s marijuana banking bill

    A bill introduced by Colorado Rep. Ed Perlmutter that would allow banks to serve marijuana-related businesses without fear of penalties from the federal government got a boost Tuesday from a bipartisan coalition of state attorneys general. A letter sent to leaders in Congress Tuesday by 19 state attorneys general requests that Congress pass legislation such as the Secure and Fair Enforcement (SAFE) Banking Act to “provide a safe harbor” for banks that provide financial products or services to state-legal marijuana businesses. The recent rescission by U.S. Attorney General Jeff Session of Obama-era guidance for the U.S. Treasury Department’s Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN) regarding banks doing business with marijuana firms has made the need for Congressional action more urgent, the attorneys general said. Enacting laws such as the SAFE Banking Act that ensure accountability in the marijuana industry would, “bring billions of dollars into the banking sector, and give law enforcement the ability to monitor these transactions,” the attorneys general said. “Moreover, compliance with tax requirements would be simpler and easier to enforce with a better-defined tracking of funds.” Democrat Perlmutter introduced the SAFE Banking Act last April with co-sponsors Denny Heck, D-Washington, and Don Young, R-Alaska. The bill, which currently has 64 cosponsors, is a reintroduction of the Marijuana Businesses Access to Banking Act, which was first introduced in 2013 — and again in 2015 — but subsequently languished. “I first introduced this legislation in 2013 to get cash off the streets and reduce the threat of crime, robbery and assault in our communities,” Perlmutter said in an email to The Cannabist. “Voters have spoken on this issue and voted to legalize some form of marijuana in nearly every state in the country. States are taking responsible steps to regulate the industry and we must ensure that includes access to the banking system.” The attorneys general from seven of the eight states that have legalized recreational marijuana for adults signed the letter. Cannabis banking is an issue impacting both red and blue states, California Attorney General Xavier Becerra said in a statement announcing the letter. “The future of small and local licensed businesses has been clouded by the Trump Administration’s relentless attacks on progress, in conflict with the will of voters,” the California Democrat said. “Congress has the power to protect a growing $6.7 billion industry and the public safety of our communities.” Related: California’s new attorney general gearing up to defend legal weed A spokesperson for Colorado Attorney General Cynthia Coffman, a Republican who also signed the letter, could not immediately be reached for comment. Notably absent from the letter was the signature of Nevada Attorney General Adam Laxalt, a Republican who is also running for governor, and was opposed to the Nevada Marijuana Legalization Initiative before Nevada voters approved it in November 2016. The SAFE Banking Act would prevent federal banking regulators from: • Prohibiting, penalizing or discouraging a bank from providing financial services to a legitimate state-sanctioned and regulated cannabis business, or an associated business (such as a lawyer or landlord providing services to a legal cannabis business); • Terminating or limiting a bank’s federal deposit insurance solely because the bank is providing services to a state-sanctioned cannabis business or associated business; • Recommending or incentivizing a bank to halt or downgrade providing any kind of banking services to these businesses; • Taking any action on a loan to an owner or operator of a cannabis-related business. Perlmutter’s SAFE Banking Act is the latest marijuana-related measure in the U.S. House of Representatives to see increased support in the wake of Sessions marijuana policy shift. Nearly 70 congress members signed a letter sent Friday asking House leadership to include Colorado Rep. Jared Polis’ McClintock-Polis Amendment in any forthcoming appropriations legislation. That amendment would ensure Department of Justice funds cannot be used to interfere with states that have authorized some form of marijuana legalization.

    Denver Post: Business / 4 h. 25 min. ago more
  • Five of six men indicted in metro Denver heroin-ring bust are in the U.S. illegallyFive of six men indicted in metro Denver heroin-ring bust are in the U.S. illegally

    ICE detainers have been issued for five of the six people indicted on charges of running a heroin trafficking ring in Jefferson County and other parts of metro Denver. According to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, four of the men had been deported multiple times before they were indicted on Dec. 22, accused of receiving shipments of heroin from outside Colorado, storing the drugs in four stash houses, and then wiring some of the proceeds from sales to people outside of the U.S. During the investigation led by the West Metro Drug Task Force, cops made undercover purchases or seized of 3,305 grams of heroin. According to investigators, potential buyers called and spoke with a dispatcher who told them where and when the drugs would be delivered. A runner then would meet the buyer, and return the cash to Fermin Flores-Rosales, 41, who then wired some of the money to banks in Mexico. According to ICE, Flores-Rosales, who is from Mexico, has been previously deported multiple times, and is illegally present in the U.S. ICE lodged a detainer on him with the Jefferson County jail on Dec. 5. The next day, ICE asked for detainers for his co-conspirators, Cristobal Flores-Rosales, 47, and Yoel Soto-Campos, 21. Both men are from Mexico, had been deported previously and are in the U.S. illegally, an ICE spokesman said. On Friday, ICE filed a detainer for Mario Acosta-Ruiz, 30, aka, Alfonso Rosales-Alverez. Acosta-Ruiz, who is from Mexico, is in the U.S. illegally. The agency also filed a detainer for Joel Torrez-Espinoza, 25. Torrez-Espinoza, who is from Mexico and had been deported from the U.S. multiple times, was convicted in 2012 in Utah of felony possession with intent to distribute cocaine. A sixth man, 24-year-old Juan Borques Meza, also was indicted. ICE did not have information on his immigration status. Related ArticlesOctober 13, 2017 Four arrested, five at large, in indictment of alleged heroin and meth ring November 30, 2017 Dad of DU student who died of heroin overdose says he was powerless to fight son’s opioid addiction January 3, 2017 Colorado’s opioid and heroin overdose deaths outnumbered homicides in 2015 January 1, 2018 As Colorado’s largest drug and alcohol addiction treatment provider closes, other organizations are scrambling December 8, 2017 5 defendants plead guilty in Boulder County’s “Operation Crystal Stiletto” drug bust November 6, 2017 Colorado’s opioid epidemic explained in 10 graphics Fermin Flores-Rosales, Cristobal Flores-Rosales, Acosta-Ruiz and Soto-Campos all have been arrested and appeared in court Tuesday. Borques Meza is in custody but was unable to appear in court Tuesday. Torrez-Espinoza has a warrant out for his arrest but is not in custody. ICE detainers are a request that a law enforcement agency maintain custody of a person in the country illegally for up to 48 hours so ICE may take custody of the individual. ICE places immigration detainers when the agency has probable cause to believe an alien is deportable. In these types of circumstances, undocumented immigrants typically serve their sentence in the U.S. UPDATED Jan. 16, 2017: This story was updated to reflect that Torrez-Espinoza is not in custody.

    Denver Post: Crime / 4 h. 33 min. ago more
  • Colorado claims first U.S.-bred certified hemp seedColorado claims first U.S.-bred certified hemp seed

    Colorado has claimed a victory in the race to develop a successful, viable hemp industry. The state is now home to the first U.S.-bred hemp seed to qualify as Association of Official Seed Certifying Agencies certified seed.

    Colorado News / 5 h. 32 min. ago
  • Downtown Colorado Springs sports and event center gains support - The Denver PostDowntown Colorado Springs sports and event center gains support - The Denver Post

    The Denver PostDowntown Colorado Springs sports and event center gains supportThe Denver PostA proposal to build a 10,000-seat sports and event center in city-owned Antlers Park in downtown Colorado Springs got a warm reception Monday night at an open house held by the project's proponents. The Q&A-style event was held in a ballroom in The ...

    Google News / 5 h. 39 min. ago more
  • Downtown Colorado Springs sports and event center gains supportDowntown Colorado Springs sports and event center gains support

    A proposal to build a 10,000-seat sports and event center in city-owned Antlers Park in downtown Colorado Springs got a warm reception Monday night at an open house held by the project’s proponents. The Q&A-style event was held in a ballroom in The Antlers hotel and led by Perry Sanders Jr., a Colorado Springs attorney and co-owner of the hotel, and Nick Ragain, owner of the Switchbacks minor league soccer team with his father, Ed. Antlers Park is directly west of the hotel. The team would play in the center’s stadium. Some people praised the effort, others expressed concern about adding to downtown traffic or questioned how the public could use the center. Related Articles Colorado Springs officials urge vigilance with cold weather, warming fires Colorado Springs declined to allow recreational marijuana sales. Now it’s having second thoughts The City Council will discuss the proposal at a meeting Wednesday. The city faces a December deadline to start work on the center or risk losing nearly $28 million in tax-increment financing approved by the state to help build the project. Read the entire story at gazette.com.

    Denver Post: Business / 5 h. 41 min. ago more
  • University of Colorado settles lawsuit with former employeeUniversity of Colorado settles lawsuit with former employee

    The University of Colorado has agreed to a cash settlement with a former employee who sued the university, alleging she was fired because of her age and gender. The Daily Camera re

    Big News Network.com / 5 h. 45 min. ago
  • Legislature working to change CO nurse licensingLegislature working to change CO nurse licensing

    The Colorado state legislature's house finance committee met early Tuesday morning to vote on a bill that will affect the nursing community. It's called the Enhanced Nurse Licensure Compact

    Big News Network.com / 5 h. 48 min. ago
  • Broncos QB question hangs over offseasonBroncos QB question hangs over offseason

    DENVER -- During the final week of the Broncos season, a huge blue dumpster sat in a parking lot adjacent to the practice field. It sat there as a catch-all as the team continues to overhaul inside me

    Big News Network.com / 5 h. 48 min. ago
  • Body found in Gore Creek in VailBody found in Gore Creek in Vail

    VAIL, Colo. - Ski access points in the Lionshead area of Vail were closed on Tuesday due to a death investigation.Vail Fire said a body was discovered in Gore Creek Tuesday morning.Further d

    Big News Network.com / 5 h. 48 min. ago
  • Wings Over the Rockies to build 2nd campusWings Over the Rockies to build 2nd campus

    ENGLEWOOD, Colo. - Wings Over the Rockies is spreading its wings and expanding.The organization announced on Tuesday that it plans to build a new 15-acre campus at the Centennial Airport.The

    Big News Network.com / 5 h. 48 min. ago
  • Colorado named 2nd best state for retireesColorado named 2nd best state for retirees

    DENVER - If you're looking to retire but you're not so keen on Florida…consider Colorado.The Centennial State just made a list of the best states in which to retire. WalletH

    Big News Network.com / 5 h. 48 min. ago
  • 5 Things to Know for Tuesday, Jan. 16, 20185 Things to Know for Tuesday, Jan. 16, 2018

    It';s going to get bitter cold by early Tuesday. Expect single digits early Tuesday with wind chills near zero. The roads will be slick in places for the morning drive, especially side

    Big News Network.com / 5 h. 48 min. ago
  • Study finds Great Outdoors Colorado gives state $507 million economic boostStudy finds Great Outdoors Colorado gives state $507 million economic boost

    Grants from Colorado Lottery-funded Great Outdoors Colorado directly supported 11,800 jobs, providing $507 million in labor income and, by protecting land and water and open space for recreation, helped spur $392 million in spending on sporting goods over the past decade, a new study finds. Launched by voters in 1992, GOCO has sent more than $917 million of lottery proceeds to 4,700 open-space projects, including creation or restoration of 900 miles of trails and 1,100 parks. “The bottom line is that, from an economic standpoint, Colorado’s decision to invest lottery proceeds in sustaining the state’s quality of life is a remarkably smart decision.” said Trust for Public Lands economist Jennifer Plowden, the study’s author. “It’s good for business. It’s good for urban and rural communities. It’s good for the health of Coloradans,” she said. Related ArticlesNovember 29, 2016 Outdoor industry will be added to the calculus of the nation’s gross domestic product June 5, 2016 Colorado emerging as a national leader in developing a recreational-based economy August 6, 2017 Power play: How outdoor retailers are positioned as a political, economic and social force for change June 9, 2015 Great Outdoors Colorado to create more outdoor experiences for kids July 25, 2017 Audit concludes no misuse of funds at GOCO, but finds $45 million in miscategorized grants, unequal support for outdoor recreation Conservationists planned to unveil the 56-page study this week following the introduction Friday of Senate Bill 66, which would make the Colorado Lottery permanent. While Colorado’s constitution allows for the lottery, it is run by a lottery division that depends on an authorizing statute that expires in 2024. The bill is backed by Sen. Jerry Sonnenberg and Rep. Cole Wist, both Republicans, and Sen. Leroy Garcia and Rep. Jeni James Arndt, both Democrats. The lottery provides funds for GOCO, the Conservation Trust Fund and Colorado Parks and Wildlife. Since 1992, the funds have been divided under a formula that gives half (up to a $65 million cap) to GOCO, 40 percent to the conservation fund and 10 percent to the state parks and wildlife agency. Lottery proceeds that exceed the cap are given to a state schools construction assistance fund.

    Denver Post - Adams County / 5 h. 59 min. ago more
  • Game Preview: What to Watch For in the Nuggets Game Against the MavericksGame Preview: What to Watch For in the Nuggets Game Against the Mavericks

    Things are getting real for the Nuggets as the NBA season crosses over the halfway point and winds toward the All-Star break. The Nuggets are in a three-way tie at 22-21 in the Western Confe

    Big News Network.com / 6 h. ago
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  • In Colorado, a glimpse of renewable energy's insanely cheap future - VoxIn Colorado, a glimpse of renewable energy's insanely cheap future - Vox

    VoxIn Colorado, a glimpse of renewable energy's insanely cheap futureVoxUsually, when we talk about how renewable energy will evolve in the next five years, we rely on analysts and projections. This is different. When a utility puts out a request for proposals (RFP) — asking developers to bid in for the chance to build ...Renewable Energy Is Kicking Ass in ColoradoMother Jonesall 43 news articles »

    Google News / 6 h. ago more
  • Colorado lawmaker pushes pricing transparency bill for diabetes drugs - STATColorado lawmaker pushes pricing transparency bill for diabetes drugs - STAT

    STATColorado lawmaker pushes pricing transparency bill for diabetes drugsSTAThe pharmaceutical industry may be fighting a first-in-the-nation law in Nevada to demand pricing transparency on diabetes drugs, but Colorado legislator Dylan Roberts is not deterred. Last week, he introduced a bill to similarly demand that drug makers ...

    Google News / 6 h. 8 min. ago
  • 30s today, but highs in the 60s in Denver by Thursday - The Denver Channel30s today, but highs in the 60s in Denver by Thursday - The Denver Channel

    The Denver Channel30s today, but highs in the 60s in Denver by ThursdayThe Denver ChannelIt's a beautiful but chilly day across the state. We'll see highs in the mid- to upper 30s across the Metro Area this afternoon and that's about 5 to 7 degrees below normal this time of year. Wind chills this morning were at about 15 to 30 degrees ...

    Google News / 6 h. 29 min. ago more
  • Frontier deal with sister airline Volaris could mean more cheap flights to Mexico, Central AmericaFrontier deal with sister airline Volaris could mean more cheap flights to Mexico, Central America

    Frontier Airlines could soon be touching down in more destinations in Mexico and Central America. The Denver-based, ultra-low-fare airline announced Tuesday it has signed a code-sharing deal with Mexican sister carrier Volaris Airlines. The arrangement, whereby the two carries will co-book and share flights in certain areas, will require regulatory approval in Mexico and the United States. If the deal clears those hurdles, Frontier fliers could be riding Volaris jets into destinations such as Mexico City; San Jose, Costa Rica; and San Salvador, El Salvador.  Volaris, which services 24 places in the U.S., including Denver, features 40 destinations in Mexico. Frontier, which offers flights to the Mexican cities of Cabo San Lucas, Puerto Vallarta and Cancun, overlaps with Volaris in 21 cities, providing multiple opportunities to build connecting itineraries to other places Frontier previously didn’t touch. Purchase one set of tickets, check your bags in Denver and land in a Mexican city, all without have to find your own connecting flight. “It takes the pain points out of building a low-cost connecting flight,” Frontier spokesman Richard Oliver said.  Frontier is owned by Indigo Partners, a private equity firm. Volaris is a publicly traded company, but its majority shareholder is Indigo. The two carriers will each receive new jets through Indigo’s record $49.5 billion deal with Airbus inked in November.  The code-sharing arrangement comes at a time when Frontier is greatly expanding its reach. The carrier added 21 destinations out of Denver International Airport alone last year.  “Many customers traveling between the U.S. and Mexico are forced to pay high fares to fly, and this agreement will provide lower fares to a vast majority of the U.S. and Mexico population,” Frontier CEO Barry Biffle said in Tuesday’s news release. “As the leading ultra-low-cost carrier in Mexico, Volaris is an ideal partner with which to align, and we look forward to working together to deliver low fares to millions of people.” Related ArticlesNovember 15, 2017 With triple the number of jets, Frontier Airlines wants to more than triple its customers in a decade September 11, 2017 Frontier pilots ready to walk off the job if new labor agreement can’t be reached July 18, 2017 Frontier Airlines adds 21 new destinations out of Denver International Airport, marking renewed focus on home hub Volaris officials estimate the deal will create 80 new routes between the U.S. and Mexico. The news release claims this is among the first-ever code-sharing deal between ultra-low-cost carriers. “Our goal is to unite families and friends on both sides of the border, and this new agreement with our partners at Frontier will allow us to expand the travel options for our audience while keeping fares low,” Volaris CEO Enrique Beltranena said in the news release.

    Denver Post: Business / 6 h. 31 min. ago more
  • Denver marijuana dispensaries boost nearby home prices, says studyDenver marijuana dispensaries boost nearby home prices, says study

    As recreational marijuana sales ramp up throughout California’s Bay Area, could the newly legal drug end up creating an unexpected type of high — in the real estate market? Researchers looking at the impact of legalized recreational marijuana on Denver’s home prices found a surprising trend: dispensaries that began selling recreational marijuana had a “large positive impact on neighboring property values.” After recreational sales became legal, houses close to a participating dispensary saw their value increase more than 8 percent relative to homes located slightly farther away, the study found. It’s a small study based on data from only one metro area, but the research — the first of its kind — could provide an important glimpse into the potential impact of legalization. “We went into the project and we weren’t really sure what to expect,” said James Conklin a real estate professor at the University of Georgia who co-authored the paper called “Contact High: The External Effects of Retail Marijuana Establishments on House Prices” last summer. “We thought maybe there would be a negative impact. I think our takeaway after working on the project was that we don’t see a negative effect — we do see results point to a positive effect.” Conklin and his co-authors found that after recreational marijuana sales became legal in Denver at the beginning of 2014, single-family homes located near dispensaries saw their values go up. Homes within 0.1 miles of a dispensary saw gains of 8.4 percent relative to houses located between 0.1 and 0.25 miles away. These weren’t new dispensaries — they were existing medical marijuana dispensaries that expanded to recreational sales when it became legal. Read the rest of this story at TheCannabist.co

    Denver Post: Business / 6 h. 58 min. ago more
  • Colorado claims first US-bred certified hemp seed - Journal AdvocateColorado claims first US-bred certified hemp seed - Journal Advocate

    Colorado claims first US-bred certified hemp seedJournal AdvocateColorado has claimed a victory in the race to develop a successful, viable hemp industry. The state is now home to the first U.S.-bred hemp seed to qualify as Association of Official Seed Certifying Agencies (AOSCA) certified seed. "This is an exciting ...and more »

    Google News / 6 h. 59 min. ago more
  • Hearing for teen accused of killing Kiaya Campbell closed to public, mediaHearing for teen accused of killing Kiaya Campbell closed to public, media

    An Adams County District judge has closed a hearing in which she will decide whether to try a teenage boy as an adult in the murder of 10-year-old Kiaya Campbell. Judge Priscilla Loew ruled Tuesday morning that it is in the best interest of the boy and the community to keep the public from a preliminary hearing and a later hearing to determine whether tor try him as an adult. Loew said that the case is now in juvenile court. Adams County District Attorney Dave Young said he will seek to prosecute the boy, who was 15 when Kiaya Campbell died, as an adult. Loew made her decision to exclude the public, including a Denver Post reporter, after asking defense attorneys and prosecutors what their position was in regard to holding an open hearing. Young said he did not have an opinion. A defense attorney requested that the hearing remain closed. Young has not named the boy because he is a juvenile, but Loew in a previous hearing identified him as the son of Kiaya’s father’s girlfriend. The suspect has been held in an Adams County juvenile detention facility. The teen entered the courtroom Tuesday morning wearing green detention facility pants and a blue sweat shirt. Kiaya disappeared the night of June 7 while walking with the teen to a store from the home in the 12400 block of Forest Drive in Thornton where her father lived with his girlfriend and her two sons. Following an Amber Alert and an intense search involving 23 rescue and law enforcement agencies, her body was discovered the afternoon of the following day in a greenbelt area about 1½ miles from where her family reported she had disappeared. The teen Kiaya was with told police that he run and became separated from the girl when it began raining hard. Some neighbors have disputed that there was a rainstorm in the area that night.

    Denver Post - Adams County / 7 h. ago more
  • Colorado ranked as second-best state for retirees - FOX31 DenverColorado ranked as second-best state for retirees - FOX31 Denver

    FOX31 DenverColorado ranked as second-best state for retireesFOX31 DenverDENVER — Colorado has climbed to the second-best state to retire, trailing only Florida, according to a survey by WalletHub. Last year, Colorado ranked No. 5, behind Florida, Wyoming, South Dakota and South Carolina. WalletHub ranked states in ...Report: Colorado one of the best places to retireThe ColoradoanColorado moves up on 'best states to retire' list9NEWS.comColorado named 2nd best state for retireesThe Denver Channelall 21 news articles »

    Google News / 7 h. 4 min. ago more
  • Northern Colorado's Most Livable Cities Might Surprise YouNorthern Colorado's Most Livable Cities Might Surprise You

    Yes, Greeley out-"rank"-ed Fort Collins in a way it should be proud of. and, if you're wanting the best combination of attributes in your city based solely on financial aspects, there are your Colorado winners.

    Colorado News / 7 h. 49 min. ago
  • Colorado May Issue More Driver's Licenses to Undocumented Immigrants in 2018Colorado May Issue More Driver's Licenses to Undocumented Immigrants in 2018

    Before Colorado legislators repealed the state's "Show me your papers" law in 2013, which allowed peace officers to detain undocumented immigrants, thousands were detained and deported, many after being stopped for minor traffic infractions like driving without a license. The law was essentially replaced that same year with SB 251, which established a driver's license program for undocumented Coloradans under the Department of Motor Vehicles.

    Colorado News / 7 h. 49 min. ago more
  • Owner, 5 dogs escape unharmed as Boulder County crews douse house fire off FlagstaffOwner, 5 dogs escape unharmed as Boulder County crews douse house fire off Flagstaff

    A woman and her five dogs were able to escape from a house fire on a remote residential outlet off of Flagstaff Road on Monday evening.

    Colorado Daily / 8 h. 10 min. ago
  • Colorado mom pleas for help finding daughter’s killerColorado mom pleas for help finding daughter’s killer

    FORT COLLINS, Colo. — The mother of a northern Colorado woman found dead near Fort Collins last week is urging anyone with any information at all about her recent whereabouts or what happened to come forward. The body of 41-year-old Kimberlee Graves was found in Lory State Park on Jan. 9. Her death has been ruled a homicide, but investigators have not said how she was killed. E.C. Waller told KUSA-TV that Graves had two children, a 16-year-old daughter and a 7-year-old son, and was beautiful inside and out. Graves was last seen at her home the night of Dec. 4. Her home was later found to be ransacked and her car was eventually found abandoned in a parking lot. Related Articles Federal Heights woman charged with murder after allegedly killing her dad and encasing his body in concrete Hearing for teen accused of killing Kiaya Campbell closed to public, media 38 homicides make 2017 the second deadliest in El Paso County history Teen will spend 5 years in youth corrections for killing 16-year-old at Thornton homecoming party Puerto Rico fears post-Maria murder surge: 11 days, 32 slain Police say that someone had been using her car for several days before it was found.

    Denver Post: Crime / 8 h. 46 min. ago more
  • Colorado Mom Pleas for Help Finding Daughter's Killer - U.S. News & World ReportColorado Mom Pleas for Help Finding Daughter's Killer - U.S. News & World Report

    Colorado Mom Pleas for Help Finding Daughter's KillerU.S. News & World ReportThe mother of a northern Colorado woman found dead near Fort Collins last week is urging anyone with any information at all about her whereabouts or what happened to come forward. Jan. 16, 2018, at 10:40 a.m.. Colorado Mom Pleas for Help Finding ...and more »

    Google News / 9 h. 12 min. ago more
  • Colorado skier numbers down amid warm, dry winter - Washington PostColorado skier numbers down amid warm, dry winter - Washington Post

    Colorado skier numbers down amid warm, dry winterWashington PostASPEN, Colo. — Early season visits to Colorado ski resorts are down between 11 and 13 percent compared with last year because of low snow conditions, operators reported. Colorado Ski Country USA, which represents 23 resorts, recorded 13 percent fewer ...and more »

    Google News / 9 h. 14 min. ago
  • Colorado skier numbers down amid warm, dry winterColorado skier numbers down amid warm, dry winter

    Colorado ski resorts say early season visits are down between 11 and 13 percent compared with last year because of low snow conditions

    ABCNews.com / 9 h. 19 min. ago
  • Colorado May Issue More Driver's Licenses to Undocumented Immigrants in 2018 - WestwordColorado May Issue More Driver's Licenses to Undocumented Immigrants in 2018 - Westword

    WestwordColorado May Issue More Driver's Licenses to Undocumented Immigrants in 2018WestwordBefore Colorado legislators repealed the state's "Show me your papers" law in 2013, which allowed peace officers to detain undocumented immigrants, thousands were detained and deported, many after being stopped for minor traffic infractions like ...

    Google News / 9 h. 20 min. ago more
  • Colorado Springs man removed from sex offender registry in unusual caseColorado Springs man removed from sex offender registry in unusual case

    For more than a decade, David felt “like trash” having to register as a sex offender because he had consensual sex with his girlfriend when they were both minors. Now, with the help of a Colorado Springs attorney, those days are behind him. He was officially removed from the registry Jan. 2. “Now I feel like everybody else,” David said. The Gazette agreed to use only his first name to protect his identity. David previously shared his struggle as a registered sex offender for a Gazette story about the impact the registry has on offenders. At the time, a U.S. district judge had ruled the Colorado Sex Offender Registration Act unconstitutional. State Attorney General Cynthia Coffman is appealing that ruling, arguing that the registry protects the public. Related ArticlesJanuary 8, 2018 Fort Collins man pleads guilty to murder of woman whose body was found in lake January 2, 2018 Former Grandview High School security guard pleads guilty to sexual exploitation of a child December 18, 2017 Registered sex offender posing as Good Samaritan allegedly rapes Boulder woman David offered his story as proof of how the registry can do more harm than good. He described the struggle he faced finding a place to live, earning a living, falling in love and starting a family because of the label. Read the full story on Gazette.com.

    Denver Post: Crime / 10 h. ago more
  • Fierce flu season estimated to cost employers $9 billion in lost productivityFierce flu season estimated to cost employers $9 billion in lost productivity

    Sick employees could wind up costing employers $9 billion in lost productivity because of sick days related to the flu, according to Challenger, Gray & Christmas, Inc., an executive coaching firm that crunched the stats.

    DailyCamera.com / 10 h. 32 min. ago
  • Loveland police arrest thieves, return stolen Pomeranian puppy to pet storeLoveland police arrest thieves, return stolen Pomeranian puppy to pet store

    Jenny Sparks, Reporter-HeraldMark Aine, who owns Town and Country Pet Center with his wife Sharon Aine, visits with puppies Friday at the shop in downtown Loveland. Two men broke into the store early Friday morning and stole a Pomeranian puppy that was in the cage holding the puppies that Aine is visiting. Loveland police have arrested two men and safely returned a Pomeranian puppy stolen from a Loveland pet store. The 9-week-old puppy was taken early Friday when two men broke through a wall into Town and Country Pet Center. Store owner Mark Aine said the puppy was worth about $1,500. The theft was captured on the pet store’s surveillance video and images of the thieves were widely shared in the Loveland area. Around 4 a.m. Sunday, a caller alerted police that two suspicious men with a Pomeranian puppy were at the Loveland Walmart Supercenter, 250 W. 65th St., by a caller. Police arrested the men and returned the puppy, who was in good health, to the pet store owners. Related ArticlesJanuary 15, 2018 Thieves rip ATM out of ground in Colorado Springs using stolen front-end loader January 14, 2018 Crimes against homeless people up 42 percent in Denver and suburban cops say that’s pushing transients into their towns January 12, 2018 Thieves break in to Loveland pet store, steal Pomeranian puppy January 12, 2018 Phone open to Facebook profile leads Greeley cops to car-theft suspect January 11, 2018 Postal inspectors nab alleged Grinch for stealing mail in Colorado Springs Read more on Reporter-Herald.com.

    Denver Post: Crime / 10 h. 40 min. ago more
  • Second boarder comes forward to take blame for collision on Aspen MountainSecond boarder comes forward to take blame for collision on Aspen Mountain

    A second snowboarder stepped forward Tuesday morning to take blame for a collision last week on Aspen Mountain, saying he, not his friend, was the one who crashed into a tourist. Connor Marx, 26, of Aspen called The Aspen Times on Tuesday and confessed to being the person who hit a 56-year-old skier from Illinois on Thursday afternoon. “I want to set it straight and make sure people know (Michael McKiernan) didn’t do that,” Marx said. “I want to come forward so he doesn’t take the fall.” As of Tuesday morning, Marx had not gone to the Aspen Police department. McKiernan denied hitting the skier, saying he went around the man who was already on the ground when he reached him, according to police reports. According to police, McKiernan got into altercations with two Aspen Skiing Co. employees who confronted him at base area and McKiernan was charged with disorderly conduct. “McKiernan was adamant that he did not hit the male … but rather the male was already on the ground when McKiernan passed him,” according to the police report. McKiernan, 24, was identified by at least three witnesses on the ski hill and at the base of the gondola as the person who hit the skier, according to police reports. Related ArticlesJanuary 7, 2018 Injured Eldora Mountain skier flown to hospital December 30, 2017 Loveland Ski Area employee who died on the job was a father who recently returned to Colorado December 29, 2017 Loveland Ski Area employee’s death unrelated to chairlift, state safety inspectors say A 70-year-old Aspen Skiing Co. instructor, who told police he witnessed the incident from the base, confronted McKiernan after the incident, and the two men allegedly engaged in a shoving match near the base of the Silver Queen Gondola. McKiernan also allegedly threw punches at another Skico employee who attempted to pull his ski pass, according to police reports. Editor’s note: This story and headline have been updated after The Aspen Times received a phone call Tuesday morning from a local man who said he was the snowboarder involved in the incident. Read the full story on Aspen Times.

    Denver Post: Crime / 11 h. 26 min. ago more
  • Reader: Keep our airspace openReader: Keep our airspace open

    The Greeley-Weld County Airport plays an important role in our community. Local doctors - including cardiologists and other specialists - fly from our airport to eastern Colorado, southern Nebraska and western Kansas to provide medical services to patients in rural communities who would otherwise be forced to drive hours to see a specialist.

    Colorado News / 12 h. 34 min. ago more
  • Colorado Springs superintendents revising state's school funding formulaColorado Springs superintendents revising state's school funding formula

    The way Colorado public schools are funded under a nearly quarter-century-old formula is no longer fair, say Pikes Peak region superintendents, who are in a grassroots effort to modernize the Public School Finance Act of 1994. "Some districts are winners, and some are losers right now," said Grant Schmidt, superintendent of Hanover School District 28, a small rural district southeast of Colorado Springs.

    Colorado News / 17 h. 6 min. ago more
  • Property owners can look up their Boulder County tax bills onlineProperty owners can look up their Boulder County tax bills online

    Owners of taxable real estate and personal property in Boulder County won't be mailed their official property tax statements until late this month, but they can go online now to look up what's coming due, County Treasurer Paul Weissmann announced.

    ColoradoHometownWeekly.com / 19 h. 47 min. ago
  • Food trucks could soon serve outside Louisville recreation centerFood trucks could soon serve outside Louisville recreation center

    Louisville residents with a taste for some eats served up on four wheels could soon find themselves with more places to dine.

    ColoradoHometownWeekly.com / 19 h. 49 min. ago
  • Blue few: Boulder County facing police officer shortageBlue few: Boulder County facing police officer shortage

    Law enforcement agencies in Boulder County are having trouble finding officers, a problem departments across the country are facing in the wake of more jobs in the private sector and increasing fears about the safety of police work.

    Colorado Daily / 19 h. 53 min. ago
  • New anti-fracking group buds in Lafayette, adding to list of local activistsNew anti-fracking group buds in Lafayette, adding to list of local activists

    Some parents in Lafayette have formalized as "Together Against Neighborhood Drilling" to fight Extraction Oil & Gas Inc.'s proposal to plant a large-scale development in open space behind an elementary school.

    ColoradoHometownWeekly.com / 19 h. 58 min. ago
  • NFRMPO Elects New Chair and Vice Chair for 2018NFRMPO Elects New Chair and Vice Chair for 2018

    Fort Collins, Colorado - The North Front Range Metropolitan Planning Organization Council, the lead planning organization for transportation and air quality in Northern Colorado, has elected a new Chair and Vice Chair for 2018.

    Colorado News / 21 h. 20 min. ago
  • Loveland police safely return Pomeranian to pet store ownersLoveland police safely return Pomeranian to pet store owners

    A puppy stolen from a Loveland pet shop early Friday morning has been safely returned to its owners, the Loveland Police Department announced on its Facebook page over the weekend.

    DailyCamera.com / 21 h. 26 min. ago
  • Woman killed in Boulder Canyon crash ID'd as CU lacrosse player Julia Sarcona Woman killed in Boulder Canyon crash ID'd as CU lacrosse player Julia Sarcona

    The woman who died in a single-vehicle crash in Boulder Canyon over the weekend was identified today as Julia Sarcona, a University of Colorado student and a member of the Buffs' lacrosse team.

    Colorado Daily / 21 h. 58 min. ago
  • Boulder County Coroner Emma Hall to run for re-electionBoulder County Coroner Emma Hall to run for re-election

    Boulder County Coroner Emma Hall will run for a third and final term this November, she announced on Monday.

    ColoradoHometownWeekly.com / 22 h. 54 min. ago
  • MacKinnon helps Avs beat Ducks 3-1 for 7th straight winMacKinnon helps Avs beat Ducks 3-1 for 7th straight win

    Nathan MacKinnon kept up his torrid home scoring with a goal, Jonathan Bernier stopped 33 shots and the Colorado Avalanche beat the Anaheim Ducks 3-1 for their seventh straight win

    ABCNews.com / 1 d. 1 h. 14 min. ago
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  • Palmer Ridge quarterback Ty Evans commits to Colorado BuffaloesPalmer Ridge quarterback Ty Evans commits to Colorado Buffaloes

    Palmer Ridge quarterback Ty Evans verbally committed to Colorado on Monday. The junior is one of the nation’s top-rated players at his position in the Class of 2019. The decision, Evans said, is fueled by his desire to contribute to “the rise” of a program he’s loved since childhood. “I remember as a little kid going to CU camps, and one specific time, we were walking out of Folsom after playing a game of ultimate football there and I looked at my dad and said, ‘This is where I want to play,’ ” Evans said. “I was maybe seven or eight years old, but that was a memory from little Ty telling me that this is the right move.” Evans, 6-foot-3, 190 pounds, threw for 3,627 yards and 42 touchdowns this past fall while leading Palmer Ridge to an undefeated season and the Class 3A state championship, the first in program history. His performance led to multiple honors — including being named state’s Gatorade Player of the Year as well as selection to The Denver Post All-Colorado team. “Winning that state championship was the happiest day of my life,” Evans said. “Getting the personal accolades is awesome — but that title meant so much more than all my accolades combined, because Palmer Ridge and Monument as a city as a whole, they deserved that trophy.” Originally pledged to Arkansas, Evans reopened his recruitment in November, two days after the Razorbacks fired coach Bret Bielema. That move, coupled with the Buffaloes’ hiring of Kurt Roper as their new quarterbacks coach Jan. 3 — the same guy who offered Evans a scholarship while working on the South Carolina staff last fall — led the 17-year-old to believe Boulder is the best place for him. Related Articles CU Buffs football taking charge recruiting in-state 2019 prospects Football nearly killed him. Then it helped save his life. Nederland considers dropping high school football program Mullen football coach Tom Thenell resigns after six seasons with the Mustangs Former ThunderRidge offensive lineman Sam Jones entering NFL draft “Everybody says don’t commit to a school because of the coaching staff, but realistically, the staff is a big part of making that decision,” Evans said. “Also, a quarterback hasn’t been drafted (out of) CU (since 1997). I do think that could change with Steven Montez because he’s a great quarterback, but I also want to be part of the rise of Colorado football in that way.” The junior noted his ability to get noticed by an array of Power 5 programs — in addition to Arkansas and South Carolina, he also had offers from Colorado State, North Carolina State, Northwestern and Kansas State — was due to the combination of the Bears’ ascension to the top of their classification last fall as well as the out-of-school training he put in with Jenkins Elite. “I came into the Jenkins Elite program with a bunch of raw talent — I could really throw the ball, because I’d always been able to — but it took me from being a good quarterback to an elite quarterback by working on my footwork, my mindset, everything,” Evans said. He plans to graduate from Palmer Ridge a semester early so he can send in his National Letter of Intent to the Buffaloes during the December early signing period next fall, which will allow him to go through spring football with CU in 2019.

    Denver Post - Douglas County / 1 d. 1 h. 26 min. ago more
  • Is It Illegal to Warm Up Your Car Unattended in Colorado in 2018?Is It Illegal to Warm Up Your Car Unattended in Colorado in 2018?

    The law has changed a couple of times over the last few years. So, can you 'puff' in the morning, or not? Here's what the current law - and Hickenlooper - says.

    Colorado News / 1 d. 1 h. 50 min. ago
  • Disappearing offense leaves Nuggets on the skidsDisappearing offense leaves Nuggets on the skids

    Michael Malone banned talk of the postseason from the Denver Nuggets locker room after a stunning home loss to the Atlanta Hawks last week. There doesn't seem to be a reason to welcome it back after

    Big News Network.com / 1 d. 2 h. 57 min. ago
  • California tragedy a reminder of Colorado's mudslide vulnerabilityCalifornia tragedy a reminder of Colorado's mudslide vulnerability

    The images coming out of Santa Barbara County last week were awful. Having already endured the largest wildfire in recorded history in California, residents then faced fast moving debris flows, with mud and boulders and trees crashing through their neighborhoods, their homes, and their lives.

    Colorado News / 1 d. 4 h. 7 min. ago
  • Commentary: Beer episode of "Top Chef" spills its chance to highlight Colorado's brew cultureCommentary: Beer episode of "Top Chef" spills its chance to highlight Colorado's brew culture

    "Top Chef" judges Tom Colicchio, far left, Graham Elliot, center left, Padma Lakshmi and guest judge, Denver restaurateur Keegan Gerhard. Bravo's award-winning "Top Chef" series picked Colorado to film its 15th season and one of the early episodes promised the show's first-ever beer garden.

    Colorado News / 1 d. 4 h. 7 min. ago
  • Listen Live: Cherry Creek at Grandview in Centennial League girls basketball on Post Preps RadioListen Live: Cherry Creek at Grandview in Centennial League girls basketball on Post Preps Radio

    Grandview girls basketball hosts Cherry Creek on Saturday at 1:30 p.m. in an early yet pivotal Centennial League showdown. The Class 5A bout will be streamed live via Post Preps Radio, as well as archived afterward on The Denver Post site. The lone in-state loss for the No. 2 Wolves (9-3, 4-0) came against No. 1 Regis Jesuit on Dec. 11, while the No. 4 Bruins’ (9-3, 4-0) only setback to a Colorado team was to No. 3 Ralston Valley on Dec. 7. Scott Hormann and Nick Vinson have the call starting at 1:25 p.m from Aurora. See the full Post Preps Radio schedule here.

    Denver Post - Arapahoe County / 1 d. 5 h. 21 min. ago more
  • Colorado ski numbers down amid warm, dry winterColorado ski numbers down amid warm, dry winter

    Wind Chill Advisory issued January 15 at 4:16AM MST expiring January 16 at 11:00AM MST in effect for: Cheyenne, Kit Carson, Yuma Winter Weather Advisory issued January 15 at 10:26AM MST expiring January 15 at 5:00PM MST in effect for: Huerfano, Las Animas, Otero, Pueblo Winter Weather Advisory issued January 15 at 9:19AM MST expiring January 15 at 1:00PM MST in effect for: Adams, Arapahoe, Boulder, Broomfield, Denver, Douglas, Elbert, Jefferson Wind Chill Advisory issued January 15 at 9:19AM MST expiring January 16 at 9:00AM MST in effect for: Logan, Phillips, Sedgwick, Washington This group of photos represents the first gallery showing snow in the mountains this year! Ski patrol is testing out fresh snow at Silverton Mountain, Arapahoe Basin is creating their snow and Telluride is enjoyed their first mountain snow of the year during a chilly weekend.

    Colorado News / 1 d. 6 h. 22 min. ago more
  • In Colorado ski country, 2018 is the year of the mountain coaster | Colorado Springs Gazette, NewsIn Colorado ski country, 2018 is the year of the mountain coaster | Colorado Springs Gazette, News

    A rider flies down the 6,280-foot long Outlaw Mountain Coaster Saturday, Dec. 9, 2017, at Steamboat Resort. The new ride next to the Christie Peak Express is the longest hillside coaster in North America.

    Colorado News / 1 d. 6 h. 22 min. ago
  • Will recess cuts boost learning? One struggling Colorado district wants to find out.Will recess cuts boost learning? One struggling Colorado district wants to find out.

    A suburban Denver school district on a state-mandated improvement plan has cut recess time for elementary students in a bid to devote more time to instruction. On a good day, elementary children in the Adams 14 district get about 15 minutes of recess at lunch time, but sometimes it’s as little as seven, according to teachers who’ve spoken out about the issue. The change, instituted at the beginning of the school year, has angered both parents and teachers who say the lack of outside playtime is stressful and unhealthy for students and has led to more behavior problems in the classroom. The reduction in recess is one of a series of controversial decisions this year in the 7,400-student district, where almost half the students are English language learners and 86 percent qualify for subsidized meals. Also contentious this year were decisions to end parent-teacher conferences and scale back a biliteracy program once envisioned as a model for other districts. Related ArticlesJanuary 15, 2018 Despite concerns, Jeffco school board agrees to spend $1 million to start funding school innovations January 15, 2018 Denver schools’ budget plan: More money for poor students, cuts to central office January 10, 2018 Enrollment at Colorado’s online, charter schools show biggest growth January 8, 2018 Low birth rates, skyrocketing housing costs shrink Denver school enrollment January 5, 2018 Proposals to raise more money for Colorado’s public schools inch closer to ballot It’s not uncommon for students in high-poverty schools like the ones in Adams 14 to get less recess compared to their more affluent peers. A 2006 report from the National Center for Education Statistics found that the students in the highest poverty elementary schools got 17 to 21 minutes of recess a day while those at schools with relatively few students from poor families got 28 to 32 minutes a day. Read the full story on Chalkbeat Colorado. Chalkbeat Colorado is a nonprofit news organization covering education issues. For more, visit chalkbeat.org/co.

    Denver Post - Adams County / 1 d. 6 h. 29 min. ago more
  • Lafayette outdoor MLK events canceled; indoor events still scheduledLafayette outdoor MLK events canceled; indoor events still scheduled

    All outdoor events related to Martin Luther King Jr. Day have been canceled in Lafayette. However, indoor events at Angevine Middle School, 1150 W. South Boulder Road, still are occurring from 11 a.m. to 12:45 p.m.

    Colorado Daily / 1 d. 6 h. 37 min. ago
  • After initial program failed, Boulder looks to give evening workers relief from high parking costsAfter initial program failed, Boulder looks to give evening workers relief from high parking costs

    Boulder plans to soon launch a program that will offer a drastically reduced rate for parking permits for the nighttime workers who make Pearl Street and the downtown business district hum.

    Colorado Daily / 1 d. 7 h. 8 min. ago
  • Martin Luther King Jr. Day events in Longmont, Lafayette and BoulderMartin Luther King Jr. Day events in Longmont, Lafayette and Boulder

    Residents can celebrate the life and work of Martin Luther King Jr. at several events throughout Longmont this weekend leading up to Monday's holiday.

    Colorado Daily / 1 d. 10 h. 7 min. ago
  • Colorado man runs Florida race with nurse who saved himColorado man runs Florida race with nurse who saved him

    A Colorado man has completed a 5-kilometer race with the nurse who helped save his life last year in the same Florida Keys competition. Bill Amirault ran with Florida nurse anesthetist Robbie Ladd in the 5K division of the Key West Half Marathon Sunday.

    Colorado News / 1 d. 11 h. 16 min. ago
  • Saskatchewan Rush remain undefeated, down Colorado Mammoth 17-12Saskatchewan Rush remain undefeated, down Colorado Mammoth 17-12

    Curtis Knight, Robert Church and Matthew Dinsdale all had hat tricks to lead the Saskatchewan Rush past the Colorado Mammoth 17-12 on Saturday night in National Lacrosse League action. Ben McIntosh, Adrian Sorichetti and Mike Messenger all struck twice for the Rush .

    Colorado News / 1 d. 11 h. 16 min. ago
  • Avalanche bring six-game win streak into game vs. DucksAvalanche bring six-game win streak into game vs. Ducks

    Nathan MacKinnon didn't think he deserved to play in the NHL All-Star Game last season. The Avalanche were the worst team in the league, but with at least one player from each club required to be on t

    Big News Network.com / 1 d. 19 h. 53 min. ago
  • Dean propels No. 14 UCLA to 93-55 win over ColoradoDean propels No. 14 UCLA to 93-55 win over Colorado

    Japreece Dean sank five 3-pointers and got a career-high 21 points to propel No. 14 UCLA to a 93-55 win over Colorado on Sunday

    ABCNews.com / 1 d. 23 h. 34 min. ago
  • With slow approach, Erie may move on broadband initiativeWith slow approach, Erie may move on broadband initiative

    After months of cautious queries and citizen outreach, Erie may soon embark on a path of its own to townwide broadband both similar and different to those proposed by its Boulder County neighbors.

    ColoradoHometownWeekly.com / 2 d. 2 h. 22 min. ago
  • $2.25M pledge to support local, low-income CU Boulder business undergraduates$2.25M pledge to support local, low-income CU Boulder business undergraduates

    A $2.25 million pledge from Boulder donors Chuck Bellock and Madeleine Morrison will support local, low-income students at the University of Colorado Leeds School of Business.

    ColoradoHometownWeekly.com / 2 d. 8 h. 13 min. ago
  • Erie election may serve as referendum on town's existential issuesErie election may serve as referendum on town's existential issues

    At least 17 Erie residents have pulled packets to potentially run for an open mayor seat and three Board of Trustees positions in the town's upcoming spring election.

    ColoradoHometownWeekly.com / 2 d. 9 h. 37 min. ago
  • Go in or walk away? Shooting that killed Douglas County deputy underscores danger officers face when confronting mental illnessGo in or walk away? Shooting that killed Douglas County deputy underscores danger officers face when confronting mental illness

    In the hours before a fatal encounter with a man in the throes of a mental crisis, Douglas County Sheriff’s Deputy Zackari Parrish listened calmly as the man’s illogical ramblings fluctuated among screams, whispers and giggles. The man bragged about his wealth, law degree and military service. He spoke about a quarrel with his lover and about robots and lasers. Parrish and his fellow deputies, having defused the situation, left without making an arrest or putting him on a mental health hold. Two hours later, the man’s agitation had escalated. The morning would end with Parrish and the man dead. Four more officers and two civilians would be wounded by gunfire. When deputies arrived at 5:17 a.m. on Dec. 31, Matthew Riehl was making loud noises and met Parrish and Deputy Taylor Davis on the landing outside his apartment. He refused to allow deputies inside or to come outside to talk to them. “Go away. Goodnight. Go away!” Riehl yelled amid his rants from behind a door he slammed shut. “Happy New Year!” “Boy, he’s manic,” Parrish told Davis as he determined they needed to take Riehl into custody on a mental health hold. Last week, Douglas County Sheriff Tony Spurlock released several hours of raw body-camera footage recorded as his deputies responded to calls at Riehl’s apartment at 3 a.m. and 5:17 a.m. The footage provides a firsthand view of how a deputy tried to handle an increasingly combative, unpredictable and argumentative person whose mind was not functioning properly. Law enforcement officers often must make quick, high-pressure assessments on how much of a public-safety threat the person poses and whether to back away or take them into custody. These encounters happen hundreds of times a year, sometimes with wildly different outcomes. Spurlock said he released the footage, in part, because there is a national crisis when it comes to mental health care, and law enforcement officers must deal with people in mental crises themselves because there aren’t enough treatment centers or other avenues for getting them help. Editor’s note: This video was edited for brevity and graphic content. “Law enforcement is doing its very best to try to deal with them during this ad hoc, emergency situation,” Spurlock said in an interview last week. “We’re doing whatever we can and that’s exactly what Deputy Parrish was trying to do. Calm him down and keep him as calm as we possibly could and get him to where we could get him to a hospital or some treatment facility.” The video footage, which often is graphic, shows how deputies interacted with Riehl and his roommate, how they approached Riehl inside his apartment, the moment he opened fire and then how deputies fled from rounds fired through a bedroom door. When deputies realized Parrish had fallen after being struck, they made multiple attempts to rescue him, but Riehl was heavily armed and had a tactical advantage from his second-story bedroom. Spurlock also said he wanted the public to see the “enormous firepower we were against” and the “number of times officers put their lives on the line to get Zack Parrish.” Policing experts have warned for years that the United States’ unwillingness to fund mental health care services is taking a toll on law enforcement, said Louis Dekmar, president of the International Association of Chiefs of Police and chief at the LaGrange Police Department in Georgia. “The public policy has been, frankly, to ignore it,” Dekmar said. “As a result, the police are left to deal with it when individuals are in crisis.” His organization conducted an analysis of 700 police shootings and found 36 percent were “suicide by cop.” Dekmar also referenced a 2015 Washington Post report on fatal police shootings that found a quarter of the 462 people killed during the first six months of that year were mentally ill. “What is frustrating is before that fatal encounter officers have interacted with these individuals two, three, five times and sometimes have even taken them to a hospital for treatment,” Dekmar said. “It’s a significant officer-safety issue. It’s a community-safety issue. And it’s a safety issue for the people who are suffering.” Indeed, Douglas County sheriff’s deputies had made repeated trips to visit Riehl during the weeks before the shooting. Those visits included the office’s community response team, which has mental health professionals working hand-in-hand with deputies. The sheriff’s office said the Riehl family had declined services. The team has made more than 500 calls. None had resulted in gunfire until New Year’s Eve, Spurlock said. “Unfortunately, in this case it went violent,” Spurlock said. “And then we switched gears. Once he went violent on us, it was too late to go back and try to help him. “ The first call Riehl called 911 at 3 a.m. on Dec. 31 to report a domestic assault. As Parrish quietly talked to the roommate inside, another deputy questioned Riehl — who was becoming increasingly louder — outside. Parrish asked the roommate why Riehl would be so upset. It’s the first indication that Parrish had detected a mental health issue. “Is he on anything?” Parrish asked. “Does he have any mental disabilities?” The roommate answered that he wasn’t aware of anything. Just as Parrish was about to wrap up the call, Riehl, who was outside with another deputy, began shouting, “Assault! Assault! Assault! Rape! Rape!” That deputy had his hand pressing on Riehl’s chest. Parrish asked the roommate a second time if he knew whether Riehl had a mental illness diagnosis. “It sounds like he might have some mental issues,” Parrish said. “A mental diagnosis. I don’t know if you can encourage him to have that checked out. But obviously not tonight.” Throughout the encounter, Parrish asked multiple questions. He asked Riehl about his sexual relationship with his roommate, his employment, his education, his money situation. He listened as Riehl talked about the conflict with his roommate, people smoking marijuana outside and how he hit his roommate in the chest with a laser. “The reason we ask these hard questions that are tough to answer is we want to make sure you’re OK,” Parrish said. Parrish was using his training to figure out just where Riehl was mentally. Related ArticlesJanuary 8, 2018 Slain Douglas County deputy was trying to take shooter into custody on mental health hold January 6, 2018 Worrisome emails weren’t enough to charge Matthew Riehl prior to Douglas County shooting, prosecutors say January 9, 2018 Douglas County gunman used four weapons against deputies, SWAT team in New Year’s Eve shooting December 31, 2017 Gunman ambushed deputies in deadly Douglas County shooting; 1 deputy dead, 6 people wounded While policing and mental health experts said they did not want to comment specifically about the Douglas County case, multiple people interviewed said officers responding to mental health calls listen to a person’s words, observe their mannerisms and quickly try to assess the situation. “All of our training is basically decisionmaking,” said Sgt. John Wilton, who coordinates crisis intervention training at the Aurora Police Department. “What’s the safest outcome for the greatest number of people on this call?” After the first call, Parrish and his colleagues determined no crime had been committed and Riehl’s behavior did not meet the requirements under Colorado state law to take him into custody for mental health treatment. The second call By the time Parrish, Davis and the other deputies returned to Riehl’s apartment at 5:17 a.m., it was clear his agitation had escalated. Unpredictability is a hallmark of extreme mental illness, experts said. Capt. Chris Juul, a district executive officer at the Aurora Police Department and former academy instructor, said people with mental instability have highs and lows. Drug use and alcohol also can change the dynamics. “The way I dealt with him last time may not work next time,” Juul said. Parrish and his colleagues had seen enough that night to determine that Riehl needed medical treatment. “He’s having a manic episode,” Parrish said before telling two other deputies that they needed to “take him.” While Parrish determined Riehl was having a manic episode, mental health professionals said it would be impossible to offer a diagnosis based on a video. Riehl’s family previously had told law enforcement in Wyoming that he suffered from bipolar disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder. A person experiencing a manic episode can be irritable or agitated for several days. Their behavior is hyper and excitable. They have feelings of grandiosity and no need for sleep, said Debra Boeldt, a psychologist at the University of Colorado Anschutz’s National Mental Health Innovation Center. “Their mind is just going all over the place and being easily distracted,” she said. To diagnose a person with bipolar disorder, though, a psychologist would interview him during a period of stability, Boeldt said. She would want to know how long the episode lasted, the person’s medical history and the harm their behavior had caused them and their family and friends. But police officers answering 911 calls in the middle of the night don’t have that amount of time to make an assessment. “Those are enormous challenges for law enforcement,” Boeldt said. “Every time they walk into these scenarios, they don’t know what they’re going to be encountering.” It is unclear whether Parrish was aware of Riehl’s recent history with Douglas County law enforcement. Information about Riehl had been shared during regular briefings, and Parrish would have had access to that information, Spurlock said. But the sheriff was uncertain about what Parrish knew. Parrish and his fellow deputies were concerned about guns. Riehl made at least one reference to having them, and, on the second call, deputies positioned themselves outside the apartment to prepare for the possibility. They wore ballistic vests, and Davis carried a shield. But they would not have known just how much firepower Riehl had. He had 11 functional guns in the apartment and used four — an M16, an M4, a shotgun and a Glock pistol — during the shootout, Spurlock said. That’s the risk law enforcement officers take every day, multiple experts said. “There’s so many variables in each one of these calls,” said Dekmar of the chief’s association. Those variables include the risk to the person who is sick, the officers involved and the general public, Wilton said. Officers must consider potential scenarios where a person could harm himself and others. In Riehl’s case, would he have decided to take his guns to his lover’s workplace and start shooting because he was the focus of Riehl’s anger? Or would he have gone to sleep? Before deputies tried to take Riehl into custody, they spent several minutes discussing a plan. Four deputies and a sergeant went inside. They used a key to enter but had to kick and push through a barricade of junk piled in the apartment. Within less than a minute, Riehl blasted shots through his bedroom door. Parrish, Davis, Doyle and Deputy Jeff Pelle were shot. Riehl later would be killed by a SWAT unit sent to rescue Parrish. The case will be investigated and studied by multiple agencies. But at the end of the day, Spurlock said he can’t guarantee his deputies won’t face a similar situation again, especially if mental illness continues to be ignored. “They did every thing they were supposed to do,” Spurlock said. “They followed all of the common procedures to deal with a mental health patient and then it went violent.” Helen H. Richardson, The Denver PostElizabeth police officer Sean Bigler, middle, gets a hug from a fellow officer during a candle light vigil for her their friend and fellow officer Douglas County deputy sheriff Zackari Parrish at Mission Hills church on Jan. 1, 2018 in Littleton. Helen H. Richardson, The Denver PostOfficers and friends of slain Douglas County deputy sheriff Zackari Parrish hug one another during a candlelight vigil at Mission Hills church on Jan. 1, 2018 in Littleton.Helen H. Richardson, The Denver PostElizabeth police officer Sean Bigler, middle, cries with his wife and fellow officers by his side during a candle light vigil for his friend and fellow officer Douglas County deputy sheriff Zackari Parrish at Mission Hills church on Jan. 1, 2018 in Littleton.Helen H. Richardson, The Denver PostGracie Parrish, middle, holding her daughter Evie, rests her head in her hands, as she is overcome with emotion during a candlelight vigil for her slain husband Douglas County deputy sheriff Zackari Parrish at Mission Hills church on Jan. 1, 2018 in Littleton. Helen H. Richardson, The Denver PostDouglas county sheriff deputies arrive for a candlelight vigil for slain Douglas County deputy sheriff Zackari Parrish at Mission Hills church on Jan. 1, 2018 in Littleton. Helen H. Richardson, The Denver PostVolunteer Kim Lundquist, left, hands out candles before a candlelight vigil for slain Douglas County deputy sheriff Zackari Parrish at Mission Hills church on Jan. 1, 2018 in Littleton.Helen H. Richardson, The Denver PostA Castle Rock police officer, wearing black over his badge, arrives for a candlelight vigil for slain Douglas County deputy sheriff Zackari Parrish at Mission Hills church on Jan. 1, 2018 in Littleton.Helen H. Richardson, The Denver PostA makeshift memorial has started as people leave flowers on a police cruiser outside of the Douglas County Sheriff Substation for Deputy sheriff Zackari Parrish Parrish on Jan. 1, 2018 in Highlands Ranch. Helen H. Richardson, The Denver PostPeople leave flowers on a police cruiser outside of the Douglas County Sheriff Substation for Deputy sheriff Zackari Parrish on Jan. 1, 2018 in Highlands Ranch. Parrish, 29, killed when deputies responded to a domestic disturbance at Copper Canyon apartment complex. Helen H. Richardson, The Denver PostPeople embrace after leaving flowers on a police cruiser outside of the Douglas County Sheriff Substation for Deputy sheriff Zackari Parrish on Jan. 1, 2018 in Highlands Ranch. Helen H. Richardson, The Denver PostNeighbors of Deputy Zackari Parrish placed blue ribbons on trees in honor of him on Dec. 31, 2017 in Highlands Ranch. Helen H. Richardson, The Denver PostSheriff deputies put up police tape around the scene of an early morning shootout that led to the death of a Douglas County sheriff deputy on Dec. 31, 2017 in Highlands Ranch. Joe Amon, The Denver PostA gunman killed one Douglas County deputy and wounded four others during an early morning ambush as they responded to a domestic disturbance call at a Highlands Ranch apartment complex Dec. 31, 2017.Helen H. Richardson, The Denver PostPolice investigate the scene of an early morning shootout that led to the death of a Douglas County sheriff deputy on Dec. 31, 2017 in Highlands Ranch. Helen H. Richardson, The Denver PostA tow truck driver secures the suspect's vehicle to his truck as police continue to investigate the scene of an early morning shootout that led to the death of a Douglas County sheriff deputy on Dec. 31, 2017 in Highlands Ranch. Deputy Zackari Parrish, 29, was killed and four other deputies were wounded in what police described as an ambush when deputies responded to a domestic disturbance at Copper Canyon Apartment complex at 3401 E. County Line Road. Helen H. Richardson, The Denver PostPolice investigate the scene of an early morning shootout that led to the death of a Douglas County sheriff deputy on Dec. 31, 2017 in Highlands Ranch. Deputy Zackari Parrish, 29, was killed and four other deputies were wounded in what police described as an ambush when deputies responded to a domestic disturbance at Copper Canyon Apartment complex at 3401 E. County Line Road. Helen H. Richardson, The Denver PostPolice investigate the scene of an early morning shootout that led to the death of a Douglas County sheriff deputy on Dec. 31, 2017 in Highlands Ranch. Helen H. Richardson, The Denver PostPolice investigate the scene of an early morning shootout that led to the death of a Douglas County sheriff deputy on Dec. 31, 2017 in Highlands Ranch. Helen H. Richardson, The Denver PostPolice investigate the scene of an early morning shootout that led to the death of a Douglas County sheriff deputy on Dec. 31, 2017 in Highlands Ranch. Joe Amon, The Denver PostA gunman killed one Douglas County deputy and wounded four others during an early morning ambush as they responded to a domestic disturbance call at a Highlands Ranch apartment complex Dec. 31, 2017.Joe Amon, The Denver PostA gunman killed one Douglas County deputy and wounded four others during an early morning ambush as they responded to a domestic disturbance call at a Highlands Ranch apartment complex Dec. 31, 2017.Helen H. Richardson, The Denver PostPolice investigate the scene of an early morning shootout that led to the death of a Douglas County sheriff deputy on Dec. 31, 2017 in Highlands Ranch. Deputy Zackari Parrish, 29, was killed and four other deputies were wounded in what police described as an ambush when deputies responded to a domestic disturbance at Copper Canyon Apartment complex at 3401 E. County Line Road. The gunman used a rifle and fired at least 100 rounds at the deputies. The gunman was killed in the shootout with law enforcement officers. Parrish is survived by a wife and two children. He had been a deputy for only 7 months. The other injured officers are Dep. Mike Doyle, 28, Dep. Taylor Davis, 30 and Dep. Jeffrey Pelle, 32. Castle Rock police officer Tom O'Donnell, 41 was also injured. All are listed as stable at area hospitals.Joe Amon, The Denver PostA gunman killed one Douglas County deputy and wounded four others during an early morning ambush as they responded to a domestic disturbance call at a Highlands Ranch apartment complex. Dec. 31, 2017 in Denver.Joe Amon, The Denver PostA gunman killed one Douglas County deputy and wounded four others during an early morning ambush as they responded to a domestic disturbance call at a Highlands Ranch apartment complex Dec. 31, 2017.John Leyba, The Denver PostPolice officers line up their patrol cars outside of Littleton Adventist Hospital for a procession honoring an officer who was fatally wounded in a domestic incident in a Highlands Ranch apartment complex on Sunday, Dec. 31, 2017. John Leyba, The Denver PostEmergency personnel shield the cameras with a white sheet as they load fallen officer who was shot and killed during a domestic violence call in a Highlands Ranch apartment complex early Sunday. Various police agencies lined up for a procession for fallen officer on Dec. 31, 2017 in Littleton.John Leyba, The Denver PostA bystander stands on the side of the road on S. Broadway holding an American flag as a procession leaves Littleton Hospital with fallen officer who was shot and killed during a domestic violence call in a Highlands Ranch apartment complex early Sunday. Various police agencies lined up for the procession on Dec. 31, 2017 in Littleton.John Leyba, The Denver PostA hearse arrives at Littleton Hospital as officers from various police agencies line up for a procession for fallen officer on Dec. 31, 2017 in Littleton. One Douglas County deputy died and four more wounded along with two civilians Sunday morning at a Highlands Ranch apartment complex.Show Caption of Expand

    Denver Post - Douglas County / 2 d. 9 h. 59 min. ago more
  • Suburbs north of Denver have “come of age” with explosive growth along I-25 corridorSuburbs north of Denver have “come of age” with explosive growth along I-25 corridor

    City leaders in Thornton last week signed off on a $3.75 million incentive package for Topgolf to build one of its sprawling dining and golf entertainment venues in the city. The issue generated no discussion in council chambers and wrapped up in less than five minutes. Yet Tuesday’s vote was a significant part of a growing trend in Denver’s north suburbs: Its expanding population base is finally attracting regional draws such as Topgolf, Ikea, Cabela’s and a high-end outlet mall — the type of amenities that to date have largely clustered around affluent communities south of Denver. “Five or 10 years ago, you would have only seen these types of things in the south metro,” said John Cody, Thornton’s economic development director. “The north I-25 corridor has come of age.” Cody’s counterpart in Broomfield, Bo Martinez, describes the Interstate 25 corridor north of Denver as “the next urban frontier.” That’s especially true, he said, at the nexus of Colorado 7 and I-25, where Broomfield controls three of the interchange’s four corners. “We see this as the next regional employment center,” Martinez said. Ikea, the massive Swedish furniture outlet, plans to break ground this spring on a 400,000-square-foot store at the northwest corner of the interchange while, next door, Children’s Hospital Colorado is undergoing a 140,000-square-foot expansion effort. Directly west of the interchange, the 1,100-acre North Park development in Broomfield is all about available land, “most of it in large lots that provide opportunities for over 30 million square feet of commercial mixed-used development, regional employment, shopping, restaurants and entertainment districts,”Martinez said. Last year, the Butterfly Pavilion said it would pull up stakes from its longtime Westminster home to move to a twice-as-large facility in North Park, with an opening date in Broomfield set for 2021. J.J. Ament, CEO of the Metro Denver Economic Development Corporation, said there’s no doubt that more land is available in the north suburbs of Denver than to the south. And that, he said, will have definite repercussions on the areas’ growth prospects over the next few years. Related ArticlesJanuary 9, 2018 Denver has a lot of retail development on deck in 2018, but economy showing signs of cooling December 28, 2017 Denver International Airport in 2017: Busiest. Year. Ever. December 26, 2017 Why people really want to move to Idaho but are fleeing its neighbor, Wyoming December 22, 2017 Record number of Coloradans are traveling this holiday season December 21, 2017 “Growing like a weed,” Douglas County will create 13 new voting precincts for next year’s election A fourth-quarter 2017 report from commercial real estate brokerage CBRE calculated that while the Denver’s southern suburbs had 246,000 square feet of retail space under construction, the north side had more than 674,000 square feet getting built. “The north has the space to grow and can make land acquisitions,” Ament said. “We’re starting to see that part of the region have the success that other areas have had.” Cody said there are 1,400 acres in Thornton along the interstate that are eligible for development. The city, Colorado’s sixth largest by population, saw $350 million worth of commercial projects break ground along I-25 in 2017. Two of the bigger projects underway for Thornton in the corridor are the Denver Premium Outlets: an 80-store development that is set to open at 136th Avenue and I-25 late in 2018 and bring 800 jobs to the city, and an 855,000-square-foot Amazon fulfillment center at I-25 and 144th Avenue. Amazon’s center, scheduled to open at the end of the year, could employ 1,500 full-time workers. The population numbers help to tell the story up north, according to state demographer Elizabeth Garner. The top two metro-area counties, aside from Denver, in terms of projected raw population growth from 2015 to 2025 are north of the city — with Adams County expected to pick up 110,000 people, an increase of 22.5 percent, and Weld County expected to gain the same number of people as Adams during that period, a 39 percent increase. “There is some pressure from the north, for sure,” Garner said. Meanwhile, her office projects that Broomfield will grow by 23,143 people from 2015 to 2025. Not that the south metro area is standing still. Garner’s office projects that Arapahoe County will grow by nearly 100,000 people in that same 10-year period while Douglas County could see 60,000 more residents move in. Neil Marciniak, economic development manager for Centennial, doesn’t see the situation as north vs. south. He said metro Denver is just going through a boom phase. “What you’re actually seeing is the metro area as a whole having a strong pull for projects like these,” he said Marciniak said there’s still plenty of both commercial and residential development along I-25 south of Denver. In Centennial, home to Colorado’s first Ikea and Topgolf, the 1.8 million-square-foot Jones District is on the rise, with promises of offices, retail outlets and a hotel. Farther south, Lone Tree’s master-planned RidgeGate subdivision could add more than 10,000 housing units — many of them multifamily — around the intersection of I-25, C-470 and E-470 over the next few years. Matthew DeBartolomeis, a vice president with CBRE Retail Services in Denver, said the south metro simply got an earlier start than the north, partly spurred by the construction of C-470 and E-470 years before the north side got the Northwest Parkway and its section of E-470. “The south is more mature and (has) had more retail expansion,” DeBartolomeis said. It’s what gives the southern metro area more square footage of rentable retail space than the north — 28 million square feet vs. 23 million, according to CBRE data — but that gap will probably narrow as the north’s growth prospects outpace those of the south. Highlands Ranch is almost fully built out, and land is harder to come by and more expensive in the south than in the north. But DeBartolomeis said growth prospects for all sides of the metro area show no signs of abating at this point, so one area’s gain is not necessarily another area’s loss. “It’s been exciting to watch this all play out,” he said.

    Denver Post - Adams County / 2 d. 12 h. ago more
  • Crimes against homeless people up 42 percent in Denver and suburban cops say that’s pushing transients into their townsCrimes against homeless people up 42 percent in Denver and suburban cops say that’s pushing transients into their towns

    Denver police often order Connie Smith to pack her stuff and move along. She has been without a home for five years, and while she sometimes couch-surfs, she doesn’t flinch from spending cold nights huddled out of sight on Denver’s streets or on the banks of the South Platte River. But she’s not always safe. “After dark it is not good,” she said one recent evening on a perch overlooking a path running alongside the dark river. Sometimes the threat surrounding life on the street drives her to take shelter inside a Porta-Potty. “It is nasty,” said Smith, 45. “But I feel safe.” The number of reported crimes against homeless people in Denver climbed nearly 42 percent over a four-year period to 1,008 in 2017 even as suburban law enforcement agencies say more transients are being pushed to outlying communities by the threat of violence. Denver police say their own uniformed presence in areas where homeless people congregate results in more victims making reports. But advocates blame the increase in crime on Denver’s urban camping ban, which bars sleeping in a tent or under a blanket in public spaces. As camps are broken up, the advocates say, homeless people disperse from the safety of groups into more remote areas where they won’t be rousted by cops, but where they also are at more risk for crimes ranging from petty theft to assault. Life on the streets is always dangerous and difficult, said Chris Conner, interim director of Denver’s Road Home. “Street homelessness does not provide a safe refuge from crime, the elements and related public-health concerns,” he said. “We will continue to encourage those in need to come indoors so we can provide them with support services, connect them to housing resources when possible and support their overall well-being.” Eighty-six percent of the city’s homeless either use the shelter system or stay in transitional housing and safe havens, said Denver Human Services spokeswoman Julie Smith. But many homeless avoid the shelters, saying they are dirty, unsafe and breeding grounds for illness and bed bugs. Police enforcement of Denver’s camping ban has resulted in constant movement and greater danger for those who live on the streets, said Terese Howard, an advocate and organizer of Denver Homeless Out Loud. “When you are pushed to areas where you are not with your community, you are more in danger of having things happen to you,” she said. “The city is playing a game of Whac-A-Mole. It is arbitrary enforcement. You are not going to sweep homeless people away. They are living from one block to another, to different cities and back to the river.” Law enforcement representatives in Lakewood, Wheat Ridge, Littleton, Englewood and other nearby areas say they have seen an increase in the number of homeless people living in their jurisdictions. “This is a statewide concern,” Wheat Ridge Police Chief Dan Brennan said. “A lot of us are dealing with a higher number of transients.” Littleton Police Cmdr. Trent Cooper said camps with multiple inhabitants have popped up on abandoned properties in the city. He recently talked to about a dozen homeless people at one campsite. All said they had come from Denver. “For the first time in my memory, we have had a couple of homeless camps where multiple people are living,” he said. He said he’s aware that homeless populations increase over time, but “cities are pushing them out.” Denver’s population has grown rapidly over the past decade, and the U.S. Census Bureau estimates that the city added 13,028 people in the year that ended July 1. How many newcomers are homeless is unknown. But there is wide agreement that the lack of affordable housing in the city is exacerbating homelessness. The Metro Denver Homeless Initiative — which counts homeless people in the seven counties that make up the Denver metro area on one night each year, a count known as the point-in-time survey — found that the number of homeless in Denver dropped to 3,336 in 2017 from 3,631 the year before. However, the survey found the number of people considered chronically homeless increased to 712 from 578. The chronically homeless, according to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development,  are those living in a place not meant for human habitation, a safe haven or an emergency shelter continuously for at least a year or on at least four separate occasions in the past three years where the combined length of time homeless is at least a year. Also, the chronically homeless each have a disability. The point-in-time survey found that during the same period, Boulder County, where the city of Boulder has a tough camping ban and an aggressive program to get people into transitional housing, experienced a drop in the homeless population to 600 in 2017 from 726 in 2016. Numbers also fell in Adams County, to 157 from 200, and Jefferson County, to 395 from 439. During the same period, the number of homeless rose in Arapahoe County, to 562 from 456, with the number of chronically homeless jumping to 160 from 66. In Douglas County, the homeless number jumped to 45 from two, and in Broomfield County, the number rose to 22 from 13. Twenty-five of Colorado’s 76 largest cities have citywide camping bans and 17 others ban camping in certain places, primarily parks, according to a 2016 study the Sturm College of Law Homeless Advocacy Policy Project at the University of Denver. The point-in-time survey doesn’t account for all of the metro area’s homeless, and many believe the number is much higher than the 5,116 homeless individuals counted in the seven-county metro area on Jan. 30. While the number of homeless people in Wheat Ridge has grown, Brennan is not sure that a tough camping ban is forcing a migration from Denver. Related ArticlesJanuary 13, 2018 Durango woman brings healing touch to veterans, others January 12, 2018 Fires from homeless camps testing west-side Colorado Springs residents’ tolerance January 11, 2018 Colorado homelessness programs to receive $30.6 million in federal grants January 9, 2018 $120 million plan for giant affordable housing project in Lakewood raises questions, concerns January 7, 2018 Tiny home village moves to new location: “It’s costing us about $25,000 and it is displacing villagers” “I can tell you what some of the homeless have told us: The reason they’re coming to the suburbs is not because Denver is pushing them out,” Brennan said. “They have been victims of crime down there, sometimes from other homeless people.” Mike Sandgren, who works with homeless people in Englewood, said he hears similar comments about Denver. “Based on their experience, Englewood is preferable to Denver,” said Sandgren, who coordinates Wellspring Church’s Compassion Ministry in Englewood. “The crowd isn’t as rough.” In 2013, Denver Homeless Out Loud questioned those who regularly slept in Denver’s downtown area about why they chose to bed down on the 16th Street Mall or other public spaces. Most who answered the question said they felt “these areas were safe and well-lit.” “One of the reasons that people stay in groups is because of safety,” said Raymond Lyall, who is with Denver Homeless Out Loud. Camps that grew up around shelters such as Samaritan House and the Denver Rescue Mission offer protection and access to services, he said. Those camps and other places where the homeless congregate have been the focus of increased police attention and a sustained camping ban enforcement effort that began on March 8, 2016, outside the Samaritan House, which is on Park Avenue West. “The cops move us at least a few times a day,” said Tina Marie, a 29-year-old with a pixie’s grin. “We just go to another spot where they told us to leave.” The homeless and their advocates say the camping ban has resulted in people traveling alone to out-of-the-way locations where isolation increases the chance they will be victimized. “For people alone, there are serious risks,” Homeless Out Loud’s Howard said. Many have made their way into alleys, “where there is tremendous abuse that goes on,” or to the banks of the South Platte, she said. The number of crimes involving a homeless victim has been rising in Denver, according to the Denver Police Department. In 2014, there were 712. The number climbed to 950 in 2015 and to 1,068 in 2016. And between Jan. 1 and Dec. 27, 1,008 crimes involved homeless victims. The number of crimes reported prior to 2014 — 428 in 2012 and 483 in 2013 — is much lower due to the department’s switch to an electronic data exchange platform that counts incidents that previously weren’t recorded. Denver Police Cmdr. Ron Saunier said there could be several reasons for the increase. Chief among them is a greater police presence around shelters and other places where the homeless gather. The police data shows the largest numbers of crimes are reported near the Samaritan House and at Civic Center park and other places where the homeless congregate. “We put extra patrol where crimes are happening,” Saunier said. Denver has also seen a jump in violent crime associated with heroin and methamphetamine use, he said. And like others interviewed for this article, he thinks there is an increasing number of homeless people in the metro area. Since 2016, the Salvation Army’s homeless-outreach team has noted more crimes against transients, most of them committed by other homeless people, said Anthony Williams, the charity’s outreach program supervisor. As police broke up bigger camps, many of the occupants filtered to more remote areas, including the green space that lines the South Platte. “There were more moving down to the river when they dismantled the camps and there was an uptick (in criminal activity) along the Platte,” Williams said. Lamar Harvey, 23, left the streets of downtown Denver about three months ago and moved to the northside, where he often stays at Bernabe “Indio” Franco Park, which is at West 37th Avenue and Lipan Street. “I was downtown, but it got rough,” Harvey said. “People were stealing my stuff. They took my sleeping bag.” Pointing to a strip of dirt beneath low-hanging bushes in the park, he said, “This is my bed area. I keep my clothes hidden in the bushes.” As he spoke, flames shot into the air from the fire that he and a friend started in a park barbecue grill. “I know downtown is rough,” Williams told him, adding that Harvey would have more access to storage space for his belongings and a host of services if he went to the Salvation Army. A few moments later, a fire truck rolled up and firefighters doused the flames. It was the second time that evening they extinguished the blazing grill. “You guys are killing us,” a firefighter said. “We’ve got much better things to do than this.” When they left, Harvey said he would continue to stay in the area of the park and maybe move to a shelter when cold weather settled in. “But probably no more fires,” he said.

    Denver Post - Adams County / 2 d. 17 h. 43 min. ago more
  • Kerfoot scores, assists on winner as Avs beat Stars 4-1Kerfoot scores, assists on winner as Avs beat Stars 4-1

    Alexander Kerfoot scored in the first period and assisted on Nathan MacKinnon's winner, and the Colorado Avalanche beat the Dallas Stars 4-1 for their sixth straight win

    ABCNews.com / 2 d. 18 h. 31 min. ago
  • Dallas Stars and Colorado Avalanche players scuffle during the third period of an NHL hockey game Saturday, Jan. 13, 2018, in Dallas. Colorado won 4-1. (AP Photo/Brandon Wade)Dallas Stars and Colorado Avalanche players scuffle during the third period of an NHL hockey game Saturday, Jan. 13, 2018, in Dallas. Colorado won 4-1. (AP Photo/Brandon Wade)

    Dallas Stars and Colorado Avalanche players scuffle during the third period of an NHL hockey game Saturday, Jan. 13, 2018, in Dallas. Colorado won 4-1. (AP Photo/Brandon Wade)

    ABCNews.com / 2 d. 19 h. 48 min. ago
  • Fatal crash closes lanes at Potomac and Broncos ParkwayFatal crash closes lanes at Potomac and Broncos Parkway

    Troopers Saturday night closed down lanes at the intersection of Potomac and Broncos Parkway due to a single-car crash resulting in a fatality, according to the Colorado State Patrol. The crash occurred on Potomac south of Broncos Parkway shortly after 7 p.m. There was no indication when the lanes would be re-opened, said CSP’s Twitter account.

    Denver Post - Arapahoe County / 2 d. 20 h. 11 min. ago more
  • Boulder County traffic deaths highest in at least a decadeBoulder County traffic deaths highest in at least a decade

    In 2017, Boulder County has had 30 fatal traffic crashes as of Dec. 23, surpassing last year's total of 24 and the highest of any year since at least 2004, according online Colorado Department of Transportation records.

    ColoradoHometownWeekly.com / 3 d. 2 h. 29 min. ago
  • Two injured in early morning robbery at Glendale PetSmartTwo injured in early morning robbery at Glendale PetSmart

    Two PetSmart employees were taken to a hospital early Saturday morning after they were beaten during an armed robbery inside the store. There was an armed robbery this morning at the Glendale Petsmart. Expecting police briefing soon. pic.twitter.com/xWAGHHutTG — Noelle Phillips (@Noelle_Phillips) January 13, 2018 The robbers wore masks and brandished guns, said Glendale Police Department Lt. Roy Martin. They remain at-large, he said. Police were called at 5:05 a.m. to respond to a burglary in process, Martin said. Related Articles Longmont robbery suspect arrested after driving wrong way on Diagonal Highway Naked man in Colorado Springs reports assault, lost clothing Man stabbed during Larimer home invasion robbery Greenwood Village police investigating two Saturday robberies Robbers hit five Denver-area banks over four days around the Christmas holiday The two employees — a woman and a man — were already at work preparing to open the store later in the morning, Martin said. Their conditions were unknown. The robbers fled with an undisclosed amount of cash, Martin said.

    Denver Post - Arapahoe County / 3 d. 7 h. 35 min. ago more
  • New RTD light rail line launching Sunday to boost service downtown and improve systemwide on-time performance, officials sayNew RTD light rail line launching Sunday to boost service downtown and improve systemwide on-time performance, officials say

    A new light rail line — dubbed the L-Line — launches in downtown Denver on Sunday, with transit officials touting it as a more efficient way to move passengers traveling to and from the Five Points neighborhood while also helping boost on-time performance across the Regional Transportation District’s rail system. The L-Line, which does not use new track, takes over the existing northerly segment of the D-Line, which runs from Mineral Station in Littleton to the 30th and Downing Station in Five Points. After Sunday’s launch, the D-Line will end at the 18th and Stout Station while the L-Line will cover the 1.7 miles between that station and the 30th and Downing station, with trains doing a turnaround loop through the heart of downtown Denver along Stout, Welton and 14th streets. By breaking off the northernmost segment of the D-Line and making it a standalone line, service should improve for those traveling between Five Points and the 16th Street Mall, said RTD spokeswoman Lisa Trujillo. “Currently, our D-Line trains along Welton have about an 80 percent on-time performance,” she said, noting that RTD’s light rail trains overall average a 94 percent on-time rating. “This ripples through the system — if there is a late D-Line that continues south of downtown, then other trains behind it are affected.” The L-Line will maintain 15-minute frequencies most of the day, and trains will run at the same times they do now. While the creation of the L-Line appears to be little more than a glorified name-change for a short section of the D-Line, it represents a step in a long-term plan to link Five Points to the A-Line’s 38th and Blake Station, Trujillo said. An extension of the L-Line to 38th and Blake Station — just under a mile in distance — would give residents in the neighborhood a quick and easy rail connection to Denver International Airport that doesn’t exist now. Related ArticlesJanuary 16, 2018 Colorado lawmakers on course to fix pot-tax glitch that hit RTD and led to doomed special session January 15, 2018 Anti-Trump “Sh—hole” graffiti message appears in Denver January 10, 2018 RTD names Doug Tisdale as 2018 chair of transit agency’s board of directors January 5, 2018 Fatal shooting of man at RTD by security guards justified, Denver DA rules January 3, 2018 Denver will become a Happy City with U.K. artist Stuart Semple’s first American public art exhibition “The main advantage is to provide a better destination for the northeastern end of the line and provide another connection for the Convention Center area of downtown with the airport, as well as the Five Points neighborhood,” Trujillo said. But no funding has been identified and no timeline set for that new track, which is part of RTD’s Central Rail Extension project. The project is part of the FasTracks program approved by voters in 2004. Tracy Winchester, executive director of the Five Points Business District, said she’s happy to see the L-Line finally start up, but she doesn’t want it to stop here. “It’s a move in the right direction, but we can’t lose sight of connecting to 38th and Blake,” she said. Tourism is vital to the continued vitality of Five Points, Winchester said, so allowing visitors to travel by rail from DIA down Welton Street to the Convention Center would be big for the neighborhood. “We’re having an economic renaissance,” she said.

    Denver Post - Arapahoe County / 3 d. 10 h. ago more
  • 'Huffing' being investigated in death of 31-year-old Superior woman'Huffing' being investigated in death of 31-year-old Superior woman

    Investigators are trying to determine if 'huffing' played a role in the death of a 31-year-old Superior woman after a can of compressed air was found next to her body.

    ColoradoHometownWeekly.com / 3 d. 18 h. 21 min. ago
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  • Boulder businessman Scott Roy sentenced to six months in jail for unlawful sexual contactBoulder businessman Scott Roy sentenced to six months in jail for unlawful sexual contact

    Statements from multiple women read in Boulder District Court and an arrest warrant affidavit unsealed on Friday portray Scott Roy as a man who used his status as a successful businessman to sexually abuse female employees, including two undocumented immigrants, as well as a woman to whom he misrepresented himself as a sexual healer.

    Colorado Daily / 3 d. 19 h. 37 min. ago
  • Chaparral starts Continental League hoops play with an edge en route to blowout win over Mountain VistaChaparral starts Continental League hoops play with an edge en route to blowout win over Mountain Vista

    One had to look no further than the Chaparral boys basketball twitter feed before Friday night’s battle against Mountain Vista to get a sense of the Wolverines’ focused mind-set heading into its Continental League opener. The team’s tweet that morning said, in part, “Our conference is stacked this year and every game will be a battle.” And as that tweet indicated, No. 2 Chaparral (11-3) took the court with a sense of urgency against the capable Golden Eagles (8-4), riding an 18-point first quarter advantage to a 65-51 blowout victory that sets the tone for its upcoming conference schedule. “We know where we need to be at the end of the conference, and for us to do that, there won’t be any games off in the league,” Chaparral coach Tellus Truesdale said. “Even the teams that will finish at the bottom, their records right now are 8-3, 9-2 — there’s no slouches in this league, and tonight was a great start for us.” Junior forward @Ronnie_DeGray23 talks @Chap_Hoops win over Mountain Vista tonight, room for improvement, the ultimate goal for the No. 2 Wolverines and more #copreps pic.twitter.com/pzSknxcb73 — Kyle Newman (@KyleNewmanDP) January 13, 2018 The victory provided Truesdale’s team with a definitive bounce-back win following its first loss to an in-state opponent, No. 7 George Washington on Monday, a game in which the Wolverines didn’t perform up to their potential on their home floor. “We talked after that game, because our staff didn’t think our guys were ready for a dog fight,” Truesdale said. “George Washington brought it to us, so we were prepared for tonight because we know Vista always plays hard, they’re scrappy and they’re tough to beat at their place.” Chaparral was lethal from downtown in the opening quarter, draining six 3-pointers while Mountain Vista’s only scoring production came from senior small forward Connor Staib. By half, double-digit efforts from junior shooting guard Joseph Dalton and sophomore point guard Kobe Sanders had the Wolverines at a 37-17 advantage, sucking the home momentum out of the Eagles’ Nest. Dalton and Sanders finished with 19 points apiece, while junior forward Ronnie DeGray III also had 16. Mountain Vista was paced by 25 points from Staib. Related Articles Prep Power Rankings: Week of Friday, Jan. 19 Prep basketball rundown: Notable 5A, 4A performances for the week of Jan. 13 Indiana loses former Overland prep star De’Ron Davis for season with torn Achilles tendon Weekly Colorado Preps Primer: Games, tournaments to watch for Jan. 9-13 Listen Live: Chaparral at Mountain Vista in Continental League boys basketball opener on Post Preps Radio The game was a marked difference from the teams’ last meeting, which was also a win by Chaparral, although in that contest the Golden Eagles had their way in the first half with an 11-point advantage heading into the locker room. On Friday, the Wolverines didn’t flinch throughout each surge by the Golden Eagles, showing why they are an early 5A state title contender. “We won a lot 50-50 balls, and I thought our intensity carried over into the second half,” Truesdale said. “In a league game like this you keep expecting for the other team to make runs, but we did a good job of hitting shots and continuing to play hard defensively.” Mountain Vista came out competitive in the third quarter, winning the frame by two, and proceeded to cut into the lead in the fourth. But it was not enough to overcome the large deficit to a Chaparral team well-versed in breaking presses as well as slowing the game in the halfcourt. Chaparral is next in action Tuesday against 4A No. 7 Ponderosa (10-2), while Mountain Vista looks to get back on track that same night on the road at Castle View (11-2). Replay the game via Post Preps Radio:

    Denver Post - Douglas County / 3 d. 21 h. 20 min. ago more
  • Colorado Democrats denounce Trump's comments while honoring Martin Luther King Jr. with a resolutionColorado Democrats denounce Trump's comments while honoring Martin Luther King Jr. with a resolution

    Colorado Democrats pointed to Trump's reported comments as the latest in a long line of racially tinged events since Trump took office, none more alarming than the white supremacist rally last year in Charlottesville.

    DailyCamera.com / 3 d. 22 h. 54 min. ago
  • Arapahoe County deputy guilty of DUI, weapon violation, while on dutyArapahoe County deputy guilty of DUI, weapon violation, while on duty

    An Arapahoe County Sheriff’s deputy was convicted Friday of driving under the influence of alcohol and prohibited use of a weapon, both while on duty. Jeffery Vincent, 45, will be sentenced on the misdemeanor counts on Feb. 1, according to the district attorney’s office. On Jan. 3, 2017, a fellow deputy told supervisors that he suspected Vincent was intoxicated on the job. Vincent was working at the jail, transporting inmates from the jail to the courthouse, which included a short drive on the justice campus. Jury finds Arapahoe deputy guilty of DUI while he was on duty. Release: https://t.co/UG4aIUWwWh — DA Office of 18th (@DA18th) January 12, 2018 The deputy’s suspicion was immediately investigated and Vincent was booked on the spot. Related ArticlesJanuary 14, 2018 Police: Alleged drunk teen driver rams stolen car into police cruiser in south Colorado Springs December 29, 2017 Boulder man with 8 alcohol-related convictions arrested in Longmont on suspicion of DUI Vincent remains on unpaid administrative leave with the sheriff’s office and an internal investigation is ongoing, said Audry LaCrone, a sheriff’s spokeswoman. “No one starts drinking with the idea they are going to strap on a gun … but that’s the problem with alcohol – it affects decision-making,” Chief Deputy District Attorney Brian Sugioka told the jury during closing arguments, according to a news release. “The defendant must be held accountable for that: This is a peace officer accused of being drunk on duty, carrying a weapon while drunk on duty, and transporting an inmate while drunk on duty.”

    Denver Post - Arapahoe County / 3 d. 23 h. 51 min. ago more
  • Thieves break in to Loveland pet store, steal Pomeranian puppyThieves break in to Loveland pet store, steal Pomeranian puppy

    Two men stole a Pomeranian puppy from the Town and Country Pet Center in Loveland early Friday morning in the latest break-in at the store, which has seen at least 13 thefts and burglaries since 1990.

    DailyCamera.com / 4 d. 0 h. 15 min. ago
  • Incident at homeless shelter had lasting consequences for Boulder man found dead on ChristmasIncident at homeless shelter had lasting consequences for Boulder man found dead on Christmas

    Those who knew Benjamin Harvey, the Boulder homeless man who was found dead outside on Christmas morning, are mourning the loss of a man they describe as sharp, conscientious and compassionate, and deeply troubled by alcoholism.

    Colorado Daily / 4 d. 1 h. 50 min. ago
  • Pirate radio raises its flag in Longmont — and draws high-level FCC attentionPirate radio raises its flag in Longmont — and draws high-level FCC attention

    A pirate radio signal that first shot out across Longmont's airwaves late last year has drawn an unusual, high-level scolding from the Federal Communications Commission — directed not at the illicit broadcasters, but to an online news outlet that wrote about their hijacking of an FM frequency.

    Colorado Daily / 4 d. 3 h. 42 min. ago
  • Teen will spend 5 years in youth corrections for killing 16-year-old at Thornton homecoming partyTeen will spend 5 years in youth corrections for killing 16-year-old at Thornton homecoming party

    Denver7Haley Vargaz was shot to death in Sept. 2016. A teenager who shot and killed a 16-year-old girl at a homecoming party in Thornton in 2016 on Friday was sentenced to five years in the state’s youthful offender system. Angelo Alvarez, 18, was indicted in March on one count of first-degree murder and five counts of attempted first-degree murder related to the shooting that occurred outside of a party in the 13000 block of Monaco Way in Thornton. He pleaded guilty to second-degree murder in October. Chief District Judge Patrick Murphy warned Alvarez that if he fails to comply with the strict requirements of the youth-corrections sentence, he could be sent to prison for 20 years. District Attorney Dave Young said difficulties with the case led to the plea agreement. “No one is happy with this outcome, but we have to look at what justice is in this case, and in my mind, this is justice,” Young said in a news release. “There was significant risk that the defendant could be found not guilty based on the evidence in this case. Now he must take responsibility for his actions and comply with this program. If he doesn’t, he will be spending 20 years in prison.” Related ArticlesJanuary 10, 2018 Thornton mother struggles with plea deal in daughter’s shooting death at party April 12, 2017 Teen indicted, arrested on murder charge in Thornton shooting death of 16-year-old Haley Vargaz September 22, 2016 Coroner identifies 16-year-old girl shot dead at Thornton house party According to the Adams County District Attorney, Haley Vargaz, a junior at Thornton High School, was shot in the back as she ran from the party, which went out of control after a “flurry of Facebooks posts about the event led to carloads of people showing up who were not invited.” The DA said a fistfight broke out between two groups of girls and Alvarez fired his gun into the air from the front porch of the house. Another person then fired his gun into the air, and then Alvarez fired into the crowd as the teen began running toward her car. “This is as sad and tragic a case as I have seen,” Young said in the news release. “Angelo Alvarez fired a gun into a crowd of people at a party without any thought of the consequences and Haley Vargaz was killed. This remarkable young woman had won a battle with cancer but her determination in overcoming cancer could not save her from the defendant’s bullet. The loss of Haley has devastated her family and everyone who knew her.”

    Denver Post - Adams County / 4 d. 6 h. 8 min. ago more
  • Oil and gas industry spills increased by 17 percent around Colorado last yearOil and gas industry spills increased by 17 percent around Colorado last year

    Oil and gas spills across Colorado increased in 2017 after two years of decline, with companies reporting nearly a dozen mishaps per week — including numerous leaks along pipelines and at least six cases in which hydrocarbons flowed directly into waterways. A review of the latest state data also shows 22 incidents under investigation in which gas apparently contaminated domestic water wells. The industrial spills disclosed to the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission show continuing environmental harm as the total number of active wells statewide surpassed 55,000. Oil and gas companies in 2017 produced oil and gas worth about $10.6 billion. Their operations are concentrated in Weld County, north of metro Denver, with more than 23,700 wells. Garfield County in western Colorado has more than 11,400 wells. Closer to Denver, companies have drilled about 400 wells in Boulder County and 989 in Adams County. State lawmakers created the COGCC to regulate oil and gas development while protecting people and the environment. In 2017, COGCC enforcers imposed an all-time high $7,166,851 in penalties for violations of rules. On Thursday, leaders of Conservation Colorado, one of the state’s largest environmental organizations, raised concerns that spills increasingly degrade Colorado’s land, air and water and urged lawmakers to do more to deal with worsening cumulative impacts. Companies reported 619 spills in 2017, state data show. Altogether, companies spilled more than 93,000 gallons of oil into soil, groundwater and streams. They also spilled more than 506,000 gallons of “produced water,” waste from drilling and hydraulic fracturing that emerges from deep underground and contains chemicals. That number of spills reflects a 17 percent increase above the 529 spills reported in 2016, state data show. Total annual spills remained lower than the 792 spills in 2014 and 624 in 2015. “We have concerns about any oil/produced water spill, which is why we have a regulatory system set up to ensure such spills are reported, investigated and cleaned up,” Colorado Department of Natural Resources spokesman Todd Hartman said. The volume of oil spilled each year has decreased compared with the volumes spilled between 2009 and 2013, Hartman said, adding that this happened “with thousands of additional active wells added since that time.” In at least six cases in which oil and gas spills directly contaminated rivers and streams, COGCC regulators notified Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment water quality officials. State investigations of the 22 household water wells that may have been contaminated with gas are continuing because COGCC rules require companies to take precautions (using steel casing held in place by cement), in drilling and later abandoning wells, to guard against contamination of fresh water. Some of the wells were located in agricultural parts of Weld County, according to a report provided to the water quality officials. So far, the investigations “tell us that well integrity issues do exist in certain cases and do cause thermogenic gas impacts to the aquifer,” Hartman said. “But with thousands of water wells sampled in the (Denver-Julesburg) Basin, we also know that the problem is not ubiquitous or systemic throughout the basin. These are unique circumstances that the agency takes very seriously and makes every effort to investigate and stop the source of gas and ensure that the impacted party has a reliable source of safe drinking water.” Related ArticlesJanuary 13, 2018 Could Colorado’s green energy debate go big in 2018? January 12, 2018 17 former wildlife officials urge Interior to rethink easing rules against killing birds January 12, 2018 Feeling pinched? Denver-Boulder inflation races ahead at fastest pace in a decade January 12, 2018 Denver’s Liberty Oilfield Services IPO rolls out strong January 12, 2018 Pipeline protester Red Fawn Fallis won’t get more details on FBI informant she alleges seduced her The Colorado Oil and Gas Association industry trade group did not immediately respond to requests for comment. Conservation Colorado officials said lawmakers must do more to deal with environmental harm. “The oil and gas impacts in Colorado are only getting greater. And they are not going to go away soon. There are myriad impacts. Damage to our water. Oil and gas well fragmentation of habitat. Air pollution caused by the leaking methane. Not to mention public health and safety,” said the group’s deputy director, Jessica Goad. “People don’t feel like there’s a venue where change can be made. We’ve seen the oil and gas commission struggling to determine how to fix the issues of oil and gas pipeline mapping and the leaking. And we have not made progress in the legislature. Dozens of bills have been killed in the state Senate over the last few years,” Goad said. Conservation Colorado has 36,000 members. It is focused on legislation that would require bigger buffers between industrial facilities and schools. It is also seeking to increase local control over industrial operations inside cities and increase health and safety protection for residents.

    Denver Post - Adams County / 4 d. 11 h. 30 min. ago more
  • Nighttime shutdown of I-25 ramps to C-470 will create a 4-mile detourNighttime shutdown of I-25 ramps to C-470 will create a 4-mile detour

    Merging from Interstate 25 on to C-470 will get complicated next week, as highway officials plan a complete shutdown of two off-ramps for three nights in a row at the heavily used interchange. The Colorado Department of Transportation will close the northbound and southbound I-25 ramps to westbound C-470 starting at 10 p.m. Monday through 5:30 a.m. Tuesday. The shutdown will be in place for the same hours starting Tuesday and Wednesday nights. The closure is necessary to perform wall excavation work as part of the C-470 Express Lane project, which will add toll lanes to the often-congested south suburban highway. Motorists coming off I-25 will be asked to detour onto northbound E-470 and then turn around at Peoria Street to head back toward C-470 — a distance of just over 4 miles. No tolls will be charged during closure.

    Denver Post - Arapahoe County / 4 d. 12 h. 1 min. ago more
  • How Colorado libraries and bookstores are staying competitive with celebrities like Segel and SpringsteenHow Colorado libraries and bookstores are staying competitive with celebrities like Segel and Springsteen

    Andy Cross, The Denver PostCathy Esposito gives super rocker Bruce Springsteen at kiss on the cheek at the Tattered Cover book store on E. Colfax November 30, 2016. Over a thousand fans waited hours to get a photo and a signed copy of his new book, “Born to Run.” Andy Cross, The Denver PostFans line up for a meet-and-greet with Bruce Springsteen at the Tattered Cover bookstore on Colfax Ave. in Denver Wednesday morning, Nov. 29, 2016. Springsteen is promoting his new memoir, "Born to Run." Andy Cross, The Denver PostFans line up for a meet-and-greet with Bruce Springsteen at the Tattered Cover bookstore on Colfax Ave. in Denver Wednesday morning, Nov. 29, 2016. Springsteen is promoting his new memoir, "Born to Run."Andy Cross, The Denver PostFans line up for a meet-and-greet with Bruce Springsteen at the Tattered Cover bookstore on Colfax Ave. in Denver Wednesday morning, Nov. 29, 2016. Springsteen is promoting his new memoir, "Born to Run." Andy Cross, The Denver PostOver a thousand fans waited hours to get a photo of super rocker Bruce Springsteen and a signed copy of his new book, “Born to Run.”Andy Cross, The Denver PostOver a thousand fans waited hours to get a photo of super rocker Bruce Springsteen and a signed copy of his new book, “Born to Run.”Andy Cross, The Denver PostBruce Springsteen fans line up and wait for super rocker Bruce Springsteen at the Tattered Cover book store on E. Colfax November 30, 2016. Over a thousand fans waited hours to get a photo and a signed copy of his new book, ÒBorn to Run.ÓAndy Cross, The Denver PostMorgan Schwartz, 11, gets a hug from super rocker Bruce Springsteen at the Tattered Cover book store on E. Colfax November 30, 2016. Over a thousand fans waited hours to get a photo and a signed copy of his new book, “Born to Run.”Andy Cross, The Denver PostBruce Springsteen fans line up and wait for super rocker Bruce Springsteen at the Tattered Cover book store on E. Colfax November 30, 2016. Over a thousand fans waited hours to get a photo and a signed copy of his new book, “Born to Run.”Andy Cross, The Denver PostBruce Springsteen fans Morgan Schwartz, left, and her father Ryan Schwartz have their picture taken with Springsteen at the Tattered Cover book store on E. Colfax November 30, 2016. Over a thousand fans waited hours to get a photo and a signed copy of his new book, “Born to Run.”Andy Cross, The Denver PostBruce Springsteen fan Elliott White greets super rocker Springsteen at the Tattered Cover book store on E. Colfax November 30, 2016. Over a thousand fans waited hours to get a photo and a signed copy of his new book, “Born to Run.”Andy Cross, The Denver PostBruce Springsteen fan Julie Stoppel has her picture taken with super rocker Springsteen at the Tattered Cover book store on E. Colfax November 30, 2016. Over a thousand fans waited hours to get a photo and a signed copy of his new book, “Born to Run.”Andy Cross, The Denver PostBruce Springsteen fan Beth Westberg has her picture taken with super rocker Springsteen at the Tattered Cover book store on E. Colfax November 30, 2016. Over a thousand fans waited hours to get a photo and a signed copy of his new book, “Born to Run.”Andy Cross, The Denver PostBruce Springsteen fan Andrea Ives has her picture taken with super rocker Springsteen at the Tattered Cover book store on E. Colfax November 30, 2016. Over a thousand fans waited hours to get a photo and a signed copy of his new book, “Born to Run.”Andy Cross, The Denver PostBruce Springsteen fan Eileen Neilands has her picture taken with super rocker Springsteen at the Tattered Cover book store on E. Colfax November 30, 2016. Over a thousand fans waited hours to get a photo and a signed copy of his new book, “Born to Run.”Andy Cross, The Denver PostBruce Springsteen fan Barbara Leibensperger has her picture taken with super rocker Springsteen at the Tattered Cover book store on E. Colfax November 30, 2016. Over a thousand fans waited hours to get a photo and a signed copy of his new book, “Born to Run.”Andy Cross, The Denver PostBruce Springsteen fan Gina Behrens greets super rocker Springsteen at the Tattered Cover book store on E. Colfax November 30, 2016. Gina's husband proposed to her at the Tunnel of Love tour in 1988 at the old McNichols Arena. Over a thousand fans waited hours to get a photo and a signed copy of his new book, “Born to Run.”Andy Cross, The Denver PostBruce Springsteen fan Becky Kober has her picture taken with super rocker Springsteen at the Tattered Cover book store on E. Colfax November 30, 2016. Over a thousand fans waited hours to get a photo and a signed copy of his new book, “Born to Run.”Andy Cross, The Denver PostSuper rocker Bruce Springsteen at the Tattered Cover book store on E. Colfax November 30, 2016. Over a thousand fans waited hours to get a photo and a signed copy of his new book, “Born to Run.”Show Caption of Expand Bruce Springsteen was a longshot to visit the Tattered Cover, the 47-year-old independent bookseller with a trio of stores in Lower Downtown, Littleton and on East Colfax Avenue. But new owners Len Vlahos and Kristen Gilligan went for it, knowing exactly what a visit from The Boss would mean for them. “We pulled out all the stops,” Vlahos said, including filming a YouTube video that featured a continuous, four-minute musical tour of the store with Vlahos on acoustic guitar. “And it worked,” he said. “A day like that is huge for us, and not just in book sales, which are already big. We had every news network out here, we had 15,000 people trying to buy 1,100 tickets, and we had super happy customers, many of whom may have not have been customers before that.” Front Range bookstores and libraries have increasingly leaned on marquee names to bring in new customers and cardholders, from politicos such as Hillary Clinton, Jimmy Carter and Al Franken to legendary activist and writer Gloria Steinem and bestselling romance novelist Nicholas Sparks — all with a new book to promote. Related ArticlesJanuary 11, 2018 Book review: “Fire and Fury” is the hottest book of 2018 — too bad it’s so dull January 5, 2018 Michael Wolff’s Trump administration book sparks rush at Colorado booksellers January 5, 2018 Forget Harry Potter. In D.C., people lined up at midnight for Michael Wolff’s Trump exposé. January 5, 2018 Michael Wolff: “In every way comfortable” with Trump book January 3, 2018 Trump portrayed as uninformed, unprepared and lacking focus in unflattering new book “It’s become more important, especially as our business model shifts from being simply a seller of books to a purveyor of experiences,” said Vlahos, whose stores host more than 500 events per year. Long shots, such as the one that brought Springsteen to the Tattered Cover on Nov. 30, 2016, to promote his book “Born to Run,” are what brick-and-mortar bookstores need now. A flattening in ebook sales that publishers and book sellers initially cheered has turned sour as consumers have continued migrating from physical shops to online giants such as Amazon. (In fact, Amazon’s success has encouraged it to open or announce more than a dozen physical stores.) For the first 10 months of 2017, bookstore sales were down 2.9 percent from the same period in 2016, dropping to $8.84 billion, according to Publisher’s Weekly. And total bookstore sales in the United States that were $15.24 billion in 2010 fell to $11 billion in 2016. In other words: people are still buying physical books, just not where they used to. Denver Post fileA boy reaches for a book on the top shelf in the Children’s section of the Tattered Cover Book Store on Colfax Avenue in Denver on June 11, 2016. The number of independent bookstores nationally has jumped by over 30 percent since 2009, according to the American Booksellers Association. A recent New York Times story dubbed it “the final shakeout” for brick-and-mortar booksellers, following the recent closures of Book World, Hastings Entertainment and Family Christian Stores — all of which came amid the continuing loss of national chain stores like Barnes & Noble. That’s where the big names come in. “Patrons enjoy hearing the story behind the stories from their favorite authors,” said Cindy Mares, manager of strategic programming at Arapahoe Libraries, which counts 298,753 card-holders. “And we bring them in for all ages, from children’s authors to teen to adult. It gives us a chance to talk about the other great things libraries have to offer.” Mares and her staff track attendance and hand out surveys after every program while watching the check-out list for the system’s most popular titles. The results help dictate not only the author series but also movie night selections, Native American storytelling sessions and the “Anglophile Afternoon” program — most recently focused on the British TV period drama “Downton Abbey.” And it’s not just author programs: From workshops on videography and 3D printing, as with The Studio at Thornton’s Anythink Libraries, to Jefferson County’s 11 public libraries offering the 30,000-title Kanopy streaming service, libraries have worked to update and diversify their programming. Of course, author visits have always been a crucial part of the library and bookstore ecosystem. Limited were the ways in books could traditionally be promoted, and none could match an in-person visit to drum up interest, and loyalty. “It’s always been part of our platform, but around five years ago we started bringing in bigger authors when we realized through a survey how much our community liked it,” said Amber DeBerry, director of community relations for Douglas County Libraries. Like Arapahoe Libraries, Douglas County has partnered with the Tattered Cover to bring in big-name author for signings and lectures. The library hosts while the Tattered Cover sells books. “Dan Brown (‘The Da Vinci Code’) is one of the most-requested, and we just brought him in this past fall,” DeBerry said. “We’ve had Nicholas Sparks (‘The Notebook’) twice in the past five years, as well as Jodi Picoult (‘My Sister’s Keeper’).” (Hutch Tibbetts, Provided by Douglas County Libraries)Actor/author Jason Segel at a talk and book signing for Douglas County Libraries at the Lone Tree Marriott in November 2016. In addition to bestselling authors and personalities Deepak Chopra and Brown, actor-authors such as “Breaking Bad” star Bryan Cranston and “How I Met Your Mother” actor/writer Jason Segel draw so many fans to their Front Range events that they can’t fit in the host bookstore or library, instead turning to churches, hotel ballrooms and other venues to satisfy interest. “We probably had about 800 for Jason Segel, and Dan Brown was close to 1,000,” DeBerry said, noting that Douglas County Libraries counts 237,795 card-holders, or 68 percent of all county households. “Eventizing” the visit — or giving people a reason to leave their home by offering something they can’t get anywhere else — is key. “Here we always ‘eventize’ our shows a little bit,” said Walter Chaw, vice president of operations for Colorado’s Alamo Drafthouse Cinema. “So when people come, here’s a record drop, or here’s a poetry reading. Basically, how do we incorporate other interests with the movie-going experience?” For the Alamo at Aspen Grove in Littleton, that means partnering with the Tattered Cover across the parking lot to bring in authors with notable film and TV connections, such as Wesley Snipes (in June 2017, for his book “Talon of God”) and the aforementioned Cranston (in October 2016, for “A Life in Parts”). “We generally don’t pay for talent,” Chaw said. “For a bigger name like Bruce Campbell, we couldn’t afford a $50,000 fee. The ticket price for an event like that for us to break even would be $1,000.” Mercifully, publishers tend to pick up most of the promotional costs for touring authors, from airfare to lodging, which makes them attractive to cash-strapped libraries and booksellers. “In the contracts you sign, some authors would like to be able to get at least 500 or 1,000 people at their events,” said DeBerry. “But we never net a profit from these events, if there’s an admission cost at all. It just covers our costs, like speaking fees and venue rentals and refreshments. We buy the books that come along with the tickets, but at a discounted rate.” That’s something to keep in mind the next time a big name appears on a bookstore or library calendar: These events are as much about branding the bookstore as catering to local readers. “We’ve gotten some great names lately, but really what we’re mostly in competition with isn’t other bookstores or libraries, but other markets, like Chicago,” said the Tattered Cover’s Vlahos. “We’ve definitely been devoting more staff resources to it than we used to. There are not a lot of places outside of a bookstore or library where you can go meet someone you’re a colossal fan of, and usually for free.” Hutch Tibbetts, Provided by Douglas County LibrariesActor/author Jason Segel talks before a book signing for Douglas County Libraries at the Lone Tree Marriott in November 2017.

    Denver Post - Douglas County / 4 d. 17 h. 59 min. ago more
  • Martin Luther King Jr. Day events planned for Boulder, Longmont, LafayetteMartin Luther King Jr. Day events planned for Boulder, Longmont, Lafayette

    Residents can celebrate the life and work of Martin Luther King Jr. with several events in Boulder, Longmont and Lafayette for Monday's holiday.

    ColoradoHometownWeekly.com / 4 d. 18 h. 59 min. ago
  • Douglas County father arrested as suspect in the death of his infant daughterDouglas County father arrested as suspect in the death of his infant daughter

    A Douglas County father has been arrested as a suspect in the 2017 death of his infant daughter. An arrest warrant was issued Wednesday for James Howatt, 26, according to the sheriff’s office. He was taken into custody at his home and is being held at the Douglas County jail on $25,000 bail. Father Arrested for Child Abuse Resulting in Death of 3-Month-Old Daughter https://t.co/YiBCIUF3xa — DC Sheriff (@dcsheriff) January 11, 2018 On May 10, deputies responded to the 5300 block of Hospitality Place in Parker on a report of a 3-month-old girl who was not breathing. Aliah Howatt was taken to a hospital, where she was pronounced dead. On Jan. 4, a grand jury returned an indictment against Howatt alleging knowing and reckless child abuse causing death.

    Denver Post - Douglas County / 4 d. 20 h. 56 min. ago more
  • Boulder DA Stan Garnett resigning to take 'crazy to pass up' job at old law firmBoulder DA Stan Garnett resigning to take 'crazy to pass up' job at old law firm

    District Attorney Stan Garnett is resigning two years into his third and final term as Boulder County's top prosecutor to take a senior partner position at a private law firm in Denver.

    Colorado Daily / 4 d. 21 h. 32 min. ago
  • Bipartisan group of senators, including Colorado's Michael Bennet and Cory Gardner, reach deal on DACA, immigrationBipartisan group of senators, including Colorado's Michael Bennet and Cory Gardner, reach deal on DACA, immigration

    The group of U.S. senators announced Thursday that they have reached an agreement on how to address immigration and the future of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals recipients.

    DailyCamera.com / 4 d. 22 h. 32 min. ago
  • Remains found at Federal Heights home identified; man’s daughter arrested as murder suspectRemains found at Federal Heights home identified; man’s daughter arrested as murder suspect

    Federal Heights PoliceWilliam MussackFederal Heights PoliceDayna Michele JenningsShow Caption of Expand The remains of a 69-year-old man found in a Federal Heights home were identified Thursday, and his 44-year-old daughter has been arrested as a suspect in his death. An autopsy performed Thursday confirmed the remains as those of William Mussack, police said. His daughter, Dayna Jennings, who lived at the home with Mussack, is being held at the Adams County jail on suspicion of first-degree murder. On Dec. 28 concerned family members contacted police because they hadn’t been able to contact Mussack. Investigators on Wednesday executed a search warrant at the home, 10022 Eliot Circle. Related ArticlesJanuary 16, 2018 Federal Heights woman charged with murder after allegedly killing her dad and encasing his body in concrete January 15, 2018 38 homicides make 2017 the second deadliest in El Paso County history January 14, 2018 Denver police investigating homicide on South Federal Boulevard January 14, 2018 38 homicides make 2017 the second deadliest in El Paso County history January 12, 2018 Teen will spend 5 years in youth corrections for killing 16-year-old at Thornton homecoming party A cause of death is still pending.

    Denver Post - Adams County / 4 d. 23 h. 48 min. ago more
  • Peruvian woman facing deportation seeks sanctuary at Boulder church Peruvian woman facing deportation seeks sanctuary at Boulder church

    A Peruvian woman who has avoided deportation since last year by living in churches in Denver and Fort Collins has now moved to a Boulder church that recently voted to become a sanctuary.

    Colorado Daily / 5 d. 0 h. 23 min. ago
  • Colorado governor touts progress, legal pot, in final speechColorado governor touts progress, legal pot, in final speech

    Colorado's term-limited governor, Democrat John Hickenlooper, is urging lawmakers to take advantage of a better-than-usual budget outlook to make down payments on schools, public employee pensions, rural broadband and roads.

    ABCNews.com / 5 d. 2 h. 47 min. ago
  • Pádraig Smith, Wayne Brant promoted by Colorado RapidsPádraig Smith, Wayne Brant promoted by Colorado Rapids

    The interim titles are gone. The Colorado Rapids on Thursday officially promoted Pádraig Smith to executive vice president and general manager, and Wayne Brant was elevated to senior vice president of business operations. Smith previously served as the Rapids’ sporting director and interim general manager, while Brant was the club’s interim chief business officer. The club said Smith now has the Rapids’ top executive post and will continue to oversee all soccer operations. Brant will be in charge of all day-to-day business areas of the club. Related Articles Recent Rapids signings signal radical change in team’s method of attack Edgar Castillo, Jack Price sign with Colorado Rapids Marlon Hairston ready for opportunity with U.S. national team as 2022 World Cup cycle begins Colorado Rapids 2018 schedule Deklan Wynne acquired by Colorado Rapids in trade with Vancouver “For both Pádraig and Wayne, these are well-deserved promotions,” Matt Hutchings, executive vice president and chief operating officer of Kroenke Sports & Entertainment, said in a news release. “They have managed this transition period very well, and given their combined knowledge and experience, we look forward to watching them guide this club to success both on and off the field.” Rapids bolster front office staff Shortly after Smith’s promotion was announced, the Rapids bolstered their front office support staff with the addition of Fran Taylor as assistant general manager. Taylor will assist Smith with the club’s soccer operations, and will oversee the Rapids’ data and analytics program. Taylor spent the past eight years as VP of analytics application at StatDNA, a software and analytics company acquired by Arsenal Football Group in 2013. “In an off-season in which we’re entirely overhauling the way we conduct ourselves on the soccer side, we’re absolutely delighted to welcome Fran to the front office,” Smith said in a news release. “He’s a sharp mind, and his experience at Arsenal – both with the scouting and coaching staffs – will play a crucial role in bringing our vision for the future of this club to life.”

    Denver Post - Adams County / 5 d. 6 h. 50 min. ago more
  • Douglas County deputy wounded in New Year’s Eve shooting moved out of ICUDouglas County deputy wounded in New Year’s Eve shooting moved out of ICU

      Courtesy Boulder County Sheriff's OfficeBoulder County Sheriff Joe Pelle, left, sits beside the bed of his son, Douglas County sheriff’s deputy Jeff Pelle, who was shot Sunday in an ambush in Highlands Ranch, and two family members not identified by Boulder County Sheriff’s Office, which tweeted this photo. Douglas County Sheriff’s Deputy Jeff Pelle has been moved out of the intensive care unit. Pelle, 32, was one of four Douglas County sheriff’s deputies shot on New Year’s Eve while responding to a domestic disturbance call at a Highlands Ranch apartment. Deputy Zackari Parrish was fatally shot when law enforcement officers tried to take the shooter into custody on a mental health hold. He later died in the gunfight with law enforcement officers. A Castle Rock police officer and two people in neighboring apartments also were injured. Pelle, the son of Boulder County Sheriff Joe Pelle, is the only one still hospitalized. Related ArticlesJanuary 8, 2018 Slain Douglas County deputy was trying to take shooter into custody on mental health hold January 3, 2018 Deputy in fatal shooting recovering after “bullet missed his heart by an inch” January 9, 2018 Douglas County gunman used four weapons against deputies, SWAT team in New Year’s Eve shooting December 31, 2017 Gunman ambushed deputies in deadly Douglas County shooting; 1 deputy dead, 6 people wounded January 5, 2018 “Go Blue. Live like Zack.” Thousands honor fallen Douglas County Sheriff’s Deputy Zack Parrish Joe Pelle previously said the bullet missed his son’s heart “by an inch.” Boulder County Sheriff’s Office Cmdr. Mike Wagner confirmed that Jeff Pelle’s condition was upgraded on Tuesday. “He still has some fever and infection issues they are dealing with,” Wagner said. Read the full story at TimesCall.com.

    Denver Post - Douglas County / 5 d. 10 h. 10 min. ago more
  • “Alexa, ask Douglas County” – Amazon’s digital assistant can tell you what’s happening in DougCo“Alexa, ask Douglas County” – Amazon’s digital assistant can tell you what’s happening in DougCo

    Too tired to look up information on the internet? Douglas County residents now have an easier way with the debut of the “Ask Douglas County” feature on Amazon Alexa’s voice-activated devices. The county touts the feature as the first of its kind for a Colorado local government, allowing its residents to simply shout out questions about events, road closures, tax information — or even something as vague as “Alexa, Ask Douglas County, what’s new?” Related ArticlesJanuary 14, 2018 Suburbs north of Denver have “come of age” with explosive growth along I-25 corridor January 14, 2018 A century before Amazon H2Q, Denver and other cities battled for coveted Federal Reserve regional bank January 13, 2018 Pizza Hut says driverless delivery will create more jobs January 13, 2018 Las Vegas hotels bet on technology to attract, dazzle guests January 13, 2018 Retail workers feel disruption from shifting shopper habits Alexa, Amazon’s cloud-based voice service, connects to the Amazon Echo, Echo Dot, Echo Show and other devices, such as Fire TV, Amazon Tap, and Fire Tablets. All a user needs to do to get going is to say to their Amazon device, “Alexa, enable Douglas County.”

    Denver Post - Douglas County / 5 d. 12 h. ago more
  • Boulder City Council may not have appetite for broadband ballot measure in 2018Boulder City Council may not have appetite for broadband ballot measure in 2018

    The City Council decided in the middle of last year to scuttle what had been tentative plans to place a measure on the 2017 ballot related to a build-out of a broadband network in Boulder.

    Colorado Daily / 5 d. 21 h. 18 min. ago
  • Divorced couple take their fight over frozen embryos to Colorado courtDivorced couple take their fight over frozen embryos to Colorado court

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    ABCNews.com / 5 d. 23 h. 33 min. ago
  • Colorado lawmakers pledge zero tolerance of harassmentColorado lawmakers pledge zero tolerance of harassment

    Colorado lawmakers have started their new legislative session amid tension over unresolved sexual misconduct allegations against some of their colleagues

    ABCNews.com / 6 d. 0 h. 17 min. ago
  • Arizona man turned camera on injustices of Native AmericansArizona man turned camera on injustices of Native Americans

    Arizona man celebrated for the humanity in his photographs throughout the Colorado Plateau and globally has died

    ABCNews.com / 6 d. 1 h. 7 min. ago
  • Colorado Senate president calls for bipartisanship in opening day of legislature, moves quickly on transportation with funding billColorado Senate president calls for bipartisanship in opening day of legislature, moves quickly on transportation with funding bill

    Colorado Senate President Kevin Grantham cast an optimistic tone as he kicked off the 2018 legislative session with a speech Wednesday urging bipartisanship, announcing that his Republican caucus would be moving quickly with efforts to fund transportation by introducing a bill on day one.

    DailyCamera.com / 6 d. 3 h. 50 min. ago
  • Colorado oil-gas regulators delay decisions on rules for pipelinesColorado oil-gas regulators delay decisions on rules for pipelines

    Colorado officials trying to set rules for multiplying underground oil and gas pipelines dove into details Tuesday ranging from when companies must report accidents to industry assertions that providing precise maps would aid terrorists – and hit a wall.

    DailyCamera.com / 6 d. 20 h. 51 min. ago
  • Douglas County gunman used four weapons against deputies, SWAT team in New Year's Eve shootingDouglas County gunman used four weapons against deputies, SWAT team in New Year's Eve shooting

    The gunman in a fatal New Year's Eve shooting of Douglas County Sheriff's Office Deputy Zackari Parrish used four weapons during the shootout with law enforcement officers, said Sheriff Tony Spurlock, who released more body camera footage.

    DailyCamera.com / 6 d. 20 h. 56 min. ago
  • Colorado Sen. Cory Gardner to meet with Jeff Sessions after doubling down on threats over marijuana enforcement changeColorado Sen. Cory Gardner to meet with Jeff Sessions after doubling down on threats over marijuana enforcement change

    U.S. Sen. Cory Gardner said he plans to press Attorney General Jeff Sessions on federal marijuana policy when the two Republicans meet Wednesday.

    DailyCamera.com / 7 d. 0 h. 30 min. ago
  • A look at the top 8 issues for the 2018 legislative session in ColoradoA look at the top 8 issues for the 2018 legislative session in Colorado

    The political fog at the Colorado Capitol and the agenda for the 120-day legislative session make the task ahead difficult, according to dozens of interviews ahead of the start. Here's a look at the top eight issues and a forecast for what lawmakers and lobbyists expect in the 2018 session.

    DailyCamera.com / 7 d. 3 h. 37 min. ago
  • A Colorado professor explains how Obamacare prevented hospitals from closingA Colorado professor explains how Obamacare prevented hospitals from closing

    A new study by professors at the Colorado School of Public Health says Medicaid expansion helped keep hospitals from closing - but only in states that actually adopted the expansion.

    DailyCamera.com / 7 d. 20 h. 23 min. ago
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  • White House meeting on immigration to include Colorado Sen. Cory Gardner and likely Michael BennetWhite House meeting on immigration to include Colorado Sen. Cory Gardner and likely Michael Bennet

    U.S. Sens. Michael Bennet and Cory Gardner of Colorado are both likely to attend a Tuesday meeting at the White House to discuss immigration but - even with their bipartisan participation - expectations are low that the conference will lead to a breakthrough in negotiations.

    DailyCamera.com / 7 d. 23 h. 43 min. ago
  • 'Go Blue. Live like Zack.' Thousands honor fallen Douglas County Sheriff's Deputy Zack Parrish'Go Blue. Live like Zack.' Thousands honor fallen Douglas County Sheriff's Deputy Zack Parrish

    Gracie Parrish wore her husband Zackari Parrish's badge as she read a final love letter to him at his funeral service.

    DailyCamera.com / 10 d. 20 h. 28 min. ago
  • Shots fired outside Colorado Capitol on Thursday afternoonShots fired outside Colorado Capitol on Thursday afternoon

    At least one gunman fired several shots outside the state Capitol on Thursday afternoon, prompting a brief lockdown and shutting down traffic as Denver police secured the scene. Police said no injuries were reported.

    DailyCamera.com / 11 d. 17 h. 54 min. ago
  • Louisville may allow food trucks to operate outside recreation centerLouisville may allow food trucks to operate outside recreation center

    Louisville may soon allow food trucks — a staple of the city's office parks — to serve outside its recreation center, according to a housing-cleaning ordinance aimed at updating regulations for the mobile eateries.

    Colorado Hometown Weekly / 31 d. 20 h. 58 min. ago
  • Boulder-based Elevations Credit Union hands out $50K to 17 area nonprofitsBoulder-based Elevations Credit Union hands out $50K to 17 area nonprofits

    Boulder's 'I and love and you' sends 100K meals to dogs in fire-ravaged CaliforniaBoulder pet food brand "I and love and you" on Monday sent 3,000 bags of its dog food to four Los Angeles-area shelters to provide for pets displaced by the raging wildfires in California.

    Colorado Hometown Weekly / 33 d. 7 h. 54 min. ago
  • Newly released documents show details of Colorado's bid for Amazon's second headquartersNewly released documents show details of Colorado's bid for Amazon's second headquarters

    State documents shared with the Denver Post included redacted references to the sites and incentives, but the series of emails revealed a coordinated effort by state leaders to brainstorm early and include as many strategic partners as possible, from local universities and agencies to private firms from Xcel Energy and Zayo Group.

    Colorado Hometown Weekly / 67 d. 23 h. 6 min. ago
  • Lafayette Homebrew Supply to shutter church-owned space next monthLafayette Homebrew Supply to shutter church-owned space next month

    Lafayette Homebrew Supply, LCC, a wholesale brewing shop that's operated out of the Flatirons Church-owned marketplace space at 400 W. South Boulder Road, will close its doors next month.

    Colorado Hometown Weekly / 82 d. 2 h. 13 min. ago
  • Novartis division closing Broomfield operationsNovartis division closing Broomfield operations

    Novartis, a global health care company based in Switzerland, is closing its Sandoz division in Broomfield at 2555 W.

    Colorado Hometown Weekly / 92 d. 1 h. 37 min. ago