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    This RSS feed URL is deprecated, please update. New URLs can be found in the footers at https://news.google.com/news

    Google News / 17.01.2018 04:02
  • Sheriff Joe Arpaio will be keynote speaker at GOP dinnerSheriff Joe Arpaio will be keynote speaker at GOP dinner

    Former Arizona Sheriff Joe Arpaio will be a guest speaker at a Republican dinner in Nevada.

    Arizona Capitol Times / 2 min. ago
  • Barrio Queen: Local Mexican concept lands at Desert Ridge Marketplace with tasty food and festive ambianceBarrio Queen: Local Mexican concept lands at Desert Ridge Marketplace with tasty food and festive ambiance

    Barrio Queen  Local Mexican concept lands at Desert Ridge Marketplace with tasty food and festive ambiance. North Valley residents can finally get their Barrio Queen fix without having to drive to Old Town Scottsdale or Gilbert. Barrio Queen’s third Valley restaurant recently opened at Desert Ridge Marketplace at Loop 101 and Tatum Boulevard, much to the delight of the restaurant’s devout fans. The festive atmosphere of The Queen is complemented with Mission-style architecture outfitted with artwork from Arizonan and Mexican artists. The three outdoor patios and a nice wraparound bar that divides the indoor/outdoor areas lends a friendly, open vibe. We were given a big basket of warm, crisp tortilla chips when we sat down, along with a large cup of homemade salsa. You can also order tableside-prepared guacamole for a separate fee. They have a large drink menu, including creative cocktails, as well as a traditional selection of beverages. The first item we ordered was the roasted elote ($6). For this dish, the chef takes an ear of corn, removing all the corn silk and most of the stalk, to prepare it for cooking. The corn is rubbed with butter and mayonnaise and then roasted. Once it’s cooked to perfection, Cotija cheese and a sprinkle of chile powder are added. Served with a little bit of tomato salsa and a sharp knife, it’s pure deliciousness. I like to shave the kernels of corn off the cob and then eat it with a fork, but there’s no shame in picking it up and munching straight off the cobb. The flavors of all the ingredients mix perfectly and complement the fresh corn. Next up, we tried the Queen ($12, an additional $6 for an added protein). We added carne asada to these enchiladas for some meatiness. This dish features a mixture of Oaxaca, Cotija, and goat cheese mixed with sautéed spinach, shallots, and garlic. The mixture is then stuffed inside the tortilla and covered in a cream sauce. It’s finished off with a sprinkle of Cotija cheese and a dollop of crema fresca. The mixture is so delightful that even though the dish comes with three good size enchiladas, you’ll wish there was more. However, this dish is very filling. The plate is also adorned with black beans and a small zucchini, squash, and onion side salad called calabacitas. All the ingredients taste perfect together and I can definitely see ordering this dish again. We also ordered three street tacos ($4, or $11 for three). We decided it was best to order the trio taco option in order to get a good variety. We asked for most of the toppings to be served on the side in order to be able to taste the protein as-is, as well as with the chef’s toppings. The first taco was the suadero azteca. This is slow cooked beef brisket that is then diced up and put into the tortilla. It’s topped with diced red onion and cilantro. The brisket had a nice non-smoke flavor and was tender to the bite. The second selection was the carnitas taco. This corn tortilla was topped with pulled pork that’s marinated in cola and orange rind before being slow cooked and then shredded. It’s topped with the red onion and cilantro. The cola flavor is subtle but does allow for some sweetness to sink into the pork. Third in the trio was the carne asada taco. The steak is marinated in fresh orange and garlic prior to being cooked on the grill. It’s then topped with onion and cilantro and a perfectly cooked over easy fried egg. The egg yolk kicks this taco up a notch and makes it extra delicious. The tacos are easy to hold in your hand and while three doesn’t sound like a lot when talking about smaller sized tortillas, there’s plenty of filling inside Barrio Queen’s tacos. The entire staff is very accommodating with requests and was extremely friendly during our visit. The food is paced well out of the kitchen, which is a nice relief when ordering several dishes. I recommend getting a table outside under the big shade tree, so that you can enjoy some great food and the mild winter weather.   Barrio Queen barrioqueen.com (480) 466-7445 21001 N. Tatum Blvd., Phoenix     The post Barrio Queen: Local Mexican concept lands at Desert Ridge Marketplace with tasty food and festive ambiance appeared first on North Valley Magazine.

    North Valley Magazine / 12 min. ago more
  • Scottsdale Airport closed after aircraft leaves runwayScottsdale Airport closed after aircraft leaves runway

    Scottsdale Airport is closed after an aircraft went off the runaway around 4 p.m. on Tuesday.         

    Azcentral.com / 27 min. ago
  • Arizona lawmakers to California: Can we help you secede from the union?Arizona lawmakers to California: Can we help you secede from the union?

    Rep. Mark Finchem today introduced a concurrent resolution supporting California’s secession from the United States.

    Arizona Capitol Times / 28 min. ago
  • Barrett-Jackson 2018: See 10 of the collector cars sold on opening dayBarrett-Jackson 2018: See 10 of the collector cars sold on opening day

    The first day of bidding begins Monday at the Barrett-Jackson collector car auction in Scottsdale with 88 cars expected to cruise across the block.         

    Azcentral.com / 36 min. ago
  • Woman arrested on Loop 101 overpass is suspected of fatally stabbing boyfriendWoman arrested on Loop 101 overpass is suspected of fatally stabbing boyfriend

    Zynia Chapman, 23, was arrested on suspicion of first-degree murder after police said she stabbed her boyfriend to death.         

    Azcentral.com / 45 min. ago
  • Ducey outraises 2 Dem foes combined in gubernatorial raceDucey outraises 2 Dem foes combined in gubernatorial race

    Gov. Doug Ducey raised more than $2 million more than his Democratic competitors for the 2018 Arizona governor’s race.

    Arizona Capitol Times / 47 min. ago
  • There’s money to burn in Dem gubernatorial primary There’s money to burn in Dem gubernatorial primary 

    Farley outraised David Garcia this cycle and has more than double the amount of cash available, but Ducey trumped both Democratic candidates by orders of magnitude. To read more on this item plus all the stories in the Jan. 16 Yellow Sheet Report, go to www.yellowsheetreport.com (Yellow Sheet Subscription Required). To subscribe to the Yellow Sheet Report, where you’ll find the ...

    Arizona Capitol Times / 1 h. 13 min. ago more
  • Man shot in Tucson hostage incident in October released from hospital, arrestedMan shot in Tucson hostage incident in October released from hospital, arrested

    The suspect in the carjacking crime spree was arrested after being hospitalized since October, the Tucson Police Department said.         

    Azcentral.com / 1 h. 13 min. ago
  • Business group asks Congress for protection for marijuanaBusiness group asks Congress for protection for marijuana

    A group representing marijuana business owners in the West is urging Congress to include language in a government spending bill that would protect pot operations.

    Arizona Capitol Times / 1 h. 34 min. ago
  • Tucson officials hope airport video has clues about abandoned baby's momTucson officials hope airport video has clues about abandoned baby's mom

    A newborn baby boy abandoned in a women's restroom was found by a Tucson airport employee on Sunday night, Tucson police said.         

    Azcentral.com / 2 h. 7 min. ago
  • New volunteers needed at the Waste Management Phoenix OpenNew volunteers needed at the Waste Management Phoenix Open

    Every year a number of volunteers help out at the Waste Management Phoenix Open, but this year there is a new volunteer opportunity. With record-breaking crowds expected at the 2018 event, volunteers are need to manage the front gate, which is the entrance to the tournament. The Phoenix Open says that volunteers will need to enjoy interacting with people and working as a team. Each day of the tournament, which runs Jan. 29 to Feb. 4, needs at least 12 volunteers to work form 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. If…

    Bizjournals.com / 2 h. 14 min. ago more
  • Peoria City Hall, 2 other buildings reopened after lockdown; package deemed safePeoria City Hall, 2 other buildings reopened after lockdown; package deemed safe

    Peoria City Hall and two other municipal buildings were reopened after a lockdown Tuesday afternoon.         

    Azcentral.com / 2 h. 24 min. ago
  • Digital fingerprint: The emerging technology that will identify the world around usDigital fingerprint: The emerging technology that will identify the world around us

    Sometimes a technology grows from many directions without much notice, and before we do notice, it is a major game-changing theme across industries and applications. The concept of digital fingerprints is just such a technology that is finding its way into everything from food safety to tracking online fraud. It is so powerful that all technology companies should know what it is and understand how it plays in their products and services. What is a digital fingerprint? Every object, real or in…

    Bizjournals.com / 2 h. 37 min. ago more
  • Downtown Phoenix has seen 318 percent increase in tech companies since 2012Downtown Phoenix has seen 318 percent increase in tech companies since 2012

    Shannon Selby moderated a Silicon Desert panel today at the Phoenix Country Club, discussing how the city was leading the way for the tech sector for the Arizona Commercial Real Estate Women organization.

    Bizjournals.com / 3 h. 18 min. ago
  • Police: Two detained after bank robbery in Phoenix - ABC15 ArizonaPolice: Two detained after bank robbery in Phoenix - ABC15 Arizona

    ABC15 ArizonaPolice: Two detained after bank robbery in PhoenixABC15 ArizonaCopyright 2018 Scripps Media, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. AIR15. AIR15. Show Caption Hide Caption. Previous Next. PHOENIX - Two suspects are in police custody following a bank ...and more »

    Google News / 3 h. 21 min. ago more
  • Jeff Flake backs off Donald Trump comparison to StalinJeff Flake backs off Donald Trump comparison to Stalin

    U.S. Sen. Jeff Flake, R-Ariz., is clarifying his claims President Donald Trump’s criticisms of the media and use of the term "enemies of the people" compares to Soviet dictator Joseph Stalin. Flake is slated to make a Senate speech faulting Trump for his drumbeat of "fake news" against the media. The Arizona senator went on MSNBC, CNN and ABC News to talk about Trump’s hits on the media and how his language is similar to that used by Stalin and other authoritarians. That comparison drew criticism…

    Bizjournals.com / 3 h. 27 min. ago more
  • Hardy Boyz and Beth Phoenix return to WWE 2K18 as part of final DLC pack - GamesRadarHardy Boyz and Beth Phoenix return to WWE 2K18 as part of final DLC pack - GamesRadar

    GamesRadarHardy Boyz and Beth Phoenix return to WWE 2K18 as part of final DLC packGamesRadarFans of WWE 2K18 have had a rollercoaster few months, with the fight sim still exhibiting critical bugs months after release – but there's a bit of good news for them today with its final DLC pack now available for download. The pack, entitled Enduring ...and more »

    Google News / 3 h. 41 min. ago more
  • Phoenix MLK Day march serves as backdrop for civil-rights music videoPhoenix MLK Day march serves as backdrop for civil-rights music video

    The march in downtown Phoenix drew between 4,000 to 5,000 people in its two-mile stretch.         

    Azcentral.com / 4 h. 7 min. ago
  • The New Deer Valley AirparkThe New Deer Valley Airpark

      Historically Deer Valley Airpark had the reputation as a heavy industrial park full of contractor yards, junk-yards and trailer parks and everything else down and dirty. That impression is The post The New Deer Valley Airpark appeared first on Deer Valley Times.

    Deer Valley Times / 4 h. 8 min. ago
  • Veteran real estate broker jumps firms, launches new land groupVeteran real estate broker jumps firms, launches new land group

    See who it and where they went.

    Bizjournals.com / 4 h. 13 min. ago
  • Family finds dog dead, hanging in mobile pet grooming van in Phoenix - AZCentral.comFamily finds dog dead, hanging in mobile pet grooming van in Phoenix - AZCentral.com

    AZCentral.comFamily finds dog dead, hanging in mobile pet grooming van in PhoenixAZCentral.comA Phoenix mother said she and her children are traumatized after they found their family dog, Max, dead of an apparent hanging in a mobile pet-grooming van. Amanda Wohland said she and two of her children discovered Max hanging from the loop used to ...and more »

    Google News / 4 h. 14 min. ago more
  • OCJ Kids offers positive activities and adult mentorsOCJ Kids offers positive activities and adult mentors

      OCJ Kids (Opportunity Community and Justice for Kids), founded in 1992, forming an alliance with the business and faith communities to provide services, resources and caring adults to address The post OCJ Kids offers positive activities and adult mentors appeared first on Deer Valley Times.

    Deer Valley Times / 4 h. 14 min. ago
  • See who leads the GOP Senate race to succeed Trump foe Jeff FlakeSee who leads the GOP Senate race to succeed Trump foe Jeff Flake

    A new poll gives U.S. Rep. Martha McSally, R-Ariz., the lead over former Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio and Kelli Ward in the GOP primary to replace U.S. Sen. Jeff Flake, R-Ariz. Flake is a big critic of President Donald Trump but is not running for re-election. McSally and Arpaio both got into the Republican primary field last week. They are both Trump fans, and McSally sounded a very pro-Trump tone in her Senate campaign announcement Friday. The poll by Data Orbital LLC and pollster George…

    Bizjournals.com / 4 h. 15 min. ago more
  • Three Steps To Properly Insure Your Small Business In A Natural DisasterThree Steps To Properly Insure Your Small Business In A Natural Disaster

      The recent spate of natural disasters that devastated parts of North America included a violent variety of events. There were three major hurricanes – Harvey, Irma and Maria – The post Three Steps To Properly Insure Your Small Business In A Natural Disaster appeared first on Deer Valley Times.

    Deer Valley Times / 4 h. 21 min. ago
  • Suns vs. Trail Blazers odds: Picks from expert who's 20-9 on Phoenix games - CBSSports.comSuns vs. Trail Blazers odds: Picks from expert who's 20-9 on Phoenix games - CBSSports.com

    Rip City ProjectSuns vs. Trail Blazers odds: Picks from expert who's 20-9 on Phoenix gamesCBSSports.comA pair of Western Conference teams collide Tuesday when the Phoenix Suns travel to meet the Portland Trail Blazers (10 p.m. ET). Portland is looking to snap a three-game losing streak that followed a three-game winning streak, while Phoenix has lost ...Trail Blazers prep for week of home games, starting with the Suns: Morning BlazerRip City Projectall 28 news articles »

    Google News / 4 h. 23 min. ago more
  • 5 Rules to Follow When Attending a Golf Tournament5 Rules to Follow When Attending a Golf Tournament

    By Mike Poe, General Manager of Quintero Golf Club  The Waste Management Phoenix Open may be known for the massive crowds, party atmosphere and fancy outfits, but we must not The post 5 Rules to Follow When Attending a Golf Tournament appeared first on Deer Valley Times.

    Deer Valley Times / 5 h. 9 min. ago
  • Organic food pioneer debuts first real estate development in West ValleyOrganic food pioneer debuts first real estate development in West Valley

    See the details.

    Bizjournals.com / 6 h. 6 min. ago
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  • How the Supreme Court’s ruling on internet sales tax could affect Arizona retailersHow the Supreme Court’s ruling on internet sales tax could affect Arizona retailers

    The U.S. Supreme Court announced last week that it will take on a case that could determine if states will be able to collect sales tax from online sales.

    Bizjournals.com / 6 h. 7 min. ago
  • Legislator Jay Lawrence: 'I am Not a Racist' ... Some Countries Are 'Shitholes'Legislator Jay Lawrence: 'I am Not a Racist' ... Some Countries Are 'Shitholes'

    "They bathe and get their water and defecate in the same places ... I have no problem with referring to those kinds of places as hellholes," Lawrence said.

    Phoenix New Times / 6 h. 20 min. ago
  • Arizona group again helping immigrants renew DACA statusArizona group again helping immigrants renew DACA status

    An Arizona immigrant rights group will resume providing counseling and financial assistance to people who need to renew their status under the federal Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program.

    Arizona Capitol Times / 6 h. 22 min. ago
  • Next generation gear heads create projects at AZ Science CenterNext generation gear heads create projects at AZ Science Center

    "Create U: TechForce Transportation Challenge" is an after-school program that introduces urban youth from 7th to 9th grade to the many job opportunities across the automotive, diesel and collision industry and technical trade fields.

    Bizjournals.com / 6 h. 50 min. ago
  • Builder buys West Valley land for gated developmentBuilder buys West Valley land for gated development

    Bret Rinehart and Ryan Semro of Land Advisors Organization in Scottsdale brokered the real estate deal.

    Bizjournals.com / 6 h. 50 min. ago
  • Season for Sharing: Circle the City's Medical Respite Center offers health care to homelessSeason for Sharing: Circle the City's Medical Respite Center offers health care to homeless

    Circle the City’s Medical Respite Center in Phoenix is a 50-bed facility where people experiencing homelessness can recover from illness or injury.         

    Azcentral.com / 6 h. 58 min. ago
  • Scottsdale calls on Arizona to handle LGBT non-discrimination protectionsScottsdale calls on Arizona to handle LGBT non-discrimination protections

    Scottsdale leaders say the issue warrants a consistent statewide approach, rather than a patchwork of local ordinances.         

    Azcentral.com / 7 h. 22 min. ago
  • Art in the Park returns Jan. 20Art in the Park returns Jan. 20

    Art in the Park, a free family event, returns to Mountain View Community Center Park, 1104 E. Grovers Ave., from 10 a.m.-12 p.m. on Saturday, January 20. This month’s festivities feature programming from Phoenix Public Libraries and Mountain View Community Center. This art-infused FREE, family-friendly event is the perfect way to kick off the new year. Presented by Thunderbird Arts Center, January’s Art in the Park will allow the community to paint a beautiful community bookshelf. Upon completion, Mountain View Community Center will install the bookshelf in the park. A staff member from the Phoenix Public Library will be reading stories appropriate for children of all ages (see schedule below). Coloring pages and hot chocolate will be available, as well as a chance to win a free class at Thunderbird Arts Center (up to $350 value)! Winners will be contacted via email in the week following the event. Free onsite parking available. For more information, e-mail info@phoenixcenterforthearts.org or call 602-254-3100. The storytime schedule includes: Birth to age 2, 10-10:15 a.m. 3-5 years, 10:15-10:30 a.m. 6-9 years, 10:30-10:45 a.m. 10-12 years, 10:45-11 a.m. 11:15 a.m.-12 p.m., Interactive Storytime

    North Central News / 7 h. 34 min. ago more
  • Voice, dance classes for seniorsVoice, dance classes for seniors

    Jewish Family & Children’s Service offers a new and expanded session of participatory Creative Aging classes for older adults beginning the week of Jan. 22. Creative Aging is a national initiative based on studies showing that older adults live longer and better if they are actively involved in the Arts. The movement is aimed at fostering an understanding of the vital relationship between creative expression and quality of life for older adults. “JFCS is dedicated to helping to ensure the highest quality of life for people at any age,” says Ellie Schwartzberg, JFCS Vice President of Older Adults and Jewish Community Services. “We are pleased to be able to offer so many varied classes to help engage the minds, bodies and spirits of older adults. Our participants range from 63 to 92.” “According to the US Census Bureau, one in four people in Arizona will be over age 60 by the year 2020,” reports Janet Arnold, JFCS Director of the Creative Aging program. “We need to find innovative ways to keep our older adults actively engaged. Creative Aging is based on an ‘assets approach’ to aging, emphasizing what “can” be done rather than what limitations there might be.” A new round of classes begins the week of Jan. 22. A Voice class as well as a Senior chorus will be held at Temple Chai, 4645 E. Marilyn in Phoenix. Both are led by Dan Kurek, who has 35 years experience teaching music and working in musical theater. The voice class offers small group instruction with individual time; the chorus sings contemporary music. New this session is Israeli Dance, offered at Congregation Beth Israel, 10460 N. 56th St., in Scottsdale on Tuesday afternoons from 2-3 p.m., starting Jan.23. Classes are taught by Nancy Stone who has many years experience in dance. All classes are open to adults 60 or older. Registration fees vary. Registration is available on the JFCS website: www.jfcsaz.org/creativeaging, by contacting janet.rees@jfcsaz.org, or calling 480-599-7198. Funding for the classes comes from the Jewish Community Foundation of Greater Phoenix, the Arizona Commission on the Arts and private funders.

    North Central News / 7 h. 36 min. ago more
  • Free dental exams for kids in FebruaryFree dental exams for kids in February

    Risas Dental and Braces, a health care company committed to making dental care accessible to all, is celebrating National Children’s Dental Health Month (NCDHM) in February by offering free exams and X-rays for kids, as well as educating students on proper oral health care at a number of Phoenix-area schools. “About 147 million kids drink at least some sugar-sweetened beverage daily, so it’s no wonder one of the top reasons kids miss school is due to dental problems,” said Dr. Whitney Wright, founding orthodontist at Risas Dental and Braces. “What children eat and drink not only affects their oral health, but their overall well-being. It’s critical to educate them on the importance of proper care.” Risas Dental and Braces will offer free exams and X-rays for all children ages 17 and younger between Feb. 1–28. Parents can make an appointment for the free exam and X-rays at any of Risas Dental’s offices, by calling 480-566-2930 or they can book online at www.risasdental.com. Local offices include Metrocenter, 10621 N. 35th Ave., and Phoenix Central, 4501 N. 7th St.

    North Central News / 7 h. 37 min. ago more
  • Phx among country’s fastest-growing economiesPhx among country’s fastest-growing economies

    By Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton Great cities must have strong economies – quality jobs with opportunity that can lift everyone. We’ve worked overtime to build that kind of economy in Phoenix, and the latest indicators show that our investments and hard work are paying off. This year, Phoenix earned a spot in the Top 10 for the nation’s fastest-growing economies, and median wages rose by 7.6 percent – the highest increase of any city in the county. Not only do Phoenix jobs pay better, but there are more of them too: we’ve cut the unemployment rate in half from where it was six years ago. How did we get here? Since 2012, we’ve pursued investments to make our economy more innovation-based, we’ve sought to grow trade and exports, we’re working with local companies to help them grow, and we’ve put a greater focus on helping residents learn the skills they need to compete in today’s economy. And though we’re on the right track – we’re just getting started, and what we’ve done in 2017 will pay dividends in the near future. Phoenix is growing its bioscience resources. On the Phoenix Biomedical Campus in downtown, city investments helped open the University of Arizona’s 10-story Biomedical Sciences Partnership Building, which will bring world-class researchers and physicians to our community and help attract top talent. Up north, on the Arizona Biomedical Corridor near Desert Ridge, a partnership among Phoenix, Arizona State University and Mayo Clinic will help build the 150,000-square foot Health Solutions Innovation Center that will transform medical education and health care for the entire country. Efforts to make Phoenix a more global, trade-focused city is paying dividends, too. Our city opened its second trade office – in Hermosillo – adding to the one in Mexico City. Already, one Mexican manufacturing firm served through the Hermosillo office has made a $2.2 million investment in a facility near our Sky Harbor International Airport, which will give it convenient access to other global markets. The news that ASU will re-locate its Thunderbird School of Global Management to downtown Phoenix will only help our city grow our international reach. Our approach has also been to recruit companies that fit the skilled-workforce model, and work with existing local companies to help them grow. We successfully attracted 32 new companies this past year, and Phoenix became third in the nation for high-tech job growth. The city’s economic development team visited nearly 1,000 business to find out how to best connect employers with local talent, and more than 55 companies indicated plans for expansion within the next year. That’s exciting. What many of these companies told us is that when they expand, they need skilled workers to fill those jobs. To grow that pool of human capital, the city got to work and assisted more than 75,000 job seekers through our three career centers this year alone. And we launched “sector-specific” strategies in construction, advanced business services and risk management that brought together private partners and job seekers looking to earn new certifications and apprenticeships. Phoenix now boasts a workforce in which more than 60 percent of workers hold jobs in advanced industries such as business and financial services, precision manufacturing, health and life sciences, and technology. That’s a promising sign for our future. Rebuilding an economy isn’t easy – and it’s a long road. But the proof that we’ve made the right choices is in our results. Whether we’re building biomedical research facilities or supporting companies looking to expand business across the borders, Phoenix is committed to creating new economic opportunity everywhere we can.

    North Central News / 7 h. 39 min. ago more
  • David Byrne Is Coming to MesaDavid Byrne Is Coming to Mesa

    Here's what you need to know.

    Phoenix New Times / 7 h. 58 min. ago
  • Republican Moses Sanchez Running for Phoenix Mayor to Change 'Status Quo'Republican Moses Sanchez Running for Phoenix Mayor to Change 'Status Quo'

    "The political establishment and special interests are only looking out for themselves and they don’t want to see an outsider elected to leadership," Sanchez said.

    Phoenix New Times / 8 h. 26 min. ago
  • Barrett-Jackson 2018: Tuesday's auction cars include Model A, Trans AmBarrett-Jackson 2018: Tuesday's auction cars include Model A, Trans Am

    The Barrett-Jackson collector car auction at WestWorld in Scottsdale will see 200 vehicles on the auction block during the second day of bidding.         

    Azcentral.com / 8 h. 40 min. ago
  • Buckeye target shooters react to stray-bullet deathBuckeye target shooters react to stray-bullet death

    About 24 hours after Kami Gilstrap was killed by a stray bullet at a popular target-shooting area in Buckeye, some shooters were puzzled by the death.         

    Azcentral.com / 8 h. 47 min. ago
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    WestwordQueen Phoenix Rose Quickly as an Activist; Now She's Missing in ActionWestwordHe didn't believe Phoenix was 100 percent innocent, but it did seem like prosecutors were going after her extra hard, threatening to put her behind bars for what he considered a relatively benign business venture. Were the charges really in retaliation ...

    Google News / 9 h. 2 min. ago more
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    ABC15 ArizonaPhoenix PD: Woman arrested on overpass, man found dead at homeABC15 ArizonaPHOENIX - Police are investigating after a Sunday morning disturbance on a freeway overpass led to a body found in a central Phoenix home. Investigators say around 9:30 a.m. officers responded to reports of a woman acting erratically at the overpass of ...and more »

    Google News / 9 h. 30 min. ago more
  • Republican Moses Sanchez enters Phoenix mayoral race - AZCentral.comRepublican Moses Sanchez enters Phoenix mayoral race - AZCentral.com

    AZCentral.comRepublican Moses Sanchez enters Phoenix mayoral raceAZCentral.comCity Hall outsider Moses Sanchez jumped into the Phoenix mayoral race Tuesday — the first Republican to do so. Sanchez, 40, has run in local Republican circles for years and previously served on the Tempe Union High School Governing Board, but has ...Republican Moses Sanchez Running for Phoenix Mayor to Change 'Status Quo'Phoenix New Timesall 2 news articles »

    Google News / 10 h. 2 min. ago more
  • Republican Moses Sanchez enters Phoenix mayoral raceRepublican Moses Sanchez enters Phoenix mayoral race

    City Hall outsider Moses Sanchez jumped into the Phoenix mayoral race Tuesday — the first Republican to do so.         

    Azcentral.com / 10 h. 2 min. ago
  • AZ Bill: Publish Wrong Medical-Marijuna Dispensary Address and You Could Be a FelonAZ Bill: Publish Wrong Medical-Marijuna Dispensary Address and You Could Be a Felon

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    Phoenix New Times / 10 h. 2 min. ago
  • Leo Nakano, Son of Hiro Sushi Chef, to Open New Sushi Restaurant in AhwatukeeLeo Nakano, Son of Hiro Sushi Chef, to Open New Sushi Restaurant in Ahwatukee

    Sushi Nakano will feature housemade soy sauce.

    Phoenix New Times / 10 h. 2 min. ago
  • Navajo Nation firefighter runs half marathon in full gear for charityNavajo Nation firefighter runs half marathon in full gear for charity

    There is still time to help him raise money to fight cancer.         

    Azcentral.com / 10 h. 3 min. ago
  • Six Teachers Get Fired at Once in Gilbert. Who Replaces Them?Six Teachers Get Fired at Once in Gilbert. Who Replaces Them?

    How does a school fire six teachers, then reassure parents that they'll hire the best possible replacements on short notice? By tapping people with previous ties to the school.

    Phoenix New Times / 10 h. 32 min. ago
  • Arizona Vegetarian Festival Returns to Downtown Scottsdale This WeekendArizona Vegetarian Festival Returns to Downtown Scottsdale This Weekend

    The two-day event is expected to draw 6,000 folks to Scottsdale this weekend.

    Phoenix New Times / 11 h. 2 min. ago
  • Here's the 2018 Lineup for Canal ConvergenceHere's the 2018 Lineup for Canal Convergence

    And everything else you need to know.

    Phoenix New Times / 11 h. 2 min. ago
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    Google News / 11 h. 54 min. ago more
  • 50 Free Things to Do in Metro Phoenix Any Time in 201850 Free Things to Do in Metro Phoenix Any Time in 2018

    Low on funds and high on FOMO? We can help with that.

    Phoenix New Times / 12 h. 2 min. ago
  • 5 Great Spots for Tea Service in Metro Phoenix5 Great Spots for Tea Service in Metro Phoenix

    A proper spot of tea in the desert? We've got it.

    Phoenix New Times / 12 h. 2 min. ago
  • Why Mouse Powell Keeps It LocalWhy Mouse Powell Keeps It Local

    His new album taps some of Phoenix's best-known musicians.

    Phoenix New Times / 12 h. 2 min. ago
  • Two in custody, one sought after shots fired at off-duty officer's car in Phoenix - ABC15 ArizonaTwo in custody, one sought after shots fired at off-duty officer's car in Phoenix - ABC15 Arizona

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    Google News / 12 h. 9 min. ago more
  • 10th Annual Arizona IT Symposium To Be Held On April 3rd In Phoenix10th Annual Arizona IT Symposium To Be Held On April 3rd In Phoenix

    Posted on January 16, 2018 by Top News US Full Feed in Press Releases Leadership is an overused word, and is often misused. We like this definition.

    Phoenix News / 12 h. 47 min. ago
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  • The Breakdown, Episode 2: This session is specialThe Breakdown, Episode 2: This session is special

    Gov. Doug Ducey's State of the State address focused on ideas that may seem easy for everyone to get behind, but the devil is always in the details.

    Arizona Capitol Times / 14 h. 1 min. ago
  • Police investigating after child shot in north Phoenix home - ABC15 ... - ABC15 ArizonaPolice investigating after child shot in north Phoenix home - ABC15 ... - ABC15 Arizona

    ABC15 ArizonaPolice investigating after child shot in north Phoenix home - ABC15 ...ABC15 ArizonaPHOENIX - Phoenix police are investigating the circumstances surrounding an accidental shooting which left a young child with minor injuries Monday afternoon. Police say the incident occurred at a home near 19th Avenue and Cactus Road shortly after 5 p ...Phoenix police investigate shooting of 4-year-old boy - Story | KSAZFOX 10 News Phoenix4-year-old boy accidentally shot in Phoenix, police say - Arizona's ...AZFamily4-year-old boy injured in shooting at Phoenix homeAZCentral.comall 9 news articles »

    Google News / 17 h. 12 min. ago more
  • A New Satire about Self-Help and Self-Promoting GurusA New Satire about Self-Help and Self-Promoting Gurus

    New book "Keys to Success from a Completely Unsuccessful Person" takes a humorous, satirical poke at self-improvement and publishing industries. "I loved the idea of selling an intentionally, audaciously, ridiculous 'self-help' book that would provide a satire of the giant industry that is self-help," said Cunningham."

    Phoenix News / 17 h. 20 min. ago
  • Blazers, Suns seek to end skidsBlazers, Suns seek to end skids

    PORTLAND, Ore. -- The Portland Trail Blazers and Phoenix Suns will collide Tuesday night at Moda Center, both teams hoping to regain a measure of equilibrium. The Trail Blazers (22-21) will try to en

    Big News Network.com / 19 h. 59 min. ago
  • Coyotes lost season continues vs. SharksCoyotes lost season continues vs. Sharks

    GLENDALE, Ariz. -- The Arizona Coyotes are running out of time. Not to secure a playoff berth -- hopes of that vanished when the Coyotes lost their first 11 games. And not to get to the .500 mark, ei

    Big News Network.com / 20 h. 8 min. ago
  • Let’s agree – greater education funding will lead to greater qualityLet’s agree – greater education funding will lead to greater quality

    Based on a recent poll we released, it seems like we are getting closer to reaching universal support for additional education funding than we’ve ever been – currently, 78 percent of Arizonans agree our schools need more. Put in other words, about four out of every five Arizonans see a need for more public school funding.

    Arizona Capitol Times / 20 h. 40 min. ago
  • Good Samaritan law needed in crusade against opioid overdosesGood Samaritan law needed in crusade against opioid overdoses

    As I watch Governor Ducey declare a statewide health emergency in response to the opioid overdose epidemic, I feel that it is my duty to speak out.

    Arizona Capitol Times / 20 h. 43 min. ago
  • Rep. Lawrence favors more partisanship in local electionsRep. Lawrence favors more partisanship in local elections

    In a time of extreme partisanship, national division, and increasing intolerance toward others, Scottsdale Representative Jay Lawrence is proposing a bill, HB2032, which would INCREASE the animosity and tribalism in our local communities by requiring local elections to be partisan.

    Arizona Capitol Times / 20 h. 46 min. ago
  • Police ID 2 people killed in north Phoenix crashPolice ID 2 people killed in north Phoenix crash

    The two were killed Sunday night near 35th Avenue and Bell Road after a car crashed into them as they were making a left turn.         

    Azcentral.com / 21 h. 6 min. ago
  • Thousands join MLK Day march in Phoenix as pastor urges people to 'stay woke'Thousands join MLK Day march in Phoenix as pastor urges people to 'stay woke'

    The annual Martin Luther King, Jr. Day march and celebration at Margaret T. Hance Park took place in Phoenix, Monday, January 15, 2018. Speakers include 11-year-old Isaiah Lewis and Warren Stewart, Jr. Hundreds march west on Washington Street at 7th Street in downtown Phoenix, Monday, January 15, 2018, as part of the Martin Luther King Jr. Day celebrations.

    Phoenix News / 21 h. 42 min. ago more
  • UPDATE: Newborn found in Tucson airport bathroom safe, healthyUPDATE: Newborn found in Tucson airport bathroom safe, healthy

    TUCSON, AZ (Tucson News Now) - A newborn, who was abandoned in a bathroom at Tucson International Airport, is safe and healthy, according to first responders.Sunday night, Jan. 14 between 9

    Big News Network.com / 23 h. 52 min. ago
  • Different tone to celebrations as Tucsonans honor Martin Luther King JrDifferent tone to celebrations as Tucsonans honor Martin Luther King Jr

    TUCSON, AZ (Tucson News Now) - The 31st annual Martin Luther King day parade and celebration at Reid Park in Tucson, took on a very different tone this year.'At this point in 2018, it

    Big News Network.com / 23 h. 52 min. ago
  • After false missile alert, some Hawaii businesses threw customers outAfter false missile alert, some Hawaii businesses threw customers out

    PHOTOS: False missile warning causes wave of panic across Hawaii Slideshow: PHOTOS: False missile warning causes wave of panic across Hawaii...

    Big News Network.com / 23 h. 52 min. ago
  • Olympic champ Simone Biles says she was abused by doctorOlympic champ Simone Biles says she was abused by doctor

    FILE - In this Aug. 16, 2016 file photo, United States gymnast Simone Biles displays her gold medal for floor during the artistic gymnastics women';s apparatus final at the 2016 Summer Olympics i

    Big News Network.com / 1 d. 0 h. 11 min. ago
  • 13 people held captive in California home, police say13 people held captive in California home, police say

    PERRIS, Calif. (AP) -- Authorities say an emaciated teenager led deputies to a California home where her 12 brothers and sisters were locked … ...

    Big News Network.com / 1 d. 0 h. 33 min. ago
  • Brothers arrested in connection with death of Phoenix manBrothers arrested in connection with death of Phoenix man

    A 21-year-old man and his 16-year-old brother are suspects in the death of 48-year-old Jon Clarke. The pair were arrested in Green Bay, Wisconsin.

    Phoenix News / 1 d. 2 h. 11 min. ago
  • Bipartisan Bill Seeks to Legalize Needle Exchanges In ArizonaBipartisan Bill Seeks to Legalize Needle Exchanges In Arizona

    Supporters say "it’s a way to get people into treatment." But foes like Bill Montgomery liken it to "a free-case-of-beer-a-month program for alcoholics."

    Phoenix New Times / 1 d. 3 h. 48 min. ago
  • The content of his character: Trump epitomizes the personal failures he tries to pin on black folksThe content of his character: Trump epitomizes the personal failures he tries to pin on black folks

    U.S. President Donald Trump speaks at a campaign rally in Phoenix, Arizona, U.S., August 22, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts Donald Trump doesn't know the words to the national anthem.

    Phoenix News / 1 d. 6 h. 57 min. ago
  • Guy Fieri Ate at This Vietnamese Restaurant in Scottsdale — and So Did IGuy Fieri Ate at This Vietnamese Restaurant in Scottsdale — and So Did I

    After 27 seasons, Vietnamese at a strip mall.

    Phoenix New Times / 1 d. 10 h. 2 min. ago
  • How Did a Nice Old Man Like Pimp Floyd Turn to Trafficking Women?How Did a Nice Old Man Like Pimp Floyd Turn to Trafficking Women?

    Mesa police say 76-year-old Floyd Warter was running a high-tech brothel with the help of a 32-year-old woman; neighbors said he was just a nice guy.

    Phoenix New Times / 1 d. 11 h. 2 min. ago
  • Deli Tavern Brings Classic Comfort Food & Cocktails to An Iconic Downtown Phoenix AddressDeli Tavern Brings Classic Comfort Food & Cocktails to An Iconic Downtown Phoenix Address

    When a new spot opens in town, we can't wait to check it out - and let you know our initial impressions, share a few photos, and dish about some menu items. First Taste, as the name implies, is not a full-blown review, but instead a peek inside restaurants that have just opened, sampling a few items, and satisfying curiosities .

    Phoenix News / 1 d. 11 h. 40 min. ago
  • Police: Woman 'in crisis' on freeway overpass leads officers to bodyPolice: Woman 'in crisis' on freeway overpass leads officers to body

    A man was found dead in the home of a woman, who police detained on a Loop 101 overpass Sunday morning. Readers can send news tips to azcentral.com via the newspaper's social media channels, email or by calling the office.

    Phoenix News / 1 d. 16 h. 14 min. ago
  • An Ode to Phoenix BarbecueAn Ode to Phoenix Barbecue

    Silvana Salcido Esparza - Phoenix's longtime top Mexican chef who is perennially acknowledged as one of the best in America - wants to open a barbecue joint. This is her heavily smoked plate of cochinita pibil.

    Phoenix News / 1 d. 20 h. 45 min. ago
  • CFB notebook: Arizona set to hire SumlinCFB notebook: Arizona set to hire Sumlin

    Arizona hired Kevin Sumlin as its head football coach, the school announced Sunday evening. Terms of the new contract will be made available at a Tuesday news conference in Tucson to introduce Sumlin

    Big News Network.com / 1 d. 22 h. 24 min. ago
  • Arizona reaches deal with SumlinArizona reaches deal with Sumlin

    Arizona hired Kevin Sumlin as its head football coach, the school announced Sunday evening. Terms of the new contract will be made available at a Tuesday news conference in Tucson to introduce Sumlin

    Big News Network.com / 1 d. 22 h. 32 min. ago
  • Club Candids: Having A Blast at the Keep On Movin' Dance...Club Candids: Having A Blast at the Keep On Movin' Dance...

    Local DJs dished out beats as dozens danced the night away during the Keep On Movin' dance party on Saturday, January 13, in Phoenix. Here's a look at who Club Candids spotted at the event.

    Phoenix News / 1 d. 22 h. 50 min. ago
  • Inspired by history, steeped in luxury, what’s old is new again at two reimagined resortsInspired by history, steeped in luxury, what’s old is new again at two reimagined resorts

    Modern Luxury  Inspired by history, steeped in luxury, what’s old is new again at two reimagined resorts. By Becky Antioco With approximately 450 hotels and resorts in the greater Phoenix area, totaling more than 62,000 available rooms, there’s no shortage of places to stay for visitors and stay-cationers alike, no matter your style or budget. Many have storied histories, playing host to presidents and celebrities, stretching from the golden days of Hollywood to present day. Two reimagined resorts —Mountain Shadows and The Scott—draw on that history, while creating new icon status with their modern luxury. An Arizona Icon Reimagined The original Mountain Shadows resort opened in 1959, earning its name from the shadows cast by nearby Camelback and Mummy mountains in the town of Paradise Valley. It was an instant hit with international visitors, and Hollywood notables like Bob Hope, Lucille Ball, Elizabeth Taylor, Sammy Davis, and their contemporaries. It earned further renown as the backdrop for the detective drama The Brothers Brannagan and an episode of The Monkees. After expansion and redevelopment in the 1960s, the resort eventually became Marriott’s Mountain Shadows in 1981, and closed for good in 2004. The property remained vacant for about a decade, changing hands multiple times until the developers of Sanctuary on Camelback and Hotel Valley Ho invested $100 million into rebuilding Mountain Shadows in its original location. Newly opened in April 2017, the new Mountain Shadows has an upscale boutique resort vibe, tinged with 1950s style and sensibility. The guestrooms combine mid-century modernism and clean, contemporary style, most with floor-to-ceiling windows and private patios. Special “Immerse” rooms have a freestanding tub so guests can soak and savor the view of Camelback Mountain. Retro touches include in-room cocktail carts and authentic vintage postcard artwork. As it was in its heyday, the new Mountain Shadows is the perfect place to rejuvenate— with two pools and a state-of-the-art fitness center called The Citizens Club—and to socializ —over Hearth ‘61’s fresh, local, American cuisine, or on Arizona’s only 18-hole par-three golf course. The vibe is also Arizona-centric, with PV Mercantile offering design-focused local products, and The Gallery which will feature artwork by artists with ties to the state, rotating every two months. Old Town Charm at The Scott       The Scott has a more recent history on the resort scene. Once known as Sunburst Resort, it was most recently Firesky Resort & Spa, a Kimpton Hotel. The Mission-style architecture recalls the area’s heritage, while Bauhaus fixtures and decor, infused with bright colors create a 1930s Havana aesthetic. Why Cuba, you may ask. The Scott takes its name for Scottsdale’s founding father, Winfield Scott. But the hotel’s design is inspired by Julian Duarte, a Cuban ex-pat who befriended Scott and helped turn Scottsdale into the oasis we know today. When he left Cuba as a boy, Duarte dreamed of building a home like the one he lost. With new outdoor public spaces collectively named The Canal Club, The Scott belatedly realizes Duarte’s vision. The lobby bar, pool, cabanas, and outdoor spaces are inviting, vibrant and lush. Chef de Cuisine Chris Castro’s menus are described as American cuisine with a Cuban twist. The inspiration, the origin story, of The Scott is “a story of travel, ingenuity, and the desire to belong.” Indeed, despite a location in the heart of Old Town, walking through The Scott’s lobby and Canal Club area feels like a genuine escape. And you can completely lose yourself in the serenity of La Vidorra spa, with a signature Vichy Nirvana massage or another treatment in one of six treatment rooms. The Scott’s next phase of renovations will upgrade the decor in all the rooms and suites, while a third wave will add a presidential suite and 12 one-bedroom suites. While visitors flock here to escape harsher climates, or to enjoy our signature seasonal events, Arizonans are blessed with year-round proximity to world-class resorts and stunning scenery. Scottsdale’s newest resorts capitalize on the area’s greatest assets. Inspired by history, steeped in luxury, what’s old is new again.   The post Inspired by history, steeped in luxury, what’s old is new again at two reimagined resorts appeared first on North Valley Magazine.

    North Valley Magazine / 2 d. 0 h. 16 min. ago more
  • Reports: Arizona reaches deal with SumlinReports: Arizona reaches deal with Sumlin

    Arizona reached an agreement to hire Kevin Sumlin as coach, according to multiple reports Sunday. The school has yet to make an official announcement. Sumlin, 53, was 51-26 in six seasons at Texas A

    Big News Network.com / 2 d. 1 h. 55 min. ago
  • Glendale PD: Double shooting was murder-suicideGlendale PD: Double shooting was murder-suicide

    Go inside the Phoenix Fire Department 911 call center to learn about what's going on when you call 911 in the Phoenix metro area. Hannah Gaber/azcentral.com Glendale officials identified the shooter as 59-year-old Ricky Bailey and his victim as 85-year-old Pearl Merenyi, Bailey's mother-in-law.

    Phoenix News / 2 d. 3 h. 14 min. ago
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  • Firefighters battle flames that engulf commercial building in north PhoenixFirefighters battle flames that engulf commercial building in north Phoenix

    About 40 firefighters put out a fire that had engulfed a commercial building early Sunday, and one of the firefighters suffered a back injury. About 40 firefighters put out a fire that had engulfed a north Phoenix commercial building early Sunday morning, and one of the firefighters suffered a back injury, the Phoenix Fire Department said.

    Phoenix News / 2 d. 7 h. 37 min. ago more
  • There's Nowhere to Eat in This TownThere's Nowhere to Eat in This Town

    If I were going to open a restaurant next week, I'd do so at 44th Street and Indian School. I figure I could survive on the overflow alone from the bazillion chain restaurants that have set up shop at this Arcadia intersection.

    Phoenix News / 2 d. 12 h. 8 min. ago
  • Stolen snake stuffed down shirt - caught on cameraStolen snake stuffed down shirt - caught on camera

    PHOENIX, AZ - Two people were caught on camera apparently stealing rare snakes from a pet shop. How they tried to get two very pricey reptiles out of the store surprised the shop's staff.

    Phoenix News / 2 d. 16 h. 31 min. ago
  • It's hot, again. Phoenix area flirts with record-high temperaturesIt's hot, again. Phoenix area flirts with record-high temperatures

    It's Arizona hot. The Valley was 1 degree away from reaching the record high of 79 degrees, according to the National Weather Service.

    Phoenix News / 2 d. 20 h. 48 min. ago
  • Are Your Wedges Costing You Strokes? Are Your Wedges Costing You Strokes? 

    Are Your Wedges Costing You Strokes?  By Scott Sackett As many of you may know, I spend the summers as director of instruction at Park Meadows Country Club in Park City, Utah. Each summer, I do on average four golf schools. The schools are three days, with 18 holes of golf each day and a maximum three-to-one student teacher ratio. This past summer, I partnered with short game legend Stan Utley and put on two short game only schools in Park City. This was as much of a learning experience for me as it was for any of my students and it got me thinking about a lot of the areas of the short game that may be costing a player strokes. One of the things I kept circling back to was lie. The lie on a player’s wedge has a tremendous impact on distance control, spin, and consistency. We can all agree a club which is too upright for a player will launch the ball left and produce a left axis tilt on the ball (this is assuming center contact and a zero club path). Conversely, a club with is too flat will launch the ball right and produce a right axis tilt on the ball (this is again assuming center contact at zero club path). The question becomes, what impact does lie have around the greens? It’s true we encounter a wide variety of scenarios when missing the green. The ball could be buried in the rough, fried egg in a bunker, or sitting pretty on the fringe. You could have grass growing into you, away from you, or a ball sitting up on top of the grass as if it’s on a tee. When you introduce the need to use the club’s bounce or open the face to add loft, the actual lie on the wedge becomes even more paramount. Overall, you always want to err on the side of the wedge being too flat versus upright. Typically, 1 to 1.5 degrees flatter. When you start accounting for all the greenside situations, a club that is too upright is going to by grabbed quicker by longer grass, sand, or firm ground. In longer grass, you’ll have increased difficulty controlling the distance and how the ball comes out. In the bunkers, a club that is too upright will heel dig, making it almost impossible to generate high rates of spin and friction. The moral of the story is to pay attention to your wedges around the green and consider tweaking them a little flatter than the rest of your set. You’ll better be able to utilize the bounce, giving you more versatility. This little change can have a dramatic impact.         The post Are Your Wedges Costing You Strokes?  appeared first on North Valley Magazine.

    North Valley Magazine / 4 d. 3 h. 30 min. ago more
  • Hi, my name is… Paul ReevsHi, my name is… Paul Reevs

      My company & title is… Eco-Logic Management Pest Services, Owner & Vice President A typical day in my life includes… spraying perimeter barriers, drilling termiticide injection holes, paying bills The post Hi, my name is… Paul Reevs appeared first on Deer Valley Times.

    Deer Valley Times / 4 d. 7 h. 43 min. ago
  • Best Hiking Trails in Phoenix for KidsBest Hiking Trails in Phoenix for Kids

      By Jill “MamaBug” Frier January 2018 Phoenix is well known for its fantastic hiking trails. There are over 200 miles of trails on more than 41,000 acres in the The post Best Hiking Trails in Phoenix for Kids appeared first on Deer Valley Times.

    Deer Valley Times / 4 d. 7 h. 45 min. ago
  • Do your homework when looking for a pest serviceDo your homework when looking for a pest service

    Happy New Year! It is that time of year when its time to set a course for how you intend to enjoy 2018. Many of you are considering which streaming The post Do your homework when looking for a pest service appeared first on Deer Valley Times.

    Deer Valley Times / 4 d. 7 h. 46 min. ago
  • A Grape Winter Escape: Taste around Temecula in styleA Grape Winter Escape: Taste around Temecula in style

    A Grape Winter Escape  Taste around Temecula in style. By Alison Bailin Batz Though technically winter, Temecula Valley Wine Country, which is less than an hour from San Diego Airport or a quick five-hour drive from the Valley, will spring to life in January. “Every year, we put our growth––not to mention our grapes––on display during grand Temecula Valley Barrel Tasting Weekend,” says Cori DeHore of the Temecula Valley Winegrowers Association. “This year, from Jan. 27 to 28, our 30-plus partner wineries will not only open their doors to wine lovers, but invite guests behind the scenes to enjoy unfinished barrel and tank wine samples, as well as finished and newly released wines with their sommeliers, winemakers, and even some owners on hand to answer questions and get in on the fun.” According to DeHore, each of the wineries will also perfectly pair delectable food samplings from area restaurants with their wines all weekend long, including these standouts: Callaway Winery: Though it’s the oldest winery in Temecula, Callaway Winery is among the most innovative. Founded by Ely Callaway––of Callaway Golf fame––and now privately owned by a local family, the breathtaking estate and tasting room is built high above the city. Briar Rose: This property is off the path of the wine trails among the rolling hills, originally designed by Beldon Fields who assisted in creating Disneyland in the 1950s. The property is host to a life-size replica of Grimm’s Brothers Snow White’s Cottage. Falkner: Located high on a hill with a spectacular view overlooking the entire Temecula Valley. Longshadow: They have horses on property so only go if you want a “rustic” spot, but really funky and cool with re-modeled barn. If they have it, get the chocolate boot shooter of port. Oak Mountain: The only winery in a cave in the area. And, in an effort to prevent any remotely buzzed or drunk drivers on the road, the Temecula Valley Winegrowers Association partners with the premiere wine tour company on the West Coast, Grapeline Wine Tours, to provide two-day transportation as well as expert guides, who are as entertaining as they are educated about the area, both days of the event. “Though their bustling tour buses and vans, each impossible to miss with their trademark giant grapes emblazoned on each vehicle, are now available throughout Napa, Paso Robles, Santa Barbara and Sonoma Valley, Grapeline Wine Tours was actually founded 15 years ago here in the heart of Temecula by local couple John and Kim Kelliher,” says DeHore. “As a result, they’ve been key to growing this event over the past several years, not to mention acting as our city’s ambassadors for the thousands of out of town guests we host throughout the weekend.” There are also a host of resorts and hotels in the area that are picture perfect for the event weekend or anytime during the winter months, and offering special deals to Barrel Weekend guests, including: Ponte Vineyard Inn: Just a few years old, Ponte Vineyard Inn has already earned AAA Four-Diamond status and been lauded by Trip Advisor as the “Number One Hotel in Temecula” and by Departures Magazine as one of the “Top 10 Vineyard Hotels in the World” for its luxurious accommodations tucked right into its sprawling 300 acres of juicy grapevines, which allows for up close and personal winemaking and wine tastings experiences. A bonus––every room in the sustainable inn offers a private patio or balcony overlooking the vineyards, and often a sea of hot air balloons each morning. Ponte also offers a full bar, which is located underground in their cavernously cool Cellar Lounge. Europa Village: Among Temecula’s newest and boldest destinations yet. Focused on bringing a little taste of the Old World to the heart of Temecula’s wine country, the mission of the vineyard/tasting haven/luxury bed and breakfast concept is to wake up the taste buds and provide a delightful slice of European style, ambiance, and hospitality at every turn. Hot air balloon adventures depart each morning on-site near the winery side while world-class tastings are offered to new guests and returning club members. Two-day passes for the Temecula Valley Barrel Tasting Weekend––inclusive of all tastings at up to 36 wineries, transportation on Grapeline Wine Tours, and all small bites from restaurants and resorts across the region––start at just $239 per person. One-day passes and those who do not wish to use transportation can get tickets starting at just $78. For more information, visit temeculawines.org.   The post A Grape Winter Escape: Taste around Temecula in style appeared first on North Valley Magazine.

    North Valley Magazine / 5 d. 19 h. 33 min. ago more
  • Subaru Outback: A practical daily driver for the road aheadSubaru Outback: A practical daily driver for the road ahead

    Subaru Outback  A practical daily driver for the road ahead. By Greg Rubenstein For some, the car is an extension of personality—a tangible expression of aspiration. That high-end capabilities—like a 150-plus mph top speed or 30-degree approach angle—might rarely be pursued is irrelevant. If what you drive reflects your passion, it offers a glimpse into what you might do, be it a blast down the Autobahn or ford a river. It’s all about possibilities. Others are utterly nonplussed by the idea that their car is anything but a means to an end; for these folks, a vehicle is just an appliance for getting from one place to another. Yet even in this reality, a few cars and brands transcend buyer segmentation, earning a garage spot untethered from traditional motivations. The Prius and MINI Cooper are two examples of the phenomena, as are most vehicles produced by Subaru, a company with renowned buyer loyalty built upon pillars of reliability, safety, and go-anywhere all-wheel-drive utility. For the faithful and prospective conquests alike, the new fifth-generation Outback crossover utility represents the epitome of the Subaru’s most desirable features, and is sure to help continue the manufacturer’s five-plus years of increasing sales. Offered in four trims and with two engine options, the sampled 2.5i Limited is squarely midrange in the Outback lineup. With a $32,695 base price and an as-tested $35,695 sticker, this Outback 2.5i Limited came equipped with $2,095 in options including navigation, automated braking while in reverse, LED headlights, headlights responsive to steering and Subaru’s “EyeSight” system, which constantly monitors the road ahead, providing driver with audible and visual warning or even applying the brakes when hazards are detected. A 175-horsepower, 2.5-liter four-cylinder engine mated to a continuously variable transmission is the Outback’s standard powertrain. An upgraded 256-horsepower, 3.6-liter six-cylinder engine (also with the CVT) is an option with the upmarket Limited and Touring trims. Sound-insulated front-door glass, tire monitoring system with display of pressure at each corner, and an infotainment system with 6.5-inch multi-function touchscreen are other Outback standard features. Stepping up from the base trim, Premium adds heated front seats and side mirrors, two-zone climate control, and power driver’s seat. For the Limited trim, additional standard accoutrements include leather upholstery, heated rear seats, power front passenger seat, 18-inch alloy wheels and fog lights, plus side mirrors with built-in turn indicator. The range-topping Touring model adds low-profile roof rails, heated steering wheel and a brown leather interior with contrasting ivory stitching, along with piano black-finished switch panels. Limited and Touring trims also get an upgraded infotainment system with 8-inch high-resolution touch-screen display, Bluetooth hands-free text messaging and satellite radio. While the 2018 Outback remains essentially unchanged mechanically, the exterior received new front and rear bumpers, new grille design, revised headlights and side mirrors with reduced wind noise, thanks to aerodynamic improvements. Dynamically, this Subaru is a peppy workhorse, equally ready for errands, commute duties or long-hauls to the mountains or coastline. While the base engine is fine for around town and adequate for light road trips, the more powerful six is better suited for families who like to pack heavy or spend a lot of time on the road, especially at higher altitudes. EPA rated at 25 mpg city and 32 mpg highway economy (28 mpg combined), the Outback also scored a five-star overall government crash safety rating. Driver and passenger are protected with a five-star rating in frontal crash and side crash testing, and the Outback earned a four-star rollover rating. Everything about the Outback is nicely executed, from basic ingress and egress to interior design, switchgear layout, ride comfort, and outward visibility. There is nothing the Outback doesn’t do well, making it an easy choice for buyers needing a safe set of wheels for new drivers, as an extra people-hauler which can be taken anywhere without worry about snow or off-road capability (or what might happen when left parked for days), or as a practical daily driver with a minimal operating expense. Subaru love, indeed. Try the Outback, and you may just fall for it, too.     The post Subaru Outback: A practical daily driver for the road ahead appeared first on North Valley Magazine.

    North Valley Magazine / 7 d. 19 h. 9 min. ago more
  • The dental profession was a back-street horror show for hundreds of years, details state historian Marshall TrimbleThe dental profession was a back-street horror show for hundreds of years, details state historian Marshall Trimble

    Frontier Dentistry  The dental profession was a back-street horror show for hundreds of years, details state historian Marshall Trimble.   I’ve often said, “The good old days really weren’t all that good.” Recently, Professor Joanna Bourke wrote, “Agonizing toothache, horrifying extractions and barbaric tools have cast a large shadow over our dental past.” No truer words were ever spoken. Trained dentists didn’t exist until the 1800s and prior to that the care of the nation’s mouths was in the hands of blacksmiths and barbers who doubled as surgeons. Like something right out of the Spanish Inquisition, they wielded pliers for pulling teeth or devices resembling bottle openers, which relied on the hapless patient’s jaw for leverage. It wasn’t uncommon to accidentally dislodge the patient’s jaw during a “procedure.” The profession was a back-street horror show for hundreds of years, run by ham-fisted amateurs who were sure to leave their patients in agony––that is, if they survived. The arrival of affordable sugar from the West Indies in the mid-1600s led to soaring cases of tooth decay. Extraction was almost the only treatment available for a toothache until the middle of the 19th century and it wasn’t something to look forward to. Thousands of people died from botched treatment, infections and other complications so it was hardly surprising that the dentist’s chair was regarded with sheer terror. For a time in the 18th century, transplanting teeth from dead to the living was popular. A small fortune could be earned by grave robbers converging upon battlefields and pulling teeth from the dead and selling them to be used as transplants. If you were lucky there might be a shot of whisky to numb the pain but otherwise all that was offered was a prayer. Until relatively recently rotten and neglected teeth were part of daily life. The invention of the mass-produced toothbrush in 1780 helped but it was too expensive for the poor and was often a “community toothbrush.” The drill was invented during the Victorian Era. Operated by a foot pedal and a belt that turned the drill, the process was slow but it sometimes enabled dentists to drill away the decayed part, eliminating the painful extraction. Out West one of the hazards a dentist had to deal with were temperamental gunfighters. Outlaw Clay Allison, suffering from a toothache, visited a dentist in Cheyenne, Wyoming, who began drilling on the wrong tooth. After having his bad tooth repaired by a different doctor, Allison returned to the offending dentist, pinned him down, and extracted a tooth with a pair of pliers. There had been something available for quite some time but it took almost a hundred years before it became a common treatment for pain. The first chemical used for pain relief was nitrous oxide, also known as laughing gas, invented in 1799. Nitrous oxide, commonly known as laughing gas, due to its euphoric effect upon those who inhale it, was introduced by an English chemist named Joseph Priestley. It became popular among the upper class to have laughing gas parties where everyone got high. Some believed it resulted in a powerful spiritual and mystical experience. One even claimed it revealed to him the secrets of the universe. Unfortunately, for the inhaler, the knowledge they gained quickly faded when the effects wore off. It first became popular for surgery and dentistry due to its anesthetic and analgesic effects in 1844; however, the availability of equipment to produce enough gas for medical purposes along with the fact that it was slow to gain acceptance by doctors and physicians delayed its common use until the 1870s. In 1876 Joseph Clover invented the gas-ether inhaler and it became common to initiate aSECTION: home/HISTORY HED: Frontier Dentistry DEK: The dental profession was a back-street horror show for hundreds of years, details state historian Marshall Trimble. Standard bio & photo for Marshall Trimble V, surprisingly, this is way shorter than most of his columns. If you need an additional visual, we could use a stock photo of a tooth or something. I’ve often said, “The good old days really weren’t all that good.” Recently, Professor Joanna Bourke wrote, “Agonizing toothache, horrifying extractions and barbaric tools have cast a large shadow over our dental past.” No truer words were ever spoken. Trained dentists didn’t exist until the 1800s and prior to that the care of the nation’s mouths was in the hands of blacksmiths and barbers who doubled as surgeons. Like something right out of the Spanish Inquisition, they wielded pliers for pulling teeth or devices resembling bottle openers, which relied on the hapless patient’s jaw for leverage. It wasn’t uncommon to accidentally dislodge the patient’s jaw during a “procedure.” The profession was a back-street horror show for hundreds of years, run by ham-fisted amateurs who were sure to leave their patients in agony––that is, if they survived. The arrival of affordable sugar from the West Indies in the mid-1600s led to soaring cases of tooth decay. Extraction was almost the only treatment available for a toothache until the middle of the 19th century and it wasn’t something to look forward to. Thousands of people died from botched treatment, infections and other complications so it was hardly surprising that the dentist’s chair was regarded with sheer terror. For a time in the 18th century, transplanting teeth from dead to the living was popular. A small fortune could be earned by grave robbers converging upon battlefields and pulling teeth from the dead and selling them to be used as transplants. If you were lucky there might be a shot of whisky to numb the pain but otherwise all that was offered was a prayer. Until relatively recently rotten and neglected teeth were part of daily life. The invention of the mass-produced toothbrush in 1780 helped but it was too expensive for the poor and was often a “community toothbrush.” The drill was invented during the Victorian Era. Operated by a foot pedal and a belt that turned the drill, the process was slow but it sometimes enabled dentists to drill away the decayed part, eliminating the painful extraction. Out West one of the hazards a dentist had to deal with were temperamental gunfighters. Outlaw Clay Allison, suffering from a toothache, visited a dentist in Cheyenne, Wyoming, who began drilling on the wrong tooth. After having his bad tooth repaired by a different doctor, Allison returned to the offending dentist, pinned him down, and extracted a tooth with a pair of pliers. There had been something available for quite some time but it took almost a hundred years before it became a common treatment for pain. The first chemical used for pain relief was nitrous oxide, also known as laughing gas, invented in 1799. Nitrous oxide, commonly known as laughing gas, due to its euphoric effect upon those who inhale it, was introduced by an English chemist named Joseph Priestley. It became popular among the upper class to have laughing gas parties where everyone got high. Some believed it resulted in a powerful spiritual and mystical experience. One even claimed it revealed to him the secrets of the universe. Unfortunately, for the inhaler, the knowledge they gained quickly faded when the effects wore off. It first became popular for surgery and dentistry due to its anesthetic and analgesic effects in 1844; however, the availability of equipment to produce enough gas for medical purposes along with the fact that it was slow to gain acceptance by doctors and physicians delayed its common use until the 1870s. In 1876 Joseph Clover invented the gas-ether inhaler and it became common to initiate all anesthetic treatments with a mild flow of nitrous oxide and then gradually a stronger ether or chloroform. It remained in use until the 1930s. Today hospitals use a more advanced anesthetic machine. It still uses the same principle used by Clover’s invention that initiates the anesthesia with nitrous oxide before administering a more powerful anesthetic. In the early part of the 20th century dentistry was still so expensive that some people chose to have all their teeth pulled to spare themselves a lifetime of pain. Having all your teeth removed was considered the perfect gift for a 21st birthday or a newly married bride. Thank heaven for progress. ll anesthetic treatments with a mild flow of nitrous oxide and then gradually a stronger ether or chloroform. It remained in use until the 1930s. Today hospitals use a more advanced anesthetic machine. It still uses the same principle used by Clover’s invention that initiates the anesthesia with nitrous oxide before administering a more powerful anesthetic. In the early part of the 20th century dentistry was still so expensive that some people chose to have all their teeth pulled to spare themselves a lifetime of pain. Having all your teeth removed was considered the perfect gift for a 21st birthday or a newly married bride. Thank heaven for progress. The post The dental profession was a back-street horror show for hundreds of years, details state historian Marshall Trimble appeared first on North Valley Magazine.

    North Valley Magazine / 11 d. 1 h. 4 min. ago more
  • The Cave Creek Museum preserves the North Valley’s historyThe Cave Creek Museum preserves the North Valley’s history

    Desert Life  The Cave Creek Museum preserves the North Valley’s history. By Julie Carlson The Cave Creek Museum’s mission is to collect, interpret, and preserve Cave Creek and Carefree’s history. Open to visitors from October through May, the museum began as an historical society in 1968. Located at the base of Black Mountain, it boasts 80 active volunteers dedicated to preserving the history of life in the north desert foothills. “Although we are small, we are mighty in volunteers,” says Karrie Porter Brace, executive director of the museum. “A lot of our people are from the Cave Creek area, or have winter residences. They are docents; they help with collections; they design and install exhibits, and lead programs.” The museum is divided into three different wings––the Mini-Wing, the Pioneer Wing and the Archeology Wing. Collections are also located throughout the central Ansbaugh Auditorium, in addition to outdoor spaces. “That includes the ranching community, mercantile industry, military, and early historic times of Phoenix,” says Karrie. “We also have an amazing archeological collection that documents the Hohokam period and later––ceramics, baskets, stone tools that date back to a 1,000 years before Anglo-European occupation.” The museum often receives input from the Fort McDowell Yavapai Nation, the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community, and other local Native American tribes. Representatives offer programming and activities as well as discussions on how they continue to identify with their tribes while bringing awareness of their history. As for the Pioneer Wing, it focuses on exhibits and reproductions relating to the mining communities in the Cave Creek area and the popularity of ranching during the 1950s in places such as Sierra Vista, Spur Cross, and Rancho Manana. “To enjoy the West and get a sense of what it was like to live on a ranch is what attracted a lot of people out here,” says Karrie. “One of the major things that the Cave Creek Museum owns is a ten-stamp mill.” A stamp mill was used to it to extract gold, usually in flakes and dust from hard rock such as quartz. The Golden Reef Stamp Mill, located outside, is run by a group of dedicated volunteers the museum affectionately calls the dream team. From Oct.14 through May 12, see it in action every Saturday at 1:30 p.m. “What makes our particular stamp mill unique is that it was located here in Cave Creek, and was relocated to the museum grounds, reassembled and operated monthly for our guests.” Also in the Pioneer Wing is an exhibit on the Cartwright Ranch, the last big ranch in the area. This exhibit features photos and artifacts showcasing the pioneers who settled in the area from 1882-1928, cowboy bronze sculptures by renowned artist John Wade Hampton, and a reproduction of an assayer’s office showing the tools and devices used for mining. In the Mini-Wing, visitors can learn more about the communities of Cave Creek and Carefree. Travel back through time while checking out collections of architect Paolo Soleri, how banking worked during the early 1900s, photography from Jerry Sieve, and learn about how Cave Creek was instrumental in helping medically with tuberculosis patients in the Ansbaugh Auditorium. The Cave Creek Museum also has a small library and archives specific to the mission and scope of the museum as well as a lovely desert cactus garden surrounding the building’s exterior. Also outdoors is the Mission Chapel. Originally an episcopal church in the 1940s, the Mission Chapel is now non-denominational. It’s used frequently for weddings. Throughout the year, the museum also hosts a variety of events and fundraisers. Every November is the Miners Dinner, which supports the mining heritage exhibits, the Stamp Mill, and the dream team. During the month of December, family programming centers on the holidays. Dec. 3 is the museum’s Holiday Magic event with crafts and treats. Dec. 9 the museum hosts author and Carefree resident Robert A. Kittle to discuss his book Franciscan Frontiersmen. On Jan. 14 enjoy a day of food from yesteryear. Bring your heirlooms and antiques over to the museum on Jan. 20 to be appraised for a small fee. On March 11 will be Cave Creek Museum’s annual Homes Through Time’ Tour. Make sure to check the museum’s website for more Family Fun Workshop and Adult Discovery Series dates and/or changes. Before you leave don’t forget to stop in the museum store where you can find books, stuffed animals, beaded jewelry, purses made from cowboy boots, and more, available for sale.   Cave Creek Museum cavecreekmuseum.org (480) 488-2764 6140 E. Skyline Dr., Cave Creek           The post The Cave Creek Museum preserves the North Valley’s history appeared first on North Valley Magazine.

    North Valley Magazine / 13 d. 6 h. 24 min. ago more
  • Movie Releases January 2018Movie Releases January 2018

    JANUARY 5 Insidious: The Last Key JANUARY 12 The Commuter Proud Mary Paddington 2 Condorito: La Pelicula January 19 12 Strong Den Of Thieves Forever My Girl January 26 Maze The post Movie Releases January 2018 appeared first on Deer Valley Times.

    Deer Valley Times / 14 d. 6 h. 18 min. ago
  • Movie Review January 2018Movie Review January 2018

    The Shape Of Water In 1962, a mute janitor develops a relationship with a sea creature that is the center of a series of government experiments, and attempts to break The post Movie Review January 2018 appeared first on Deer Valley Times.

    Deer Valley Times / 14 d. 6 h. 22 min. ago
  • Anytime Fitness at Norterra offers convenient workoutsAnytime Fitness at Norterra offers convenient workouts

    State-of-the art equipment. 24/7 access. Almost 4,000 locations worldwide. Sound intriguing? Then Anytime Fitness is the gym just for you! Anytime Fitness is aimed for people who try to get The post Anytime Fitness at Norterra offers convenient workouts appeared first on Deer Valley Times.

    Deer Valley Times / 14 d. 6 h. 31 min. ago
  • Editor's Note January 2018Editor's Note January 2018

    With the new year off and running, it seemed like a good opportunity to introduce myself. Back in 2013, I walked into the Arcadia News and asked if they were looking for any writers. As luck would hav

    Arcadia News / 15 d. 7 h. 3 min. ago
  • Chem-Free: How to safely color foodChem-Free: How to safely color food

    Ahhh the joys of baking! While some prefer to make candy such as peppermint bark and peanut butter cups, others love the smell and tradition of baking treats such as sugar cookies with yummy frosting.

    Arcadia News / 15 d. 18 h. 2 min. ago
  • Options for senior drivers that assist with safety, well-beingOptions for senior drivers that assist with safety, well-being

    From pedal extensions to seat cushions, older drivers have a number of options available to make their vehicles safer and enable them to stay behind the wheel longer. 

    Arcadia News / 15 d. 18 h. 2 min. ago
  • Ask the Appraisers: Hoarding can be deadlyAsk the Appraisers: Hoarding can be deadly

    My mother loved my father very much. They wed in the mid-1960s and aside from work, I don’t think they were ever apart. November 12, 1988 was a day that changed my mother forever. In addition to being

    Arcadia News / 15 d. 18 h. 2 min. ago
  • An equine touch: Church partners with horse therapy programAn equine touch: Church partners with horse therapy program

    A local church has gone above and beyond to connect those in need with a valuable form of therapy.  

    Arcadia News / 15 d. 18 h. 2 min. ago
  • Top 10 movies for 2017Top 10 movies for 2017

    Boiling down all the movies of 2017 to a list of 10 favorites is an agonizing task and yet a challenge I will always accept. Here’s my list of the best of last year. 

    Arcadia News / 15 d. 18 h. 2 min. ago
  • Gleaning: Collecting citrus for the communityGleaning: Collecting citrus for the community

    The neighborhoods of Arcadia are lined with citrus trees, ripe full of delicious and healthy fruits, such as oranges, grapefruit, tangerines, lemons and limes. The start of a new year means that citru

    Arcadia News / 15 d. 18 h. 2 min. ago
  • A memorable trip full of favorite thingsA memorable trip full of favorite things

    As early as I can remember, I adored musicals. Those larger than life films where they would break into some big, random song and dance number whether it made sense or not. They allowed you to suspend

    Arcadia News / 15 d. 18 h. 2 min. ago
  • Refugee family welcomed to Arcadia neighborhoodRefugee family welcomed to Arcadia neighborhood

    Jill Thomas and Nola Enge have been very busy.  

    Arcadia News / 15 d. 18 h. 2 min. ago
  • Business Briefs January 2018Business Briefs January 2018

    D’Lite – D’Lite has opened a new location near Arcadia. Specializing in on-the-go healthy eats, D’Lite already has multiple locations across the Valley. The newest one will be on the northeast corner

    Arcadia News / 15 d. 18 h. 2 min. ago
  • An old sport, a renewed interestAn old sport, a renewed interest

    Alex Dodson, right, puts Empower College Prep students Joclyn (left) and Sesmar through a squash ball “balancing” drill, while Arizona Squash coach Calvin Worthen has sixth-grade student Miguel run timed laps during tryouts for the new Arizona Squash team at the charter school (photo by Teri Carnicelli). The game of squash was invented at Harrow School in England in the 1830s after racquetball players discovered a deflated ball proved much more challenging to hit. In 1884, the first squash court was built in the United States, making it the second of the now 185 countries where the game is played. But the sport has never really reached the level of popularity in America that it enjoys across Europe and other countries. One man is hoping to change that—one city at a time. James Dodson, a recent Chicago-area transplant to Phoenix, has launched Arizona Squash, Inc., a nonprofit that aims to introduce the game of squash to low-income students. The group has partnered with Empower College Prep, a public charter school whose elementary students currently go to school on the campus of North Phoenix Baptist Church, 5757 N. Central Ave. Dodson is no stranger to the game of squash—both his children have played the game into college—nor is he inexperienced with starting a program from the ground up. Dodson is a founding board member and past board chair of Chicago’s MetroSquash, which opened its $8.3-million squash and academic facility on the campus of the University of Chicago in April 2015. Arizona Squash, his latest project, is an afterschool program that uses the game to engage underserved Phoenix area youth through academic support, physical fitness and wellness, mentoring, enrichment, and community service. Students from Grand Canyon University will help the fledgling program with its academic support arm. Empower College Prep fifth and sixth graders in late November tried out for 24 team positions in the new Squash Club, and the church has committed to converting at least two of its old indoor racquetball courts into squash courts—the first one of which Dodson hopes will be ready for action by the end of January. “We are committed to providing our students with unique opportunities that will help develop their gifts and interests, and I believe that this program exposes them to a global game that can expand not only their cultural awareness but their college opportunities,” said Naquana Mitchell Borrero, director of Development and Community Relations for Empower College Prep. Arizona Squash, a free program for students, is still in its beginning stages and is looking for financial support from the community to help the program succeed and grow. Funds are needed to purchase equipment for the students (approximately $50 per student) and to complete the court conversions at the church (approximately $60,000). For more information, contact Dodson at jdodsonphx@icloud.com or follow Arizona Squash on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.    

    North Central News / 15 d. 18 h. 10 min. ago more
  • A love of gardening shared over 80 yearsA love of gardening shared over 80 years

    By Teri Carnicelli Things were very different in Phoenix in 1937. Much of the Valley was still undeveloped, and life was a struggle for many families trying to survive the Great Depression, which wouldn’t end for two more years. A group of women living in what is now the Encanto-Palmcroft Historic Neighborhood began meeting informally to help each other in their yards. They planned and planted gardens, pulled weeds, and traded flowers and plants. During those hours in the sun, they talked about their families, shared their worries, and enjoyed the support and friendship of each other. Members of the Diggers Garden Club gather for their annual luncheon Dec. 6 at Vincent on Camelback (photo by Teri Carnicelli). After the gardening was finished, the hostess served coffee, tea and cookies, followed by a good game of Bridge. They called themselves “The Diggers.” A year later, as a way to enlarge the group, each woman was asked to invite a friend, and this is how the Diggers Garden Club formally began. Eighty years later, women from around the Valley still gather once a month to share their love of gardening and to enjoy each other’s company. “There are other garden clubs in the Valley, but to our knowledge we are the largest, consistently operating one,” says Mary Ann O’Neil, current Diggers Garden Club president. Club members now range in age from the late 50s to the early 90s. Some are still active gardeners, some enjoy visiting others’ gardens and learning about different plants. And one thing remains the same—in order to join, you have to be invited by a current member. And overall membership is limited, so some ladies wait years for a spot to open up. Peggy Brignall has been a member for 10 years, and served on the board seven times—twice as president. “We all have a common love, and it makes it so easy to fit in,” she says. “It’s quite a joy to work with this group.” Currently there are 34 active members, and 28 inactive members. The club meets monthly, October through May, at a local venue or at different member’s homes. “We save several months during the year to enjoy each other’s gardens,” O’Neil explains. There is often a guest speaker from outside the club. “We have heard about everything from compost to chrysanthemums,” O’Neil says. The club also is very active with charitable endeavors that reflect their passion. Each year at the annual party, donations are collected for a pre-selected beneficiary. This year a little over $600 was donated to the Pioneers’ Cemetery Association, to help fund a project to add more trees and plants to the historic Pioneer & Military Memorial Park in downtown Phoenix. The ladies also have been ongoing supporters of the North Mountain Visitor Center and were significant funders of the Bird Blind there. Phoenix has changed dramatically in the last 80 years, growing from a small, struggling desert town to the fifth-largest city in the nation, as of 2017. “One thing has remained constant—the beauty of nature has continued to enchant the Diggers Garden Club, and the fellowship of our members remains strong,” O’Neil says. “We have thoroughly enjoyed our 80 years of ‘digging’ together.”

    North Central News / 15 d. 19 h. 2 min. ago more
  • Luxury apartments get OK from cityLuxury apartments get OK from city

    By Teri Carnicelli The Phoenix City Council last month voted 6-2 to approve a planned urban development (PUD) zoning change for a luxury apartment development just east of 7th Street on Stella Lane. More than 40 residents attended the meeting in opposition to the zoning change, and many said they were extremely disappointed in the council’s decision, but also not that surprised, as the city has been very pro-development in the last several years. Mary Crozier, president of the North Central Phoenix Homeowners Association, with support from a large contingent of orange-shirted supporters, speaks to the Phoenix City Council at its Dec. 13 meeting in opposition to a rezoning request to allow high-density apartments in the neighborhood south of Maryland Avenue and east of 7th Street (photo by Teri Carnicelli). Alta Marlette, a project of Wood Partners, is a luxury rental community proposed for just under 4 acres between Stella Lane and Marlette Avenue, east of 7th Street. The bulk of the project lies behind the strip center that includes Christo’s Ristorante and C&S Sporting Goods, and also juts to the north behind Inman & Sons. The underlying zoning, primarily R-4 and R-5, plus some commercial, allowed for a maximum of 156 units and three stories on that total acreage. Wood Partners wanted 245 units, ad came to the city with a Planned Urban Development (PUD) rezoning request, which would allow for the higher density and up to four stories. The City Council had delayed vote on the zoning change request two times, directing the neighborhood leaders and development representatives to sit down together and try to work out a compromise. The opposition said the density was far too much for this older, quiet neighborhood, which would also cause serious traffic issues for those trying to enter/exit the development off Stella Lane. However, traffic engineers from the Streets Transportation Department signed off on the traffic study submitted by Wood Partners, which commissioned the study from J2 Engineering. The study showed a regular “gap” period between the lights at Maryland Avenue to the north, and Rose Lane to the south, which would allow several cars to safely turn left only 7th Street from Stella, even during rush hours. Neighbors contend that the bulk of vehicles exiting the property were much more likely to turn right, and then cut through the neighborhood using Maryland Avenue—which puts them in the direct path of children heading to Madison Traditional Academy at 10th Street. Jamie Blakeman from J2 Engineering responded that while many cars probably will turn right, those drivers more than likely would head up to Glendale Avenue before turning east, and pointed out that no one would deliberately choose to get caught in school zone traffic. Nonetheless, traffic already is an issue in this neighborhood, and adding more than 200 additional residences will only worsen the problem, said Mary Crozier, president of the North Central Phoenix Neighborhood Association, one of more than 15 neighborhood groups that had joined together in opposition of the re-zoning request. Crozier and some of the other more vocal opponents had been called out for not actually living near this development site. However, Crozier pointed out this zoning change would open the door for other developers interested in high-density infill projects in Central Phoenix, who would use the PUD method to get around existing, lower-density zoning. Approval means the city now has this precedent on its books. While a meeting, facilitated by Mayor Greg Stanton, was held between neighborhood leaders and representatives of the developers in late November, no progress was made. The opposition group was then shocked to hear at the Dec. 13 city council meeting that the developers had agreed to 229 units, after working directly with Councilman Michael Nowakowski. Though Alta Marlette is not in Nowakowski’s district, Wood Partners had developed the five-story, 230-unit Alta Fillmore in his district in 2016. Alta Fillmore, which sits on just over 4 acres at 601 W. Fillmore St., sold in November for $59 million to a Canadian real estate investment trust. Residents were visibly angered that they weren’t included in those negotiations and raised concerned about “secret back-door dealings.” They also said 229 units was still far too many for an area that was zoned for 63 less than that number. Atlanta-based Wood Partners, with offices in Scottsdale, has a history in Phoenix of building, then selling, these types of development within a fairly short time period. Residents argued that this demonstrated their lack of interest in being a part of the “community.” “Wood Partners is in the flipping business,” Crozier said. “Two years from now it is highly likely they will be gone [and] we will be stuck with this big box apartment complex and overwhelming traffic problems that the city has no money to fix.” Kate Gallego and Laura Pastor were the only dissenting votes, with Debra Stark recusing herself in advance of the discussion and vote due to a “potential conflict of interest.”

    North Central News / 15 d. 19 h. 5 min. ago more
  • School BriefsSchool Briefs

    Glendale Union High School District GUHSD Board honors WHS Achievers Washington High School’s best of the best were honored Nov. 1 during the annual Achievement Above All awards ceremony. Principal Kevin Cashatt introduced the guests of honor. The Achievement Above All Teacher Recipient was Amanda Humphrey, who teaches English and serves as a mentor for new teachers joining the district, coaches tennis, works with the Link Crew, and formed the new student group, College Club. The Student of the Year was Alexandra McWatters, who is in the top 3 percent of her class at Washington with a weighted GPA of 4.55. Besides being an excellent student, McWatters is involved on campus and in the community, serving as the co-president of Interact, part of the Youth Arts and Culture Council for the City of Phoenix, part of Link Crew, Swim Team, Dance, National Honor Society, and St. Joseph’s Junior Volunteer Program. The Student Group Award Recipient was Washington Dance, with more than 220 members. Throughout the year, students participate in several performances and other special events, as well as at least two community service projects each year. Washington’s Support Staff Employee of the Year was Kelly Barnes. She joined the Ram family in 2015 and is the athletics secretary. The Volunteer of the Year Award went to the Wilfong family. Cristina and Warren Wilfong had two sons graduate from Washington, but they continue to serve at the school as volunteers with the swim and dive teams. Future freshmen invited to tour schools The GUHSD will hold its annual Future Freshman Night on Jan. 18. Families will have an opportunity to tour campuses, meet teachers and learn more about the traditions of the Glendale Union High School District. Learn why more than 15,700 students are proud to attend GUHSD schools and enroll in Advanced Placement and honors courses, work toward an Advanced Placement International Diploma, participate in championship athletic programs and extracurricular activities, and more. Future Freshman Night is held on each high school campus starting at 6:30 p.m. Contact the school of your interest (information found at www.guhsdaz.org) for specific details. Start the new year with top colleges Glendale Union High School District presents the Pathway to America’s Top Colleges and Universities, on Jan. 11, 2018. This informational evening will introduce students and their families to prestigious college and university opportunities. Representatives from some of the country’s top schools, including Brown, Princeton, Yale and Harvard will be on site for families to investigate higher education opportunities. The evening will also present information on financial aid as well as student scholarships. The event begins at 6 p.m. in the Moon Valley High School Auditorium, 3625 W. Cactus Road. Call the District Office at 623-435-6000 for more information. Madison Elementary School District Madison teachers receive mini-grants The Madison Education Foundation (MEF), the nonprofit supporting additional arts and music education for the students of the Madison Elementary School District, in November distributed $8,000 in grants to 11 teachers, helping them supplement arts programming in their classrooms. Nearly 20 teachers submitted grant applications, which were reviewed by a panel of community members, retired teachers, and MEF board members using a metric-based evaluation system. Those receiving awards are: Jessie McKinley, music teacher at Camelview, who will develop future bass instrument players by using pBuzz instruments. Heights art teacher Katherine O’Connor will work with her third grade students to create totem animals based on Navajo and Zuni cultures. Madison Traditional Academy music teacher Ken Giordano will receive a digital keyboard for his classroom. Madison No. 1 art teacher Michelle Lindsay will work with students to photograph their self-portrait and use Aurasma (augmented reality app), and dance teacher, Cassandra Gray, will purchase dance costumes for her students. Park Middle School art teacher Sara Daffe will help her students create a recycled arts lighting STEAM Project, and music teacher Julie Thibodeaux will create Claymation films with her students. First grade teachers at Madison Simis will come together as a collective group and create a site-specific art installation using paint and paper to be displayed in the school hallway. Three teachers at Madison Meadows were awarded grants. Among them were art teacher Mariah Starkey, who will work with her eighth-grade students to create self-portraits of children living in an orphanage. In addition, Kim Thomas, digital design teacher, will purchase three Green Screens for students to create green screen videos, and Christy Schwalenberg, math teacher, will create a project with her students using art and math concepts. For more information about the program or to make a donation, visit www.madisoneducationfoundation.org or call 602-664-7964. Parking lot makes way for garage As the new Madison Center for the Arts building nears completion, construction will begin on the accompanying parking garage. The garage will be located in the current parking lot shared by the District Office and Madison No. 1 Middle School. Families will no longer be able to drop-off or pick-up students on 16th Street. A one-way drop off lane, on the north side of the property, can be accessed off 16th Street, however, the lane will not be opened until 8 a.m. each weekday morning. The lane will wrap around the east side of the school, near the I-51, and cars will exit west onto Missouri Avenue. There will be an afternoon satellite bus available to transport students from Madison No. 1 to North Phoenix Baptist Church, 5757 N. Central Ave., where parents may pick them up. Additional parking for student drop-off and pick-up will also be available at the LDS church on 18th Street and Missouri Avenue. These changes will go into effect Jan. 8, 2018 when Madison No. 1 returns from winter break. The projected completion date is December 2018. If you have any questions, contact the District Office at 602-664-7900. For a map of the new drop-off route, visit http://madisonaz.org/no1-middle-school/home/. Osborn Elementary School District Argentine teachers visit Osborn district Osborn recently participated in an exchange program of Argentine teachers that presented an opportunity for both educators and students. For three weeks, 25 teachers from Argentina were involved in 60 hours of in-classroom internships and 40 hours of professional development. Their visit was in cooperation with the ASU Center for Advanced Studies in Global Education. The experience was memorable for the Argentine cohort, the 12 mentor Osborn teachers who welcomed these scholars, and 350-plus Osborn students who learned from and interacted with the scholars in English and Spanish. Osborn teachers and administrators taught professional development sessions in the evenings in Spanish, allowing the Argentine educators to experience in the classrooms what they were learning as part of their professional development. D-backs grant aids ‘mobile’ learning The Arizona Diamondbacks Foundation recently awarded Clarendon Elementary School a grant through its annual School Challenge program. The grant money will be used to support the school’s Walking Classroom, first launched in early 2016. Thanks to The Walking Classroom, Clarendon’s fourth-graders are learning while they walk. Lessons on everything from history to wellness to English come easier during their 20-minute walks around campus. Material comes pre-loaded on special audio players that students began using early in 2016. The classes stride around the school while listening to the lesson, after which they return to the classroom to discuss and write about what they learned. Best of all, the material is aligned to current standards, so teachers can keep their kids moving while they’re learning critical material. One major benefit for English language learners is that the audio players have a dial to adjust speed, which enables students to slow the diction to a pace that they can break down and better understand. Each winning school will receive a check at a 2018 D-backs game in April ot May at Chase Field. The D-backs will donate more than 400 tickets for students, parents, teachers and staff from each school to attend the game in which their school will be honored. Phoenix Union High School District Innovation Lab coming to Camelback Students from Camelback’s entrepreneurship class have been working toward opening an Innovation lab on campus—a place where students can see their visions become a reality. Working with ASU’s EPIC program and Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation, these entrepreneurship students have been studying design thinking, and needed a place where they could prototype their ideas. Teacher Maria Abrams has been working with career exploration teacher Debora Fox to have students not only explore careers but to build projects that require 21st Century skills. Eric Ose, a volunteer from Heatsync, a makerspace in Mesa, has been working with the teachers and students designing working desktop pinball machines made from cardboard. These students will learn skills incorporating design, 3D printing, construction, soldering, electronics and  circuits and coding. Abrams has written several grants to support this Innovation Lab and to date has received funding from the Verizon Foundation, SRP, The United Way and Fiesta Bowl Charities. Students honored for leadership Three Metro Tech students were recipients of the Phoenix Regional Hispanic Heritage (HHF) Youth Awards, honored for their leadership in the classroom and community. The ceremony took place Nov. 30 at the Arizona College of Medicine-Phoenix Campus. Receiving Silver Awards were students Estephanie Marie Torres for Business & Entrepreneurship; Cecy Abigail Mendoza for Technology, and Gisselle Beltran for Healthcare & Science. The Phoenix event is one of 10 regional events in the United States. Youth Awardees will receive grants for their education or to fund an idea or community project. Regional Youth Awardees will be narrowed to one National Youth Award recipient for each of the seven categories. Students speak at Toastmasters event Camelback Entrepreneurship held its Toastmasters Brunch, Dec. 8 at the Bluewater Grill, which was organized by volunteers Jeff Stephens and Doug Ullrich of Toastmasters. Seven finalists gave 5-minute speeches, which were judged according to Toastmaster rules. Jowun Ben took first place, Nichole Segay placed second and Alec Karsten was third. The brunch drew over 60 students, staff, some parents and community members. Central cheer team captures first place Central High’s varsity cheerleaders took first place in the Co-ed Varsity Show Cheer Novice division at the USA Regionals at Deer Valley High School, Dec. 9. Scoring an 89.9 out of 100, the team also qualified for Nationals in Anaheim in February, where they will compete against other schools from around the country. The cheerleaders are coached by  photography teacher Cecily Frutos. Washington Elementary School District WESD receives grades from ADE The Arizona Department of Education has released its A-F school labels. Of the 32 schools in the Washington Elementary School District, one school received an A, 17 received a B, 13 received a C and one school received a D. The new A-F letter grades system uses a variety of measures including: Percentage of proficient students on the AzMERIT grade level or end of course assessment; EL language proficiency and growth; and indicators to measure students’ ability to accelerate beyond elementary or high school. Desert View Elementary received the District’s only D. Lori Mora, assistant superintendent of Academic Services, said that a plan is in place to provide assistance to the school. To view all the WESD schools and their corresponding letter grades, visit www.wesdschools.org. Royal Palm lauded for after-school offerings Royal Palm Middle School was recognized for best practices in after-school programming at a 21st Century Community Learning Center Unit  Middle and High School Networking Meeting in Flagstaff on Dec. 1. Royal Palm offers robotics, health & fitness, homework help, film editing, math, reading, yearbook and community service/leadership. The program also offers the Grand Canyon University Learning Lounge, which provides math tutoring for Royal Palm students in partnership with college students from GCU. Private and Charter Schools MHP hosts high school VRC qualifying event Madison Highland Prep will expand its 4th-annual VEX Robotics Competition State Qualifying tournament from 24 teams to 38 teams this school year. The tournament, which will be held Saturday, Jan. 13, will include three competition fields in the gymnasium and two practice fields along with the pits in the student commons. With the increase in teams, MHP will look to recruit additional corporate sponsors along with up to 100 volunteers to conduct the event. The competition game for this season is VRC in the Zone. The object of the game is to obtain points by stacking cones on goals, moving mobile goals into goal zones, having the highest stack on goals and parking robots in goal zones. Matches consist of two periods, a fifteen second autonomous period and a one minute and 45 second driver controlled period. MHP VEX Robotics looks to earn its second consecutive berth to the Arizona Interscholastic Association (AIA) state championships in March. The team is coached by Nick Bonds, an engineering teacher. To participate as a sponsor or volunteer, call 602-745-3800. Students participate in street clean-up AmeriSchools Academy had more than 40 students, staff and family members turn out on Nov. 18 for the Camelback Corridor clean up. The school’s National Junior Honor Society members, along with many student athletes, were among the volunteers who are fully engaged in giving back to the community. The clean up, sponsored by Local First, The International Rescue Committee, The Neighborhood Services Department and Councilwoman Laura Pastor’s District 4 office, tackled the area from 7th to 23rd avenues. Entrance exam, financial aid info Xavier College Preparatory will host its High School Placement Test (HSPT) Entrance Exam for eighth grade applicants on two upcoming dates in January: Saturday, Jan. 20 at and Saturday, Jan. 27. Both exams will take place at 7:30 a.m. Approximate dismissal time will be 11:30 a.m. on both exam dates. Online registration as well as additional information regarding Xavier’s testing dates and admissions process may be found on the school’s website at www.xcp.org. An exam fee of $50 will be collected at the beginning of the exam, and either cash or a check made payable to Xavier College Preparatory will be accepted. On both dates, Financial Aid Workshops will be held for interested parents during the exam. School club seeks mobility devices Bourgade Catholic High School (BCHS) offers a variety of student extracurriculars and clubs, including one that focuses efforts on collecting mobility devices to those in need in Africa, where the accessibility of such devices is virtually non-existent. The Interact Club at Bourgade Catholic is an international organization that develops leadership skills and service to others. This holiday season, the BCHS Interact Club chose Crutches 4 Africa as its service project initiative “We collect used and surplus mobility devices, ship them to developing countries, and distribute them free of cost, to individuals with physical challenges regardless of their race, gender, tribe, age, or religion,” says Interact Club moderator, Amber Christenberry. The club’s motto is “service above self.” “That really resonated with me and led me to join,“ says Jaiden Gatson, Interact Club president. Crutches 4 Africa will accept any used mobility device such as crutches, walkers, canes, wheelchairs, etc. The school will accept any mobility device donations in their front office, 4602 N. 31st Ave., until Feb. 24. For more information or to make a donation, contact Bourgade Catholic High School at 602-973-4000.

    North Central News / 15 d. 19 h. 5 min. ago more
  • A personal struggle, a message of hopeA personal struggle, a message of hope

    North Central resident Lori Price has always had an interest in fitness, and particularly enjoys finding was to make fitness fun for children of all ages. Something she has achieved as co-owner of Flip Dunk Sports at 1515 E. Bethany Home Road. The Phoenix Suns Gorilla greets a group of ladies who completed the Phoenix NEDA Walk, including, from left: Kay Eskridge, Phoenix NEDA Walk founder Lori Price, Katie Hassett, and Paige Price (submitted photo). But what many people may not know about Price is that she has personally struggled with a debilitating eating disorder. “I felt alone and like nobody could understand,” Price recalls. “I ended up going into treatment as an adult with three kids.” That is why before she became a business owner, she first committed to raising awareness about this underreported mental illness that can have grave and long-lasting consequences. By Teri Carnicelli “Eating disorders are life threatening,” Price emphasizes. “They have [some of the] highest mortality rates of any mental illness.” Gina Rich Hassett has been friends with Price for more than 20 years, ever since their sons started preschool together. “If you know Lori, talking about her struggles isn’t something that comes naturally for her. So for her to come forward and do what she is doing to bring awareness to eating disorders is just amazing,” Hassett says. “She has helped countless people; she is probably the most passionate person I know with the biggest heart.” Price started the Phoenix NEDA Walk in 2011. NEDA (National Eating Disorders Association) reports that 10 million men, and 20 million women develop and eating disorder at some point in their lives, and that half of teen girls and a third of teen boys use unhealthy weight control behaviors. “My goal is to spread awareness, help others not feel alone, and to let them know help is available,” Price says. And she has strong team of supporters in her corner, including her family. “I have a really strong and amazing committee that helps with the walk every year,” Price says. “This makes chairing the walk and running Flip Dunk easier to manage. Also, at Flip Dunk my business partners are incredible—Malarie and Bob Woolf do a ton of the work, and they also help with the walk.” The Phoenix NEDA Walk is set for 6-9 a.m. Sunday, Feb. 25 at the Phoenix Zoo, 455 N. Galvin Parkway. There will be a 1-mile walk through the zoo, with the Phoenix Suns Gorilla on hand to congratulate participants at the end of the walk. There also will be speakers, raffles, information booths, a kids crafts station, a DJ and refreshments. Teams have until 1 p.m. Feb. 23 to register. Or, you can make a pledge to an existing team, like Price’s. Her team name is “You’re More Than A Number.” “Everyone knows somebody who’s been affected by an Eating Disorder, but because of NEDA, there is hope, prevention, cures, and improved access to quality care,” Price says. For more information, visit: https://nedawalk.org/phoenix2018.

    North Central News / 15 d. 19 h. 6 min. ago more
  • Renowned violinist visits Memory CaféRenowned violinist visits Memory Café

    This month’s Memory Café, hosted by Jewish Family & Children’s Service, will feature internationally known violinist Moshe Bukshpan. The event will be held 10-11:30 a.m. Thursday, Jan. 4 at Beth El Congregation, 1118 W. Glendale Ave. Born in Tel-Aviv in 1954, Moshe began his violin studies at the age of 8 and was a featured artist on Israeli TV at age 11. Since 1982, Moshe has taught strings in private studios and public schools, and has performed throughout Arizona. Other activities at the January Memory Café will include a variety of art experiences. The Memory Café is for those with memory loss and their care partners, offering an opportunity to come together to make new friendships and support one another. There is no charge but registration is required. To register or for more information, e-mail kathy.rood@jfcsaz.org or call 602-452-4627.  

    North Central News / 15 d. 19 h. 11 min. ago more
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  • The December and January skies offer some astounding sightsThe December and January skies offer some astounding sights

    Sky Observations  The months ahead promise some astounding sights. By Steve Kates The Earth has completed another orbit around our amazing star, the sun. The month of December is full of amazing sights to see, along with some great events taking place in 2018. December skies begin with a discussion of the most amazing moon of all of 2017. The super moon will occur on the night of Dec. 3. The super moon is the full moon that is closest to Earth and appears to be 13 percent larger and some 30 percent brighter than most full moons in a calendar year. A super moon can occur during the full or new phase of the moon. Arizona observers, note that the moon will be full at exactly 7:47 a.m. MST on Dec. 3 and moves to a position we call perigee at around 1 a.m. MST on the morning of the 4th and will be some 222,135 miles from the Earth. This full, super moon is also known as the full cold moon or the full long night moon. It’s the only super moon of 2017. There can only be a few of these very close moons during any given year. One of the last super moon events was back on Nov. 14, 2016, which was the closest super moon since Jan. 26, 1948. The closest full moon of the 21st century will occur on Dec. 6, 2052. After this great full moon, the moon moves on to its last quarter phase on the 10th and continues to wane and reach a new phase on the 18th. December has some interesting planets to view too. Most of the activity will take place in the morning sky, as Venus and Jupiter continue a nice series of close encounters, like the close conjunction back in early November. Saturn moves into solar conjunction, by the 21st. The seasons change once again, as we welcome the holidays and the Christmas season. The winter solstice begins on the 21st at 9:28 a.m. MST December has one last surprise. Watch out for the annual Geminid meteor shower, which will peak on the morning hours of the 14th. This is one of the best meteor showers of the entire year and the moonlight isn’t expected to interfere too much with the viewing. To see it at its best, look to the northeastern sky after midnight on the 13th, into the 14th. You may get to see upwards of 50 meteors per hour, many with bright vapor type trails. The Geminid meteors are all thought to be a part of a rock comet. The source of this shower may be an old asteroid /comet, 3200 Phaethon. January skies also offer some amazing sights. We welcome the first major total lunar eclipse on the night of Jan. 31, 2018. This will be the first total lunar eclipse seen from Arizona since 2015. This eclipse will be an early morning event for us here. The partial phases of the eclipse begin at 4:48 a.m. MST. The total phase begins at 5:51 a.m. MST with the best totality at 6:29 a.m. MST. Totality ends at 7:07 a.m. MST. The moon will appear deep red in color and totality will last for some 68 minutes. If you miss this one, the next decent total lunar eclipse will occur on Jan. 20, 2019. That eclipse will begin for us in Arizona, around 8:33 p.m. MST. The other big news story of 2018 will be the close approach of Mars. Mars will come to a near historic close approach to Earth on July 26. It will be 35,785,537 miles from us. While it sounds far, this is very close and it only happens every 15 years or so. Don’t miss it.                                 The post The December and January skies offer some astounding sights appeared first on North Valley Magazine.

    North Valley Magazine / 28 d. 0 h. 36 min. ago more
  • Scottsdale pharmaceutical company raises funds to help hurricane victimsScottsdale pharmaceutical company raises funds to help hurricane victims

    Far From Home Scottsdale pharmaceutical company raises funds to help hurricane victims. By Julia De Simone Photos by Steven Fellheimer The devastation caused by Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico is personal for Sean Lonergan of Scottsdale. The PruGen Pharmaceuticals’ founder of the Scottsdale-based company not only has a home on the island, but so do several of his employees. “We’re trying to help in any way we can,” says Lonergan, also chairman and CEO of the company. “From our standpoint, we’re so close. Our friends, family, employees were all affected.” In the wake of the situation, the company’s PruGen Foundation is raising funds to assist victims affected in Puerto Rico and the continental United States. In addition, every dollar donated by the company’s team members and customers will be matched. As of press time, more than $100,000 had been raised at youcaring.com/prugencares. Their goal is $250,000, which Lonergan is confident they can surpass by the end of the calendar year. “At PruGen, we believe that when we come together, united for a common cause, the sky’s the limit for the impact we can make for those in need,” Lonergan states on the site. The PruGen founder said when the hurricane hit Puerto Rico, he and his family were in the Valley but his 10 employees that work on the island returned to work immediately afterward. Currently employees are residing at Lonergan’s Puerto Rico house with their primary job of “delivering food, water, and helping.” “I take great pride in them and the team echoes (those sentiments),” he says. In a recent Fox 10 interview, Nadja Bague, a PruGen employee who also calls Puerto Rico her home, says it’s been “devastating.” “Puerto Rico has been basically destroyed. The power structure that there was is non-existent now. So hopefully, you know pretty soon, we will be able to get that stuff back on,” she says. Lonergan also plans to travel to Puerto Rico early January where they will continue to work with employees and fellow friends residing on the island to best determine those needing the greatest assistance. “Everyone is making use of himself or herself on the island,” he says. “People know that they’re hurting. We want to get the word out that we’re trying to help them as soon as we can.” In the meantime, they will continue to concentrate on their other sponsored organizations including Golf Fore Africa, Play for P.I.N.K., Map International, Tee It Up for the Troops, and Family Promise of Greater Phoenix. PruGen Inc., founded in 2006, develops, manufactures and markets generic and branded prescription and over-the-counter medications. Roughly 600 employees in the continental United States and Puerto Rico make up the company, which performs research and development in areas such as drug delivery technology for oral medications and advanced treatments for fungal infections, acne and rosacea. In August 2011, PruGen was named the 29th fastest-growing company in the United States by Inc. 500 Magazine. An application for the PruGen foundation to be recognized as a 501©(3) tax-exempt organization is currently pending with the IRS. All donations are retroactive. For more information on donating to assist Hurricane Maria victims, visit youcaring.com/prugencares, as well as their Facebook page. The post Scottsdale pharmaceutical company raises funds to help hurricane victims appeared first on North Valley Magazine.

    North Valley Magazine / 29 d. 7 h. 44 min. ago more
  • Nursery Finds: Nice custom favorites for baby’s roomNursery Finds: Nice custom favorites for baby’s room

    Nursery Finds  Nice custom favorites for baby’s room. By Nadine Bubeck Photos by Melissa Mulera, Studio No 5, studionumber5.com Trending in the wonderful world of nurseries––custom and contemporary. For my baby boy number three, I wanted to create a simple and uncluttered living space equipped with unique finds, personalized décor, and quality furniture. Here’s a look inside my son’s new room, and nine of my favorite nursery must-haves.   FAB FURNITURE Traditionally unique and high quality, the perfect combo for the modern nursery. Oxford Baby offers an array of furniture that grows with your child, like the Harlow 4-in-1 Crib that easily converts to a toddler bed, daybed, and full bed. Exquisite in look and safe for baby, pair this crib with the matching six-drawer dresser featuring tons of storage and soft-closing drawers. Chic designs and finishes including midnight navy, vintage white and artic gray. babiesrus.com   COZY RUGS The Lorena Canals Round ABC Rug is a lovely, playful, and educational addition to any kid’s room. Comfortable for snuggling and generous in size, the round rug is machine washable and eco-friendly, made of non-toxic dyes and 100 percent cotton. lorenacanals.com   CUSTOM ART Dress your walls in Oopsy Daisy art. The boutique website showcases hundreds of personalized prints and décor, making your nursery pop with pizazz. My pick: a custom wall decal with your child’s name. Removable and easy to reposition, these exquisite stickers don’t damage your walls or leave a residue. oopsydaisy.com   SHOP ETSY Tip: peruse Etsy! Opt for original décor like custom name signs from shops such as Rachel’s Wood Barn. Choose your preferred wood finish, letter fonts, colors, and design resulting in an original and special touch to your child’s room. etsy.com   STORY TIME Instead of the cliché bookcase, go for floating bookshelves from Cloud Zero. Allowing colorful book-covers to be wall décor, these space-saving wall-mounted shelves are made of clear acrylic, giving the room a magical floating feeling. They’re sturdy, safe, simple to install, and can hold many books. mycloudzero.com   CUSTOM BEDDING Carousel Designs will become your newest obsession. It’s a site that lets you customize and personalize just about anything for your nursery. Choose from hundreds of fabrics, colors, and fonts to create original crib sheets, draperies, throw pillows, and more. My pick: the ultra hip personalized crib sheet with Navy Cross Arrow fabric. babybedding.com   A LOVING LOVEY Before giving birth, buy a My Baby’s Heartbeat Animal to savor the intimate memory of hearing your baby’s heartbeat. All kits come with a plush pal and 20 second recorder that captures the sound of baby’s heartbeat in the womb. Once the beat is recorded and placed within, press the animal’s foot to hear the special sound. mybabysheartbeatbear.com   BABY SOOTHERS Soothe baby to sleep with Skip Hop’s Moonlight & Melodies Cloud Mobile. While stars project on the ceiling, it lulls little ones to sleep with glowing clouds, lullabies, and nature sounds. Choose the the combination of mobile features you prefer, and even restart the mobile outside the nursery via a remote control. skiphop.com   ACCESSORIZE Accessories your nursery with items from My First Years, a website that custom creates personalized gifts and trinkets for babies. Trending: the gender neutral Star Jacquard Knit Blanket with your child’s name, perfect as a throw. This, in addition to the timeless royal-looking rocking chair available made from pinewood. Personalize the headrest for a charming extra touch. my1styears.com     The post Nursery Finds: Nice custom favorites for baby’s room appeared first on North Valley Magazine.

    North Valley Magazine / 33 d. 0 h. 15 min. ago more