• La Mesa takes next step toward its climate action planLa Mesa takes next step toward its climate action plan

    Despite criticism from some environmentalists that the process is taking too long, La Mesa is making progress on creating a climate action plan to reduce greenhouse gases and carbon emissions. The city’s 10-member Environmental Sustainability Commission and the Climate Action Plan Council Subcommittee...

    UT San Diego / 20.12.2017 22:25
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    This RSS feed URL is deprecated, please update. New URLs can be found in the footers at https://news.google.com/news

    Google News / 45 min. ago
  • Firefighters, Civilians Line Freeway for Iverson Procession Firefighters, Civilians Line Freeway for Iverson Procession

    Thousands of firefighters and people who just wanted to pay their respects lined Interstate 15 to watch fallen firefighter Cory Iverson's funeral procession make its way to El Camino Memorial Park in Sorrento Valley Sunday."Today had been a day that I am struggling to find words to try and describe," Cal Fire Chief Tony Mecham told NBC 7. "Cory Iverson made a decision to seek a profession where he put others first and by doing that that comes at great consequence to his family." Mecham traveled with the procession from Ventura County Sunday morning. "We were never alone for 203 miles today," he said. "For 203 miles not a single overpass did not have multiple fire engines standing in salute."Iverson, 32, was a Cal Fire Engineer from Escondido. He was part of a strike team made up of five engines with Cal Fire San Diego that were in an active area of the Thomas Fire in Fillmore, California when an accident occurred at about 9:30 a.m. Thursday.A funeral procession for a San Diego firefighter killed while battling the Thomas Fire started Sunday morning in Ventura County. "It's just heartbreaking," Ventura County resident Lauren Jayne told NBC 4 in LA. "Everybody's working so hard, and there's so little we can do except for to just be human and to try and do something kind." She came out Sunday to pay her respects to Iverson.The procession left around 10 a.m. from the Ventura County Medical Examiner's office, traveling southbound on Highway 101. It then moved onto State Route 134 and Interstate 210 before continuing south to Interstate 15 arriving in San Diego around 1:20 p.m.The procession ended at the El Camino Memorial Park cemetery in Sorrento Valley around 2:12 p.m.Natalie Pomiak decided to honor Iverson's sacrifice by coming out to watch his procession. "We’re so grateful and thankful for all that they do and they put themselves to protect us," she said.Scripps Ranch resident Christine Bowen agreed. "We’ve lived in the community for 20 years, so we have been part of fires in the past and it’s a big deal, and we want to bring this fallen firefighter home," she told NBC 7.Iverson's remains will stay at the El Camino Memorial Park until his memorial service on Dec. 23. The service will be held at The Rock Church on Rosecrans Street in Point Loma at 10 a.m.Iverson is survived by his wife, Ashley, and their two-year-old daughter. His wife was pregnant with a second child, expected in May.Photo Credit: NBC 7 This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.

    NBC 7 / 59 min. ago more
  • 3 injured in fiery small plane crash near Gillespie Field in El Cajon3 injured in fiery small plane crash near Gillespie Field in El Cajon

    A small plane crashed and burned in an El Cajon parking lot shortly after takeoff Sunday, sending three people to a hospital. 

    KFMB / 1 h. 9 min. ago
  • 1 killed, 2 injured in crash near Pala Mesa Resort1 killed, 2 injured in crash near Pala Mesa Resort

    One person was killed and at least two others injured in a two-car crash on Old Highway 395 near Pala Mesa Resort on Sunday. 

    KFMB / 1 h. 13 min. ago
  • Funeral procession held for fallen local firefighterFuneral procession held for fallen local firefighter

    A touching show of solidarity was on display Sunday as the body of fallen San Diego firefighter Cory Iverson returned to San Diego. 

    KFMB / 1 h. 16 min. ago
  • Padres re-sign Jordan Lyles, designate Travis Wood for assignment - The San Diego Union-TribunePadres re-sign Jordan Lyles, designate Travis Wood for assignment - The San Diego Union-Tribune

    The San Diego Union-TribunePadres re-sign Jordan Lyles, designate Travis Wood for assignmentThe San Diego Union-TribuneSan Diego Padres starting pitcher Jordan Lyles delivers during the first inning of a baseball game against the Colorado Rockies in San Diego, Friday, Sept. 22, 2017. (Alex Gallardo / AP). Dennis LinContact Reporter. The asking prices for most free ...and more »

    Google News / 1 h. 22 min. ago more
  • For Chargers, repeating history will be much more difficult - The San Diego Union-TribuneFor Chargers, repeating history will be much more difficult - The San Diego Union-Tribune

    The San Diego Union-TribuneFor Chargers, repeating history will be much more difficultThe San Diego Union-TribuneChargers quarterback Philip Rivers congratulates Kansas City quarterback Alex Smith (11) after the Chiefs' 30-13 win on Saturday at Arrowhead Stadium in Kansas City, Mo. (David Eulitt / TNS). Dan Woike. Inside the visiting locker room at Arrowhead ...Chiefs Hammer Chargers, Take Control of AFC WestNBC 7 San Diegoall 436 news articles »

    Google News / 1 h. 35 min. ago more
  • Procession for Fallen Firefighter Makes Its Way From Ventura County to San Diego - NBC 7 San DiegoProcession for Fallen Firefighter Makes Its Way From Ventura County to San Diego - NBC 7 San Diego

    NBC 7 San DiegoProcession for Fallen Firefighter Makes Its Way From Ventura County to San DiegoNBC 7 San DiegoFirefighter Cory Iverson lost his life battling the Thomas Fire in Ventura County last week. (Published 2 hours ago). A funeral procession for a San Diego firefighter killed while battling the Thomas Fire started Sunday morning in Ventura County. The ...Funeral procession held for fallen local firefighterCBS 8 San DiegoWatch Live Fox 5 coverage: Procession for fallen firefighterThe San Diego Union-TribuneFuneral Procession Begins for San Diego FirefighterFOX40KTLA -Los Angeles Times -KSBY San Luis Obispo Newsall 47 news articles »

    Google News / 2 h. 12 min. ago more
  • UPDATED: Antonio Brown has partially torn calf muscle - The San Diego Union-TribuneUPDATED: Antonio Brown has partially torn calf muscle - The San Diego Union-Tribune

    The San Diego Union-TribuneUPDATED: Antonio Brown has partially torn calf muscleThe San Diego Union-TribuneWhat seemed to be a potentially minor injury to Steelers wide receiver Antonio Brown took on a serious tone when he was transported to the hospital on Sunday. ProFootballDocContact ReporterSports Medical Analyst. Hopefully, the news that Steelers wide ...and more »

    Google News / 2 h. 15 min. ago more
  • Christmas fizz for friends and the fat elf himself
Christmas fizz for friends and the fat elf himself

    San Diego Reader / 2 h. 20 min. ago
  • Sen. McCain returning to Arizona, will miss tax bill voteSen. McCain returning to Arizona, will miss tax bill vote

    Watch Video WASHINGTON — Sen. John McCain is heading home to Arizona to continue recovering from the side effects of chemotherapy for a brain tumor and will not be in Washington for the tax vote this week, two sources close to McCain confirmed to CNN. McCain is unlikely to return to Washington this year, one of the sources said. But his ability to get on a plane to Arizona was a “good sign,” a source said. McCain left Walter Reed Medical Center “exhausted, but ok,” a Republican close to him said. McCain’s daughter, Meghan McCain, confirmed that the senator would be in Arizona for Christmas. “Thank you to everyone for their kind words. My father is doing well and we are all looking forward to spending Christmas together in Arizona,” she tweeted Sunday afternoon. The Republican senator was admitted into the hospital on Wednesday after missing a third straight day of votes in the Senate. McCain suffers from a type of brain tumor called a glioblastoma. He was diagnosed with the tumor following surgery to remove a blood clot in July. The final vote on the Republican tax bill is expected to take place early this week. The passage of the tax bill, however, does not hinge on McCain’s support because the GOP has a 52-48 vote advantage in the Senate. Vice President Mike Pence can also cast a tie-breaking vote, should it come to that. The White House and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s office have been planning for McCain’s potential absence during the tax bill vote, making Tennessee Republican Sen. Bob Corker’s announcement Friday that he would support the plan critical. He did so as an insurance policy for McCain’s absence, two Republicans close to the matter said. Last week, sources in the Senate told CNN they were worried about McCain recently, following a week when the Arizona Republican was kept from the Senate to address side effects from his brain cancer treatment. The sources described McCain as looking increasingly frail and said he has not spoken up in recent GOP meetings the way he had before, in addition to his absence this week for treatment at Walter Reed Medical Center.

    FOX 5 / 2 h. 40 min. ago more
  • New state courthouse in downtown finally to open - The San Diego Union-TribuneNew state courthouse in downtown finally to open - The San Diego Union-Tribune

    The San Diego Union-TribuneNew state courthouse in downtown finally to openThe San Diego Union-TribuneTrial information is displayed electronically in the lobby of the San Diego Superior Court's new Central Courthouse. (Bradley J. Fikes). Bradley J. FikesContact Reporter. When the new state courthouse in downtown San Diego opens today, it will be the ...

    Google News / 2 h. 50 min. ago more
  • New state courthouse in downtown finally to openNew state courthouse in downtown finally to open

    When the new state courthouse in downtown San Diego opens today, it will be the culmination of more than a decade of planning and work, along with some frustrating delays and disputes with an adjacent trolley construction project. The $555 million courthouse at the corner of Union and West C streets...

    UT San Diego / 2 h. 50 min. ago
  • Single-Engine Plane Crashes Near Gillespie Field Single-Engine Plane Crashes Near Gillespie Field

    A single-engine plane crashed into a parking lot near Gillespie Field Sunday morning sending three men to the hospital with major trauma injuries.  Jury Trial Set for San Diego’s 'SnapChat Murder' Teen The plane was on fire, which has since been knocked down. Hazmat has been requested for the fuel spill. No one on the ground was hurtPhoto Credit: NBC 7 This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.

    NBC 7 / 2 h. 57 min. ago more
  • 1 killed, 2 injured in two-car crash in Fallbrook1 killed, 2 injured in two-car crash in Fallbrook

    FALLBROOK, Calif. - One person was killed and at least two others injured in a two-car crash on Old Highway 395 near Pala Mesa Resort Sunday. The crash was just before 12:30 p.m. at Tecalote Lane, a California Highway Patrol dispatcher said. Authorities shut down Highway 395 from Stewart Canyon Road to Tecalote Lane, the dispatcher said. One person was airlifted to Scripps Memorial Hospital La Jolla, and another was taken in an ambulance to Inland Valley Medical Center in Wildomar. A witness told CHP officers that the SUV involved in the crash was driving erratically. No names were immediately released.

    FOX 5 / 3 h. 21 min. ago more
  • LA Getaway (from your relatives this holiday): San Diego - HuffPostLA Getaway (from your relatives this holiday): San Diego - HuffPost

    HuffPostLA Getaway (from your relatives this holiday): San DiegoHuffPostLike birds flying south for the winter, Angelenos get in their cars and head down one of a few freeways toward the warm climes of San Diego during the holidays. It's the retirement destination of many of our parents and grandparents, and the long ...

    Google News / 3 h. 49 min. ago
  • Pentagon Program Spent Millions Investigating UFOs: ReportsPentagon Program Spent Millions Investigating UFOs: Reports

    The Pentagon said that it had a secret program that lasted for five years that investigated unidentified flying objects, or UFOs, according to multiple reports published Saturday.The program, which only a few officials knew about, ran from 2007 to 2012, according to reports in The New York Times and The Washington Post, and received $22 million in annual funding from the U.S. Department of Defense budget. It investigated sightings by military pilots of flying objects that "maneuvered so unusually and so fast that they seemed to defy the laws of physics,"  Politico reported. Alpine Woman Decks Out Home With 23 Christmas Trees The Times' included a Youtube video that suggests the footage was taken from a Navy fighter jet and shows an "unidentified aerial phenomenon." Special Counsel Obtains Thousands of Trump Transition Emails The Pentagon acknowledged the existence of the program."The Advanced Aviation Threat Identification Program ended in the 2012 timeframe," Pentagon spokeswoman Laura Ochoa said in an email to Reuters. "It was determined that there were other, higher priority issues that merited funding and it was in the best interest of the DoD to make a change." Dying Man's Wish to See New 'Star Wars' Movie Comes True According to the reports, officials claim the program is still in existence in some form today and sightings are still being investigated. But the Pentagon did not confirm or deny that."The DoD takes seriously all threats and potential threats to our people, our assets, and our mission and takes action whenever credible information is developed," Ochoa told Reuters.Democratic Sen. Harry Reid, who represented Nevada from 1987 to 2017, was a strong supporter of getting funding for the program, as he had a fascination for face phenomena, according to the Times. On Twitter Saturday, Reid linked to the Times' story, writing, "The truth is out there. Seriously."Photo Credit: Andy Dunaway/USAF via Getty Images, File, This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.

    NBC 7 / 3 h. 50 min. ago more
  • Weekly San Diego Sports Preview - NBC 7 San DiegoWeekly San Diego Sports Preview - NBC 7 San Diego

    NBC 7 San DiegoWeekly San Diego Sports PreviewNBC 7 San DiegoNBC 7's Becki Schildhouse previews what is going on in San Diego sports this week. (Published Saturday, Dec. 16, 2017). Here is a look at what is going on in San Diego sports for the week of December 18th-23rd. GULLS: It is rivalry week for the Gulls ...and more »

    Google News / 3 h. 59 min. ago
  • Veterinarian: ‘Dogs don’t typically attack owners;’ calls for further investigationVeterinarian: ‘Dogs don’t typically attack owners;’ calls for further investigation

    GOOCHLAND COUNTY, Va. - A Virginia veterinarian said it’s highly unusual for a dog to attack its owner, and she has a lot of questions about what actually happened when a local woman was allegedly mauled to death by her dogs, WTVR reported Friday. “She was supposed to go take care of her dogs at her dad’s house and come back,” Barbara Norris, a friend of Bethany Stephens, said. However, Stephens never came back and her father made a gruesome discovery in a Goochland field. “All I heard was, ‘Don’t come down here, it’s bad,'” Norris said. “There were various articles of clothing, underclothing scattered about the area not far from the body and torn into small pieces, there were patches of blood,” Goochland Sheriff James Agnew said. Agnew described the scene as one of the most grisly he has seen in his 40 years of law enforcement. “It was very clear the woman in the woods had suffered severe injuries consistent with being mauled by these dogs,” Agnew said. The sheriff said that according to a preliminary report from the medical examiner, Stephens two pit bulls, each weighing about the same amount as her, 125 pounds, killed their owner. “There were no strangulation marks, the victim had puncture wounds in the skull and this was not a homicide,” Agnew said. A man who used to work with Stephens at a dog training facility told CBS 6 that Stephens was very experienced working with animals, and loved her dogs. He said she had one of them named “Tonk” for a while, and he could not imagine him doing this to her. He said the other one was newer, but he thought it came from the same litter. Although Dr. Amy Learn, a veterinarian at Cary Street Veterinary Hospital, did not know Stephens or her dogs, she believes many questions still need to be answered. “I think the investigation needs to be ongoing,” Learn said. “Dogs don’t typically just out of the blue attack their owners, so there is typically some kind of provocation.” She said that provocation causes fear, which can cause aggression. But she wonders if there is more to the story. “Was there somebody else there? Were they being attacked by somebody, were they trying to defend themselves and their owner from somebody else, from a wild animal? Was it actually something else that attacked the owner? Were there stray dogs, coyotes [or] something else in the woods,” Learn asked. The dogs, which will be euthanized, are being held at Goochland Animal Control.

    FOX 5 / 4 h. 6 min. ago more
  • What Matthew Alice found interesting in San Diego
What Matthew Alice found interesting in San Diego

    San Diego Reader / 4 h. 13 min. ago
  • 3 hurt when plane crashes near Gillespie Field - The San Diego Union-Tribune3 hurt when plane crashes near Gillespie Field - The San Diego Union-Tribune

    The San Diego Union-Tribune3 hurt when plane crashes near Gillespie FieldThe San Diego Union-TribuneA small plane carrying three passengers crashed Sunday morning in El Cajon in when it struck a light pole. The plane crashed into a fence and caught fire, damaging Cox Communications trucks in an adjacent parking lot. Karen KucherContact Reporter. A ...Single-Engine Plane Crashes Near Gillespie FieldNBC 7 San Diego3 Injured In San Diego County Plane CrashPatch.comall 9 news articles »

    Google News / 4 h. 42 min. ago more
  • Landslide in Chile leaves 5 dead, 15 missingLandslide in Chile leaves 5 dead, 15 missing

    At least five people are dead and 15 are still missing after a landslide swept through a remote village in southern Chile on Saturday, the country’s president said. The deadly catastrophe devastated the town of Villa Santa Lucia, near a popular national park in the Chaitén region following a deluge of rain on Friday. President Michelle Bachelet confirmed the deaths — including that of a tourist — at a Saturday press conference, adding that eight people also were injured in the disaster. The tourist’s name and nationality have not yet been publicly released. Aerial video of the devastation showed debris and portions of the village half-buried beneath the mud in the valley, where emergency responders are continuing to search for the missing. The Chilean President also offered her condolences to the families, saying on Twitter: “My deepest condolences to the families of Elsa Pineda and Claudia Ojeda, victims of the barrage in #VillaSantaLucía. Chile is with you!” More than 4.5 inches (11.4 cm) of rain fell in 24 hours, but conditions were forecast to improve, according to a Reuters report citing Chile’s Interior Ministry. Villa Santa Lucia is 1,270 kilometers (790 miles) south of Santiago.  

    FOX 5 / 4 h. 45 min. ago more
  • Trump says he is not considering firing MuellerTrump says he is not considering firing Mueller

    Watch Video WASHINGTON — Upon returning to the White House on Sunday night, President Donald Trump said he is not considering firing special counsel Robert Mueller. “No, I’m not,” Trump said when asked if he was considering it. On the news that Mueller obtained tens of thousands of transition officials’ emails, Trump said he was very upset about it and called it “very sad.” “I can’t imagine there’s anything on them,” he said. “A lot of lawyers thought that was pretty sad.”

    FOX 5 / 4 h. 52 min. ago more
  • Funeral procession for firefighter killed in Thomas blaze passing through fire-affected countiesFuneral procession for firefighter killed in Thomas blaze passing through fire-affected counties

    The procession, which began at 10 a.m., will travel south on the 101 Freeway through Ventura, Los Angeles and Orange counties. It will continue on Interstate 15 in San Diego County and arrive at El Camino Memorial Park about 2:15 p.m. Iverson, 32, died Thursday while fighting the fire, which is now burning into Santa Barbara County and continuing to threaten homes and prompt evacuations.

    San Diego News / 5 h. 6 min. ago more
  • Word ban at CDC includes ‘fetus,’ ‘transgender,’ ‘science-based’Word ban at CDC includes ‘fetus,’ ‘transgender,’ ‘science-based’

    WASHINGTON — Officials at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the very agency tasked with saving and protecting the lives of the most vulnerable, are now under order by the Trump administration to stop using words including “vulnerable” in 2018 budget documents, according to The Washington Post. In a 90-minute briefing on Thursday, policy analysts at the nation’s leading public health institute were presented with the menu of seven banned words, an analyst told the paper. On the list: “diversity,” “fetus,” “transgender,” “vulnerable,” “entitlement,” “science-based” and “evidence-based.” Alternative word choices reportedly were presented in some cases. For instance, in lieu of “evidence-based” or “science-based,” an analyst might say, “CDC bases its recommendations on science in consideration with community standards and wishes,” the source said. But those working on the Zika virus’s effect on developing fetuses may be at a loss for appropriate — or acceptable — words. The reaction in the room was “incredulous,” the longtime CDC analyst told the Post. “It was very much, ‘Are you serious? Are you kidding?'” As news of the word ban spreads at the CDC, the analyst expects growing backlash. “Our subject matter experts will not lay down quietly,” the unnamed source said. “This hasn’t trickled down to them yet.” Health and Human Services spokesman Matt Lloyd disputed the report in a statement to CNN. “The assertion that HHS has ‘banned words’ is a complete mischaracterization of discussions regarding the budget formulation process,” Lloyd said. “HHS will continue to use the best scientific evidence available to improve the health of all Americans. HHS also strongly encourages the use of outcome and evidence data in program evaluations and budget decisions.” Others, outside the agency, are already responding with their own choice words. “To pretend and insist that transgender people do not exist, and to allow this lie to infect public health research and prevention is irrational and very dangerous,” Mara Keisling, executive director of the National Center for Transgender Equality, said in a written statement. “The Trump administration is full of dangerous science deniers who have no business near American public health systems like the CDC,” she continued. “They are actually going to kill Americans if they do not stop.” Calling the order “reckless” and “unimaginably dangerous,” Dana Singiser, vice president of public policy and government affairs for Planned Parenthood Federation of America, also weighed in. “You cannot fight against the Zika virus, or improve women’s and fetal health, if you are unable to use the word ‘fetus.’ You must be able to talk about science and evidence if you are to research cures for infectious diseases such as Ebola,” Singiser said. “You must be able to acknowledge the humanity of transgender people in order to address their health care needs. You cannot erase health inequities faced by people of color simply by forbidding the use of the words ‘vulnerable’ or ‘diversity’.” “Here’s a word that’s still allowed,” added Rush Holt, chief executive officer of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. “Ridiculous.” The Office of Management and Budget did not immediately respond to CNN’s request for comment.

    FOX 5 / 5 h. 14 min. ago more
  • Name released of man killed in City Heights double shootingName released of man killed in City Heights double shooting

    Police on Sunday released the name of a man killed in a double shooting in City Heights.

    KFMB / 6 h. 48 min. ago
  • Pedestrian Fatally Struck by Train Pedestrian Fatally Struck by Train

    A pedestrian was hit and killed by a train at the Carlsbad Village Train Station Sunday afternoon.The crash happened around 12:11 p.m. Lilac Fire Milestone: 100% Contained Carlsbad Police are at the scene providing traffic control.The Sheriff’s Department will investigate. 'Granite Strong': Community Mourns HS Senior Killed in Crash

    NBC 7 / 6 h. 52 min. ago more
  • Overnight Poway checkpoint nets 4 arrestsOvernight Poway checkpoint nets 4 arrests

    A driver's license and drunken driving checkpoint in Poway resulted in four arrests, sheriff's officials said Sunday.

    KFMB / 6 h. 54 min. ago
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  • Power outage cripples Atlanta’s Hartsfield-Jackson airportPower outage cripples Atlanta’s Hartsfield-Jackson airport

    ATLANTA -- A power outage at the world's busiest airport left thousands of passengers stranded in dark terminals and in planes sitting on the tarmac, as a ground stop for Atlanta's Hartsfield-Jackson International disrupted air travel across the United States. Incoming and outgoing flights at the airport were halted as crews worked to restore power. Atlanta is the heart of the US air transport system, and the disruption led to hundreds of flight delays and cancellations across the country. San Diego International Airport Flight Status Here are the latest developments: - More than 600 flights to and from Atlanta have been canceled, including 350 departures, according to Flightradar24. - American Airlines is canceling the rest of Sunday's flights in and out of Atlanta. - United is suspending operations to and from Atlanta for the rest of Sunday. - More than 450 Delta mainline and regional flights have been canceled. - Southwest Airlines has canceled all operations in and out of Atlanta. - Flights headed to Atlanta are being held on the ground at their departure airport. - Inbound flights to Atlanta are being diverted, US Customs and Border Protection said. - Departures from the airport are delayed because electronic equipment is not working in the terminals, the FAA said. - The cause of the incident is under investigation. *Alert* Flights, security checkpoints, and plane taxiing delays reported at @ATLairport due to major power outage. Airport officials & @GeorgiaPower are working to quickly fix the problem. Atlanta Fire Units on stand by. #Airport #Poweroutage #ATLAirport #Hartsfield — Atlanta Fire Rescue (@ATLFireRescue) December 17, 2017 The outage affected all airport operations. The airport is working with Georgia Power to determine the cause, spokesman Reese McCranie said. The outage cut power in the terminals, leaving passengers stranded in the dark as they stood in line at gates and security checkpoints. People used flashlights on their phones to see where they were going, said passenger Heather Kerwin, an Atlanta resident bound for New York. "There were a few emergency lights on, but it was really dark -- felt totally apocalyptic," she said. "I decided to get the hell out of there."           Brittny Dettro said she was waiting to board a flight from Atlanta to Milwaukee when the power went out in Terminal B. She shot this image at 1:10 p.m. ET. The outage left passengers sitting in planes on the tarmac for hours. Jodi Green's Delta flight from the Bahamas landed at 1:15 p.m. ET Sunday. As of 4 p.m. she was still on the plane. The ground stop led Southwest Airlines to cancel all operations in and out of Atlanta for the rest of the day, spokesman Brian Parrish said. Customers are being offered re-bookings without fare differences, he said. United and American Airlines also suspended operations to and from Atlanta for the rest of Sunday. Delta, which has its headquarters and largest hub in Atlanta, canceled more than 450 Delta mainline and regional flights as a result of the ground stop, the airline said in a statement. Delta said it is working to deplane customers from aircrafts that have not been able to park at a gate due to the outage.

    FOX 5 / 7 h. 7 min. ago more
  • Cooler weather expected across San DiegoCooler weather expected across San Diego

    Despite recent windy, dry conditions, some San Diegans were treated to cool weather, and in some areas, light sprinkles this weekend.

    KFMB / 7 h. 9 min. ago
  • University City updates: Christmas concert, Shift Program and Adopt-A-FamilyUniversity City updates: Christmas concert, Shift Program and Adopt-A-Family

    Christmas concert at the UC Library Jonathan Crick and Mary Lu Brandwein will perform a Christmas concert with many musical modes and moods by performing with Japanese Bamboo flutes on Dec. 20, 6:3...

    Sdnews.com / 8 h. 28 min. ago
  • 3 injured in fiery plane crash in El Cajon3 injured in fiery plane crash in El Cajon

    EL CAJON, Calif. -- A small plane crashed and burned in an El Cajon parking lot shortly after takeoff Sunday, sending three men to a hospital. The 70-year-old plane had just left Gillespie Field and was bound for John Wayne Airport in Orange County when the pilot reported engine trouble and attempted to turn back, said Mark Casey, a spokesman for Heartland Fire and Rescue. The plane went down just before 10 a.m. near the intersection of Cuyamaca Street and Marshall Avenue, Casey said. That's one block away from the airport. Firefighters found that the crash site was actually in the parking lot of a business on nearby Gillespie Way, he said. The plane struck a light pole and ended up against a fence between two buildings leaking fuel caught fire, and the wreckage became engulfed in flames, Casey said. The three men, who are members of the Huntington Beach Police Department, were all able to escape, and were taken to Sharp Memorial Hospital, he said. The extent of their injuries was unknown. Casey said two Cox Cable Company vehicles were parked near the crash site and sustained damage. The Federal Aviation Administration will investigate the incident, he said. ECPD on scene of a small plane crash in the area of Gillespie Wy & Weld Blvd. Traffic shut down. Please stay clear of the area if possible. pic.twitter.com/bjjz7cCjdv — El Cajon Police (@elcajonpolice) December 17, 2017

    FOX 5 / 8 h. 55 min. ago more
  • Border wedding included drug-smuggling groom
Border wedding included drug-smuggling groom

    San Diego Reader / 9 h. 50 min. ago
  • What We Learned This WeekWhat We Learned This Week

    This is the least creepy pregnancy stock image I could find. / Image via Shutterstock When I first told Scott Lewis I was pregnant, one of his first responses was “I can’t wait to read all the fiery pregnancy takes in What We Learned This Week.” Friends, there have been no takes. It’s not that I don’t have fiery opinions about the abject misery that is pregnancy. But when you’re pregnant, most things in your life tend to become solely about that — whether you want them to or not — and this space has instead been a wonderful refuge where I’ve had the chance to continue being a person who thinks about news and politics. That said, I’m reaaaaaaaaaaaaally hoping that any day now, I’ll be taking a break from this column, and from work altogether (and by that I mean trading it for another, very intense kind of work). So, here’s a condensed version of some of my hot takes on pregnancy, all in one place: I expected pregnancy to be terrible, and it is unquestionably terrible. That said, it was not terrible in any of the ways I expected, and it was terrible in all kinds of ways I never knew to expect. I never dealt with morning sickness. I never dealt with a single stranger putting his or her hands on my belly. But, ever hear of round ligament pain? Me either! Turns out it’s a fun, incredibly common ailment among pregnant women in which you feel unbearable searing pain in your lower abs any time you try to walk. Since walking is something you tend to do a lot during the day, this is quite a predicament. I swear, the second I found out I was pregnant, every news story became about mothers dying in childbirth. ProPublica has been exploring the United States’ disturbingly high rate of maternal deaths in a series all year, which kicked off with this piece about how even a neonatal nurse with a doctor husband — people you’d think would know symptoms and the system well enough to spot signs of trouble — died in childbirth. From there, we got hundreds of profiles of women who died in childbirth just in the last year.  Vox did a piece specifically about California women hemorrhaging to death. NPR just published this devastating piece about why maternal death rates are even higher for black women. These are incredibly important issues to explore, and I’m so glad newsrooms are investing in them. That these investigations have coincided with my own pregnancy, though, has been a little unsettling! The best piece related to pregnancy this year was about Kim Kardashian of all people, but I promise you, this is a thoughtful, insightful read about how celebrity pregnancy has become a sort of performance art, written by one of the best pop culture analysts in the country. Though I’m not joking about pregnancy being terrible, and I feel very deeply that women should be able to express that opinion freely, it’s also true that it’s brought out the best in friends, family, coworkers and total strangers. I haven’t had anyone come up and abruptly touch my stomach, but I have had people go out of their way to make my life easier, or to just offer congratulations. So, thanks for that. What VOSD Learned This Week The news this week revolved around where we should build homes, and what people should be allowed to do with them once they own them. First of all, San Diego truly out-San Diego’d itself when Councilman David Alvarez of all people torpedoed the latest attempt to actually create regulations for short-term vacation rentals. Councilman Scott Sherman unloaded after the vote, suggesting Alvarez and Councilwoman Myrtle Cole were both too beholden to labor. Andy and I talked about the epic vacation rental failure on the podcast this week as well. Then there are the San Diego County homes that aren’t built yet. As wildfires raged in the northern part of the county this week, it’s important to remember that county leaders may soon decide whether to let developers move forward with several projects that would be located in areas of extreme wildfire danger. Speaking of the fires, we broke down what officials actually mean when they say a fire is only “(insert percentage)” contained. And down in the southern part of the county – another area where developers want to erect more homes – some homebuyers are backing out of their deals now that methane and other gases have been discovered underground. More students have described to Ashly McGlone disturbing behavior they either experienced firsthand or witnessed in the classroom of a former La Jolla High teacher. Meanwhile, more parents have told frightening stories of what’s happening in severely understaffed special education classrooms, including students wandering off or injuring themselves. What I’m Reading What a week for accountability journalism examining police misconduct: Vice analyzed data from the 50 largest police departments in the country and found cops shoot Americans far more than anyone realized. The Oregon department tasked with overseeing police officers let cops who’d been fired remain eligible for work even after they’d racked up records for brutality or ineptitude. (Oregonian) The L.A. Sheriff’s Department has a secret list of hundreds of deputies with histories of misconduct. (L.A. Times) And in other news … An important point: The #MeToo movement is as much about the workplace as it is about sex or harassment. (New York Magazine) No one articulates a political moment better than Molly Ball, and her dispatch from Doug Jones’ stunning Senate victory is no exception. (Time) The film “Frida” came along right at the moment I was forming Important Adult Opinions about everything from politics to art to feminism. Salma Hayek’s explosive new essay about what Harvey Weinstein put her through to get it made adds a whole new dimension – both Frida Kahlo’s story and Hayek’s attempt to tell it shed light on what it takes for talented women to get art made in worlds dominated by powerful men. (New York Times) About a decade before Donald Trump became president, the government initiated a massive land seizure in order to build a build a section of border wall. In doing so, it abused its power at every turn. (Texas Tribune/ProPublica) One way American’s lives could be made infinitely better – without requiring any action by politicians! – would be to bring Japan’s amazing Kit-Kat selection here. (Yes, I would try the “college tater” flavor. No question.) (L.A. Times) Line of the Week “In the coming weeks, we’re going to start challenging many of the tired assumptions in publishing. For example: Who said that a film review can’t be ghostwritten by a member of that film’s publicity team?” – This parody piece about a wealthy businessman purchasing an alternative weekly newspaper is a little *too* good.

    Voice of San Diego / 11 h. 20 min. ago more
  • Christ Lutheran Church sells affordable senior housing complex in Pacific BeachChrist Lutheran Church sells affordable senior housing complex in Pacific Beach

    Christ Lutheran Church (CLC) in Pacific Beach announced on Dec. 14 the sale of Luther View Apartments, a 48-unit affordable senior housing complex that the church built in 1979. The property was so...

    Sdnews.com / 11 h. 42 min. ago
  • Half of Voters Prefer Democratic-Controlled Congress: PollHalf of Voters Prefer Democratic-Controlled Congress: Poll

    Half of all registered voters say they prefer a Democratic-controlled Congress, according to a new NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll, signaling a dangerous political environment for Republicans entering next year’s midterm elections.Fifty percent of registered voters say they prefer a Democratic-controlled Congress, versus 39 percent who want Republicans in charge. GOP Betting That Its Fix for US Economy Will Defy Warnings The last time Democrats both held a double-digit lead and hit 50 percent on this question in the NBC/WSJ poll was September 2008, right before the party won the White House and picked up a substantial number of House and Senate seats.The NBC/WSJ poll was conducted Dec. 13-15 of 900 adults – nearly half reached by cell phone – and it has an overall margin of error of plus-minus 3.3 percentage points. The margin of error among the 736 registered voters is plus-minus 3.6 percentage points. Special Counsel Obtains Thousands of Trump Transition Emails Photo Credit: Getty Images, File

    NBC 7 / 11 h. 48 min. ago more
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    The region’s top agency in charge of building roads and rail has faced endless criticism from environmental groups over its enthusiasm for building so-called express lanes that serve buses, carpools, electric vehicles and paying customers. Winning over transit advocates could prove one of the biggest...

    UT San Diego / 12 h. 20 min. ago
  • Chula Vista's PR campaign boosted city's imageChula Vista's PR campaign boosted city's image

    Chula Vista’s $100,000 public relations campaign apparently worked. Launched in February, “This is Chula” aimed to showcase the positive qualities of the county’s second-largest city to change any misperceptions. The campaign, which ran through June, included billboards erected across the county...

    UT San Diego / 12 h. 20 min. ago
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  • How air power helped defeat the Lilac fireHow air power helped defeat the Lilac fire

    In open country near I-15 and Highway 76, a spark caught fire. Fanned by strong winds, the spark became a blaze and the blaze became the Lilac fire. That was on Thursday, Dec. 7, around 11: 20 a.m. By 11:30 a.m., the sky was full of smoke, burning embers and a twin-engine airplane. Circling 3,000...

    UT San Diego / 13 h. 20 min. ago
  • Imperial Beach opens first off-leash dog parkImperial Beach opens first off-leash dog park

    Just before sunset these days, Sarah Gawronski, Nala and Lucien visit a new spot in Imperial Beach: the city’s first off-leash dog park, nestled in Veterans Park. “They seem to enjoy it and almost expect to come here every day now,” Gawronski said of her 2-year-old dogs, Nala, a German Shepherd...

    UT San Diego / 13 h. 20 min. ago
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    UT San Diego / 13 h. 20 min. ago
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    UT San Diego / 13 h. 20 min. ago
  • Bolts Refuse to Pin Loss on Litany of InjuriesBolts Refuse to Pin Loss on Litany of Injuries

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    Big News Network.com / 14 h. 56 min. ago
  • Chargers Take Step Back in Loss to KCChargers "Take Step Back" in Loss to KC

    Chargers vs. Chiefs In-Game The Los Angeles Chargers have been two different teams this season. For the first month, poor tackling, miscues, penalties and turnovers contributed to an 0-4 start. Then t

    Big News Network.com / 14 h. 56 min. ago
  • Alpine Woman Decks Out Home With 23 Christmas TreesAlpine Woman Decks Out Home With 23 Christmas Trees

    When it comes to Christmas decorations, one Alpine, California, resident's philosophy is simple: The more the merrier.Fifteen years ago, Rhonda Lamar began collecting holiday decorations. Her seasonal stockpile grows more extensive each year, from festive figurines, garlands and trimmings to her prized possessions: 23 Christmas trees. Things to Do This Weekend: Dec. 14-17 Lamar now sets up nearly two dozen Christmas trees throughout her home, all of them inspired by different themes, from gingerbread to apple pie.She hangs the lights and hand-places the ornaments, one by one, in a yearly tradition that takes her about a week to complete from start to finish. Incredible Holiday Lights in San Diego Neighborhoods "I have about 30 bins; I'm pretty organized," said Lamar, who admits to being a bit of perfectionist. Sneaky: Elf on the Shelf Ideas in Photos The result is a colorful, twinkling holiday wonderland, with something to see in every nook.And she doesn't keep the magic all to herself -- she spreads the cheer.Lamar's house was one of a handful of attractions on display for the 11th annual "Christmas in Alpine" home tour put on by the Alpine Women's Club.The fundraiser charges $30 a ticket and uses the proceeds to support local high school seniors with college scholarships.Lamar doesn't have children, which explains how she keeps her decorations looking so perfect, but is happy to put her passion to good use by supporting other kids in her community.Photo Credit: Steven Luke This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.

    NBC 7 / 15 h. 16 min. ago more
  • San Diego Cares Blood Drive collects more than 700 pints of bloodSan Diego Cares Blood Drive collects more than 700 pints of blood

    San Diego Cares: It's in our Blood, hosted by the San Diego Blood Bank, collected more than 700 pints of much-needed blood for the holiday season during today's event at the Town & Country Hotel and Convention Center in Mission Valley, the Blood Bank announced tonight. Not only a blood drive, but a celebration of San Diego's rich sports history, the event brought together representatives from the San Diego Padres, Chargers, Gulls, Sockers and Kings, along with those from San Diego State, the University of San Diego, the Tijuana Xolos, the 1904 Football Club, the Holiday Bowl and the NASCAR Foundation.

    San Diego News / 16 h. 28 min. ago more
  • MSNBC's Matthews Reprimanded for Improper Comments in 1999MSNBC's Matthews Reprimanded for Improper Comments in 1999

    MSNBC host Chris Matthews was accused of inappropriate jokes and comments about a female employee in 1999 and the woman was paid separation compensation, a spokesperson for the cable network confirmed Saturday."In 1999 this matter was thoroughly reviewed and dealt with. At that time Matthews received a formal reprimand," the MSNBC spokesperson said in an email to NBC News Saturday. Major Media Players Start Commission for Sexual Misconduct The Daily Caller, citing two sources familiar with the situation, first reported the news of the payment which it said was made by Matthews to settle with what it said was an assistant producer on his show "Hardball with Chris Matthews" in 1999.The MSNBC spokesperson said the woman complained to CNBC executives that Matthews made inappropriate jokes and comments about her in front of others, that the matter was reviewed and it was determined that the comments were inappropriate and in made in poor taste but were never meant as propositions. The show was on CNBC before it was on MSNBC. Va. Middle School Rubik’s Cube Team Solves 25 in 96 Seconds Photo Credit: Earl Gibson III/Getty Images, File

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  • How they voted, Dec. 17How they voted, Dec. 17

    CITY COUNCILS CARLSBAD The Carlsbad City Council met in special closed session Tuesday to discuss litigation and property negotiation. In regular session, the council gave final approval to an ordinance amending the city code to mark spots where parking beyond the markings of a single space is...

    UT San Diego / 19 h. 20 min. ago
  • On the agenda, Dec. 17On the agenda, Dec. 17

    CITY COUNCILS CARLSBAD The Carlsbad City Council has canceled its regularly scheduled meeting for 6 p.m. Tuesday. DEL MAR The Del Mar City Council is scheduled to meet at 4:30 p.m. Monday in council chambers, 2010 Jimmy Durante Blvd., Suite 100, to consider an appeal of the Design Review Board’s...

    UT San Diego / 19 h. 20 min. ago
  • Beachgoer armed with BB gun bitten by police dog, arrested - The San Diego Union-TribuneBeachgoer armed with BB gun bitten by police dog, arrested - The San Diego Union-Tribune

    The San Diego Union-TribuneBeachgoer armed with BB gun bitten by police dog, arrestedThe San Diego Union-TribuneA San Diego police dog was used by officers to arrest a man accused of waving around a BB gun and shooting at a police helicopter at Black's Beach Saturday. Only the 51-year-old man, who was bitten by the police dog, was hurt. Police Sgt. Edward Zwibel ...and more »

    Google News / 19 h. 49 min. ago more
  • Man Arrested for Repeatedly Shooting Gun Into Air at Beach Man Arrested for Repeatedly Shooting Gun Into Air at Beach

    A man was taken into police custody Saturday after he shot a gun into the air repeatedly at Blacks Beach.San Diego Lifeguard Marine Lieutenant Rich Stropky told NBC 7 they got a call reporting someone yelling for help from the cliff. “We did a search from land up top and down below. We had a drone in the area and vessels in the water. We couldn’t find anything on the cliff."  Lilac Fire Milestone: 100% Contained They ended up locating the man on the beach, but he was belligerent, so the rescue team backed off and called in police.Officers brought in helicopters to oversee the situation. The man on the beach continued shooting his gun in the air towards the helicopter. 'Granite Strong': Community Mourns HS Senior Killed in Crash Officers then moved in towards the man. He continued to ignore all police commands so they shot rounds of bean bags towards him and eventually released the K9.Stropky told NBC 7, “this is kind of a twist, something we don’t normally deal with."  Jury Trial Set for San Diego’s 'SnapChat Murder' Teen The man was taken into custody and was treated for the minor injury he got from the dog bite.The beach was evacuated Saturday during the incident.

    NBC 7 / 19 h. 58 min. ago more
  • Recap: Chargers Fall to Chiefs 30-13Recap: Chargers Fall to Chiefs 30-13

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    Big News Network.com / 20 h. 56 min. ago
  • Chula Vista receives award for bike-friendly effortsChula Vista receives award for bike-friendly efforts

    Chula Vista’s efforts to make its streets safer for bicyclists were recognized last week by the San Diego County Bicycle Coalition. The city was awarded the coalition’s Public Partner of the Year award for moving forward with a $2 million project that is set to create bike lanes on Broadway and...

    UT San Diego / 22 h. 25 min. ago
  • Procession from Ventura to San Diego honors fireman killed in Thomas FireProcession from Ventura to San Diego honors fireman killed in Thomas Fire

    SAN DIEGO -- A five-county procession took place Sunday for a San Diego firefighter who died battling the Thomas Fire, officials said. Cory Iverson, 32, was a fire engineer for Cal Fire San Diego. He was killed Thursday near Fillmore, falling victim to thermal injuries and smoke inhalation, according to autopsy results released Saturday by the Ventura County Medical Examiner's Office.   Thousands turned out to see Iverson's procession on its route through Ventura, Los Angeles, San Bernardino and Riverside counties back to San Diego. The procession in his honor began at 10 a.m. Sunday at the Ventura County Medical Center and traveled through the Los Angeles area before stopping at a temporary staging point in Chino, according to Cal Fire. It has moved onto the Interstate 15 corridor and arrived at El Camino Memorial around 3:30 p.m. Iverson is survived by his wife, Ashley Iverson, a two-year-old daughter and a second daughter who is due in the spring. A GoFundMe campaign created for Iverson's family called him "a true hero to our Southern California community." By Saturday, it had raised more than $300,000 -- surpassing an initial goal of $150,000, which has been raised at least twice to $500,000. Iverson, who had been with Cal Fire since 2009, left behind a wife and a 2-year-old daughter. His wife, Ashley Iverson, is also pregnant with the couple's second child. A memorial for Iverson will be held at The Rock Church in Point Loma at 10 a.m. on Saturday, Dec. 23.   5 county procession is underway for San Diego firefighter Cory Iverson who died battling the Thomas Fire. Fire engines and firefighters waiting for his arrival at El Camino Memorial Park. @fox5sandiego pic.twitter.com/mNjhpDuHAp — Felicia Martinez (@FeliciaNews) December 17, 2017 The procession for fallen hero Cory Iverson has made it to Chino, where rows of fellow firefighters and some 50 civilians were waiting to honor him. pic.twitter.com/Yhfq7SDLSV — Brooke E. Staggs (@JournoBrooke) December 17, 2017  

    FOX 5 / 22 h. 39 min. ago more
  • Wedding Ring Found in Lilac Fire Rubble Sparks 2nd ProposalWedding Ring Found in Lilac Fire Rubble Sparks 2nd Proposal

    A couple turned their misfortune into a renewal of their love after discovering a valuable possession while sifting through the rubble left behind by a rapid-moving wildfire in North County.Vaughn and Barrie Grant spent Saturday with a group of volunteers sifting through what little remained of their Bonsall home after it was torn to the ground by the Lilac Fire while they were out of town. Lilac Fire Milestone: 100% Contained It was not what they hoped they'd be doing the month of their 50th wedding anniversary. Considering the circumstances, the Grants were in surprisingly good spirits Saturday.  'Granite Strong': Community Mourns HS Senior Killed in Crash It may have been because earlier in the day, while combing what used to be the bathroom, volunteers discovered one of Vaughn Grant's most valuable possessions: her wedding ring. It was about the only thing Grant was hoping to find, but she got even more than she was hoping for. Jury Trial Set for San Diego’s 'SnapChat Murder' Teen “He asked me to marry him again,” she said.“He had the ring, he gave it to me and asked me: ‘Will you marry me’ and I would again in a New York minute,” Grant said as she gave Barrie a tender kiss on the cheek.Grant’s ring might not be as shiny as it once was, but with the help of their neighbors and family, the Grants say together they’ll be just fine.The Lilac Fire was fully contained Saturday but had destroyed 157 structures, most of which were San Diegans' homes. Dozens of volunteers were helping victims of the Lilac Fire comb through the rubble of their homes. It was one of those volunteers that came across Vaughn's wedding ring. “The fact that we were able to recover this lady’s wedding ring, which was pretty much the sole possession that she was after, it’s definitely rewarding at the end of the day,” volunteer Cole Thompson said.Volunteers hope that over the next few Saturdays, they will be able to help more of those devastated by the Lilac Fire find their precious treasures.Photo Credit: NBC 7

    NBC 7 / 22 h. 49 min. ago more
  • Cause of Death Released for SD County FirefighterCause of Death Released for SD County Firefighter

    A San Diego County firefighter died of smoke inhalation and thermal injuries while battling the massive Thomas Fire in Ventura and Santa Barbara counties, a medical examiner determined Saturday. Cal Fire Engineer Cory Iverson, 32, of Escondido was part of a strike team made up of five engines with Cal Fire San Diego that were in an active area of the Thomas Fire in Fillmore, California when an accident occurred at about 9:30 a.m. Thursday.  Jury Trial Set for San Diego’s 'SnapChat Murder' Teen Iverson was killed in the accident. The Ventura County Medical Examiner's Office said Saturday Iverson died of thermal injuries and smoke inhalation. Cal Fire said they are conducting an investigation into the incident, which will provide insight into the circumstances surrounding the death.  San Diego to Be on Fire Weather Warning Sunday A procession will be held Sunday starting at 10 a.m., transporting Iverson's remains from Ventura County across several Los Angeles and San Bernardino county freeways before entering San Diego County via southbound Interstate 15 at about 1:20 p.m.The procession will continue to travel along I-15, passing SR-78 at about 1:45 p.m. and Camino Del Norte at about 1:50 p.m. before exiting at Miramar Road at 2 p.m. Mountain View Resident Badly Hurt in Hit-and-Run Iverson's remains are expected to arrive at El Camino Memorial Park on Carroll Canyon Road at 2:12 p.m.A memorial service will be held for Iverson at The Rock Church on Rosecrans Street in Point Loma next Saturday at 10 a.m.Iverson leaves behind his wife, Ashley and their two-year-old daughter. The couple was expecting their second child in May. Those who knew Iverson said the top priority right now is to take care of his family. Online fundraising efforts are underway to do just that.An online fundraising page was created by a close friend and co-worker of Iverson’s widow to assist the family with funeral costs and other expenses they may have. In it's first few hours live, the page had already raised $20,000 for the Iversons. By Saturday afternoon, the page was nearing $300,000.Cal Fire San Diego County Firefighters Benevolent Fund has also set up a donation page for Iverson’s family. Donations can be made here. Iverson's remains were taken in a procession to the coroner's office Friday. Along the way, firefighters stood in salute on a freeway overpass and on top of fire department vehicles lining the side of a street. The 32-year-old had spent most of his life fighting fires. Iverson was an eight-year veteran of Cal Fire and had previously spent seven years with Harmony Grove Fire Department. Iverson’s friends and co-workers said they’re heartbroken over his death.“I can only imagine the pain that his family and his are going through,” said Cal Fire Capt. John Heggie. “My heart’s shattered knowing what happened to him and knowing what his family is going through.”They described him as a model firefighter and happy man who was always in a good mood, whether he was at the fire station on or the lines.“To put it bluntly, he’s the kind of man you’d want your daughter to marry and the type of fireman you’d want your son to grow up to be,” Heggie added.Following Iverson’s death, 17 San Diego-based firefighters with Cal Fire were taken off the Thomas Fire lines so they could return home to grieve the death of their colleague.The death is the second attributed to the fire, which was in its 12th day of burning Saturday and spanned both Santa Barbara and Ventura counties. The blaze had exploded to 259,000 acres, surpassing the 2007 Zaca fire to become the state's fourth-largest wildfire on record. Cal Fire estimated firefighting costs were nearing $104 million. Firefighters had the blaze 40 percent contained with full containment expected Jan. 7, 2018.Photo Credit: Cal Fire Engineer Cory Iverson with wife Ashley and their two-year-old daughter. This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.

    NBC 7 / 1 d. 0 h. ago more
  • Nola Rose Chocolate sets up shop in the VillageNola Rose Chocolate sets up shop in the Village

    As a Marine Room chef, working under famed Bernard Guillas’ tutelage, it is fitting that Robin Katz has struck out on her own – setting up shop on Girard Avenue. Katz’s new venture? A specialty lin...

    Sdnews.com / 1 d. 0 h. 18 min. ago
  • After days of criticism and accusations, Facebook speaks outAfter days of criticism and accusations, Facebook speaks out

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    Big News Network.com / 1 d. 0 h. 18 min. ago
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  • Operation Homefront provides free holiday meals to military familiesOperation Homefront provides free holiday meals to military families

    SAN DIEGO -- Operation Homefront gave hundreds of local military families a helping hand this holiday season through its free holiday meals program. On Saturday at Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, nearly 400 families received a decorative bag full of non-perishable food and a gift card they can redeem for groceries for a full holiday meal at Walmart. “We are getting stocking stuffers, scarves, games, food -- it’s amazing all that they do and we’re real grateful for it,” said Sylvia Walope, whose husband is a Marine. Through registration, those serving active duty E1 through E6 as well as wounded, ill or injured service members could participate. “Just so awesome to see people giving so much for people they don’t even know,” said Amber Patton, a Navy veteran and now Navy spouse. “Our family is in Idaho and Utah.  We were there last year but this year we are away from them so it's just us and it makes it really nice to enjoy that Christmas dinner and hang out and spend some family time together,” Patton said. The annual event is possible thanks to generous donors and is even sending one lucky family to Disneyland. “We won the Disneyland tickets. I’ve never won anything like that before so I was amazed and shocked!” said Walope, who plans to take her family to the amusement park over the holidays.

    FOX 5 / 1 d. 0 h. 32 min. ago more
  • Ex-employee claims Uber spied on rivals illegally for yearsEx-employee claims Uber spied on rivals illegally for years

    CALIFORNIA, U.S. - In a bombshell revelation, a former Uber security employee, Richard Jacobs has alleged that the ride-hailing company illegally spied on its rivals for years.In his 37-page

    Big News Network.com / 1 d. 0 h. 40 min. ago
  • Family of man injured in Mountain View hit and run pleads for driver to come forwardFamily of man injured in Mountain View hit and run pleads for driver to come forward

    Distraught doesn't begin to describe the family of Jermaine Barnes, a Mountain View man left with life-threatening brain injuries after he was hit by a car Friday night outside of his home.

    KFMB / 1 d. 0 h. 46 min. ago
  • Law enforcement hosts no questions asked gun buy backLaw enforcement hosts no questions asked gun buy back

    Gun owners were given the chance to trade in their unwanted firearms for cash or a skateboard at a gun buyback event hosted by local police and faith leaders on Saturday. 

    KFMB / 1 d. 1 h. 4 min. ago
  • Man armed with gun at Black's Beach bitten by police dog, arrestedMan armed with gun at Black's Beach bitten by police dog, arrested

    Police Sgt. Edward Zwibel said the man at least once aimed the gun at a San Diego police helicopter and may have fired the weapon.

    San Diego News / 1 d. 1 h. 14 min. ago
  • Kids get toys from heroes fresh from Lilac Fire frontlinesKids get toys from heroes fresh from Lilac Fire frontlines

    More than 140 children received early Christmas gifts Saturday thanks to a local church and the county's bravest men and women.

    KFMB / 1 d. 1 h. 23 min. ago
  • Local teams come together to resurrect defunct Chargers Blood DriveLocal teams come together to resurrect defunct Chargers Blood Drive

    The replacement event for the long-running but now-defunct Chargers Blood Drive was held Saturday at the Town & Country Resort and Convention Center.

    KFMB / 1 d. 1 h. 49 min. ago
  • Cops Who Stopped Times Square Bombing Suspect Play SantaCops Who Stopped Times Square Bombing Suspect Play Santa

    Four police officers who are credited with stopping a suspected subway bomber in Times Square played a different kind of hero on Saturday -- by handing out Christmas presents to kids in Newark. It was the first public appearance of the officers -- Anthony Manfredini, Jack Collins, Sean Gallagher and Drew Preston -- since police say a 27-year-old  Bangladeshi immigrant tried to set off a bomb strapped to his body on Monday.  Officers Dove on NYC Bombing Suspect After Explosion: Union The Port Authority police officers are credited with jumping on Akayed Ullah as he reached for his cellphone, potentially saving lives by preventing the rest of the bomb from detonating. On Saturday the officers joined others from the Port Authority and New Jersey State Troopers unions to hand out toys to 200 children who gathered at the National Action Network Newark Tech World School.  Alpine Woman Decks Out Home With 23 Christmas Trees "I think they're here to protect us," said Alquahim Diggs of Newark. "I think we're gonna have a good time (and) make sure nothing bad happens to us."  Mother Candace John said the event meant her children would have a Christmas. Special Counsel Obtains Thousands of Trump Transition Emails "I grew up poor and I don't want them to have the same life I had," John said. Organizers said the event was a special chance to do more than just spread Christmas cheer. "These kids in these communities need to know that police are their friends, troopers are your friends," Paul Nunziato, of the Port Authority PBA union, said. The officers didn't discuss the bombing at the request of federal prosecutors. 

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  • Cause of death released for fallen North County firefighterCause of death released for fallen North County firefighter

    The North County firefighter killed while battling the firestorm in Ventura County died from burns and smoke inhalation, according to autopsy results released Saturday. The Ventura County medical examiner’s office did not release any additional details about the death of Cal Fire engineer Cory...

    UT San Diego / 1 d. 2 h. 30 min. ago
  • Spirits high at Rescue Mission's Christmas meal for homelessSpirits high at Rescue Mission's Christmas meal for homeless

    A festive and thankful mood prevailed at the San Diego Rescue Mission’s annual Christmas Outreach Meal on Saturday, despite the living conditions and everyday realities endured by those in attendance. More than 1,000 homeless and impoverished men, women and children were expected to gather at the...

    UT San Diego / 1 d. 2 h. 55 min. ago
  • Lilac Fire That Destroyed 157 Structures in San Diego County Is 100% ContainedLilac Fire That Destroyed 157 Structures in San Diego County Is 100% Contained

    The Lilac Fire in northern San Diego County, which spread to 4,100 acres and destroyed 157 structures, is 100% contained, officials said Saturday morning. ...

    Big News Network.com / 1 d. 3 h. 7 min. ago
  • San Diego VA's haywire alert system led to bad flu vaccine, 'accountability' actions underwaySan Diego VA's haywire alert system led to bad flu vaccine, 'accountability' actions underway

    After a San Diego VA refrigerator failed and left 1,500 people with useless flu shots in October, the La Jolla VA hospital director says temperature alerts went to the wrong people and nobody took action - for 10 days. "I take this very seriously," Dr. Robert Smith said in an interview.

    San Diego News / 1 d. 3 h. 39 min. ago
  • Gas thieves drill truck's tank
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    San Diego Reader / 1 d. 3 h. 50 min. ago
  • Councilmember Calls for Labor Leader’s ResignationCouncilmember Calls for Labor Leader’s Resignation

    A Chula Vista councilmember and former Chula Vista mayor is calling for the resignation of a local labor leader amid allegations of sexual assault.Mickey Kasparian, the president of the United Food and Commercial Workers Union (UFCW) Local 135 and president of the San Diego Working Families Council, is accused by a county government employee of repeated sexual assaults. Lilac Fire Milestone: 100% Contained The allegations have led his accuser, Melody Godinez, to file a lawsuit that claims he sexually assaulted her on several occasions beginning in May 2014.Photo Credit: Sarah Grieco This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.

    NBC 7 / 1 d. 5 h. 30 min. ago more
  • Lilac Fire Milestone: 100% ContainedLilac Fire Milestone: 100% Contained

    Ten days after the Lilac Fire ripped through San Diego’s North County, Cal Fire officials reached the milestone they’d been tirelessly working toward Saturday: 100 percent containment.Just after 6 a.m., the agency announced the 4,100-acre fire was 100 percent contained. 'Granite Strong': Community Mourns HS Senior Killed in Crash “A big thank you to our local, state and federal cooperators,” Cal Fire said in an update posted to Twitter. “We couldn’t do it without our great partnerships and teamwork.Photo Credit: Jeff Hall/Cal Fire This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.

    NBC 7 / 1 d. 6 h. 8 min. ago more
  • San Diego shifting enforcement from illegal pot shops to delivery servicesSan Diego shifting enforcement from illegal pot shops to delivery services

    San Diego has successfully shut down nearly every illegal pot shop in the city during a crackdown launched in spring 2016, but that's prompted an explosion of illegal marijuana delivery services that present new challenges for authorities. Officials say the roughly 100 illegal delivery services operating in the city use unmarked cars, conceal their storage sites and don't operate from any location for very long.

    San Diego News / 1 d. 8 h. 23 min. ago more
  • Year in review: Missing money, mainstay issues and much more to comeYear in review: Missing money, mainstay issues and much more to come

    Over the past year, the La Jolla area has seen its fair share of trying instances. Despite what has happened, however, there always remains an air of positivity in the community. Although things lo...

    Sdnews.com / 1 d. 9 h. 24 min. ago
  • Art spot: ‘The Nutcracker,’ Johnny Mathis and other holiday favorites this seasonArt spot: ‘The Nutcracker,’ Johnny Mathis and other holiday favorites this season

    The Christmas season is arguably the busiest time of year, and the thing is that it never takes age into account. Look at Johnny Mathis. He’s 82, and he still hits the hustings every holiday. He’s ...

    Sdnews.com / 1 d. 9 h. 33 min. ago
  • Lilac fire 100 percent containedLilac fire 100 percent contained

    The Lilac fire, which spread to 4,100 acres and destroyed 157 structures, is now 100 percent contained, Cal Fire officials said Saturday morning. The wildfire started in Bonsall on Dec. 7 and spread quickly as a result of Santa Ana winds and dry vegetation. The full containment announcement comes...

    UT San Diego / 1 d. 9 h. 50 min. ago
  • San Diego dispensaries prepping to add recreational sales Jan. 1San Diego dispensaries prepping to add recreational sales Jan. 1

    Torrey Holistics dispensary became the first in the state to secure a recreational license this week Legal marijuana dispensaries in San Diego have begun applying for and receiving state licenses they need to begin selling to recreational customers when such sales become legal across California on Jan. 1. Torrey Holistics dispensary in Sorrento Valley became the first business in the state to get a retail cannabis license on Thursday, and San Diego's other 10 legal dispensaries are expected to follow suit over the next two weeks.

    San Diego News / 1 d. 13 h. ago more
  • Morning Report: Pressure Mounts on Mickey KasparianMorning Report: Pressure Mounts on Mickey Kasparian

    Mickey Kasparian speaks at Voice of San Diego’s Politifest 2016 / Photo by Vito Di Stefano Democratic Assemblywoman Lorena Gonzalez Fletcher called on labor leader Mickey Kasparian to resign Friday, but only from his position on county’s Democratic Party central committee and other community boards. “I believe In due process,” Gonzalez Fletcher wrote on Facebook, “but I am disturbed that a string of Latina women from my district have felt so threatened by one person. Ultimately, it is up to the members of [United Food and Commercial Workers Local 135] whether to retain him as their leader.” Stepping down from the party structure, she said, would “ensure no [women] feel unsafe during the litigation of these accusations.” Earlier in the week, Melody Godinez, a labor activist, filed a lawsuit against Kasparian alleging that he’d groped and harassed her. It was the third such lawsuit in about a year. Since then, other former employees have come forward to say Kasparian polices his staff and the local political landscape through bullying and fear, and that he mistreats women specifically. Kasparian has repeatedly denied the accusations, calling them “categorically and completely false” in a statement. Gonzalez Fletcher and Kasparian used to work together on the San Diego Imperial Counties Labor Council, the local affiliate of AFL-CIO, a coalition of unions. Their sometimes tense relationship got worse in 2013 when Gonzalez Fletcher endorsed then mayoral candidate Nathan Fletcher, now her husband. Kasparian recruited Councilman David Alvarez to run against Nathan Fletcher, sinking the latter’s mayoral hopes for a second time. But Friday Alvarez, came to Gonzalez Fletcher’s defense Friday on social media, saying, “Now prepare for the wrath of Mickey. I’ll stand with you when he retaliates, because he will.” It got ugly on Twitter: GOP power broker Jason Roe also jumped into the fray, advising Gonzalez Fletcher to “focus closer to home.” She asked whether he was day drinking. “Or just getting high on your wife’s weed?” Parents on Edge About Understaffed Special Ed Classrooms Parents of special education students in San Diego Unified continue to speak out that their children are unsafe in severely understaffed classrooms. A mother of a student with special needs at Perry Elementary in southeastern San Diego said kids in her child’s classroom have been injured, one wandered out of the school and another put his head through a window.. The stories should sound familiar. Last month, various parents told officials that, without the close supervision of aides and other special education staff, children have wandered out of classrooms and eaten things like rocks and paper clips. Sacramento Still Wrestling with Sexual Harassment Policies The onslaught of sexual harassment allegations in recent months have shown many powerful men are able to evade accountability, in some cases for decades, because of nondisclosure agreements. In the political world, those agreements typically provide victims with (taxpayer) money in exchange for silence. As such, California Senate GOP Leader Patricia Bates, who represents part of North County, is calling on her colleagues to re-evaluate the use of NDAs and allow victims to voluntarily release themselves from past agreements. Senate Pro Tem Kevin de León announced the hiring of two law firms to handle sexual harassment investigations into Sens. Tony Mendoza and Bob Hertzberg, and all such future probes involving Senate employees. Also in this week’s Sacramento Report, all four of the GOP lawmakers in the Assembly are urging their GOP counterparts in DC to renew a health care program that benefits vulnerable children and pregnant women. Congress passed a short-term extension for the program earlier this month, but as year-end federal budget talks continue in Washington, the program’s future remains uncertain. VOSD Podcast: San Diego Out-San Diego’d Itself There’s a leadership vacuum in San Diego, something that was made painfully clear this week when nothing was decided after a 10-hour City Council meeting Tuesday that was supposed to provide clarity on vacation rentals. Councilman Chris Cate later released a scorching statement that read, in part, “We cannot govern.” Also on this week’s podcast, hosts Sara Libby and Andrew Keatts discuss Tuesday’s epic vacation rental regulation failure. Plus: Ellen Montanari talks about the regular protests she leads outside Rep. Darrell Issa’s office. • Issa says he’s still voting no on the Republicans’ tax reform bill. Cate Pays Fine, But Defends His Action Speaking of Cate. The U-T reports he agreed to pay a $5,000 fine to a local ethics commission for passing along a confidential memo last year to developers, but struck a defensive tone in the process. The memo dealt with real estate negotiations and potential litigation surrounding property in Mission Valley, where competing projects have been proposed. Cate said he should be entitled to seek outside information as a policymaker. “While the city attorney did not introduce the Soccer City memo in closed session, it became clear she did intend it as privileged information,” he said in a statement. “I regret breaking her confidence.” In Other News One of the 20 temporary licenses issued by the California Bureau of Cannabis Control went to a Torrey Holistics, a company in the Sorrento Valley neighborhood of San Diego. (Associated Press) SANDAG’s mission is to help ensure San Diego County meets ambitious greenhouse gas reduction goals, and the new board chairman says climate change is a “debatable issue.” (KPBS) In the aftermath of the Lilac Fire and other blazes, the state public utilities commission passed more stringent regulations intended to reduce the risk of wildfires. (Union-tribune) For two years, San Ysidro School District overstated student enrollment, meaning administrators owe the state an estimated $5.1 million. Another $2.1 million worth of expenses could not be found in the current budget. (inewsource) Santee is one step closer to banning smoking in public parks, and a survey suggests that the vast majority of residents there are cool with that. (NBC7) Three San Diego-based defense contractors were ordered to pay millions after their owners pleaded guilty to defrauding the Pentagon. (NBC7) Since 2012, the Hilton hotel chain has opened its facilities to medical training seminars that involve cadavers in cities including New York, Chicago and San Diego. (New York Times) Top Stories of the Week These were the five most popular Voice of San Diego stories for the week of Dec. 8 – Dec. 15. To see the full top 10 list, click here.  Some Homebuyers Back Out of Chula Vista Development Following Methane Discovery A few homebuyers in the 950-home Village of Escaya development in eastern Chula Vista have backed out of their deals following the discovery of methane and other gases in the soil. Others hoping to move into their new homes by Christmas might not have running water. (Ry Rivard) More Students Describe Unwanted Touching From La Jolla High Teacher Two more former students of a former La Jolla High teacher accused of groping female students have come forward to say his behavior in the classroom made them uncomfortable, and that they felt at a loss as to how to respond. (Ashly McGlone) County Officials Set to Consider Allowing Nearly 6,000 New Homes in High Wildfire Risk Areas County leaders may soon decide whether to let developers move forward with several projects that would be located in areas of extreme wildfire danger. (Maya Srikrishnan) Alvarez Flips, Torpedoes Council Decision on Vacation Rentals San Diego City Councilman David Alvarez had joined three colleagues to support a permissive regulation structure for short-term vacation rentals. But as the decision headed toward a vote, he backed off. He later explained that he’d listened to residents’ feedback. But he also declined to support an alternative plan. (Lisa Halverstadt) The Learning Curve: Eight of the State’s Most Segregated Schools Are in San Diego Eight schools in San Diego Unified make the list of the most racially segregated schools in the state. But there hasn’t exactly been a critical mass of parents pushing for more integrated schools. More often, parents who aren’t happy with their assigned neighborhood schools speak with their feet. (Mario Koran) Corrections Thursday’s Learning Curve column mischaracterized an inewsource/Hechinger Report story on segregation within certain community college classes. That report dealt with students who fail to make it through a remedial course sequence within two years, not necessarily those who ultimately fail the courses.

    Voice of San Diego / 1 d. 14 h. 10 min. ago more
  • Top Stories: Dec. 8-15Top Stories: Dec. 8-15

    Downtown Chula Vista / Photo by Adriana Heldiz These were the most popular Voice of San Diego stories for the week of Dec. 8-15. 1. Some Homebuyers Back Out of Chula Vista Development Following Methane Discovery A few homebuyers in the 950-home Village of Escaya development in eastern Chula Vista have backed out of their deals following the discovery of methane and other gases in the soil. Others hoping to move into their new homes by Christmas might not have running water. (Ry Rivard) 2. More Students Describe Unwanted Touching From La Jolla High Teacher Two more former students of a former La Jolla High teacher accused of groping female students have come forward to say his behavior in the classroom made them uncomfortable, and that they felt at a loss as to how to respond. (Ashly McGlone) 3. County Officials Set to Consider Allowing Nearly 6,000 New Homes in High Wildfire Risk Areas County leaders may soon decide whether to let developers move forward with several projects that would be located in areas of extreme wildfire danger. (Maya Srikrishnan) 4. Alvarez Flips, Torpedoes Council Decision on Vacation Rentals San Diego City Councilman David Alvarez had joined three colleagues to support a permissive regulation structure for short-term vacation rentals. But as the decision headed toward a vote, he backed off. He later explained that he’d listened to residents’ feedback. But he also declined to support an alternative plan. (Lisa Halverstadt) 5. The Learning Curve: Eight of the State’s Most Segregated Schools Are in San Diego Eight schools in San Diego Unified make the list of the most racially segregated schools in the state. But there hasn’t exactly been a critical mass of parents pushing for more integrated schools. More often, parents who aren’t happy with their assigned neighborhood schools speak with their feet. (Mario Koran) 6. Everything You Need to Know About the Big Vacation Rental Vote After years of wanting action, it appears many vacation rental opponents would be greatly relieved if the City Council would punt the issue once again. The Council is set to decide on Tuesday whether to permit and regulate vacation rentals, severely restrict them or drag the issue out once again, leaving a meaningless ban on the books. (Scott Lewis) 7. Fresh Off Lost Chairmanship and Vacation Rental Debacle, Sherman Unloads City Councilman Scott Sherman, who this week lost his post as chair of the City Council’s land use committee, says unions are increasingly running the show at City Hall – and he’s not happy about it. (Lisa Halverstadt) 8. Long, Strange Marijuana Case Takes Another Turn in Pot Entrepreneur’s Favor District Attorney Summer Stephan has agreed to return to medical marijuana pioneer James Slatic and his business, Med-West Distribution, $289,979 — plus $5,484 in interest — that authorities confiscated in a 2016 raid on his Kearny Mesa facility. So ends a nearly two-year case with sudden and suspenseful turns. (Jesse Marx) 9. Scenes From a Burned-Out Neighborhood Photo albums and garden decorations are some of the few items left scattered amid charred rubble after the Lilac Fire engulfed several homes at the Rancho Monserate Country Club near Fallbrook. (Adriana Heldiz) 10. To Create Its SoccerCity Analysis, SANDAG Used a Loophole for the First and Last Time SANDAG’s traffic analysis of SoccerCity was unusual for a few reasons. First, it created the analysis at the request of one the project’s opponents. And it maneuvered around a board policy that the agency shouldn’t review projects set to appear on the ballot. That policy has since been strengthened, meaning SANDAG might not analyze competing projects like SDSU West. (Andrew Keatts)

    Voice of San Diego / 1 d. 14 h. 34 min. ago more
  • Mistreated dog is on the road to recoveryMistreated dog is on the road to recovery

    Animal-welfare officials reached out to the public Friday for help identifying and locating whoever allowed a large friendly dog to starve nearly to death before being found wandering weakly through Logan Heights. A man came across the emaciated cane corso, a breed also known as the Italian mastiff, last week and brought it to a county Department of Animal Services shelter on Gaines Street, DAS Director Dan DeSousa said.

    San Diego News / 1 d. 17 h. 40 min. ago more
  • City Heights shooting leaves 1 dead, 1 injuredCity Heights shooting leaves 1 dead, 1 injured

    SDPD investigating after two people were shot, one fatally near Teralta Neighborhood Park in City Heights pic.twitter.com/IRoWSKIS5z Dozens of low income seniors in Rancho Penasquitos are now searching for a new to live after a controversial plan to raze their apartment complex moved forward on Friday. Dozens of low income seniors in Rancho Penasquitos are now searching for a new to live after a controversial plan to raze their apartment complex moved forward on Friday.

    San Diego News / 1 d. 17 h. 40 min. ago more
  • Two shot, one dead in North ParkTwo shot, one dead in North Park

    A call about the shooting came in at 7:26 p.m.and officers arrived to find two people had been shot, said San Diego Police Department Officer Benjamin Newton. The shooter reporter walked to the two men in the park and fled the scene after the shooting.

    San Diego News / 1 d. 17 h. 40 min. ago
  • Starving dog saved by Good SamaritanStarving dog saved by Good Samaritan

    SAN DIEGO - San Diego County Animal Services wants the public's help to find the owner of a dog found suffering from extreme hunger in Logan Heights. A Good Samaritan saw the dog on Dec. 6 with its ribs and spine clearly visible, said animal services officials.

    San Diego News / 1 d. 20 h. ago
  • Unprecedented cleanup of San Diego River to remove trash, homelessUnprecedented cleanup of San Diego River to remove trash, homeless

    Alpha Project crews working down on the San Diego River banks removed and bagged trash during their 6-day clean up along the San Diego River bank. Crews estimate to have removed about 16 tons of trash debris over the six day period.

    San Diego News / 1 d. 20 h. ago
  • San Diego startup fills a niche - helping people grow marijuana at homeSan Diego startup fills a niche - helping people grow marijuana at home

    Cultivation expert Grace Oliva Hicks teaches her client, Naomi Aragon of Normal Heights, how to grow marijuana in her home. Cannabis is a notoriously difficult plant to grow properly.

    San Diego News / 1 d. 20 h. ago
  • Man accused of fatally shooting SDPD Officer to face death penaltyMan accused of fatally shooting SDPD Officer to face death penalty

    A man accused of fatally shooting San Diego police Officer Jonathan "J.D." DeGuzman and wounding his partner last year in Southcrest will face the death penalty if convicted, a prosecutor said Friday. Jesse Michael Gomez, 56, is charged with murder, attempted murder and a special circumstance allegation of murder of a police officer.

    San Diego News / 2 d. 0 h. 55 min. ago
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    The U.S. government on Friday announced a seventh straight monthly increase in people being arrested or denied entry along the Mexican border, erasing much of the early gains of President Donald Trump's push to tighten the border. Denials of entry for people at official crossings and border arrests reached 39,006 in November, up 12 percent from 34,855 in October and more than double the 15,766 who were stopped or arrested in April.

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Sewer-line break on O.B. Pier

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  • Meet the new <em>Star Wars</em>, same as the old <em>Star Wars</em>...  
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    San Diego Reader / 2 d. 4 h. 19 min. ago
  • Gems & JewelsGems & Jewels

    By Kathleen White, Graduate Gemologist, GIA | Enhancery Jewelers WE ARE BUYING GOLD AND DIAMONDS Need help with holiday bills? We are buying gold and with gold high, now is the time to cash-in! Take a look in the bottom of your jewelry box to find those single earrings, broken and dented chains and charms, or the class ring you haven’t worn in years. Enhancery Jewelers Then visit us to see just how much your old gold or diamond is worth. We buy single diamonds of one carat or more on approval. If you have a diamond certificate from GIA or EGL US please bring it with you as this adds more value to your diamond’s resale. BIRTHSTONE OF THE MONTH: JANUARY – GARNET For those born in January you are not limited in your choice of birthstone colors. Garnets are a group of gemstones that are available in a rainbow of colors, to match every personality. Women and men’s jewelry looks great when set with Mozambique garnet, the dark red variety. If you love green Tsavorites from Kenya, are bright and intense rivaling emeralds. If earth tones are your favorite Spessartite garnets range from yellowish orange to reddish orange. The Rhodolite garnet is named for the rhododendron flower and is a beautiful cranberry color. Garnets are a gemstone that can be easily worn every day to enhance your business and casual wardrobes. Martin and Kathleen White have owned Enhancery Jewelers for over 39 years. They specialize in diamond and gemstone jewelry, custom design, appraisals, and jewelry and watch repairs. Find us on Facebook and check out our monthly specials or shop online at enhancery.com. Call Enhancery Jewelers at 619-282-3900 for answers to any gem and jewelry questions you may have. Open Tues.-Fri., 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Sat. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Located at 4242 Camino del Rio N. #7, next to Chili’s at Interstate 8 and Mission Gorge.

    Mission Times Courier / 2 d. 4 h. 24 min. ago more
  • Toreros’ late start to ChristmasToreros’ late start to Christmas

    Taryn Beaufort | Opinion Editor | The USD Vista The holidays are quickly approaching and University of San Diego students seem ready to enjoy them, but there is one little catch — students will still be in the midst of finals. This year school will conclude for winter break on [...]

    The USD Vista / 2 d. 4 h. 28 min. ago
  • A college Christmas storyA college Christmas story

    Taryn Beaufort | Opinion Editor | The USD Vista ​ Perry Como sang it best, “There is no place like home for the holidays.” Some University of San Diego students may agree with Como, but instead most will be studying away for finals until Dec. 22 — only three days [...]

    The USD Vista / 2 d. 4 h. 34 min. ago
  • VOSD Podcast: San Diego Out-San Diego’d Itself With Vacation Rental VoteVOSD Podcast: San Diego Out-San Diego’d Itself With Vacation Rental Vote

    Supporters of short-term vacation rentals hold up signs at a San Diego City Council meeting. / Photo by Adriana Heldiz There’s a leadership vacuum in San Diego, something that was made painfully clear this week when absolutely nothing was decided after a 10-hour City Council meeting Tuesday that was supposed to provide clarity – finally – on vacation rentals. Hundreds of people showed up to voice their support or concerns about vacation rental regulations in San Diego. Almost everyone expected something to happen at the meeting. But in the most San Diego move ever, the City Council punted the issue yet again, leading Councilman Chris Cate to release a scorching statement afterward that read in part, “We cannot govern.” On this week’s podcast, hosts Sara Libby and Andrew Keatts discuss Tuesday’s epic vacation rental regulation failure. “Was that the most San Diego thing to ever San Diego?” Libby asked.  “It was incredibly San Diego,” Keatts said. The hosts also talk about the implications the Lilac Fire should have on elected leaders’ decisions about whether to allow developers to build right at the so-called wildland-urban interface, where fire danger is highest. Ellen Montanari became an activist after President Donald Trump was elected. / Photo by Adriana Heldiz Ellen Montanari joins Libby and Keatts in the second half of this week’s show to talk about how the election of President Donald Trump turned her into an activist. Montanari has focused her attention on unseating Republican Rep. Darrell Issa from the 49th Congressional District. She has been organizing weekly rallies outside the congressman’s Vista office since last year. “The momentum is still going,” she said. “I never would have expected this many months into the year that people would still be out in front of his office. But they are.” Hero of the Week We’re giving the nod this week to the new women who have come forward to talk about their experiences of unwanted touching by a now-retired teacher at La Jolla High School. Goat of the Week Customs and Border Protection gets the goat this week. The Union-Tribune is out with a story about a whacky $297 million hiring contract with a private company. The terms of the agreement are such that the federal agency will pay about $40,000 per new agent hired. • Stream it now • Subscribe to the VOSD Podcast on iTunes • Get the RSS feed • Sign up for VOSD Podcast Network email alerts • Listen to past episodes

    Voice of San Diego / 2 d. 5 h. 59 min. ago more
  • Call him Dr. Kickback
Call him Dr. Kickback

    San Diego Reader / 2 d. 7 h. 50 min. ago
  • Padres acquire SS Galvis from PhilliesPadres acquire SS Galvis from Phillies

    The San Diego Padres acquired shortstop Freddy Galvis from the Philadelphia Phillies on Friday for minor league pitcher Enyel De Los Santos. Galvis, 28, is slated to become a free agent following the

    Big News Network.com / 2 d. 7 h. 59 min. ago
  • Sacramento Report: Bates Wants Victims Released From Nondisclosure AgreementsSacramento Report: Bates Wants Victims Released From Nondisclosure Agreements

    The California Capitol building / Image via Shutterstock State lawmakers in Sacramento continue to wrestle with how to fix policies addressing sexual harassment at the Capitol. California Senate Republican Leader Patricia Bates, who represents portions of Orange County and North County in San Diego, this week called for victims to be released from any nondisclosure agreements that prevent them from discussing settlements they agreed to and other details about their experiences. Additionally, Bates is seeking a more unified process among both the state Assembly and Senate to address harassment claims. The suggestions were outlined in a letter signed by Bates on behalf of the Senate Republican Caucus to Senate President Pro Tem Kevin de Leόn and Assembly Speaker Anthony Rendon, both Democrats. “These NDAs conceal public business and all wrongdoing, but are funded by taxpayer dollars,” the letter said. On Thursday, de Leόn announced the hiring of two law firms to handle sexual harassment investigations into Sens. Tony Mendoza and Bob Hertzberg, “and all future probes of harassment and abuse involving Senate employees,” the Los Angeles Times reported. Two California assemblymen, Matt Dababneh, and Raul Bocanegra, have resigned in recent weeks due to sexual misconduct allegations. Meanwhile, another tool that has long been floated to fight harassment in the Capitol is a bill to protect legislative employees who call out and report bad behavior. The bill, written by Republican Assemblywoman Melissa Melendez, has stalled in the state Senate several years in a row. She’s hoping the harsh spotlight on sexual harassment issues in the Capitol will help it succeed next year, and announced that San Diego Assemblyman Brian Maienschein has signed on as a sponsor. San Diego Republicans Urge Congress to Renew Children’s Health Insurance Program All four of San Diego County’s Republican Assembly members, including Randy Voepel, Rocky Chavez, Marie Waldron and Brian Maienschein, signed a letter urging their Republican colleagues in Congress to renew the Children’s Health Insurance Program. The letter is addressed to House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy and California’s Republican congressional delegation. The program, which covers medical care for vulnerable children and pregnant women, expires on Dec. 22. Congress passed a short-term extension for the program earlier this month, but as year-end federal budget talks continue in Washington, the program’s future remains uncertain. “I believe that we should do what we can to provide basic health care services for our country’s most vulnerable children. This is a program that has justifiably received consistent bipartisan support for more than 20 years, and I believe Congress should do the right thing and reauthorize the program on a long-term basis,” Voepel said in a statement. Also in health care news, Waldron said she listened to information about what other states are doing toward universal health care during a meeting this week of the Assembly’s Select Committee on Health Care Delivery Systems and Universal Coverage, but she does not support a single-payer system. “I like competition in the market, but I want to make sure what we do is efficient and helpful to the patients,” Waldron said. Senate Bill 562, co-written by San Diego Sen. Toni Atkins, proposed a single-payer health care system in California. The plan was eventually shelved over its lack of details and a plan to pay for it all. San Diego Among Cities Driving State’s Homelessness to Largest Increase San Diego County has the fourth largest homeless population in the nation and it’s growing, according to a federal housing report released earlier this month. An estimated 9,200 people are homeless in the county — a 6-percent increase from 2016, based on new figures from the Department of Housing and Urban Development. Most sleep on streets, in cars or parks, the report found. Those numbers helped spur California to a 14-percent increase in homelessness between 2016 and 2017, the report found. Nearly half of all unsheltered homeless people in the nation live in California. San Diego County ranked behind New York, Los Angeles County and King County, Wash., home to Seattle. Reasons driving California’s rising homelessness include the escalating cost of living, lack of affordable housing and stagnant wages, experts say. Democratic Assemblywoman Lorena Gonzalez Fletcher and Republican Assemblyman Brian Maienschein serve on the Assembly’s Select Committee on Homelessness. “HUD’s latest homeless report is horrifying but hardly surprising to anyone who lives in California,” Gonzalez Fletcher said in a statement. “Going forward, it’s critical that we take action at every level of government to alleviate what is now a humanitarian crisis.” Gonzalez Fletcher and San Diego City Councilman Chris Ward worked to include San Diego among the cities that are eligible to expedite construction of emergency housing for the homeless through Assembly Bill 932. The bill was signed earlier this year and takes effect in January. Golden State News George Skelton looks ahead to the state’s 2018 gubernatorial and Senate races. (Los Angeles Times) San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee, 65, died early Tuesday from a heart attack. He was the city’s first Asian American mayor. (San Francisco Chronicle) If there’s no rain in sight, why is Southern California bracing for floods and mudslides? (Los Angeles Daily News) The Thomas Fire in Santa Barbara and Ventura counties is now the fourth largest wildfire in state history. (Los Angeles Times) California Democrats have lost a supermajority in the Assembly, for now. (Associated Press) Jerry Brown criticized President Donald Trump for ignoring the effects of climate change, which he said exacerbated the California wildfires and their devastation, on “60 Minutes” Sunday night. (CBS News) The state Public Utilities Commission approved new rules this week imposing tougher wildfire prevention standards on utility companies. (San Francisco Chronicle) Vice President Mike Pence met with California lawmakers about the wildfires but didn’t discuss reinstating federal tax relief for uninsured property damage. (Los Angeles Times)

    Voice of San Diego / 2 d. 8 h. 25 min. ago more
  • Jesus found in Point Loma
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    San Diego Reader / 2 d. 8 h. 50 min. ago
  • Remembering Pearl HarborRemembering Pearl Harbor

    By Jeff Clemetson | Editor Allied Gardens vet shares his story Dec. 7, 2017, marked the 76th anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor — so this story is a year too late to be part of the big 75th anniversary recognized last year. But being a bit late to tell it makes perfect sense for Allied Gardens resident and WWII Navy veteran Arthur Roemmich and his particular Pearl Harbor story. Joining the Navy Roemmich grew up in Depression-era North Dakota, in the small town of Mott, located about 100 miles outside of Bismarck. “There was nothing in my little town for me,” he said, adding that his family had no money to send him to college. So after he graduated high school in 1936, Roemmich said his father suggested he quit his job at the grocery store and join the Navy, even though it seemed like a far-fetched idea at the time. Arthur Roemmich was serving aboard the USS Northampton when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor. (Photo by Jeff Clemetson) “The biggest body of water I had seen at that point was the stock tank on the farm,” he said. Roemmich went with two other young men from Mott to the Navy recruiting station in Bismarck, but he was the only one accepted to join — which gave him a case of cold feet about the commitment he was making. “I got to thinking about four years,” he said. “That’s a long time to be tied up to something, so I tried to cut it down to two and they said they don’t make deals, four or nothing.” On Aug. 8, 1937, Roemmich and 154 other Navy recruits from across the northwest states left for three months of boot camp. After a short visit home for Christmas, Roemmich received his orders to serve aboard the USS Northampton, a cruiser homeported out of Bremerton, Washington. Roemmich was joined by nine others from his boot camp company and told there were openings in the engineering and deck departments. “I didn’t know what either of them did, but I said, ‘I’ll take the deck,’” Roemmich said; and for the next year and half found himself scrubbing decks and painting the ship. A fortunate delay In 1941, Roemmich was still serving aboard the USS Northampton, part of a 16-ship carrier group due back in Pearl Harbor on Dec. 6. “We were on our way back, probably within a 100 miles, and were refueling a destroyer,” he said, describing the 8-inch hoses that tie ships together while they are fueling. “The sea got a bit rolly around that time and the destroyer went this way, we went the other way, and the hoses snapped and drug alongside our ship and got wrapped around one of the propellers.” Divers were sent below the ship to free the propeller, but the operation added four hours to the carrier group’s trip. “So it was too late to go in because they ran a metal gate across the channel at Pearl Harbor at sunset to keep the submarines from sneaking in,” he continued. “So we had to go around in a circle until the next morning.” Roemmich and a shipmate were having coffee in a storeroom when they first got word of the events that would eventually change the course of the war, and of history. “The skipper got on the horn … you couldn’t understand him at first, he was too excited he started yelling, ‘Pearl Harbor is being attacked by the Japanese, this is no drill,’” Roemmich said. The convoy turned around and went about 100 miles the other way and waited for orders to come in. After the attack was over, they headed back to Pearl Harbor the next day. “It was something; you can’t describe it,” Roemmich said of the scene he witnessed pulling into the harbor. “All the water in Pearl Harbor was like a lake of oil. Every ship in there was sunk, every one of them.” The fact that the carrier group was spared from the bombing proved fortunate for the Allied war effort. “If we were in there, there would have been two carriers, there were two carriers with our group,” Roemmich said. “The Japanese figured on them being there, too. They knew who was going to be in there. So that saved a lot, we had 16 ships in our group that were out there and were saved.” At Pearl Harbor, the two carriers, four heavy cruisers, eight destroyers, submarine and oil tanker were ordered to load up as fast as possible and get out the next morning. The group’s first offensive action taken after the bombing of Pearl Harbor was an attack on the Marshall Islands, where the Japanese had built an airfield. “So we went down and bombarded that and wiped it off the map,” Roemmich said. Although his enlistment was up the following September and he wanted out because he “didn’t care much” for the deck work he was doing, Roemmich and all other active military personnel serving outside the continental U.S. were ordered by President Franklin Roosevelt to stay. Roemmich was at the Battle of Midway and helped escort Gen. Doolittle’s raid on Tokyo. He also had a stint working at the Naval Shipyards in Oakland, California, but was on a ship near the Philippines when the bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. “We were sitting in [the Port of] Manila, loading up with Marines, supplies,” he said. “We were ready to invade Tokyo and just waiting on the word from General MacArthur. There were probably about 100 ships in Manila Bay.” That word never came because the emperor of Japan surrendered after the devastation caused by the dropping of the world’s first nuclear bombs. “I tell you what, there would have been thousands of Japanese and Americans killed if we went in there,” he said. Life after wartime After the war, Roemmich served on a ship ferrying soldiers back to the U.S. In 1946, he received orders returning him to Honolulu, Hawaii, but was now a family man and the Navy didn’t approve a request to bring his wife. As a result, he resigned his commission and worked at the Naval Supply Station in Oakland as a civilian. “But that didn’t pan out. I was there for six weeks — couldn’t see it. I went and re-enlisted,” he said. Medals and photos from Roemmich’s time in the Navy hang on the wall of his home office in Allied Gardens. (Photo by Jeff Clemetson) Roemmich and his family moved to Allied Gardens in 1956. After serving for 22 years, he retired from the Navy with the rank of Chief Warrant Officer and went to work for the school district in a Kearny Mesa warehouse for another 22 years. He retired from that job in 1981. “And I’ve been doing nothing since,” he said. “We traveled a lot.” On Nov. 27 of this year, Roemmich celebrated his 100th birthday. Surrounded by family and friends, he was visited by Rear Admiral Yancy Lindsey who presented him with a letter from Secretary of the Navy Richard V. Spencer. At his birthday party, Roemmich shared that he credits his long life to his luck avoiding death during the war. “There are four reasons why I’m still here,” he said. “The first one is not being in Pearl Harbor. The second one was when I got off that ship, five months later she got sunk in the Battle of Tassafaronga, way down in the South Pacific. Then, the next ship I got on, three months after I got off that one, a Kamikaze went right down through the office where I would have been working. The fourth one was in Manila Bay when they called [the invasion of Japan] off. I had four chances to get killed but I didn’t get it.” —Reach Jeff Clemetson at jeff@sdcnn.com.

    Mission Times Courier / 2 d. 9 h. 16 min. ago more
  • Steering students toward entrepreneurshipSteering students toward entrepreneurship

    By Jeff Clemetson | Editor Patrick Henry High School teacher Adria Van Loan-Polselli’s Engineering Design & Development class is a year-long capstone course where students come up with an invention of some kind, build it, and then market it with a business plan. In essence, they are learning to become, not only engineers, but entrepreneurs. November was National Entrepreneurship Month and throughout San Diego County, Grantville-based Junior Achievement (JA) of San Diego began a program putting local entrepreneurs into classes to inspire students toward entrepreneurship. Junior Achievement volunteer Sarah Lindsay speaks to Patrick Henry engineering students about entrepreneurship. (Photo by Jeff Clemetson) On Nov. 29, Van Loan-Polselli’s class was visited by Sarah Lindsey, vice president of the Mt. Helix Branch of Synergy One Lending. Lindsey is a member of JA’s Junior Executive Society who became active with the group last year and helped launch a student program about the stock market. “To be able to give people information in regard to starting a business, financial information to help them make better decisions; I didn’t have any of this growing up,” Lindsay said. “I didn’t have Junior Achievement. I didn’t know anything about finance until I moved out of my parents’ house and went to college. So to introduce that to others at a younger age, I just like to be a part of it. It’s a good thing to do with my time.” In her presentation to the engineering class, Lindsey shared the struggles she experienced starting her own nonprofit to help people with complicated mortgage information during the recession, which followed the collapse of the housing market. “My nonprofit failed,” she said. “But I don’t like the word fail. I like, ‘I didn’t win, so I learned.’” What she learned was the reason she does things — like start a nonprofit or volunteer with JA — what she called her “why,” is that her true passion is educating people about mortgages, not just making money. “I love to help people,” she said. “I just happen to have a background in finance.” For Van Loan-Polselli, that was the lesson she most wanted her students to take from the presentation. “It really got them to think about their ‘whys,’” she said. “Why they picked their project, what are the intrigues on it.” Student Jackson James found the presentation inspiring and in line with what the engineering class is doing. “We’re starting a design process and right after that we’re doing business plans, so this really showed how we need to know why we’re doing that,” he said. “We want to make [the business plan] around why we want to make the product and not just because the teacher said so.” Douglas Prodor, part of team making a white board eraser with a built-in sprayer for its capstone project, said hearing from an entrepreneur reinforced how to sell and market ideas. “It showed how to get people interested and involved in what you’re doing and get behind your passion as well,” he said. “This presentation emphasized that.” For JA of San Diego, getting people interested in their entrepreneurship program was very easy. “Here in San Diego, we had 47 classes sign up for entrepreneurial launch lessons,” said JA learning coordinator Jenni Preciado. “We’ve only been able to fill half of those. We are still working on getting entrepreneurs for the others, so we‘re going to stretch the program out into the month of December and January to get to all the classes that wanted one.” Preciado said the National Entrepreneurship Month program has attracted a variety of entrepreneurs, including finance professionals, inventors, scientists, computer professionals, shop owners and serial entrepreneurs who start company after company. Many of them made presentations to engineering classes from the national Project Lead the Way program, which Van Loan-Polselli is also part of. Other programs, like AVID and classes that teach business skills in high school, also requested that speakers come to their schools. “Our feeling is that it doesn’t matter what the discipline of the class is, if the entrepreneur is telling their story, that is going to help inspire a student whether that be selling mortgage or building computers or whatever,” Van Loan-Polselli said. Inspiring entrepreneurship is the JA program’s No. 1 goal, said Preciado, who then pointed to recent research conducted by ORC International, which shows that while nine in 10 parents would be extremely or very likely to support their teen in becoming an entrepreneur as an adult, only 30 percent of teens are interested. According to the survey, teens find starting your own business too risky and doesn’t pay enough. JA hopes that by bringing in entrepreneurs to share their stories, it will steer young adults toward entrepreneurship. For student James, it seemed to work. “A lot of us are thinking about finding a good firm to work for, but this really opens it up and lets us know that we don’t need that one basic thing that everyone’s doing, we can branch off and do our own thing,” he said. In the meantime, students and teachers in classes like Engineering Design & Development can look forward to being supported and inspired by the JA program. “Partnering with JA is great because now I know I can outreach to them,” Van Loan-Polselli said. “When these kids are finished or mostly finished with their projects and they want to present it to someone, I can go to JA and say, ‘Hey, I need a panel of people to come in.’ They can be finance, engineers, marketing, etc. I can create a panel and these kids can present their project, their business proposal, they can demonstrate their working model and get professional input.” For more information on Junior Achievement of San Diego’s entrepreneurship program, visit jasandiego.org. —Reach Jeff Clemetson at jeff@sdcnn.com.

    Mission Times Courier / 2 d. 9 h. 16 min. ago more
  • Rec councils stripped of funds controlRec councils stripped of funds control

    Doug Curlee | Editor at Large San Diego’s 52 recreation councils will continue to operate come Jan. 1, but they won’t be in charge of their own destiny as they have been for decades. On Dec. 13, a badly split City Council voted 5-4 to accept the new method of operation, which gives financial control of recreation centers to the city’s Park and Recreation Department. For various reasons, Councilmembers Lori Zapf, Chris Cate, David Alvarez and Georgette Gomez voted against the proposed solution. Heretofore, the various recreation councils have been in control of millions of dollars in fees and other sources of money to build things, to operate more or less independently of city control. That all came to an end in the wake of City Attorney Mara Elliott’s decision that all such funds collected by the rec councils must be under the control of the Parks and Recreation Department because local laws, the city charter and state law demanded that be the case. In a conversation before the council meeting. Elliott said this shouldn’t be looked at as winners and losers. “The volunteer recreation councils still have a major role to play, and we hope the volunteers will be able to function under this new plan,” she said. “The new method of operation will be a lot like the old one, except that the city will be in charge of the vast majority of the money.” Try telling that to the rec council members who spoke out against the changes at the City Council meeting. “We’ve lost faith in the Park and Rec Department,” said David Rogers of the Adams Avenue Recreation Council. “I’ve been to seven different meetings and heard seven different plans.” “The proper answer is right in front of you — it’s called compromise,” Tierrasanta Recreation Council member Norm Ryan said. “Table this matter now — vote no.” All of which did little good in the end. Faced with the shutdown of the special-use permits that allowed the rec councils to operate as essentially independent entities, the council had little choice but to accept the Park and Rec battle plan. Starting Jan. 1, 2018, all the fees collected by the various rec councils for recreation programs will go to the city, rather than to individual rec council private bank accounts. As part of an “Interim Standard Operating Procedure” designed to make the changeover easier to tolerate, all funds collected by the city on behalf of local rec councils are guaranteed to be spent only in that rec council’s area. The city has agreed to indemnify and protect the recreation councils against lawsuits and legal actions, and to defend them if needed. There is a lot more to this, and all agreed this is going to take some time to shake out and settle — it’s not like flipping a switch and everything is fixed. Councilmember Alvarez, who has been critical of this all along, sympathized with the Park and Rec staff who’ve been working on this problem. “This is not your fault that we’re here now,” he said. “But in trying to fix this, you’ve had to create more problems than you have solutions.” Councilman Scott Sherman isn’t any happier than anyone else about this, but said “I’m all for helping the rec councils do their work.” Councilmember Gomez may have summed up the feelings of just about everyone involved in this. “The lack of time we’ve had with this hasn’t helped at all,” she said. Truer words are seldom spoken. — Doug Curlee is Editor at Large. Reach him at doug@sdcnn.com.

    Mission Times Courier / 2 d. 9 h. 17 min. ago more
  • New neighborhood coffee shop picks up steamNew neighborhood coffee shop picks up steam

    By Frank Sabatini Jr. A long overdue niche has been filled in the Lake Murray area with Brew Coffee Spot. The urban-rustic coffeehouse affords caffeine enthusiasts a spacious place to sip, eat and relax, if not spread out with school or work projects on roomy tables made of wood and metal pipes. Anchored within the Big Lots shopping center at 6101 Lake Murray Blvd. in La Mesa, the business model was conceived in just over the time it takes to swig down a couple of frothy lattes. (l to r) Owners Joe Paraiso and Ralf Wilkowski (Photo by Frank Sabatini Jr.) “My wife and I had some friends over and we started talking on a whim about opening a coffee shop because of the need for one in this area. By the end of the night we had a name for it, came up logo ideas and even created a web page,” said Joe Paraiso, a graphics designer who runs the business with his wife, Heather, and their friend, Ralf Wilkowski. The trio soon began looking for a location and eventually found two adjoining storefronts that previously housed a shoe store and Mail Boxes Etc. After knocking down a wall to combine the spaces, they designed the 2,300-square-foot shop themselves. Their combined efforts resulted in stained concrete flooring, shiplap wood accents, an expansive brick wall, LED light pendants and live plants, which gracefully dissect the sleek, open space. The shop’s pride and joy, however, is a high-end water filtration system installed specifically to spotlight the rich, natural flavor of the coffees — whether consumed hot or cold. Loose teas such as white rose, blood orange, peppermint, coconut-cacao and more are also made with the super-pure water. A mug of cold nitro brew and a café au lait (Photo by Frank Sabatini Jr.) “There’s no aftertaste to our coffee and tea drinks because of it.” Paraiso said. “The filtered water also extends the life of our La Marzocco espresso machine, which is the workhorse of the industry.” Brew Coffee Spot uses organic coffee beans sourced from San Diego’s Café Virtuoso. The roaster provided guidance in equipment selection and barista training during the lead-up to the shop’s March opening. “Going into this business can be very intimidating because there are a lot of people who are very particular about their coffee,” Paraiso added. “Café Virtuoso had everything we wanted from a roaster.” Paraiso and his wife reside in nearby Fletcher Hills. She works for an online school, and both have maintained their established careers since launching the business. Wilkowski previously owned a signage company in Pacific Beach. He now runs Brew’s kitchen, which offers a menu of hearty sandwiches and paninis using assorted breads from Bread & Cie. The sandwich choices extend to turkey caprese with pesto; roast beef with provolone; ham with Swiss; a PB&J; and brie and butter on slim French-style ficelle baguettes. Brie and butter ficelle sandwiches (Photo by Frank Sabatini Jr.) Bread & Cie also supplies a variety of pastries although the shop’s cinnamon rolls are made by Paraiso’s sister and the baklava hails from Baklava King in Santee. The coffee menu covers all bases, many of which were uncommon to this area of La Mesa until now. They include everything from pour-over Guatemalan coffee and café au lait to various lattes and a cold nitro brew that’s keg-aged for a few days. There’s also a crafty selection of espressos such as affogato with vanilla bean ice cream and Viennese spiked with honey and cinnamon. Café au lait with a foamy design (Photo by Frank Sabatini Jr.) “We’re still in soft opening and some things will change soon,” Paraiso noted, referring a likely extension of operating hours and a couple of blank walls that will make way for art. Brew Coffee Spot is currently open from 6 a.m. to 8:30 p.m., Monday through Thursday, and until 9:30 p.m. on Fridays and 2 p.m. on Sundays. In addition, live jazz is held from 6 to 8 p.m. on Thursdays and Fridays and game night takes place from 5 to 9 p.m. on Saturdays. For more information, call 619-713-6698 or visit brewcoffeespot.com. — Frank Sabatini Jr. is the author of “Secret San Diego” (ECW Press), and began his career as a local writer for the former San Diego Tribune. Reach him at fsabatini@san.rr.com.

    Mission Times Courier / 2 d. 9 h. 17 min. ago more
  • Mission Times Courier Holiday GuideMission Times Courier Holiday Guide

    Barbie’s Nails and Tails Pet Grooming 6628 Mission Gorge Rd., Suite A San Diego 92120 619-806-3056 Nailsandtails.com When visiting Barbie’s Nails and Tails Pet Grooming, one can expect a friendly greeting and an abundance of pet lovers! Each member of their staff has a little fur baby of their own, so you can expect them to take the utmost care of your precious pet and to treat them as if they were on of their own. Barbie’s board certified staff will provide the expert care that your fur baby needs and deserves! With dog and cat spa prices starting at $45 to $65, they offer services such as shampoo and conditioner, sanitary cut, poop chute, nail trimming/filling, hair brushing and/or combing, fragrance, ear cleaning, moisturizing, treatment for dry, sensitive, or irritated skin, flea and tick treatment, de-shedding, and more! Both last minute and mobile grooming services are available, for your convenience. New clients get $5 off, so come on down and see why everyone’s barking about Barbie’s Nails and Tails Pet Grooming!   Mid Century Vintage Furnishings, Accessories and Gifts 3795 Park Blvd. San Diego 92103 619-295-4832 midcenturystore.com Mid Century is locally owned and located on Park Boulevard just south of University Avenue. We are purveyors and curators of eclectic Mid-Century furniture, retro décor and funky, unique gifts. Find vintage lighting and lamps, decorative goods, wall artwork, and accent pieces from the 1950s, ‘60s and ‘70s, in our fun, friendly store. Discover modern design legacy furnishings, all in excellent condition, including ceramic collectables, stylish creations in glass, and furniture for every room, from side tables and sofas to dressers and dining chairs. All reasonably priced, well-made, and top quality. We sell and we buy, whether its individual items or entire estates — with attention to detail. Mid Century is open Tuesdays through Sundays, 11:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Find us on Instagram and Facebook. Visit us for your holiday gift shopping.   Suzie’s Hallmark 2828 Fletcher Parkway El Cajon 92020 619-698-7202 tinyurl.com/jj83j5z Remember: Life is a special occasion. Here at Suzie’s Hallmark, we are your one-stop holiday and specialty store. Our convenient location makes us the perfect choice for shopping, and our easy access and large assortment of items will meet all your needs. You will find our store filled with gifts and opportunities to brighten anyone’s day. Locally owned and operated by Suzanne Collier — who has been representing Hallmark for 35 years — with a tradition you can count on. Our helpful and dedicated team is willing to uncover that special item or recommend any one of our vast amounts of treasures. Let us help you make each day special. We care.

    Mission Times Courier / 2 d. 9 h. 17 min. ago more
  • News from Patrick Henry High School – Dec. 15, 2017News from Patrick Henry High School – Dec. 15, 2017

    By Elizabeth Tennis team standout PHHS girl’s tennis team participated in Western League competition which proved to be very fierce. As a team, the PHHS varsity team was a finalist in the First Serve Tournament held in October at Valhalla High School. Varsity tennis player Olivia Tracey (Photos courtesy PHHS) Individually, one student who finished was a standout player — Olivia Tracey. Here are some highlights for Tracey’s year: Singles record 30-4 in Western League 2017. Finished season overall in fifth place for Western League. Ranked top 25 in California in USTA in girl’s 16-and-under division. Named PHHS girls tennis MVP 2017. First-team All-Western League 2016 and 2017. All CIF Second-team 2016. PHHS goes international Last month, eight Advanced Placement Spanish students traveled to Tijuana, Mexico to experience the culture and practice their Spanish while participating in a variety of activities. Their day started with crossing the border on the Veteran’s Day holiday. Mr. Rosales, PHHS AP teacher, accompanied the students and led a tour that made the most out of a two-day trip. The students started the day in a market purchasing ingredients for a guacamole contest held in the Mercado Hidalgo. They then stopped at the Centro Cultural de Tijuana, had lunch, and then checked into their hotel where they prepared their guacamole and participated in the contest. They went to see the Disney film “Coco” at the VIP Plaza Rio, and had dinner at La Diferencia. (l to r) Shaila Campos, Eliza Rosales, Michelle Rivera, Emma McGraw, Mathew Kulis, Lexy Snyder, Bryan Ortiz and Lilly Mai The students started the next day by providing international community service by a visit to the international friendship garden, Jardin Binacional, in Playas, and after breakfast visited the Malecón de Playas. They ended their day with a scavenger hunt in Plaza Rio, salsa class at Alma Latina studio and dinner at Casa del Mole. Two students who attended the field trip shared their impressions of the two-day trip. “I had a great experience, we were able to practice our Spanish in an actual setting where it was needed to communicate with others,” Eliza Rosales said. “The activities pushed me to be more comfortable with myself and those around me. The entire group was very kind and accepting, and I am very happy that I attended.” Lilly Mai appreciated the cultural experience. “The two-day trip submerged me in Hispanic culture,” she said. “I ate authentic Mexican food and realized I am not a huge fan of mole. However, the tacos were really good. We went to the Cultural Center of Tijuana and we learned about the plants, artworks and environmental concerns. The house where we stayed was cute and had beautiful designs throughout. To end the first day, we went to watch ‘Coco,’ a beautiful story about how to honor family on the Day of the Dead.” “The second day, we helped out at the Binacional garden, where families in need around the border go in order to obtain vegetables. Later, we went to a scavenger hunt and it helped us make conversations in Spanish with the workers at the mall. Before we went home, we finished with a salsa class which was my favorite thing on the trip. I thought it was embarrassing to dance in front of everybody but we were all able to have fun and laugh. I was able to leave this trip with new memories, new friends, and a better understanding of Spanish.” Student of the Month Student of the Month Maya Klareich (Courtesy PHHS) Maya Klareich was nominated as the Patrick Henry High School (PHHS) Student of the Month for November because of her exceptional leadership role in Link Crew and her ability to inspire others to lead. She helps organize events, gives constructive feedback, and does anything that is asked of her with grace and integrity. Her ASB teacher described has as an “absolutely amazing student leader.” Klareich is the Commissioner of Community Service and goes above and beyond to get our blood drives to run smoothly. She is also coordinating the Henry Food Drive to help those who need assistance during the holidays. She is also a regularly participating member of the Henry Hoopla planning team (PHHS advisory program) which strives to build school spirit on campus and at sporting events. One of Klareich’s teachers reported that she is “motivated, helpful, mature, and just a genuinely decent and kind person.” “Maya is sincere, trustworthy and well-liked by her peers,” her teacher continued. “She is active both on and off campus. Maya always challenges herself academically and does so without complaint and never has a bad attitude.” ‘Hamilton’ hits Henry Thanks to generous funding from local and national donors, the producers of “Hamilton,” and the efforts of PHHS Social Studies teacher Taunya Robinson, 80 junior classmen will be seeing the hit Broadway musical, staged at the San Diego Civic Center next month, free of charge! Robinson wrote a grant and agreed to participate in the Hamilton Education Program by implementing a three- to five-day curriculum, which culminated in the creation of a unique performance piece by each of her students. The curriculum was based on the student performance and study guides that were sent to her. Each student was expected to create and submit an original performance piece, a maximum of two minutes in length, based on what they have learned about the Founding Era through the printed materials, the Hamilton Education Program website, and classroom instruction. The best presentation will be aired during the student “meet the cast” question-and-answer portion prior to watching a recording of the live Broadway performance. Robinson combined three classes into two performances at Henry. Every student helped create and write a unique performance which included raps, poems, biographies, memoirs, original songs, and speeches which were all shared as students presented their projects on stage in the PHAME building.

    Mission Times Courier / 2 d. 9 h. 18 min. ago more
  • Guest editorial: GOP tax bills will short-change the middle classGuest editorial: GOP tax bills will short-change the middle class

    By Rep. Susan A. Davis When considering any attempt to reform our tax code, the first question I ask myself is, “Will it help the middle class?” After carefully looking over the Republican tax bills proposed in the House and Senate, the only answer I can come to is, “No, these bills won’t help the middle class.” In fact, they will do just the opposite. The most glaring aspect of both of these proposals is how differently corporations and people are treated. Most notably is the fact that tax cuts for corporations are forever yet the cuts for the American people go away after just five years. Not only are the cuts for individuals temporary but those individuals will also lose a number of popular deductions. Rep. Susan A. Davis Currently, teachers who spend their own money on pencils, pens and paper for their students can deduct those costs. No more. The House bill ends that deduction. However, a corporation spending money on office supplies for its workers will still be able to deduct those costs. About one in three San Diego taxpayers take advantage of the state and local tax (SALT) deductions. The House bill limits the SALT deductible amount to $10,000 for property taxes. The Senate proposal eliminates the SALT deductions all together. College graduates paying off student loans can currently deduct the interest paid on their loan to lower their tax burden. The House ends that deduction, which will make it harder for people saddled with massive school loan debt to pay it off. Ending the school loan deduction would increase the cost to students attending college by $65 billion over the next decade. Ending the medical expense tax credit would not only hurt seniors but also veterans since many struggle with medical issues. Veterans will also be hit hard with the end of two other tax credits — the work opportunity tax credit and the disabled access tax credit. Between 2013 and 2015, about 300,000 veterans took advantage of the work opportunity tax credit. As you can imagine, I have been hearing from my constituents on the GOP/Trump tax bills. They are not happy. Todd in El Cajon says his family will lose $28,350 in deductions against taxable income. Todd is the sole provider for his wife and five children ages of 1 to 11. Sharon in Spring Valley counts on medical expense deductions to lower her tax liability. I heard from Walter, a resident of Hillcrest, who is worried he will inevitably pay more in taxes because he will lose the student loan interest deduction and will fall into a higher tax bracket. Finally, I have heard from a lot of my constituents who are worried about what this plan will do to the debt. I wish I could give them some words of encouragement. But the reality is — this plan would create a huge $1.5 trillion-dollar hole in our debt. That’s $1.5 trillion that we won’t be able to invest in our country. What does that mean? What could $1.5 trillion do for education? What could $1.5 trillion do for infrastructure? For veterans? For health care? For you and your family? The very same people in Washington who have long argued that we need to take the debt seriously, now believe we can simply ignore it so that their corporate friends can get a tax break. Such a reckless approach won’t grow our economy. And it won’t help most San Diegans. I am all for helping modernize our tax code. And our business leaders should be encouraged to invest more at home, instead of keeping their profits overseas. But it is simply wrong to give huge corporations giant tax breaks, while ordinary working families are forced to pay more. America has always been best when it has had a vibrant middle class — when prosperity was shared, rather than concentrated at the top. Instead of closed door negotiations, we could have found a bipartisan path to a simpler tax code while being fairer to the American people who want to keep more of their hard-earned dollars. We could have paired tax reform with ways to better grow the economy rather than the time-worn failure of trickle-down economics, which is a “trickle” for the many and “raining buckets” for the few. —Rep. Susan A. Davis represents Congressional District 53, which includes the San Diego communities of Grantville, Allied Gardens, Del Cerro and San Carlos, as well as La Mesa, Lemon Grove, Spring Valley and parts of El Cajon and Chula Vista.

    Mission Times Courier / 2 d. 9 h. 18 min. ago more
  • STEMM Foundation expands science programsSTEMM Foundation expands science programs

    By Jay Wilson The goal of the Henry Cluster STEMM Foundation to build partnerships with SDSU and other community resources continues to gain momentum. On Dec. 13, members of the Henry Cluster STEMM Foundation met with Dr. Eric Frost, director of the Visualization Lab at SDSU, along with Dr. Pat Abbott, professor emeritus from the SDSU Geology Department, and Alicia Berg, the education program instructor for the Mission Trails Regional Park Foundation, plus Olivia Allison and Denise Tayco, the Science Department chairs for Lewis and Pershing Middle Schools respectively. The purpose was to discuss the curriculum for the seventh-grade science classes and how the professors at SDSU and Alicia Berg will be assisting in the education of the seventh-grade science students and incorporating the new way science is being taught in our schools. On Dec. 15, Dr. Natalie Mladenov, a professor with the SDSU Engineering Department, and several of her grad students visited Mrs. Milse’s fifth-grade class at Dailard Elementary and conducted a water experiment and project as part of a science lesson which met the curriculum connected to the Next Generation Science Standards. There is a new way science is being taught in our schools. First LEGO League to expand The Henry Cluster STEMM Foundation is establishing FIRST (Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) community teams for K-12 students and parents in the Henry Cluster neighborhoods: FIRST LEGO League Jr. (for ages 6 to 9), FIRST LEGO League (for ages 9 to 14), and FIRST Tech Challenge (for grades seven to 12). Participants in the HCSTEMM FIRST programs will learn to use technology to solve real problems that affect their community, while learning the core values of collaboration, friendly competition, and gracious professionalism. FIRST LEGO League and FIRST Robotics Competition programs are already very successful at Henry Cluster schools, and they are very popular with the students who participate. The HCSTEMM community teams will expand FIRST opportunities to students who are unable to participate in their school teams because they are in the wrong grade or cannot meet the school schedule, and to students who attend school without teams. FIRST is an international nonprofit program that challenges and motivates young people to pursue education and career opportunities in science, technology, engineering, and math while building self-confidence, knowledge and life skills. There are thousands of FIRST teams worldwide, and the Henry Cluster STEMM Foundation is excited to add a few more teams at home. A donation to the Henry Cluster STEMM Foundation will enable us to provide robot kits, challenge materials, project supplies, computer technology, and other resources to these community teams. Its network of experienced FIRST coaches and mentors provides knowledge, advice, and support to rookie teams and coaches who are preparing for their first competitions. Our winter fundraising goal for the 2018 season is $10,000. Donations can be made via PayPal at the Henry Cluster STEMM Foundation website, hcstemm.org. The HCSTEMM has public board meetings each month; if you are interested in attending, please check the online calendar or email info@hcstemm.org for more information. —Jay Wilson writes on behalf of the Henry Cluster STEMM Foundation. Reach him at jwilson2@cox.net.

    Mission Times Courier / 2 d. 9 h. 18 min. ago more
  • Roundtable event to kick off 2018Roundtable event to kick off 2018

    La Mesa Foothills Democratic Club will start the 2018 election year with a stellar roundtable featuring some of San Diego’s best known pundits and politicians. Laura Fink The Wednesday, Jan. 3 panel will examine some of our area’s most pressing problems; preview the June and November elections; and opine on the impact of our continuing national nightmare, as well as local initiatives that will dominate the news in the early part of 2018. Our forum participants are San Diego City Councilmember Chris Ward, La Mesa City Councilmember Colin Parent, KPBS news director Mark Sauer, political analyst Laura Fink and campaign consultant Eva Posner. Eva Posner Our roundtable will be hosted by Scott Lewis, editor and CEO of Voice of San Diego, which made a name for itself by producing hard-hitting investigative reports along with civic engagement opportunities that give residents a platform to discuss and debate issues that impact our quality of life. In city of San Diego politics, it’s hard to read a story on affordable housing, homelessness, infrastructure, LGBT issues, environmental policy and short-term housing rentals without seeing Ward’s influence and initiative. Since these issues are ongoing and relevant, it will be fascinating to hear the council member’s take on the direction of the city in tackling these issues which affect our entire region. Councilmember Chris Ward Ward represents San Diego City Council District 3, which includes the Downtown and Uptown areas. He serves as chair of the Select Council Committee on Homelessness, vice chair of the Infrastructure Committee, and as a member of the Environment, Rules, and Public Safety & Livable Neighborhoods Committees, as well as vice chair of the San Diego County Regional Task Force on the Homeless. Mark Sauer Many of Ward’s progressive bonafides can also apply to Parent, our former board member, who now pushes the La Mesa council in directions they’ve never gone before. SANDAG, affordable housing, rental policy, smart growth, homelessness, the Climate Action Plan and transit issues are all at the top of Parent’s council priorities. Parent was elected to La Mesa City Council in November 2016 and works as executive director and policy counsel at the nonprofit Circulate San Diego. He is responsible for advocating for affordable transit, safe and walkable neighborhoods, and effective land-use policy. Councilmember Colin Parent Sauer will be returning as a panelist to our club, and is familiar as the regular moderator of the popular weekly news show, “KPBS Round Table.” From border walls, real estate values, jail deaths and homeless tents, to sexual harassment and sea-level rise, “Round Table” has covered them all. If there is a local issue of import, Sauer will offer an expert opinion if a solution to that problem is happening in 2018. Another returning and popular panelist, Fink has participated in club forums on women’s issues, media influence and election processes. She shares her political opinions as a regular analyst on Fox News5 in San Diego, so we have every confidence she’ll be one of our most trusted prognosticators. Scott Lewis Posner is a first-time panelist with LMFDC, and will offer a unique look at the local election scene. As owner of her own political consulting firm, she is indelibly connected to the local Democratic political apparatus. She even spent the 2016 election cycle as the communications coordinator of the San Diego County Democratic Party. LMFDC draws members from San Carlos, Allied Gardens, Del Cerro, La Mesa, the College Area, Santee, Mt. Helix, Casa de Oro and other nearby communities. Meetings are held the first Wednesday of every month at La Mesa Community Center, 4975 Memorial Drive, starting at 6:30 p.m. For more information, visit lamesafoothillsdemocraticclub.com and like us on Facebook. — Yahairah Aristry is president and Jeff Benesch is vice president of programming of the La Mesa Foothills Democratic Club. Reach them at jeffbenesch@gmail.com.  

    Mission Times Courier / 2 d. 9 h. 18 min. ago more
  • More Parents Warn Kids Are Being Injured in Understaffed Special Ed ClassroomsMore Parents Warn Kids Are Being Injured in Understaffed Special Ed Classrooms

    A meeting of the San Diego Unified school board / Photo by Jamie Scott Lytle Parents of special education students in San Diego Unified continue to warn the district that their children are unsafe in severely understaffed classrooms. The latest stories to emerge: A mother of a student with special needs at Perry Elementary in southeastern San Diego said kids in her child’s classroom have been injured, one wandered out of the school and another put his head through a window. “I’ve dedicated my life to this classroom,” said the mother, Shanika Jones, who now goes into the room to help every day. Jones and two other mothers – all with kids in the same classroom – stood in front of San Diego Unified community special education committee meeting last Thursday to plead with district staff for more support. The stories from Perry are familiar: Last month, various parents of students in special education classes told the same district committee that without the close supervision of aides and other special education staff, children have wandered out of classrooms and eaten things like rocks and paper clips. Before Thanksgiving, San Diego Unified had  100 special education aide vacancies. The district also has roughly 11 full-time teacher vacancies, nearly all for classes for students with the most severe disabilities. Another 37 positions for special education-credentialed teachers are currently filled by interns, though for some of the interns it isn’t their first year teaching at the district. Those numbers remain unchanged. Aide positions are accounted for by the number of hours a student needs in his or her education plan. Some schools have students who require aide hours, but don’t have access to them. M.J. Lewis, the mother of a student with special needs at Tierrasanta Elementary, shed tears as she thanked the staff at her school. Her daughter has come so far in her few years at the school, “but we don’t do so well when there’s not an aide in the class,” she said. Lewis said her school was short 94 hours a week in aides across all students. The district said it had a hiring event for aides on Dec. 7 and 8, which yielded between 40 and 60 candidates. It expects to have another hiring event in January. A spokeswoman for the district said in an email that the number of vacancies hasn’t changed over the last month because of holidays and furlough days. Deanne Ragsdale, the executive director of special education at San Diego Unified, previously told Voice of San Diego that the large numbers of vacancies in special education is the result of a shortage of credentialed teachers, and high turnover among special education aides in general. Staffing for special education and the success of students with disabilities is, indeed, a problem statewide. EdSource reported last week that two-thirds of the 228 districts across the state will receive additional assistance after students with disabilities performed very poorly in the state’s new accountability system. The state has been slowly trying to address the issue. In 2016, California began giving millions in grant money to help classified employees, like special education aides, get their teaching credentials. Last week, the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing changed the way special education teachers will be trained. Ragsdale told Voice of San Diego that the large number of vacancies are not related to budget cuts made by the district last year. Others aren’t so sure. Moira Allbritton, chair of the special education committee, said it is true that there has always been a shortage of special education teachers, but that it’s entirely possible the district’s budget issues have compounded the problem. “I don’t remember a time where there was an expanse of credentialed special education teachers to hire from, but yet we gave pink slips last year,” Allbritton said. “I really do believe, when we have a year like we did with the budget, those things amplify the issues with students.” Allbritton said she’s seen improvement in high-level special education staff. The transition to consolidate classrooms with the most severely disabled students, she said, was a good move in long run. The special education staff has been more transparent this year than in the past, she said. “But the staffing vacancies are disconcerting,” she said. Allbritton said that students with disabilities often struggle with transitions more than other students. For students who may be nonverbal, for example, it’s much more difficult to build a relationship with a new person in a new year because they can’t communicate their needs and feelings in the same way as other kids. In addition, students with disabilities often come in contact with more adults. They often have a teacher, an aide, a bus driver, an occupational therapist, a speech therapist, etc. When staffing churn happens, Allbritton said, it doesn’t just mean getting used to one new person, it’s getting used to a whole new team of people, which can be a lot. Not having an aide can also mean that a child who could have gone into a general education classroom part time may not get to go. That sets them back, and in some cases violates what a parent, a child’s teacher and other district staff agreed the child needed in his or her Individualized Education Program, the document that lays out the needs and goals of each child with a disability. “When a kid can’t go to gen ed because they don’t’ have an [aide] to take them, that’s a huge denial of a [Free Appropriate Public Education],” Allbritton said. “That’s the part that seems surreal. One hundred vacancies means a number of children whose [Individualized Education Programs] cannot physically be implemented.” Yvette Hernandez, one of the Perry Elementary parents at the district’s most recent special education committee meeting, said that families like hers can’t keep waiting for more staffers to materialize. They need help. “To our kids, every second, every minute counts,” she said.

    Voice of San Diego / 2 d. 9 h. 19 min. ago more
  • Pies take patience
Pies take patience

    San Diego Reader / 2 d. 9 h. 50 min. ago
  • Daily Business Report-Dec. 15, 2017Daily Business Report-Dec. 15, 2017

    Rendering of what the new Viasat campus would look like. (Renderings courtesy of SCA Architecture) SCA Architecture Completes Design of 23-Acre Campus Expansion for Viasat SCA Architecture has completed the planning, design, and entitlements for a new 23-acre campus expansion on behalf of global communications company Viasat on El Camino Real in Carlsbad. Located across the street from Viasat’s existing headquarters, the new campus is being built on a vacant parcel of land that Viasat acquired in October 2015. The campus expansion can accommodate six office buildings, three parking structures, a cafe/conference center and recreational amenities for company employees. SCA Architecture President and Founder Cheryl (Dennie) Smith said the new campus is designed to embody Viasat’s culture of creativity, exploration, freedom and innovation, as well as foster interaction between employees, clients and visitors. View of entryway to Viasat Building 12 Rendering of new Viasat campus interior The two- and three-story office buildings range in size from 77,000 to 120,000 square feet, and total 587,000 square feet of space. The corner building at El Camino Real and Gateway Drive features below-grade parking to provide visitors a secure entrance without compromising the open campus feel. Three parking structures, subterranean parking and a surface parking area accommodate a total of 2,053 vehicles, with 1,955 stalls between the parking structures, 70 stalls underneath the corner building, and 16 surface stalls in front of Building 12. New campus courtyard incorporates green space. Whiting Turner, general contractor, broke ground in late February. The first phase is scheduled for completion in August 2018. Mark Langan is principal-in-charge for SCA Architecture, with Arati Rangaswamy, Milos Makaric, and Julie Spiegel serving as co-project managers. Project consultants include PLSA as civil engineer; Ground Level, landscape architect; Wiseman & Rohy, structural engineer; Syska Hennessy, mechanical/plumbing engineer; Michael Wall, electrical engineer; and Brummitt Energy Associates, serving as energy consultant. __________________ Palomar Crest Corporate Center Palomar Crest Corporate Center Sold for $17M to Seattle Firm A Seattle-based advisory firm has acquired the Palomar Crest Corporate Center, an 81,810-square-foot office building in Carlsbad, for $17 million. The seller was a global investment manager. Palomar Crest Corporate Center is located at 2701 Loker Avenue West and situated on 5.36 acres.  Currently 77.1 percent leased, its tenants represent a variety of industries such as technology, law, energy, real estate, and professional staffing/training. Cushman & Wakefield represented the seller in the transaction __________________ Frontera Industrial Business Park TH Real Estate Acquires Frontera Industrial Business Park TH Real Estate, an affiliate of Nuveen (the investment manager of TIAA), has acquired Frontera Industrial Business Park in the Otay Mesa area of San Diego. The property consists of a seven-building industrial business park and comprises over 500,000 square feet of industrial space. The adjacent development parcel consists of nine acres of land marked for the development of an industrial building. Located in San Diego’s Otay Mesa submarket, the property offers convenient freeway access and is located adjacent to the US-Mexico border. __________________ Student volunteers greeting newly admitted students at UC San Diego Triton Days. (Photo by Erik Jepsen/UC San Diego Publications) Record 116,452 Freshman and Transfer students Apply to UC San Diego for Fall 2018 The University of California San Diego has once again received a record number of applications, with 97,670 freshmen and 18,782 transfers applying for fall 2018 admission. The university saw a 10 percent increase among freshmen and 6 percent rise among transfers, compared to last year. It has the second highest number of applicants among the University of California campuses. About 35 percent of California freshman applicants and 28 percent of California Community College transfer applicants are from historically underrepresented populations. At the California freshman level, Native American applicants increased by 11 percent, Latino and Mexican-American applicants increased by 10 percent, and African American applicants increased by 8 percent, compared to fall 2017. From the California Community Colleges, Native American applicants increased by 18 percent, Latino and Mexican-American applicants increased by 16 percent and African American applicants by 5 percent. The most popular majors chosen by applicants are in social sciences, engineering and biology. Read more… __________________ Civic San Diego Closes New Markets Tax Credit Loan to Goodwill Industries San Ysidro will soon be home to a new Goodwill Industries outlet center, distribution center and community employment center thanks to a $12.6 million New Markets Tax Credit (NMTC) investment made by Civic San Diego. The funds will help Goodwill Industries improve two recently purchased buildings in San Ysidro totaling around 75,000 square feet. Those buildings will be repurposed for an outlet center and a distribution center. The NMTC investment will also fund the addition of a community employment center at the existing storefront in San Ysidro. Additionally, rooftop solar systems will be installed at both new locations plus three additional Goodwill facilities in San Diego and Chula Vista. __________________ Community College Board Re-Elects Maria Nieto Senour as President Maria Nieto Senour Maria Nieto Senour was re-elected as president of the San Diego Community College District Board of Trustees at its organizational meeting on Thursday. First elected to the SDCCD board in 1990, Senour has served as president since 2015. Bernie Rhinerson was elected as executive vice president of the board and District Chancellor Constance Carroll was appointed as secretary. Board members Mary Graham, Rich Grosch, and Peter Zschiesche were named as vice presidents for specific functions. __________________ Personnel Announcements Westcore Properties Promotes Childs, Hires Jasinski Lori Jasinski Ryan Childs Westcore Properties has promoted Ryan Childs to director of construction and hired Lori Jasinski as director of property management. Childs has been with Westcore since 2016 and originally joined the firm as construction manager. He is certified by the Design-Build Institute of America, the only organization “that defines, teaches and promotes best practices in design-build.” He serves as president of the board for the newly-formed Cardiff-By-The-Sea Foundation, which devotes time and funds to beautification and education projects for the community. Jasinski worked with Westcore previously as a contract employee. Her duties will include overseeing property management for Westcore’s industrial and office real estate assets throughout the western states and beyond. Previously, Jasinski served as senior property manager at Cushman & Wakefield. She supports her community by serving as the “Frostiversary” coordinator for Frosted Faces Foundation, a locally based, nonprofit organization that rescues senior dogs and cats from high kill shelters and places them with families, guaranteeing medical assistance and financial support for the remainder of their lives __________________ Julia Cousins Joins Carrier Johnson + CULTURE Julia Cousins Carrier Johnson + CULTURE announced the addition of a new project manager to its roster of experts in health care design. Julia Cousins adds to the firm’s experience in medical planning and design for large hospitals, according to the firm’s leadership. Cousins’ career spans over three decades, with more than 20 years of work focused primarily on health care design. Her extensive portfolio of projects ranges widely in size and scope. Active across the United States, Cousins has built a portfolio focused on large medical care institutions along or near the West Coast, such as the University of California San Diego Medical Center, Dignity Health Mercy Gilbert Medical Center in Gilbert, Arizona, Carson Tahoe Regional Medical Center in Carson City, Nevada and Oak Valley Medical Center in Oakdale, California. As project manager, Cousins shepherds projects from planning and design through construction administration. She also works with clients and contractors to ensure that results are aligned with project goals, budgets, and timelines. Company principals said Cousins already has leading roles on multiple projects including an oncology clinic, a campus-wide accessibility improvement program, and the renovation of a behavioral health facility. __________________ Tiffany English Elected to National CREW Network Board  Tiffany English Tiffany English a member of CREW (Commercial Real Estate Women) San Diego, has become the first individual from an architectural design firm to join the national CREW Network board of directors. CREW Network is the industry’s premier business networking organization, with chapters in North America and Europe, dedicated to influencing the success of the commercial real estate industry by advancing the achievements of women. English, a principal at Ware Malcomb, an architectural and interior design firm, will serve a two-year term, which began last month. CREW Network received over 90 applications for two available board seats. “A natural trailblazer, Tiffany has made a habit of shattering ceilings; earning her place as a well-respected and inspirational CRE leader in San Diego’s local design and construction market,” said Bree Wong, incoming 2018 CREW San Diego president. “We were thrilled when she was named the first female design principal of Ware Malcomb, but she continues compounding on her successes with her recent appointment to the CREW Network Board. We couldn’t be more thrilled to have Tiffany representing the deep talent of CREW San Diego at the Network level. Expanding her reach from regional to international, she continues to pave the way and raise the bar for professional women in the commercial real estate, design and construction industry.” The post Daily Business Report-Dec. 15, 2017 appeared first on San Diego Metro Magazine.

    San Diego Metro Magazine / 2 d. 10 h. 41 min. ago more
  • Clocked by a GoPro stick at border protest
Clocked by a GoPro stick at border protest

    San Diego Reader / 2 d. 10 h. 49 min. ago
  • Major makeoverMajor makeover

    By Ken Williams | Editor Renovation of University Avenue in North Park is a year away About a year from now, construction is expected to begin on the University Avenue Mobility Project (UAMP) to transform the busy east-west thoroughfare in North Park into a street with improved safety and mobility for pedestrians and bicyclists as well as automotive and transit traffic. To improve mobility and decrease travel time, traffic signals and enhanced pedestrian crossings will be added or removed along the 1.3-mile stretch of University Avenue from Interstate 805 west to Florida Street. University Avenue through North Park, seen here at sundown near the iconic neon sign, will be transformed to improve safety and mobility. Head-in parking will remain but 91 parallel parking spots will be lost between Boundary Street west to Florida Street. (Photo by Ken Williams) Raised medians with irrigated landscaping will be built with turn pockets, so traffic will not be impeded by motorists making left turns. A transit-only lane, for buses and bicyclists, will be open westbound for the entire route. Eastbound, however, the transit-only lane will be limited to the stretch of University Avenue from Utah to Boundary streets. The Metropolitan Transit System (MTS) will also reduce the number of transit stops from 18 to 14 — seven stops in each direction — and each stop will be improved to become compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). The 7 and 10 bus routes travel along this stretch of University Avenue. To accommodate all these improvements, 91 parallel parking spots will be removed on University Avenue between Florida and Boundary streets. Another four parking spots will be removed on several side streets to allow trucks to have enough room to turn. Meanwhile, the city has already converted nearby side streets to head-in parking to add 114 parking spaces. The total net gain will 19 parking spaces after the project is completed. The UAMP has been discussed since at least 2002 and gone through numerous public meetings. The City Council approved the project on July 27, 2015. At that time, city engineers had estimated that construction would begin by late 2016 or early 2017 — which didn’t happen for a number of reasons. Upgrades to underground utilities also had to be finished along University Avenue, and that was only recently completed. The project manager, Jayna Straughn, an associate engineer with the city’s Public Works Department, on Dec. 5 briefed the Design Committee of North Park Main Street (NPMS) Dec. 5 on the progress. She listed the following time schedule: December 2017: Approval of the plant palette for the medians. Because a sewer main runs down the middle of University Avenue, no deep-rooted trees can be planted and nothing taller than 24 inches can be installed. This requires input from NPMS, which will manage a Property Based Improvement District (PBID) that was approved to maintain the landscaping and the irrigation system. April 2018: Final landscape and irrigation review; design is completed. May 2018: Construction contract is advertised. October 2018: Construction contract is awarded. Construction is expected to begin in November 2018 and last for about year. Here are some specific plans that were discussed at the meeting: Traffic signals The traffic signal on University Avenue at Ohio Street will be removed and an enhanced pedestrian crossing will be added. Angela Landsberg, executive director of NPMS, noted that Target plans to move into the vacant Wang’s building at this location. New traffic signals will be added at Arnold Avenue and Oregon Street. Signal timing will be modified to improve traffic circulation and reduce conflicts between pedestrians and vehicles. The speed limit will remain 25 mph. Straughn said the improvements will make University Avenue “calmer and safer” yet will get motorists through the area “faster” by eliminating congestion and optimizing the timing of traffic signals. Left-turn pockets The left-turn pocket at Bancroft Street will be eliminated. Left-turn pockets will be added at Boundary, Illinois, Utah, Oregon and Mississippi streets, and Arnold Avenue. This will trigger modifications to traffic signal timing and loop detectors, and signal mast arms and signal heads could be modified or replaced. Raised median The project calls for a raised median the entire length. The median will be a minimum of 10 feet wide and will narrow at intersections, where left-turn pockets could be provided. There will be landscaping and irrigation on the median that is managed by the PBID. This applies to the median from Arnold Avenue east to 32nd Street. Landsberg said property owners on either end of the UAMP project declined to participate in the PBID, so those medians will not be landscaped. Median curbs will be 6 inches tall, transitioning to 3 inches near intersections to allow delivery vehicles and fire trucks the ability to climb over the curbs to make turns. Transit improvements MTS will eliminate existing bus stops at Utah Street in both directions. The bus stop on the east side of Arnold Avenue will be moved to the west side of the street. The bus stop at Oregon Street will be replaced by a new stop at Idaho Street. Far-side transit stops will be utilized where feasible to make it easier on bus and auto movement as well as minimize conflicts with pedestrians and right-turning vehicles. The traffic plan encourages pedestrians to cross behind the bus, and allows the bus to board or drop off passengers after crossing an intersection. Incidentally, drivers will be allowed to enter the bus/bike lane to make a right turn. Broken striping lines will inform motorists when they can enter the bus/bike lane to turn right. Pedestrian improvements Pedestrians will cheer the closing of the crosswalk at Pershing Avenue, located on a knoll on University Avenue where visibility is a safety issue. An enhanced crosswalk will be installed at the intersection with 28th and Idaho streets, allowing patrons of The Mission and Breakfast Republic restaurants to safely cross the busy street. Three other enhanced crosswalks will be installed: Kansas Street, between the Observatory North Park and Tamarindo Latin Kitchen & Bar. Ohio Street, across from the vacant Wang’s restaurant and next to North Park Beer Company and Fatboy’s Deli. Iowa/Herman streets, across from Tostadas North Park and the 7-Eleven, and near the Iowa Street Senior Housing complex. There will be enhanced crossings across abutting side streets at Alabama Street (north and south legs); Idaho Street (north leg); and 28th Street (south leg). The enhanced crossings on University Avenue may include Rapid Rectangular Flashing Beacons and reflective pavement markings to warn motorists of pedestrians. All existing crosswalks will be restriped with highly reflective paint or modified to increase pedestrian safety. Straughn said “continental crosswalks” with its big, bold striping will be everywhere along the route. Parking situation The city has already created 114 additional parking spaces by converting these streets north of University Avenue from parallel parking to head-in parking: Mississippi, Louisiana, Arizona, Oregon, Idaho, Illinois and Iowa. However, by the time the project is finished, 91 on-street parallel parking spots will be eliminated along University Avenue. The problem, Straughn said, is that the thoroughfare is narrow by modern standards at 52 feet wide. She said some local businesses would be impacted by the loss of parking. To address the parking concerns, NPMS officials plan to add signage to point motorists to the city-owned parking garage, which offers affordable rates of $1 per hour or a maximum of $5 per day. Landsberg said the entrance to the parking garage is hard to find by motorists who are not familiar with the area. The garage’s entrance/exit is on 29th Street, near the Observatory North Park, between University Avenue and North Park Way. Motorists traveling west on University Avenue from the 805 freeway cannot turn left onto 29th Street, and there is not enough space on University west of 30th Street to provide left-turn lanes. The next left-turn pocket will be blocks away at Utah Street. Remaining issues Some key issues are still not resolved. The biggest one involves traffic mitigation on the east end of the project, related to I-805. The Boundary Street intersection with University Avenue is already a bottleneck during peak traffic hours, and it’s part of the Caltrans right of way. René Agustín Vidales, chairman of the North Park Planning Committee, who attended the meeting, explained the problem in a follow-up email: “The Environmental Impact Report (EIR) for the UAMP had a traffic study that analyzed road segments and intersections that were considered part of the area that would be impacted by the project.“One of the intersections analyzed was North Park Way/Boundary Street/33rd Street/I-805 southbound off-ramp/I-805 southbound on-ramp that currently has an all-way stop. “That intersection was identified to be deficient without the project and would continue to be deficient with the project unless mitigation is provided. The mitigation identified in the traffic study and listed in the EIR was to install a traffic signal to improve traffic flow. “We heard from Jayna Straughn that the city is coordinating with Caltrans, and that mitigation would not necessarily consist of the installation of a traffic signal.” Straughn said the mitigation issue had to be resolved by the project’s completion. Also, NPMS has concerns about construction possibly interfering with two major community events held on University Avenue: the North Park Festival of the Arts in May and the North Park Toyland Parade and Festival in December. North Park’s business corridor will also need to be free of construction during the Christmas holiday shopping season, Landsberg said. The arts festival, she continued, could possibly be moved to North Park Way and utilize the North Park Mini Park, which is in the planning stages and will be located directly behind Observatory North Park. Landsberg said that decision has not been finalized. Straughn said the city would try to accommodate by placing those dates in the contract’s specifications. She also noted that one lane of traffic will be open in both directions at all times during the construction phase. For questions or concerns, call the Public Works Department’s construction project information line at 619-533-4207 or email engineering@sandiego.gov. —Ken Williams is editor of Uptown News and can be reached at ken@sdcnn.com or at 619-961-1952. Follow him on Twitter at @KenSanDiego, Instagram at @KenSD or Facebook at KenWilliamsSanDiego. The post Major makeover appeared first on San Diego Uptown News.

    San Diego Uptown / 2 d. 11 h. 16 min. ago more
  • New bookstore opens in South ParkNew bookstore opens in South Park

    By Kit-Bacon Gressitt To paraphrase author Samuel Clemens, reports of the death of independent bookstores are an exaggeration, and, as proof, South Park has hosted the birth of a new one. Jennifer Powell and Seth Marko have reopened the space at 3010-B Juniper St. as The Book Catapult — and, for book lovers, it is a beautiful baby. Although the couple launched within a week of taking over the former West Grove Collective, their decision to open a bookstore was nothing like the snap action of a catapult. Sean Marko and Jennifer Powell in front of The Book Catapult in South Park (Photo by Joe Porteous) “We’ve been South Park residents since 2009 and we love the neighborhood,” Powell said. “We love being able to spend days here without having to get in the car. We value that, and we wanted to invest in that. So, we asked ourselves, how do we make that a profession and not just a lifestyle? How do we do that in a more powerful, more meaningful way? We were seeing that upswing of people coming back to smaller bookstores, and we were hoping to be part of that renewal. And then this great opportunity fell into our laps.” That great opportunity was actually a combination of events and transitioning perspectives. “Seth changed jobs a couple years ago,” Powell said. “We have a 2-year-old daughter. [Collective owner] Anne Mery was ready to move on and do something different, and we’re good friends. It seemed like such a nice fit.” Powell and Marko have transformed the Collective’s space into an eclectic collection of books. Their selection is heavy on fiction and includes a sizable children’s section, including a play space and Spanish language books. Marko, the buyer for the bookstore, has a strong background in bookselling and buying, having worked at Octavia in New Orleans and Warwick’s in La Jolla. “Working as a bookseller is not the most lucrative job, but I love talking about books. I’ve started buying things for the store that I’ve loved over the years. I like the small presses, so we have a lot of small press books. It’s definitely a paperback fiction focus — that’s our largest section — and kids’ picture books. And we have a fair amount of hardcover fiction, and some art and photography. We’re trying to avoid the big blockbuster fiction, like the airport books that you can get anywhere. We try to pick some things that are outside the box a little bit.” Nonfiction selections (The Book Catapult) The owners are also committed to serving the community in meaningful ways. “You have to curate [the collection] and tailor it to your customers. I need to see what people in the neighborhood are interested in. So we get recommendations and then we’ll have it the next week. I saw how Octavia did it and I loved that. What really struck me was their connection to the community, and I thought if I ever owned a bookstore that’s what I’d want to be — a neighborhood hub.” The prospects for The Book Catapult are encouraging. After the 2009 downturn that reduced the number of U.S. booksellers from 3,000 to 1,650, local stores have experienced a resurgence. There are now more than 2,320 in the United States, according to the American Booksellers Association. The upswing is so noticeable, it is making national news, and experts and lay people are examining the reasons behind it. In a recent interview with CBS’s Leslie Stahl, bestselling author and bookstore owner Ann Patchett said, “People are missing the community. We’re creating an environment that is for a lot more than just selling books.” Even Amazon, once the purported death knell of independents, is continuing to open brick-and-mortar outlets in major metropolitan areas. This has the potential to make small independents all the more appealing to consumers seeking the intimacy of a neighborhood store. These are the consumers Powell and Marko hope to woo, not only with books, but with kids’ Story Time, every Saturday at 11 a.m., evening author events, and an informal book club hosted by Marko, Coffee with the Catapult. “First and foremost,” Powell said, “we want to attract South Park residents, residents of the Uptown area and any other book lover, anyone who loves the written word, people who are invested in the community and want a face-to-face discussion. And we hope to draw a lot of families, because we’re expanding the children’s books section. And not just book lovers, but people who enjoy learning and want to explore their curiosity.” —Kit-Bacon Gressitt writes narrative nonfiction and commentary, published at ExcuseMeImWriting.com and is a founding editor of WritersResist.com. She formerly wrote for the North County Times. She also hosts Fallbrook’s monthly Writers Read authors series and open mic, and she can be reached at kbgressitt@gmail.com. The post New bookstore opens in South Park appeared first on San Diego Uptown News.

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  • Bike lanes, or notBike lanes, or not

    AABA members debate possible changes to 30th Street By Ken Williams | Editor Vision Zero is an ambitious strategy to eliminate all traffic fatalities and severe injuries in San Diego by 2025. The city and transportation safety advocates like Circulation San Diego are looking at practical ways to make streets safer for pedestrians, bicyclists and motorists. Across the city, Circulation San Diego is hosting focus groups to discuss ways to achieve the Vision Zero goals. One such focus group met Dec. 6 at The Air Conditioned Lounge, located at 4673 30th St., just a few dozen steps south of Adams Avenue. The Adams Avenue Business Association (AABA) invited the local business owners to the workshop to get input about a study that is looking at the potential realignment of 30th Street to better accommodate bicycles, pedestrians and traffic. The study is sponsored by the Greater Mid-City Community Parking District, which covers a broad area with three independent sub-districts that operate from Golden Hill to University Heights. The El Cajon Boulevard Business Improvement Association serves as the parking district’s advisory board. Catherine Thibault, program manager at Circulate San Diego, which is the consultant on the study, gave a PowerPoint presentation titled “Biking and Walking in North Park, 30th Street and El Cajon Boulevard.” Goals of the study are to: Instill economic revitalization. Ensure safe and friendly streets. Increase pedestrian activity. Advance transportation choices. Increase parking options. The AABA workshop focused on the stretch of 30th Street from Adams Avenue south to Upas Street, which has 16 intersections, including those at super busy El Cajon Boulevard and University Avenue. Three potential options were presented for discussion at the workshop. The first option would remove the center turn lane, leaving 8 feet for parking on each side of the street, 5-foot bike lanes in each direction with a 1½-foot buffer, and two 10-foot travel lanes. The second option would remove parking on one side of the street, leaving the center turn lane, 8 feet for parking on one side of the street, 5-foot bike lanes in each direction with a 2-foot buffer, and two 10-foot travel lanes. The street redesign would create a gentle wave by placing parking on alternating sides of the street every block and aiding traffic-calming efforts. The third option would establish a protected bikeway on both sides of the street, with a 5-foot bike lane and a 2-foot buffer from the 8-foot parking lanes and the 10-foot travel lanes. Most of the workshop participants frowned on the idea of removing the center turn lane because it is used by delivery trucks supplying local restaurants, bars and other businesses. Designer goldsmith Shirley Kanno Boynton, owner of Artisan Collection located at 4639 30th St., said she was “200 percent against bike lanes” because there are already north/south bikes lanes on nearby Utah Street — four blocks west of 30th Street. She said Utah Street is safer for bicycles because it doesn’t have as much traffic. Several participants noted that Utah Street is residential, so it is not as enticing for bicyclists as 30th Street and its commercial enterprises. Boynton said she also didn’t want to “clutter up 30th Street” with bike lanes if there would be any loss of parking. She said she moved from Hillcrest years ago because of parking problems, and said most of her customers would be driving here from places like La Jolla, Scripps Ranch and as far away as Temecula. Thibault and Scott Kessler, AABA executive director, countered that additional parking would be achieved by converting parallel parking to head-in parking on nearby side streets. Kessler said San Diego is “behind the curve” on parking alternatives and solutions. Alison Flynn, owner of Villainous Lair Comics/Gaming at 3220 Adams Ave. and second vice president of the AABA, stressed that the 30th Street/Adams Avenue corridor has been upsized for more density by city planners. Flynn said the neighborhood needs to be prepared for future growth. Gary John, owner of The Air Conditioned Lounge, said the immediate area is already booming with nine restaurants near the intersection. “A big part of my business is ride sharing,” he said, adding that he would like to see a space dedicated to loading/unloading passengers who use Uber or Lyft to come to the area to eat and drink. The workshop participants agreed that something needs to be done to improve the intersection of Adams Avenue and 30th Street. “This corner will require a more creative solution,” John added. Thibault said various studies have shown that “bikes mean business,” pointing to Seattle, where taxable retail sales spiked significantly after bike lanes were added. In Manhattan, she said, the first protected bike lane in the U.S. brought a major decrease in street injuries as well as a major increase in retail sales. In Canada, Toronto made Bloor Street, a major residential and commercial thoroughfare, friendlier to bicyclists and pedestrians. The result? A follow-up study by Clean Air Partnership found that “patrons arriving by foot and bicycle visit the most often and spend the most money per month.” Two principals representing Fall Brewing Company, located at 4542 30th St. between Monroe and Madison avenues, said a lot of their customers arrive on foot or by bicycle. Dave Lively voiced support for bike lanes. Kessler and Thibault said while 40 to 55 parking spaces could be lost on 30th Street between Adams Avenue and Upas Street, conversion of parallel parking to angled parking on Madison and Polk avenues, as well as Gunn, Landis, Dwight, Capps and Myrtle streets, could gain 71 spaces. After an hour of discussion, the informal conclusion was that losing the center turn lane was a deal-breaker and that mitigating the parking issue was very important. Comments from the AABA focus group will be added to the study results. Kessler reminded participants that there is no funding yet to tackle this project and that the city has not even begun an analysis. “This is years away from happening,” Kessler concluded. —Ken Williams is editor of Uptown News and can be reached at ken@sdcnn.com or at 619-961-1952. Follow him on Twitter at @KenSanDiego, Instagram at @KenSD or Facebook at KenWilliamsSanDiego. The post Bike lanes, or not appeared first on San Diego Uptown News.

    San Diego Uptown / 2 d. 11 h. 17 min. ago more
  • Booze, thighs and shakesBooze, thighs and shakes

    By Frank Sabatini Jr. This summer the former S&M Sausage and Meat turned into a serious drinking establishment under the Trust Restaurant Group. It’s now Hundred Proof, where you can surf with your mouth wide open through a hefty inventory of whiskey while hopscotching between various gins, rums, agave and liqueurs. Or if boilermakers are your thing, you’ve landed in the right place for throwing down the liquor shots paired to beer. The casual, non-pretentious atmosphere allows for such hedonistic rituals in what feels like a hybrid of Starlite and The Rabbit Hole. There are also boozy dessert shakes, should you care to experience the effects Junipero Gin behaves with ice cream, lemon curd and meringue, or how Whistlepig Rye Whiskey goes over in an “Almond Joy” shake. Beet hummus, The Bird cocktail, deviled eggs, mushroom pizza and lemon meringue shake (Photos by Frank Sabatini Jr.) Because a friend and I imbibed on other libations during our evening visit, we opted for no gin in the lemon meringue shake. Nevertheless, we found it outrageously toothsome, unlike any cold dessert I’ve consumed from anywhere. The sweet and tangy flavors were big and balanced. Hundred Proof is the party-happy sibling of Trust Restaurant, located less than a mile down the street. The kitchens at both are helmed by co-owner Brad Wise, whose menu on paper here appears like common bar food — a footnote to copious drink options. Yet on the palate, the dishes are admirably complex, which is the hallmark of Wise’s cooking. In painfully dim lighting hanging over the booths and tables around a roomy central bar, we zeroed in on several noshes from the fine-print menu with our phone flashlights, starting with roasted beet hummus. If you’re normally turned off by the intense earthiness of red beets, these are tamed by a little bit of pureed chickpeas. In addition, the hummus is garnished brilliantly with pistachios, green onions and creamy feta cheese, thus adding a depth of flavor married to fantabulous, grilled pita bread. An order of deviled eggs might have tasted ordinary without little sheets of crispy chicken skins laid over their creamy dressed-up yolks. Pickled shallot also enters into the scheme, offering a subtle onion-y tang. But the best poultry surprise of the night — if not the whole year — came after we obliterated an iceberg wedge salad cloaked in thick blue cheese dressing that tasted extra special as it mingled with drizzles of saba, a sweet syrup made from grape must. What followed were grilled chicken thighs, which I’m guessing receive flat reactions from patrons lured foremost by the house burger with English cheddar or the short rib boa buns. Save those trendier items for another visit. The boneless-skinless chicken is deeply marinated in citrus and other ingredients I couldn’t define. The result is extreme tenderness and a slightly fruity flavor augmented by chary grill marks from the flame grill. “Holy (expletive),” my friend blurted when taking her first bite before we gobbled down the meat with gusto. Even without the accompanying chipotle aoili, Wise somehow takes the boring out of chicken. Also memorable was a wild mushroom pizza, some of which came home with me for a delightful reheat the following day. In the presence of thinly sliced ‘shrooms were ricotta, mozzarella and Pecornio cheeses, thyme and roasted garlic — a cut above most pizzas of this variety. My drink of choice throughout dinner was a cocktail called The Bird, capped by a glistening layer of pellet ice that disguised the kick from Diplomatico Rum, Plantation Pineapple Rum and campari ambushed underneath. Fresh citrus in the mix made it innocently refreshing. My friend stuck to a couple glasses of not-so-complex Spanish Tempranillo that I felt was a few degrees too warm. She didn’t mind the “baked” flavor of the wine or that she was probably the only person in the house drinking vino in an establishment that’s so liquor- and cocktail-focused. But that’s the beauty of Hundred Proof, a neighborhood drinking spot that doesn’t lean heavily into any particular scene and one that actually fulfills its claim of serving “elevated bar food.” —Frank Sabatini Jr. is the author of “Secret San Diego” (ECW Press), and began his local writing career more than two decades ago as a staffer for the former San Diego Tribune. Reach him at fsabatini@san.rr.com. The post Booze, thighs and shakes appeared first on San Diego Uptown News.

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  • Guest Editorial:  The year in review in CongressGuest Editorial: The year in review in Congress

    By Rep. Susan A. Davis The first session of the 115th Congress is coming to a close. While it is unacceptable that so many things were left to do, there were a few legislative achievements. First on that must-do list is passing a measure to protect the Dreamers. It is unconscionable that young people and their families live in fear of deportation when they have demonstrated their commitment to be model citizens. Rep. Susan A. Davis While we were able to protect the Affordable Care Act from repeal, we could have reassured millions of American families with the enactment of bipartisan legislation to stabilize health care markets. In my district, Community Health Centers (CHC) provide services to more than 200,000 low-income patients. The failure of Congress to reauthorize CHC programs puts this vital source of care in serious jeopardy. The Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) is in similar danger, leaving access to health care for 9 million children in question. Real tax reform that addressed our human capital investment could have been transformative. Currently, Republican tax plans are unacceptable and will hurt middle-class families. I voted against the House bill but will continue to push my colleagues for a bipartisan approach that truly creates middle-class prosperity. Unfortunately, common-sense gun safety has not seen the light of day despite tragedy after tragedy. Even worse, the House passed a concealed carry bill, which I voted against, that undermines California’s gun laws. While greatly disappointed by the above action taken by the majority, I was proud to achieve a number of legislative victories for San Diego. As your representative, I want to update you on some bills you may not hear much about. The House passed my bill to train school staff to spot the signs of sex trafficking. School districts would receive federal aid to establish a training program or to expand an existing program. Advocates and survivors always tell me it is important to punish traffickers, but we also need to focus on prevention. At the start of the new Congress, I was honored to become the Ranking Member of the Subcommittee on Higher Education and Workforce Development. The Higher Education Act is in desperate need of upgrades if our students are going to compete in the global economy. We also need to ensure our job training programs are meeting the needs of our workforce. The Republican’s long-awaited bill to reauthorize the Higher Education Act (HEA) was recently unveiled. Their bill is not student-centered so I look forward to making improvements to it. One effort will be in the area of Pell Grants. I introduced legislation to make the Pell program more sustainable by increasing the purchasing power of the Pell Grant and give low-income students access to higher education. We also launched a national discussion in Congress on the importance of expanding apprenticeships in our country. San Diego is home to many incredible programs where young people can earn while they learn for a promising and fulfilling career. As we move forward on HEA, these policies areas — as well as many others — will be the focus of my attention. One area of bipartisanship continues to be the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA). As a senior member of the Armed Services Committee, I am able to play a key role in shaping policy to meet our national defense needs and take care of our military families. I was proud to include a number of provisions to the NDAA, such as: Extending survivor benefits for 63,000 widows of service members who died on active duty. This benefit, which these families paid into, was set to expire next spring. Securing $41 million, an increase from $25 million last year, to support women serving in the Afghan National Security Forces. Empowering the young women of Afghanistan is essential for the security of Afghanistan and essential for America’s security. Having traveled to Afghanistan for over 10 years and meeting with Afghan women, I am always inspired by their resilience and determination to rebuild their country and ensure peace for the Afghan people. Providing flexibility to military families when it comes to their frequent moves that interrupt a spouses’ job or education, their children’s education, and exceptional and chronically sick family members. There was also an unparalleled citizen engagement this year. My constituents are letting their voices be heard. Mail and calls to my office are on the rise and over 1,000 people attended my town hall meetings this year. A few legislative days remain on the calendar and I hope we can cross more items off our nation’s must-do list. The American people put members of Congress there for a reason and that’s to address the needs of our nation. —Rep. Susan A. Davis represents Congressional District 53, which includes the San Diego communities of Old Town, Kensington, Mission Hills, University Heights, Hillcrest Bankers Hill, North Park, South Park, Talmadge and Normal Heights, as well as La Mesa, Lemon Grove, Spring Valley and parts of El Cajon and Chula Vista. The post Guest Editorial: The year in review in Congress appeared first on San Diego Uptown News.

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  • Uptown News Holiday Guide: Part 3Uptown News Holiday Guide: Part 3

    AR Workshop 1010 University Ave. Suite C211 92103 619-701-6794 arworkshop.com/sandiego AR Workshop is a boutique DIY (do-it-yourself) studio that offers hands-on classes for creating custom and charming home decor from raw materials. Join an instructor-led workshop to make custom wood signs, framed signs, canvas pillows, lazy susans, centerpiece boxes, tote bags and more. AR Workshop will help you take your home decor to the next level and have fun while creating it. Check out the workshop schedule and find a date where your preferred project is offered. You can come alone or invite friends and family to join you. When you book a workshop, you will choose a graphic design from our many options and enter your project information, so we can prepare the needed materials before you arrive. We provide all of the tools, materials, and step-by-step instructions you will need to complete your workshop. Sip your favorite drink and have fun letting your inner “craftinista” shine. Broadway San Diego San Diego Civic Theater 1100 Third Ave. 92101 619-570-1100 Sandiegotheaters.org Broadway/San Diego — a Nederlander presentation — is part of the nationally recognized Nederlander producing company of America, one of the country’s largest and most experienced operators of live theater. Broadway/San Diego made its original debut as the San Diego Playgoers in 1976, after presenting “Equus” at the Spreckels Theatre in Downtown San Diego. For several years, San Diego Playgoers presented shows at the Fox Theatre (now Copley Symphony Hall) and the Spreckels, before establishing a permanent home at the San Diego Civic Theatre in 1986, with occasional presentations at the other venues including the historic Balboa Theatre. Broadway/San Diego has presented over 375 shows and events, including the record-setting blockbusters “The Phantom of the Opera,” “Miss Saigon,” “The Producers,” “Les Misérables,” “Disney’s The Lion King,” “The Book of Mormon,” “Wicked” and the much anticipated “Hamilton” in January 2018. Fitness Together 4019 Goldfinch St. 92103 619-794-0014 fitnesstogether.com/mission-hills Ryan Gans has been involved in the fitness community for the better part of a decade. His journey in fitness started after suffering a brutal knee injury, which required surgery. It was during knee rehabilitation, to gain basic function back in his knee, where Ryan’s passion for fitness started. It was the rehab process where Ryan learned the amazing capabilities of the human body. In the years that followed, Ryan found the tools required to improve human performance. Anyone who has trained with Ryan can attest that his workouts are effective in achieving results. The combination of Fitness Together Mission Hills, its private suites, one-on-one focus, and Ryan’s customized workouts, will get you results. Clients are never more than a couple feet away, proximity-wise, enhancing focus and taking away the fear; the intimidation, and the waiting found in most training/gym scenarios. Clients train in private, fully-equipped suites, on an appointment-only basis, where the focus is totally on and about them, and no one else. Fitness Together brings a highly-efficient process to working out, combining a superior degree of coaching with smart nutrition to get results faster and safer. Your first session is complimentary and more diagnostic in nature, to allow a better understanding of your medical and medicinal backgrounds, as well as previous work out experiences, timelines and goals. Clients at Fitness Together Mission Hills range across the spectrum, both in age and fitness levels. We meet clients “where they are” fitness and health wise, and safely move the needle in the right direction. One thing that sets Ryan apart from other trainers is that he has tested numerous fitness methodologies and knows first-hand how it affects the human body. Ryan would never give you an exercise or workout he hasn’t done, or wouldn’t do himself. If you are looking to lose a few pounds, make a major comeback from an injury, or are in need to better your body’s performance in any way, Fitness Together and Ryan Gans are a great choice. See what others are saying about us on YELP. Noric Wellness Center and Fine Art 4002 Park Blvd. University Heights 92103 619-508-4741 noricwellnesscenterandfineart.com Therapeutic massage by Norma Brinker of Noric Wellness Center is highly esteemed by many.  The Noric Wellness studio is a unique and quaint little space dedicated to health and well-being. A fine art painter, Norma is certified by Pacific College of Oriental Medicine as a massage/Asian body worker. She is licensed by the state of California. Norma has been practicing for seven years. Each wellness session is geared toward individual concerns to provide complete comfort and satisfaction. Noric offers holistic health modalities that include Swedish and deep tissue massage techniques, myofascial release, lymph drainage, meridian point therapy, cupping therapy, reflexology, reiki energy healing, sound vibration therapy, hot stone and other heat therapy modalities, aroma therapy and art as therapy. An appointment is required for wellness sessions and can be booked directly from website at noricwellnesscenterandfineart.com; or call 619- 508-4741. Noric also offers drumming circles and music entertainment for private events. The Old Globe Theater 1363 Old Globe Way 92101 619-234-5623 theoldglobe.org The Old Globe Theatre has been home to the most acclaimed national artists, designers, directors and playwrights in the theater industry. More than 20 productions produced at The Old Globe have gone on to play Broadway and off-Broadway, garnering a total of 13 Tony Awards and numerous nominations. In 1984, The Old Globe was the recipient of the Tony Award for outstanding regional theater, for its contribution to the development of the art form. These awards bring world attention, not only to The Old Globe, but also to San Diego’s rich cultural landscape. Located off of El Prado in Balboa Park –– between the San Diego Museum of Art and the Museum of Man — The Old Globe Theatre is proud to present its annual family musical, “Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas!” with performances between Nov. 4 and Dec 24. The show is described as a wonderful, whimsical musical, based upon the classic Dr. Seuss book. Back at The Old Globe for its 20th incredible year, this family-favorite features the songs “This Time of Year,” “Santa for a Day” and “Fah Who Doraze,” the delightful carol from the popular animated version of “How the Grinch Stole Christmas!” Celebrate the holidays as The Old Globe Theatre is once again transformed into the snow-covered Whoville, right down to the last can of Whohash. For more information and tickets, visit our website. The Patio on Goldfinch 4020 Goldfinch St. 92103 619-501-5090 thepatioongoldfinch.com Located in the heart of Mission Hills, The Patio on Goldfinch is the quintessential neighborhood eatery. Stop by for an elevated, yet casual, dining experience and encounter all-day happy hour on Mondays, daily specials, community events and more. Indulge in your favorite breakfast dishes with a classic California brunch and bottomless mimosas every weekend, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., and don’t forget to explore the one-of-a-kind cheese cave. Unique within Southern California, the temperature and humidity-controlled cheese cave houses a selection of artisan cheeses that are skillfully aged in-house by their affineur. Starting at 4 p.m. each day, a new and exciting dinner menu is here to tantalize and tempt the taste buds. The Patio on Goldfinch is also your go-to destination for late night dining in Mission Hills; enjoy chef-inspired modern cuisine until 11 p.m. nightly (11:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday), accompanied by happy hour specials from 10 p.m. to midnight. You’ll want to come back again and again for this seasonal, modern California cuisine. With gluten-free, vegetarian and nut-free options available, The Patio on Goldfinch has something for everyone. The post Uptown News Holiday Guide: Part 3 appeared first on San Diego Uptown News.

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  • Uptown News Food Briefs: Dec. 15, 2017Uptown News Food Briefs: Dec. 15, 2017

    By Frank Sabatini Jr Champagne expert Dustin Jones of Skurnik Wines will head up an informative tasting of French Champagne from 7 to 10 p.m., Dec. 22, at The Wine Lover in Hillcrest. Guests can drop in at any time during the indoor-outdoor event to sample four pours featuring three whites and one rosè, all hailing from within France’s Champagne province. The cost is $35 per person. 3968 Fifth Ave., 619-294-9200, thewineloversd.com. ______________________________________________ This writer’s spouse recently discovered (and purchased online) what Bon Appètit magazine rated as “the best panettone in existence.” Coincidentally, so did local restaurateur Matteo Catteneo, who is carrying the tall-standing Italian sweet bread for the month of December at Buona Forchetta in South Park, as well as Officine Buona Forchetta in Liberty Station. A fabulous mail-order dessert by a renowned pastry chef is now available at two local Italian restaurants. (Photo by Frank Sabatini Jr.) Known as “Panettoni from Roy,” the cupcake-shaped loaves are made in the Bay Area by famed pastry chef Roy Shvartzapel, who has revolutionized the ubiquitous holiday confection with wild yeast, top-quality pistachios and dried fruits, pearl sugar and dough that requires 40 hours to cure and proof. The result is an unusually airy panettone that melts in your mouth and transcends commercial brands. Catteneo sells it at his restaurants for $15 a slice or $65 for a whole loaf, which weighs 2.2 lbs. Consumers can also purchase it online for $50 a loaf (plus delivery) at thisisfromroy.com. ______________________________________________ Farm-to-table advocate Trish Watlington is selling her long-established restaurant, The Red Door, along with her newer, adjoining venture, Bar by Red Door. Both are lauded for serving locally sourced produce (some from Watlington’s Mt. Helix garden) and sustainable proteins. The forthcoming owner is Luciano Cibellia, a native of Milan, Italy, and an accomplished chef who has cooked in kitchens across Europe and in New York City. He too eschews big distributors and uses only ingredients that can be traced. The sale is expected to close in February and we’re told that Cibellia will keep The Red Door name, at least until the community gets to know him. The businesses will stay open through the transition, after which Watlington plans on remaining active in the food community while continuing to support local growers through Farm-to-Fork Week, which is next scheduled for Jan. 14–21. 741 W. Washington St., 619-295-6000, thereddoorsd.com. ______________________________________________ Fresh Catch Fish Market & Grill in Hillcrest has been replaced by Saporè, a white-tablecloth Italian restaurant specializing in seafood, pasta and brick-oven pizzas. Owner Brad Auerbach opened the restaurant after working in the restaurant and seafood industries for nearly 30 years. He was with an Italian restaurant in Boston for eight years and also owned The Ranch Deli in Rancho Santa Fe. Seafood from New England and the West Coast can be purchased at a new Italian restaurant in Hillcrest. (Courtesy Saporè) Saporè also features a retail section of fresh seafood sold by the pound. Auerbach sources much of it from established contacts in the Boston area. 3650 Fifth Ave., 619-642-0202, saporedining.com. ______________________________________________ Matt Sieve of Madison on Park in University Heights has created a new food window for the neighborhood bar next door, Park & Rec. The service operates under the name Renegade and carries a retro ’80s vibe through nostalgic music and movie references as well as dishes such as assorted Tater Tots, shell pasta mac n’ cheese and various grilled sandwiches. The window is open from 5 to 10 p.m. daily and will eventually offer brunch. 4612 Park Blvd., 619-795-9700, parkandrecsd.com. Tater Tots topped with carnitas and nacho cheese at Renegade inside Park & Rec (Courtesy Katalyst Public Relations) ______________________________________________ Roman transplant Sergio Torrisi has taken over the shuttered Royal Stone restaurant in Bankers Hill to launch Mia Trattoria, where he says the Italian bill of fare is “real – not Americanized.” He is joined by his father, Ivan, who ran a piano bar and restaurant in Rome before moving here. “Everything is made from scratch, the bread, pasta and sauces,” Torrisi said, adding that he gave the space a minor makeover before opening Dec. 1. Bankers Hill welcomes the arrival of Mia Trattoria. (Photo by Sergio Torrisi) The lunch-dinner menus include dishes such as potato-leek soup, saffron risotto, chicken piccata, rosemary lamb chops and numerous pasta dishes. 3401 First Ave., 619-230-5283, miatrattoriasd.com. ______________________________________________ The recent closing of Spitz Mediterranean Street Food in Hillcrest will give way to Fifth Avenue Kitchen & Tap in the coming months. Described by the property brokerage firm, Location Matters, as “a fun bistro-style sports bar,” the project is the brainchild of buyer Ron Crilley, who also owns The Kraken in Cardiff and OC Tavern in San Clemente. The indoor-outdoor establishment will feature New Orleans-inspired cuisine. 3515 Fifth Ave. —Frank Sabatini Jr. can be reached at fsabatini@san.rr.com. The post Uptown News Food Briefs: Dec. 15, 2017 appeared first on San Diego Uptown News.

    San Diego Uptown / 2 d. 11 h. 18 min. ago more
  • Return of ‘Miracle on 34th Street’Return of ‘Miracle on 34th Street’

    By Jean Lowerison What could be better for spreading Christmas cheer than that great story about Kris Kringle winning a court case and validating his claim to be the “real” Santa Claus? We’re in luck. San Diego Musical Theatre revives last year’s popular musical version of the old 1947 Lux Radio Hour broadcast of “Miracle on 34th Street” through Dec. 24 in its new home at the Horton Grand Theatre. The cast of “Miracle on 34th Street” (Photo by Colleen Smith) Adapted by Lance Arthur Smith, and with original songs and arrangements by Jon Lorenz, “Miracle” is a great way to enjoy the season. On Michael McKeon’s wonderfully detailed set of the radio studio surrounded by the lit windows of tall New York skyscrapers behind, Cris O’Bryon plays radio personality Alex Mialdo, who hosts the play. (He also plays a mean piano and does the Foley effects.) The problem starts when the Santa who is to march in the Macy’s parade shows up drunk, and Macy’s events chair Doris Walker (Janaya Mahealani Jones) has to find a replacement. An old man with the right look appears and is hired on the spot. This is Kris Kringle (Tim West). Doris doesn’t even believe in Santa, and has inculcated that attitude in her young daughter Susan (an adorable Cassidy Smith) as well. Santa is handed a list of overstocked toys and asked to push them to the kids. But marketing’s not his bag, and Santa has another idea: send moms to the store that has the best item wanted at the best price. When Mr. Macy finds out, he’s elated because this policy has produced oodles of goodwill for the store. Soon enough, Macy’s biggest competitor Gimbel decides to do the same thing, and before you know it, they’re in a publicity shot together. Christmas really is magic, you know? But meanwhile, Kris is having trouble being accepted as Santa. Kids have no issue, but adults (including Macy’s psychologist) are calling him a crazy, deluded old man. Someone suggests that Kris move from his retirement home closer to town, and he moves in with lawyer Fred Gailey (Matthew Malecki), who lives down the hall from Doris and her young daughter Susan. Soon Fred and Kris become good friends and all four discover a lasting bond. But Kris gets into another row with the psychologist, bops him with his cane and ends up in a holding room at Bellevue. Soon Santa finds himself in court, having to prove that he’s Santa. Of course, his roommate Fred is his attorney. It’s a delightful story, wonderfully directed by Brian Rickel and portrayed by this talented and experienced cast (all except two are returnees from last year). West’s Kris Kringle is new, amusing, kindly and winning — exactly what I’d want in a Santa. His new protégé Susan is cute, smart and knows a Santa when she sees one. Lorenz’s music — especially the modern, close-harmony versions of Christmas carols — add a contemporary touch to this sure-fire holiday favorite, and SDMT’s production is guaranteed to leave you with a smile on your face. —Jean Lowerison is a long-standing member of the San Diego Theatre Critics Circle and can be reached at infodame@cox.net. The post Return of ‘Miracle on 34th Street’ appeared first on San Diego Uptown News.

    San Diego Uptown / 2 d. 11 h. 19 min. ago more
  • Calendar: Dec. 15, 2017 – Jan. 11, 2018Calendar: Dec. 15, 2017 – Jan. 11, 2018

    Friday, Dec. 15 ‘Wings & Snow: A World of Masks’ Through Dec. 30, Sophie’s Kensington Gallery, 4168 Adams Ave. Exhibit celebrates the holiday season with a collection of masks in a variety of media including clay, fused glass, paint, mosaics, palm fronds and repurposed jewels. Guest artists include Carol Minear, a Kensington artist who uses palm fronds to create characters, and Maureen Robbins, an artist from Rochester, New York, who creates jeweled masks. Stmsc.org. ‘Jewels of the Season: Holidays at the Timken’ Through Dec. 31, featuring the Hord and Schlappi Collection of Ornaments, Timken Museum of Art, 1500 El Prado, Balboa Park. Free. Timkenmuseum.org. Jungle Bells at San Diego Zoo 9 a.m.–8 p.m., through Jan. 1, 2018. Ring in the holidays at San Diego Zoo with seasonal decorations, animal experiences, costumed characters and live entertainment. Closes at 5 p.m. Christmas Eve. Sandiegozoo.org. Craft Works Holiday Shop 2–6 p.m., through Jan. 5, 2018. Visual art exhibition by San Diego City College students, faculty, alumni and friends. Art Produce Gallery, 3139 University Ave., North Park. Artproduce.org. Ales ‘n’ Rails Ugly Christmas Sweaters Party 6–9 p.m., San Diego Model Railroad Museum, Balboa Park. Fundraiser features brews by Mike Hess Brewing, Pizza Port Brewing Company, Benchmark Brewing and Rock Bottom Brewery. $30. Bit.ly/2ALGylc. BLVD Market 6 p.m., pop-up food and entertainment event, 2855 El Cajon Blvd., North Park. Free before 10 p.m.; $10 afterwards. Bar raises money for Universal Sound and Blissed Yoga. Hotels/Motels (Unofficial Art Fair) 6–10 p.m., Southern California artists to transform hotel rooms into galleries, stages and project spaces, Lafayette Hotel, Swim Club & Bungalows, 2223 El Cajon Blvd., North Park. $10-$20. Bit.ly/2BHeP2D. Julien Baker Half War 7 p.m., The Irenic, 3090 Polk Ave., North Park. $18-$20. Theirenic.com.  ‘The Nutcracker’ 7 p.m., San Diego Civic Youth Ballet, Casa del Prado Theater in Balboa Park. $12-$18. Sdcyb.org. ‘Love Actually’ 8 p.m., Cinema Under the Stars, 4040 Goldfinch St., Mission Hills. $16-$19. Visit topspresents.com or call 619-295-4221. Also on Dec. 16. Square dancing classes 8–9:30 p.m., Recital Hall, 2130 Pan American Plaza, Balboa Park. $50 for 13 classes. 858-277-7499 or circulators.sdsda.org. Metal show 9 p.m., Squirrelly Arts, Sergulath, The End Party, DAEMOS. The Merrow, 1271 University Ave., Hillcrest. 21 and older. $5. Ticketweb.com or 619-299-7372. Saturday, Dec. 16  Old Town Saturday Market 9 a.m.–4:30 p.m., Harney Street and San Diego Avenue, Old Town. Also held on Sundays. Oldtownsaturdaymarket.com. Golden Hill Farmers Market 9:30 a.m.–1:30 p.m., B Street between 27th and 28th streets, Golden Hill. Sdmarketmanager.com. Book sale 9:30 a.m.–noon, Friends of the Library book sale, Mission Hills Library, 925 W. Washington St. 619-692-4910. Kirtan in the Park Noon, four hours of kirtan (non-sectarian group meditation) in the heart of Balboa Park. Meet at 1549 El Prado. Hotels/Motels (Unofficial Art Fair) Noon–10 p.m., Southern California artists to transform hotel rooms into galleries, stages and project spaces, Lafayette Hotel, Swim Club & Bungalows, 2223 El Cajon Blvd., North Park. $10-$20. Bit.ly/2BHeP2D. Champagne Wine Tasting 1–3 p.m., annual Champagne wine taster, Village Vino, 4095 Adams Ave., Kensington. $35. Tasting fee waived with two-bottle purchase. 619-546-8466 or villagevino.com. ‘The Nutcracker’ 2 and 7 p.m., San Diego Civic Youth Ballet, Casa del Prado Theater in Balboa Park. $12-$18. Sdcyb.org. West African dance class 7–8:30 p.m., master dancer Djibril Camara from Guinea/Senegal teaches classes for all ages and skill levels. La Vie Dance Studio, 325 W. Washington St., Hillcrest. $15. bit.ly/2rkMr1u.  Comedy Heights 8–10 p.m., local comedians perform, Twiggs Coffeehouse, 4590 Park Blvd., University Heights. Free. Comedyheights.com. Pierce Fulton + Nvdes 8:30 p.m., with Noosa. Soda Bar, 3615 El Cajon Blvd. $15. 21 and older. ticketfly.com. Christmas Chaos Toys For Tots concert 8:30 p.m., Godhammered, W.A.S.T.E., One Inch Punch, Snail Fight and Polish. The Merrow, 1271 University Ave., Hillcrest. 21 and older. $10. Ticketweb.com or 619-299-7372. Sunday, Dec. 17 Hillcrest Farmers Market 9 a.m.–2 p.m., Normal Street between University Avenue and Lincoln Street. Hillcrestfarmersmarket.com. Talmadge Art Show 10 a.m.–4 p.m., pop-up show, Talmadge House, 4514 Norma Drive, Talmadge. Two food trucks: Dos Bandidos and Le Bris Cupcakes. Talmadgeartshow.com or 619-559-9082. San Diego Made Holiday Market 11 a.m.–5 p.m., handmade goods by 60 local artists, food and drinks, kids activities and music spun by DJ Leeds, Lafayette Hotel, Swim Club & Bungalows, 2223 El Cajon Blvd., North Park. $5. Bit.ly/2B3i6v4. Marston House Garden Tour 1:30 p.m., Marston House, 3525 Seventh Ave., Hillcrest. $15. Bit.ly/2AWcvrh. ‘The Nutcracker’ 2 p.m., San Diego Civic Youth Ballet, Casa del Prado Theater in Balboa Park. $12-$18. Sdcyb.org. The Nervous Wreckords 7 p.m., with Boychick and The Strawberry Moons. Soda Bar, 3615 El Cajon Blvd. $10. 21 and older. ticketfly.com. The Playground Sunday Night Dance Party 9 p.m., DJ Heather Hardcore, The Merrow, 1271 University Ave., Hillcrest. 21 and older. Free admission. Ticketweb.com or 619-299-7372. Monday, Dec. 18 Science Winter Camps 9 a.m.–4 p.m., camps for grades 1-3 and grades 4-6, Fleet Science Center, 1875 El Prado, Balboa Park. Through Dec. 29. $50-$70. Register in advance online at fleetscience.org or at 619-238-1233, ext. 806. North Park Toastmasters 6:30–8 p.m., St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, 3725 30th St., North Park. 619-694-9148. bit.ly/2vMOGje. Bankers Hill Community Group 6:30–8 p.m., San Diego Indoor Sports Club, 3030 Front St., Bankers Hill. Open Mic Night 6:30 p.m., Lestat’s Coffee House, 3343 Adams Ave., Normal Heights. Free. bit.ly/2vMqHR9. Tuesday, Dec. 19 Hullabaloo 5 p.m., concert for kids and their families, Mission Hills Library, 925 W. Washington St. 619-692-4910. North Park Planning Committee 6:30 p.m., North Park Christian Fellowship, 2901 North Park Way. ‘Tales from the Mammal Atlas’ 7 p.m., NATtalk, The NAT, 1788 El Prado, Balboa Park. Learn about San Diego County’s rich ecology. Sdnhm.org. West African dance class 7–8:30 p.m., master dancer Djibril Camara from Guinea/Senegal teaches classes for all ages and skill levels. La Vie Dance Studio, 325 W. Washington St., Hillcrest. $15. bit.ly/2rkMr1u. Danielle Alexa 8:30 p.m., with Natalya. Soda Bar, 3615 El Cajon Blvd. $10. 21 and older. ticketfly.com. Rock and Alternative 9 p.m., Year of the Dead Bird, Alpine Circuitry and Hot Mustard. The Merrow, 1271 University Ave., Hillcrest. 21 and older. $5. Ticketweb.com or 619-299-7372. Wednesday, Dec. 20 Mission Hills Business Improvement District 3:30 p.m. Visit missionhillsBID.com for meeting location. Wednesday Night Experience 7–8 p.m., uplifting and spiritually inspiring experiences for all, Universal Spirit Center, 3858 Front St., Hillcrest. $20 donation requested. bit.ly/2vMK5xl. Adam Everett 8:30 p.m., with The Lucy Ring. Soda Bar, 3615 El Cajon Blvd. $6. 21 and older. ticketfly.com. Thursday, Dec. 21 Uptown Sunrise Rotary Club 7 a.m., Panera Bread, 1270 Cleveland Ave., Hillcrest. bit.ly/2pezpnR. North Park Thursday Market 3–7:30 p.m., North Park Way between 30th Street and Granada Avenue. Northparkfarmersmarket.com. Kornflower’s Open Mic 7 p.m. sign up, open mic (no poetry or comedy). Family-friendly event, Rebecca’s Coffee House, 3015 Juniper St., South Park, free. Rebeccascoffeehouse.com. Liberty Toastmasters Club 7 p.m., St. Paul’s Community Care Center, 328 Maple St., Bankers Hill. bit.ly/2vN6A5t. Courage to Change – Al-Anon meetings: 7:15–8:15 p.m., for friends and relatives of alcoholics, Christ United Presbyterian Church chapel, 3025 Fir St., South Park. Italian Film Series 7:30 p.m., Museum of Photographic Arts, 1649 El Prado, Balboa Park. Sandiegoitalianfilmfestival.com. Spencer Day 8 p.m., singer-songwriter-pianist and his new album “Angel City,” Martinis Above Fourth Table + Stage, 3940 Fourth Ave., second floor, Hillcrest. $40. ma4sd.com. Space Control 8:30 p.m., with OrchidxMantis. Soda Bar, 3615 El Cajon Blvd. $6. 21 and older. ticketfly.com. Kirtan Musical Meditation 8:30 p.m., chant and sing ancient and contemporary mantras celebrating love and life, Pilgrimage of the Heart Yoga, 3301 Adams Ave., Normal Heights. Free – donations welcome. Pilgrimageyoga.com. Rock and Alternative 9 p.m., Diamond Lakes’ final show, Little Heroine, Soft Lions and Low Points. The Merrow, 1271 University Ave., Hillcrest. 21 and older. $5. Ticketweb.com or 619-299-7372. Friday, Dec. 22 Memory Café 10–11:30 a.m., a gathering place for those with memory loss, caretakers and those worried about memory problems. First Unitarian Universalist Church of San Diego, 4190 Front St., Hillcrest. Donations appreciated. bit.ly/2vMSsZV. ‘Dunkirk’ 8 p.m., Cinema Under the Stars, 4040 Goldfinch St., Mission Hills. $16-$19. Visit topspresents.com or call 619-295-4221. Also on Dec. 16. Square dancing classes 8–9:30 p.m. Recital Hall, 2130 Pan American Plaza, Balboa Park. $50 for 13 classes. 858-277-7499 or circulators.sdsda.org. X 8 p.m., with Meat Puppets and Mike Watt. Observatory North Park, 2981 University Ave. All ages. $29.50. ticketfly.com. Dead Feather Moon Shane Hall 8:30 p.m., with Wish & the Well. Soda Bar, 3615 El Cajon Blvd. $12-$14. 21 and older. ticketfly.com. Saturday, Dec. 23 Old Town Saturday Market 9 a.m.–4:30 p.m., Harney Street and San Diego Avenue, Old Town. Also held on Sundays. Oldtownsaturdaymarket.com. Golden Hill Farmers Market 9:30 a.m.–1:30 p.m., B Street between 27th and 28th streets, Golden Hill. Sdmarketmanager.com. West African dance class 7–8:30 p.m., master dancer Djibril Camara from Guinea/Senegal teaches classes for all ages and skill levels. La Vie Dance Studio, 325 W. Washington St., Hillcrest. $15. bit.ly/2rkMr1u. Comedy Heights 8–10 p.m., local comedians perform, Twiggs Coffeehouse, 4590 Park Blvd., University Heights. Free. Comedyheights.com. Heavy Hawaii 8:30 p.m., with Sixes and Brandon Welchez of Crocodiles. Space, 3519 El Cajon Blvd. 21 and older. $5. ticketfly.com. The Gloomies + Hideout 8:30 p.m., with John the Baptist, Stephanie Brown & The Surrealistics. Soda Bar, 3615 El Cajon Blvd. $10-$12. 21 and older. ticketfly.com. Sunday, Dec. 24 Hillcrest Farmers Market 9 a.m.–2 p.m., Normal Street between University and Lincoln avenues. Hillcrestfarmersmarket.com. Monday, Dec. 25 Tuesday, Dec. 26 Velour 8:30 p.m., with Sweet Myths. Soda Bar, 3615 El Cajon Blvd. $6. 21 and older. ticketfly.com. Wednesday, Dec. 27 Craft & Canvas 7 p.m.–midnight, Thumbprint Gallery presents “Craft & Canvas Art,” Heights Tavern, 3377 Adams Ave., University Heights. Paint and drink craft beer. 21 and older. ThumbprintGallerySD.com. Wednesday Night Experience 7–8 p.m., uplifting and spiritually inspiring experiences for all, Universal Spirit Center, 3858 Front St., Hillcrest. $20 donation requested. bit.ly/2vMK5xl. ‘Sinatra & Me’ 8 p.m., Richard Shelton performs, Martinis Above Fourth Table + Stage, 3940 Fourth Ave., second floor, Hillcrest. $25-$30. ma4sd.com. A Shattered Hope 8:30 p.m., with Drop the Gloves, Soda Bar, 3615 El Cajon Blvd. $10. 21 and older. ticketfly.com. Thursday, Dec. 28 Uptown Sunrise Rotary Club 7 a.m., Panera Bread, 1270 Cleveland Ave., Hillcrest. bit.ly/2pezpnR. North Park Thursday Market 3–7:30 p.m., North Park Way between 30th Street and Granada Avenue. Northparkfarmersmarket.com. Kornflower’s Open Mic 7 p.m., open mic (no poetry or comedy). Family-friendly event, Rebecca’s Coffee House, 3015 Juniper St., South Park. Free. Rebeccascoffeehouse.com. Liberty Toastmasters Club 7 p.m., St. Paul’s Community Care Center, 328 Maple St., Bankers Hill. bit.ly/2vN6A5t. Courage to Change – Al-Anon meetings: 7:15–8:15 p.m., for friends and relatives of alcoholics, Christ United Presbyterian Church chapel, 3025 Fir St., South Park. Alec Mapa 8 p.m., “Holiday in Alec Mapa,” Martinis Above Fourth Table + Stage, 3940 Fourth Ave., second floor, Hillcrest. $35-$40. ma4sd.com. Electric Mud 8:30 p.m., with J.G. Bitter, Charlie Moses, Mersky, Ben Limpic. Soda Bar, 3615 El Cajon Blvd. $7. 21 and older. ticketfly.com. Kirtan Musical Meditation 8:30 p.m., chant and sing ancient and contemporary mantras celebrating love and life, Pilgrimage of the Heart Yoga, 3301 Adams Ave., Normal Heights. Free – donations welcome. Pilgrimageyoga.com. Friday, Dec. 29 Behind the Wagon 8:30 p.m., with The Downs Family and Ypsitucky. Soda Bar, 3615 El Cajon Blvd. $8. 21 and older. ticketfly.com. Winter Disco 8:30 p.m., Space, 3519 El Cajon Blvd. 21 and older. $5. ticketfly.com. Rock out 9 p.m., RDG, Fusebox and Amigo. The Merrow, 1271 University Ave., Hillcrest. 21 and older. $10. Ticketweb.com or 619-299-7372. Saturday, Dec. 30 Chicano Batman 8 p.m., with Hanni El Khatib and Thee Commons. Observatory North Park, 2981 University Ave. All ages. $30. Ticketfly.com. Downspell 8:30 p.m., with Godhammered, Squirrelly Arts and Monarch. Soda Bar, 3615 El Cajon Blvd. $8. 21 and older. ticketfly.com. Sunday, Dec. 31 The Creepy Creeps 8:30 p.m., with Cruz Radical. Soda Bar, 3615 El Cajon Blvd. $20. 21 and older. ticketfly.com. Emile Welman’s New Year’s Eve Spectacular 10 p.m., celebrate with an evening of jazz and hip-hop fusion, Martinis Above Fourth Table + Stage, 3940 Fourth Ave., second floor, Hillcrest. $125 and up. ma4sd.com. To view local community organization meeting information online, visit bit.ly/2esLpLR. —Compiled by Ken Williams. Email calendar items to ken@sdcnn.com.   ONGOING EVENTS ‘Monet’s Étretat: Destination and Motif’ View several works by French Impressionist painter Claude Monet, including two major oil paintings on loan from The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Free. Through Sunday, Dec. 31. Timken Museum of Art, 1500 El Prado, Balboa Park. bit.ly/2wvCR16. ‘C-Note’ Annual exhibit and sale, through Jan. 6, Art on 30th Gallery, 4434 30th St. in North Park. Arton30th.com or 619-894-9009. ‘Game Masters: The Exhibition’ See the works of over 30 video game designers and play video games both old and new. $17-$20. Through Jan. 15, 2018. Fleet Science Center, 1875 El Prado, Balboa Park. bit.ly/2sYkb5q. ‘Arts of South and Southeast Asia’ This exhibition displays images of Hindu deities. Through Jan. 31, 2019. San Diego Museum of Art, 1450 El Prado, Balboa Park. bit.ly/2sXMd1b. ‘Brenda Biondo: Play’ Exhibit features 25 photographs from Brenda Biondo’s series “Playground” and “Paper Skies.” Through March 11, 2018. San Diego Museum of Art, 1450 El Prado, Balboa Park. bit.ly/2sY1uiA. ‘Legacy in Black’ 10 a.m.–5 p.m. daily, works by local African-American artists Manuelita Brown, Ernest Eugene Barnes Jr., Jean Cornwell Wheat, Albert Fennell, Kadir Nelson, Faith Ringgold, Charles Rucker and Rossie Wade exhibited through April 15, 2018 at San Diego History Center, 1649 El Prado, Balboa Park. 619-232-6203 or sandiegohistory.org. ‘Aircraft Carrier: Guardian of the Seas’ Giant-screen premiere, IMAX theater, Fleet Science Center, Balboa Park. Rhfleet.org. To view local community organization meeting information online, visit bit.ly/2esLpLR. —Compiled by Ken Williams. Email calendar items to ken@sdcnn.com. The post Calendar: Dec. 15, 2017 – Jan. 11, 2018 appeared first on San Diego Uptown News.

    San Diego Uptown / 2 d. 11 h. 19 min. ago more
  • Reincarnation in Mission ValleyReincarnation in Mission Valley

    By Dr. Ink Some elements of Primos Mexican Food & Bar are brand new. Others not so much compared to when the establishment operated earlier this year as Primos Public Corner. Chips and habanero salsa, paired with a traditional margarita (Photos by Dr. Ink) Since reopening a few months ago under the new name, the owners initially introduced happy hour Sunday through Thursday, slashing the prices of all drinks by 50 percent. That changed, however, on the early December day I ducked in for a cheap nosh and drink. Now, happy hour is Monday through Friday — still from 2 to 6 p.m. except for all day on Wednesdays. A nd the bargains are a little different, yet equally enticing to Fenton Marketplace shoppers who might have blown too much money at Costco or Ikea across the parking lot. Well drinks, margaritas, Micheladas and draft beer cost $4.50, while trios of supreme taquitos or a pair of tacos with chicken, beef or fish are an easy $4. Ditto for a half order of chipotle-bacon fries. Chips, fried pork skins and several salsas are for the taking at an open station where you’ll also find brined carrots and roasted peppers. Also new is the elimination of full wait service in areas outside the bar lounge. Primos Mexican Food & Bar is rebranded and open for business. (Photo by Dr. Ink) If you want to loll over a margarita made with Rancho Alegre Tequila or a Tangerine Express beer from Stone Brewing Company on a table in the back rotunda section or the roomy outdoor patio, you’ll have to order and fetch it yourself at the bar. No big deal. I perched in the bar area on one of several high tops and amid a barrage of sports games and commentary shows playing on flat-screen televisions. Thankfully the sound was off. A playlist of contemporary Latin music filled the place instead, prompting me to order a margarita. Fish tacos (Photo by Dr. Ink) The young, female bartender doubling as a waitress in the lounge area explained with excitement that the “marg mix” is made in-house. It blends orange and lime juices with a touch of simple syrup — exactly how I like them. Served in a tall, slosh-less glass, which I also prefer opposed to chalice versions, I opted for a pair of fish tacos as well. The deep-fried fish fillets were encased heavily in batter, but they weren’t shamefully greasy. The cabbage was fresh and crisp, and the peppery aoili was a zesty departure from traditional white sauce. Something about their overall quality seemed better compared to when I ate them during the restaurant’s previous incarnation. The tortillas chips at the salsa bar were more appealing too. They were thinner, fresher and lacked the weird seasoning I remember from my visit last winter. Aside from happy hour, Primos offers all-you-can-eat tacos for $10 on Tuesdays. Combine that with the drink specials during happy hour and you’ll luck out with one of the most indulgent deals Mission Valley has to offer.   The post Reincarnation in Mission Valley appeared first on San Diego Uptown News.

    San Diego Uptown / 2 d. 11 h. 19 min. ago more
  • Edison's San Onofre panel ejects voice of reason
Edison's San Onofre panel ejects voice of reason

    San Diego Reader / 2 d. 11 h. 50 min. ago
  • Morning Report: City Councilman Unloads on ColleaguesMorning Report: City Councilman Unloads on Colleagues

    City Councilmen Scott Sherman and David Alvarez / Photo by Adriana Heldiz San Diego City Councilman Scott Sherman doesn’t seem like he’s enjoying his experience these days very much so Lisa Halverstadt checked in with him. Sure enough, he unleashed on his colleagues and the way the Council does its business. Sherman’s had a rough week, to be sure. First, Council President Myrtle Cole removed him from his chairmanship of the city’s Smart Growth and Land Use committee, where he had hoped to lead the attack on the city’s housing crisis. Cole appointed fellow Democrat, Georgette Gómez, to the seat instead. Then, Sherman watched as his joint proposal to regulate short-term rentals failed this week, after Councilman David Alvarez suddenly reversed his position and voted against it. In both cases, Sherman sees the hand of union power at work. “They’re the puppet-master,” Sherman said, adding that Council President Cole is “their puppet.” The story features a deadpan response from a union leader and Cole. • To understand why Sherman is so bitter about the housing committee stuff, remember Sherman and Alvarez had been burnishing their odd couple image trying to lead a movement to address housing costs. Even the New York Times took notice. • Repeated failures by the City Council to regulate vacation rentals have apparently inspired Mayor Faulconer to do something about the issue. He’ll start with “reaching out to well-meaning folks on both sides.” The Learning Curve: San Diego’s Segregated Schools San Diego Unified is home to eight of California’s schools that are most segregated by race and class. While the district had previously announced plans to put a good school in every neighborhood, Mario Koran reports they also have cut in half the number of students who have access to school buses, which are the main tool used to integrate schools. Critics of charter schools argue that charter schools are driving segregation. A recent story by KPCC looked into widely used data on segregated schools and found the eight most segregated schools in San Diego were split: four were public schools and four were charters. Segregated schools are known to put students of color at a disadvantage, with less effective teaching and less college preparation. “None of these trends are new, and there’s no local movement afoot to change them,” Koran writes. • The San Diego Unified School District wants to do a land-swap, offloading a total of three current sites in return for an office building and auditorium close to a freeway. (Union-Tribune) NCTD: San Diego Explained If you’ve taken a bus or trolley in San Diego, you’re probably familiar with the Metropolitan Transit System that operates those services. But if you’ve take transit to further-flung locations in the county, you might have taken the Sprinter, the Breeze or the Coaster. Those are operated by a lesser known organization: the North County Transit District. Andrew Keatts and NBC 7’s Monica Dean sum up how NCTD operates in our most recent San Diego Explained. Kasparian Accused Again On Wednesday a female county government employee filed another lawsuit against labor leader Micky Kasparian, joining other women who have filed lawsuits against him in 2016 and 2017. The Union-Tribune’s Joshua Stewart reports the woman says Kasparian groped her on four occasions, attempted to get her to participate in group sex, and pinned her down on a couch. “I felt like I was being raped,” the woman said in a deposition. Around this time last year, other women came forward with their stories of being attacked or retaliated against by Kasparian while working with him. Kasparian told the Union-Tribune there are “no truth or facts” to the new claims, and that he is planning defamation lawsuits against his accusers. Meanwhile, the charges he is facing have caused a huge rift among San Diego’s labor unions. Counting Border Crossing Deaths AZCentral investigates migrant deaths along the Mexico border in four states, and reports how the number of migrant deaths are being vastly under-reported by the Border Patrol in some cases. The investigation “found anywhere from 25 percent to nearly 300 percent more migrant deaths over five years,” AZcentral reports. In southern California, information gathered from local medical examiners, counties and law enforcement showed there were 60 percent more deaths than the Border Patrol reported for the years 2012 to 2016. Official deaths were reported at a count of 63 by the Border Patrol, but reporters were able to attribute 102 deaths to border crossings. “The lack of a full accounting of border deaths diminishes the full impact of the humanitarian crisis,” AZcentral writes. Firefighter Falls People across California are mourning the death of San Diego fire engineer Cory Iverson after he was killed battling the Thomas fire that has burned in Ventura and Santa Barbara. The Union-Tribune reports investigators are still looking into what happened to the 32 year-old, who leaves behind a wife and 2-year-old daughter. Lightning Round • Ten women have now accused a San Diego County sheriff’s deputy of sexual misconduct. (NBC 7) • Gov. Jerry Brown doesn’t want to release details of a meeting he had with Edison’s top executive for two hours, one month before a key meeting in Warsaw that helped put ratepayers on the hook for billions related to the San Onofre power plant shutdown. (Union-Tribune) • These rare affordable housing units in Pacific Beach will continue to charge only $550 per month after the site was bought by a charity. (Union-Tribune) • If you’re feeling a disturbance in the Force, that’s because the next installment of “Star Wars” is debuting in theaters this weekend. The Union-Tribune takes a look at all the important ways San Diegans are represented in “The Last Jedi.” Seth Hall is a local writer and technologist. You can email him at voice@s3th.com or follow him on Twitter: @loteck.

    Voice of San Diego / 2 d. 14 h. 19 min. ago more
  • California craft beer leads the nation
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    San Diego Reader / 3 d. 2 h. 23 min. ago
  • Move into mindfulnessMove into mindfulness

    By Erica Moe | Get Fit Daily life is full of to-do lists for the future, along with some nagging regret about the past. I challenge you to let go of the future and the past. Focus on the present and practice mindfulness. The YMCA Weight Loss Program describes mindfulness as an act of being completely present in the moment and having a greater connection with ourselves, our senses and our environment. Typically, I would tell you to move more! But this time, instead of spinning your wheels, take some time to be still. (Courtesy Mission Valley YMCA) Deep breathing One of the easiest and most inexpensive ways to be present or “in the moment” is to breathe deeply. Place one hand on your chest and the other on your stomach. If your breathing is too shallow, you will feel only the hand on the chest rise and fall.  Breathe deeply into your stomach until you can feel the bottom hand rise and fall. Here are some tricks to help you get the job done: Use a pinwheel. Get crafty by creating a breathing stick. Attach a picture of a candle on one end of a Popsicle stick and a flower at the opposite end. Pretend they are real – inhale the scent of the flower and exhale to blow out the candle. Download a free app called Breathe, which features a breathing timer. (Courtesy Mission Valley YMCA) S-T-O-P When you get stressed or frustrated (hello, holiday season!), use the acronym S-T-O-P. Stop and pause, no matter what you are doing. Take a breath. Feel it enter and exit your body, bringing you back to the present. Observe. Acknowledge what is going on, whether it is good or bad, or happening internally or externally. Proceed. Continue with what you are doing and keep the present moment in mind. Practice Try movement-based mindfulness, such as yoga or a walking meditation outside. Mindfulness doesn’t have to be still. Eat dinner without the television in the background. Keep a gratitude journal. Learn to forgive. Allow an issue to have a beginning and an end, so it doesn’t continue to bother you. Speak honestly and engage. Make eye contact, actively listen and put down the phone. Be aware of triggers and cues. Make mindfulness part of your daily routine. (Courtesy Mission Valley YMCA) Mindfulness and food Log your daily food intake and document how each food item or meal makes you feel. After a meal, are you energized or depleted? Which foods make you feel your best? Fresh fruits and veggies or less processed foods are usually the best choice, so try incorporating more of these into your diet. Try this mindfulness eating technique: Begin with a breath or two slowly from the diaphragm. Take one piece or one bite of food. Chew slowly and explore the connection. What is the taste and texture? Do you have any other reactions? Is this food connected to happy memories? If weight loss is your goal, look for the Y Weight Loss Program in January 2018. The 12-week sessions provide tools and support in a group setting. Note: This December, the YMCA is free to the community 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Christmas and New Year’s Eve. —Erica Moe, M.S., is an ACSM-certified exercise physiologist who writes on behalf of the Mission Valley YMCA where she is fitness director. The post Move into mindfulness appeared first on Mission Valley News.

    Mission Valley News / 3 d. 2 h. 48 min. ago more
  • Fresh Off Lost Chairmanship and Vacation Rental Debacle, Sherman UnloadsFresh Off Lost Chairmanship and Vacation Rental Debacle, Sherman Unloads

    City Councilman Scott Sherman / Photo by Jamie Scott Lytle It’s been a long week at City Hall for Republican City Councilman Scott Sherman. First, a deal he helped broker to pass vacation rental regulations crumbled. Then he lost his post as chair of a committee he’d hoped could push forward major housing affordability reforms. Sherman’s exasperated, and he blames unions. In an interview with Voice of San Diego on Thursday, the two-term councilman said he thinks increasing union pressure at City Hall led Councilman David Alvarez to torpedo a bipartisan vacation-rental compromise and City Council President Myrtle Cole to oust Sherman as head of the Smart Growth and Land Use Committee. In both cases, Sherman believed he had his fellow Council members’ word. Both had signed memos pledging to do something, he says, only to abandon them. “We’re at a point where people sign onto measures and then don’t support the measures they signed onto. People’s words don’t really mean much,” Sherman said. “There’s a ton of union influence and unions trying to make their influence felt around here.” San Diego labor leaders aren’t hiding the fact that they’re now pushing Democrats to take more aggressive stances. Sherman’s not happy about it. Sherman had especially harsh words for Cole, who he says shared a memo with his office prior to her re-election as City Council president indicating he’d continue to lead the committee. Union leaders rallied for Cole’s re-election at a City Council meeting last week, where she refused to promise Sherman he’d keep his committee post. A few days later, she picked Councilwoman Georgette Gómez to chair the group. “They’re the puppet-master and she’s the puppet,” Sherman said, referring to unions’ influence on Cole. Sherman claimed Cole’s switch is the latest example of her breaking promises and succumbing to union influence. He said she’d previously promised him she’d support putting a SoccerCity measure on the ballot this year and to allow the Town and County project in Mission Valley to move forward, only to change her mind on both issues following pressure from unions. Cole declined to comment on Sherman’s contention that she’s bowed to unions. “If these false accusations were stated, then they are not worth responding to,” she said in a written statement provided by a spokeswoman. Sherman’s also frustrated with Alvarez, a onetime ally. Until earlier this week, Sherman and others assumed Alvarez would support a compromise measure that would allow short-term vacation rentals to operate in the city with some restrictions. After all, he’d signed a memo in September with Sherman and fellow City Councilmen Chris Ward and Mark Kersey. Sherman learned Alvarez’s vote wasn’t a sure thing the eve of the Tuesday City Council meeting. Sherman said Alvarez told him he was “starting to have concerns about a few things.” Come Tuesday, the concerns Alvarez voiced on the dais were often unclear to Sherman and others on the City Council who tried to accommodate him. Ultimately, they couldn’t get his vote. Sherman suspects union leaders, who weighed in at the last minute, were behind the switch. “I think something happened that David did not want this to pass,” said Sherman, who said Alvarez seemed to be “grasping at straws at anything to not vote for it.” Alvarez has said constituents, not labor unions, raised concerns he felt weren’t fully addressed in his colleagues’ amendments or in the memo he signed in September. “You have to listen to the public. You have to take into consideration their testimony and you need to listen to your colleagues’ deliberations and that’s how you make your decisions,” Alvarez told me shortly after Tuesday’s 10-hour hearing. Alvarez’s spokeswoman referred to that interview when I asked for his response to Sherman’s claims. Sherman was skeptical of Alvarez’s statements about his decision not to support the vacation-rental deal. “Obviously, his written word doesn’t mean much, so I don’t know that his spoken word is worth much,” said Sherman, who made headlines for partnering with Alvarez on housing issues this year. Sherman said the latest developments don’t bode well for bipartisan progress at City Hall. He’s counting down the days he has left at City Hall – 1,087 as of Thursday. City Councilman Scott Sherman / Photo by Lisa Halverstadt Republican City Councilman Chris Cate, who on Tuesday supported the failed vacation-rental compromise, shared similar sentiments this week. “Much has been said about dysfunctional D.C.-style politics, however, it’s happening in our own backyard,” Cate wrote in a statement shortly after Tuesday’s vacation-rental debacle. Tom Lemmon, business manager of the San Diego County Building and Construction Trades Council, has a different take on the state of City Hall. He believes it’s running on all cylinders. “Poor Scott (Sherman). It’s simple math,” Lemmon said. “The City Council is divided along party lines and as it sits right now, the Democrats have five and the Republicans have four. It’s not that complicated.” Sherman’s hoping the situation improves. He said he’s already working on a memo to propose that the City Council overhaul its approach to selecting the City Council president. The City Council president sets the agenda for the City Council, giving that person significant sway over issues the City Council takes up. Sherman wants it to be a post that rotates annually based on seniority. “It just takes away all this horse-trading and political gamesmanship and everything else,” Sherman said. “I want San Diego to function like a good, non-partisan government. If you want to bring partisan politics into it, then run for state and federal office.”

    Voice of San Diego / 3 d. 2 h. 59 min. ago more
  • San Diego Explained: San Diego’s Other Transit AgencySan Diego Explained: San Diego’s Other Transit Agency

     Getting around San Diego isn’t always easy. In the central areas of the region, folks have access to trolley and bus lines provided by the Metropolitan Transit System that stretch from Escondido all the way down to the U.S.-Mexico border. But up north, where the communities are less densely populated, folks rely on a different agency, the North County Transit District. Its routes mainly cover Del Mar to the Orange County border along the coast, and extend out east all the way to Ramona and the Pauma Valley. But it also has services, like the Coaster, that take people from their coverage area into downtown San Diego. The North County Transit District is considered the smallest of the two transportation agencies in San Diego, but even then, it serves some 849,000 constituents and provides around 11 million trips per year. On this week’s San Diego Explained, Voice of San Diego’s Andrew Keatts and NBC 7’s Monica Dean go through how the North County Transit District works and the people overseeing its operations.

    Voice of San Diego / 3 d. 3 h. 19 min. ago more
  • Johannes Debus is not the man to lead San Diego Symphony
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    San Diego Reader / 3 d. 3 h. 20 min. ago
  • The Learning Curve: Eight of the State’s Most Segregated Schools Are in San DiegoThe Learning Curve: Eight of the State’s Most Segregated Schools Are in San Diego

    San Diego Unified Superintendent Cindy Marten attends a 2013 meeting at Burbank Elementary. Burbank is among the most segregated schools in California, according to an analysis of school data by KPCC. / Photo by Sam Hodgson That San Diego Unified schools are segregated by race and class isn’t news to educators or those familiar with the district. In 1977, a Superior Court judge found 23 schools in the district were racially segregated to the point they demanded intervention. The judge ordered the district to desegregate and allowed it to come up with a plan to do so voluntarily. When we looked at those schools two years ago, however, nearly all of the ones on the original list – with one possible exception – were still segregated by race and class. And over the past 10 years, the San Diego Unified school board has dramatically scaled back integration efforts. In 2011, the school board launched a plan to create a quality school in every neighborhood and keep kids in their assigned schools. In the past seven years, the district has nearly halved the number of students who have access to school buses – the mechanism that largely makes integration possible. The more interesting question, perhaps, is the degree to which any of this matters to the school board or to the public. There hasn’t exactly been a critical mass of parents pushing for more integrated schools. More often, parents who aren’t happy with their assigned neighborhood schools speak with their feet. They seek out district schools outside their neighborhood, or places like High Tech High, which achieves diversity by employing a ZIP code-based lottery system, or any number of other charter schools. There is, however, a vocal segment of the public who support traditional school systems (those without charter schools) and believe that charter schools make segregation worse. This argument can go two ways, depending on the school (or who’s making the argument): Either that charter schools have practices that discriminate against students of color during admissions, thereby attracting and enrolling more white students, or that charter schools enroll a disproportionate number of students of color. Either approach would cut against a broad goal of creating an integrated school that mirrors the demographic makeup of the greater school district or city. The latest salvo in the argument began earlier this month, with an Associated Press story that makes two main points: Charter school students are more likely to attend segregated schools; and the levels of segregation correspond to low achievement. The story was roundly criticized by education reformers and policy analysts. Robin Lake, director of the Center for Reinventing Public Education, wrote that the story relies on a flawed analysis that misses the fact that many charter schools are intentionally located in cities and neighborhoods with high concentrations of students of color. Students in those areas may attend segregated schools, but many come from neighborhood schools that are just as segregated. “If students are simply moving from one all-black school to another, there is no impact on overall segregation of schools,” Lake wrote. This is generally true in San Diego, too. Most charter schools are located south of Interstate 8 – often used as shorthand for the city’s socioeconomic dividing line. Gompers Preparatory Academy and O’Farrell Charter School, both located in southeastern San Diego, are majority black and Latino. Because the majority of students at both schools come from the surrounding neighborhood, their assigned neighborhood schools are also majority black and Latino. And the AP story glosses over the biggest drivers of school segregation: poverty and housing patterns. Alberto Retana, who leads the nonprofit Community Coalition of South Los Angeles, talked to Southern California Radio about the historical and systemic causes of segregation: “Red-lining, [housing] covenants, chronic disinvestment in where development happens, white flight, capital flight — it’s totally not surprising that our schools are an indicator of our society as a whole.” When KPCC mapped the data the AP relied on for its story, however, the analysis did shed fresh light on where racially homogeneous schools are located. Eight schools in San Diego Unified make the list of the most racially segregated schools in the state. Those eight are evenly split between charters and traditional schools. One caveat to the data is the fact in San Diego Unified, like many districts in Southern California, Latino students make up the largest subgroup of students, at 46 percent. (White students, the next largest group, make up 23 percent). This complicates efforts to create integrated schools. This is all an interesting exercise, you might be thinking. But what does it actually mean for students? The reason it matters to many people gets back to the Brown v. Board decision in which the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that segregated schools are fundamentally unequal. Despite the ruling, schools with high concentrations of students of color or those living in poverty are still more likely to have the least effective teachers, limited access to college-prep classes or stand to lose the most teachers when it comes time for layoffs. None of these trends are new, and there’s no local movement afoot to change them. Meanwhile, parents unhappy with their assigned neighborhood schools continue find an escape hatch in charter schools. For that alone, it may be worth considering what might happen if that escape hatch were to close, and parents had no other avenue for change than to organize and pressure the school board to provide the same things they seek in charter schools. Then again, turning away from charter schools in hopes that the school district one day improves neighborhood schools is a gamble many parents would be wary to make with their own children. How Effective Is Your School District? A New Measure Shows Where Students Learn the Most For years, parents looking for quality school options have looked to standardized test scores. But that might be the wrong measure to focus on, it turns out. It may be better to see where students make the biggest gains in learning. Last week, New York Times published a fascinating story and helpful tool that lets you see where that’s happening. San Diego County’s own Chula Vista Elementary School District makes the list of school districts posting the highest gains – which is especially interesting and relevant given the district’s high concentration of English-learners and bilingual education programs. The Community College ‘Segregation Machine’ Hundreds of thousands of community college students in California are placed in remedial courses every year. Many fail to make successfully make it through within two years. Success rates for students of color are even worse. Latino students in community colleges are twice as likely as whites to end up in the lowest level of remedial English, according to a joint story from inewsource and Hechinger Report. Black students are five times as likely to be placed in the lowest levels of remedial English: “The culprit, say experts and academics, has been the rules governing community college placement decisions. Almost anyone can enroll at a community college in California, but each college has its own process to decide how to place students. Even though state law requires colleges to consider more than just a standardized exam in this process, those exams have long been used as the deciding factor, despite questions about their accuracy.” Data show students who are placed directly into college-level classes pass at higher rates than those who go through a remedial sequence, including those who went to low-performing high schools, according to the story. Jerry Brown’s Dilemma: Fix School Funding Formula Now or Watch Others Do it Later With Gov. Jerry Brown termed out of office next year, EdSource checked in with two dozen education leaders, advocates and lawmakers across the state – including San Diego Assemblywoman Shirley Weber – to get their takes on the effectiveness of Brown’s landmark education law, the Local Control Funding Formula, and how it might be improved. In a companion piece, EdSource’s John Fensterwald explains the choice Brown now faces: “The question he should ask himself is whether it would be wiser to negotiate needed fixes to the law or watch the Legislature, the next governor and a new State Board of Education the new governor will appoint, start chipping away at the funding formula in ways Brown might regret.” A New Dashboard, and Tips for How (Not) to Write About Dreamers • After years of planning, last week the state released the California School Dashboard, which employs a multi-color system for grading the performance of schools, school districts and charter schools on a variety of measurements. At first glance, the dashboard can be confusing. But before you throw up your hands, read this helpful explainer from EdSource for how to interpret it. • With a deadline looming on a legislative fix for the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program – which offers young people temporary relief from deportation – The Guardian and Columbia Journalism Review gathered a group of young people impacted by the program to hear their advice for writers and reporters. They offer some great tips. Here’s one: “We don’t all have 4.2 GPAs: We understand a great student who is involved with their community is a sympathetic character, but everyone who qualifies for DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) is worthy of deportation relief. The stories of the best and brightest, the model immigrants, aren’t more important than those who have to work low-paying jobs because of their immigration status, or who drop out of school to help their families.” Correction: An earlier version of this post mischaracterized success rates for students taking remedial classes in community colleges. The inewsource/Hechinger Report story linked to in this post dealt with students who fail to make it through a remedial course sequence within two years, not necessarily those who ultimately fail the courses.

    Voice of San Diego / 3 d. 3 h. 32 min. ago more
  • U.S. FCC repeals landmark rules ensuring free, open internetU.S. FCC repeals landmark rules ensuring free, open internet

    WASHINGTON, U.S. - On Thursday, the U.S. Federal Communications Commission decided to kill off net neutrality - repealing the landmark 2015 rules that were aimed at ensuring a free and open interne

    Big News Network.com / 3 d. 4 h. 37 min. ago
  • Incredible Holiday Lights in San Diego NeighborhoodsIncredible Holiday Lights in San Diego Neighborhoods

    'Tis the season for twinkling lights and festive decorations. In San Diego County, there are many neighborhoods that take the spirit of the season up a notch, creating holiday light displays for all to enjoy. Here's a look at some of those incredible, local displays waiting to seen.Belardo LightsTierrasanta"Belardo Lights," tucked in Tierrasanta at 5306 Belardo Dr., between Camino Playa Catalina and Callejon Quintana, boasts a dazzling computerized Christmas lighting display. This year, the lights are up through Dec. 27, from 6 p.m. 10 p.m. daily. Visitors can slowly cruise through the neighborhood and take in the show, which is synchronized to music on the FM 106.1 radio station. MTS Gives Bikes to 100+ First-Graders in Logan Heights Jingle Bell HillEl Cajon"Jingle Bell Hill," also known as Pepper Drive Lights, is also a good stop for holiday lights in the East County. This El Cajon neighborhood is nestled off State Route 67 and Pepper Drive and features dozens of homes decked out for the holidays.Starlight CircleSanteeIn Santee, this massive lights display known as “Starlight Circle” draws crowds year after year. Located on East and West Glendon circles off Magnolia Avenue, visitors can see elaborate, handmade Christmas displays spanning dozens of homes. Many of the displays follow a theme – from “Star Wars” and superheroes to “Toy Story” and “Sesame Street.” Sometimes, the residents will sell hot cocoa, kettle corn, cookies and other holiday treats for visitors to enjoy as they stroll the neighborhood. Training Center Worker Trampled by Horses During Lilac Fire DB ChristmasRoe Drive in SanteeAlso in Santee is “DB Christmas,” a dazzling display created by Michael Balazs each year at his home at 9773 Roe Dr. The lights – in honor of Balazs’ late father, who died from cancer in 2009 – include thousands of multi-colored strings, spiraling Christmas trees, lawn displays that read “HOPE” and “CURE,” and even holograms of Santa Claus projected on the windows of the home. Balazs’ display is synced to holiday music; he collects donations from spectators to support charities such as the American Cancer Society and St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital on behalf of his father. Balazs said he gets his holiday cheer from his dad, who loved Christmas.Christmas Card LaneRancho PenasquitosA San Diego favorite, Christmas Card Lane in Rancho Penasquitos typically runs from dusk to 10 p.m. daily, through New Year’s Eve. The holiday lights can be seen lining homes on Ellingham, Oviedo and Renato streets off Black Mountain Road. This is a neighborhood where you’ll want to take your time admiring the lights. Mistrial Declared for Navy Commander Accused of Rape Candy Cane LanePowayBoating lights aplenty, this jolly display in Poway runs down part of Stoutwood Street, near Brookstone Drive.Christmas CircleChula VistaOver in the South Bay, the must-see holiday attraction is Christmas Circle. For six decades, residents on Whitney and Manakato streets, between First and Second avenues and south of H Street, have decked out their homes in bright lights and pretty decorations. The free displays are powered up nightly from 5 p.m. to 10 p.m. and usually stay put until a day or two after Christmas.Fairway VillageCarmel Mountain RanchEach year, Carmel Mountain Ranch also spreads holiday magic of its own via Fairway Village, a neighborhood located on the east and west sides of Stoney Gate Place. There, around 80 homes are decked out in Christmas lights through New Year's Day. Visitors will sometimes find residents playing holiday movies outside, carolers and dancers. On the Saturday evening before Christmas, this neighborhood typically holds a block party featuring hot chocolate, cider, music, lights, cookies, snacks and more.Christmas on Knob HillSan MarcosThis display, located at 1639 Knob Hill Rd. in San Marcos, has been lighting up the North County neighborhood since 1988. Over the decades, it has grown to more than 85,000 lights, powered up nightly through Dec. 30 from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Santa Claus visits Knob Hill each year; this season, he’ll be there from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. through Dec. 23.The Forward HouseBankers HillBuilt in 1905 for Mayor John Forward Sr., The Forward House in Bankers Hill houses a business called American Security Mortgage Company. Each holiday season, the large home located at First Avenue and Ivy Street turns into a Christmas bonanza, decked out in endless lights and decorations. The magic shines through New Year’s EveGarrison Street LightsPoint LomaOver in Point Loma, off Rosecrans and Garrison streets, locals will find the Garrison Street Lights display. Filling a block with festive décor, the display typically runs nightly through New Year’s Eve.There you have it: a small sampling of some holiday displays lighting up San Diego County this season. Did your favorite make the list? Share details of your favorite neighborhood for these types of displays in the comments thread below. Happy Holidays!Photo Credit: Monica Garske This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.

    NBC 7 / 3 d. 8 h. 53 min. ago more
  • ESPN, Inc.: 2017 in Review - Leadership through InnovationESPN, Inc.: 2017 in Review - Leadership through Innovation

    In 2017, ESPN strategically strengthened its position as the clear No. 1 in sports media, unparalleled in scope, consumption and brand strength. With the leading portfo

    Big News Network.com / 3 d. 9 h. 2 min. ago
  • Daily Business Report-Dec. 14, 2017Daily Business Report-Dec. 14, 2017

    Hiring forecast (Credit: Robert Half ) Survey: San Diego is Top City for Tech Hiring in First Half of 2018 Cybersecurity Takes Top Spot for CIO Priorities and Skills in Demand  Technology hiring in the San Diego area is expected to start strong in 2018, according to the Robert Half Technology IT Hiring Forecast and Local Trend Report. Twenty-nine percent of CIOs surveyed here said they plan to add full-time technology professionals to their teams in the first half of the new year, up 14 percentage points from a year ago. In addition to hiring plans, the report also highlights technology skills in demand and CIOs’ top priorities for the first six months of the year. Technical Skills “It’s been a transformational year for San Diego’s tech market,” said Kyle Houston, branch manager for Robert Half Technology in San Diego. “As more businesses build a presence here, we expect continued demand for project and full-time professionals with skills in web development, DevOps and cybersecurity to support the growth of internet-based companies and the already strong start-up market.” Top 12 Cities for Tech Hiring in 2018  In addition to the forecasted 29 percent hiring growth, 51 percent of technology leaders here expect to maintain staff levels by filling vacant roles. The demand for talent places San Diego at the top of the list of U.S. cities where tech hiring is expected to grow the most in the first half of 2018: San Diego • Atlanta • New York • Austin, Texas • Charlotte, N.C. • Minneapolis • Philadelphia • Des Moines, Iowa • Miami • Cleveland • Phoenix • Salt Lake City Hiring Challenges and Skills in Demand It continues to be a competitive hiring environment: 61 percent of CIOs in San Diego said that it’s challenging to find skilled IT professionals in today’s market. The skills in greatest demand within their organizations, according to respondents, include: Cybersecurity (60 percent) Wireless network management (52 percent) Database management (50 percent) Top Priorities  When asked to name their top priority for the next six months, 26 percent of San Diego CIOs said they will be focused on maintaining security of IT systems and safeguarding company information. Other priorities will include: Upgrading existing systems for business efficiency (21 percent) Innovation and helping to grow their businesses (21 percent) Technology innovation and investing in new technologies (17 percent) Staff retention (14 percent) _____________________ General contracting firm Pacific Building Group completed construction improvements including new walls, HVAC systems and more across seven buildings at the Frontera Business Park in Chula Vista. Pacific Building Group Completes Five Construction Projects Countywide Pacific Building Group has completed five new construction projects spanning more than 250,000 square feet countywide. From Chula Vista to Carlsbad, the projects underscore the 33-year-old general contracting firm’s industry expertise, which includes construction for corporate, biotech, defense and hospitality companies. “We completed these projects in occupied environments with serious security considerations and without interrupting the workflow of our clients,” says Jim Roherty, president of Pacific Building Group. “Our clients continued with business as usual, which saved them the time, headache and cost of temporarily relocating. In the end, they’ve maintained productivity and have upgraded work spaces to boot.” Frontera Business Park: Located in Chula Vista, the $3.5 million, 140,000 square-foot project included improvements across seven buildings. Interior improvements included the demolition of existing spaces and the construction of new walls, tenant build-outs, warehouses, electrical, HVAC systems and roll-up doors. Other highlights included new exterior paint, large illuminated signage, monuments, new irrigation and the planting of native and low-water use plants throughout. The architect was Ware Malcomb. The General Atomics A21 project included a new 10,000 square-foot building, improvements to an existing 78,000 square-foot space and more. General Atomics A21: The construction undertaking included a new 10,000 square-foot ground-up building, improvements to an existing 78,000 square-foot space including improved common areas and amenities and a new epoxy floor system, a 2,300 square-foot mezzanine, the installation of an eight-ton crane system, and the installation and coordination of specialized booths and infrastructure used in General Atomics’ manufacturing process. The architect was DGA. Lite Machines: This $1 million project meant a total office makeover for the Carlsbad-based company. Among tenant improvements were a 4,500 square-foot research and production area and a large warehouse. Other improvements to the eco-friendly building included oversized skylights and solatubes for abundant natural light, improved flooring, an extensive compressed air and power distribution system and a specialized HVAC and security surveillance system. Outside, the company installed a newly-completed soaring aluminum-clad entry cornice, attractive landscaping and more. The architect was Ware Malcomb. NXP Semiconductors: Located in Sorrento Valley, this 15,000 square-foot, $1.7 million project included the completion of improved office and lab space in just six-and-one-half weeks after the permit was issued. During the project, Pacific Building Group met heavy mechanical and electrical demands to accommodate the heating and cooling requirements specific to each lab in the building. The architect was Smith Consulting Architects. Pulse Electronics: Located in Rancho Bernardo, this 15,000 square-foot, $1 million tenant improvement consisted of new executive offices, research and development workstations, a contemporary break room, a manufacturing lab and electric vehicle charging stations. The architect was FS Designs. _____________________ The 11 Largest Retail Bankruptcies of 2017 In the first 11 months of 2017 alone, more than 30 U.S. retailers filed for bankruptcy protection. According to Trepp data, more than $35 billion of CMBS (Commercial Mortgage-Backed Securities) debt is exposed to retailers that sought bankruptcy protection this year. The main culprit for what many call the brick-and-mortar “retail apocalypse” is the continued growth of ecommerce and transformed consumer trends. The 11th largest bankruptcies: The Limited, $14.7 billion; Toys R Us, $5.6 billion; Gymboree, $5.4 billion; Payless ShoeSource, $3.9 billion; RadioShack, $2.4 billion; hhgregg, $1.8 billion; Rue21, $1.7 billion; Gordmans, $944.3 million; Gander Mountain, $432.6 million; MC Sports, $417.2 million; BCBG, $154.9 million. Read more… _____________________ San Diego’s ScoreStream Lands $3.7M from Intel Capital for Local Sports Scoring Tech ScoreStream, a San Diego start-up that delivers local sports scores via crowd-sourcing at games, said it has received financial backing from Intel Capital, the venture capital arm of semiconductor giant Intel Corp. Read more… _____________________ San Diego Betting on Lower-Income Entrepreneurs The city of San Diego wants to stimulate business growth in low to moderate income communities with a new initiative focused on supporting entrepreneurs from those neighborhoods. Read more… _____________________ California ISO Launches Expanded Online Data Resource The California Independent System Operator (ISO) on Wednesday unveiled a major overhaul of its most-visited public web page, providing a central location for accessing key data. The redesign is reflective of an organizational commitment to boost transparency and awareness of the electric grid and power markets. The refreshed Today’s Outlook page on the ISO website will allow viewers to quickly see changing patterns of supply and demand, forecasted and actual peaks, energy supplies by resource type, and renewable energy production. The updated net load graph depicts daily system ramps reflecting changes to the power supply system, as it becomes more dominated by clean energy sources. _____________________ Group Behind Quality of Life Dashboard Elects Peter MacCracken as Chairman Peter MacCracken The Center for Sustainable Energy’s Equinox Project, the group behind the “Quality of Life Dashboard,” has elected Peter MacCracken, a communications strategist, as chairman. The San Diego Regional Quality of Life Dashboard measures and benchmarks environmental and economic trends throughout the region tracking a central theme: Is our quality of life improving? Advisory board members include representatives from public agencies, government, business and nonprofit organizations who are engaged in elevating the Equinox Project as the preeminent data-driven sustainability initiative in San Diego County. MacCracken, who helped spearhead “Our Greater San Diego Vision,” wants to increase the reach and impact of the valuable data coming from the Equinox Project’s San Diego Regional Quality of Life Dashboard. “Our charge includes strategic planning for 2018 and beyond, enhancing the Quality of Life Dashboard’s impact and strategizing to achieve financial sustainability,” MacCracken said. Click here for the full advisory board members. _____________________ Bill Garrett Selected Governing Board President for 11th Consecutive Year Bill Garrett For the 11th year in a row, Bill Garrett was selected Tuesday night as president of the Grossmont-Cuyamaca Community College District Governing Board. Board member Edwin Hiel was elected vice president, and board member Debbie Justeson was selected to serve as clerk of the board. Garrett, a retired El Cajon city manager, has served on the governing board since 2004. He was initially appointed to fill a vacant seat, then was re-elected three times by East County voters. In September, the college district presented Garrett and his wife, Judy, with the newly-created Bill and Judy Garrett Civic Leadership Award to honor their leadership on district boards and their financial support of Grossmont and Cuyamaca College students. Judy Garrett served on the foundation boards for both colleges beginning in 2007, and when the foundation for Grossmont and Cuyamaca Colleges was formed in 2011, she served for three years as its president. Garrett said he has seen many changes at the colleges in his time on the board, from the physical transformation of the campuses as the result of bond-funded construction to the increased focus on student success and equity that ensures more students reach their educational goals. _____________________ Personnel Announcements Linda Lopez Joins Cavignac & Associates Linda Lopez Linda Lopez, a 20-plus-year veteran of the insurance industry, has been appointed account administrator of Cavignac & Associates’ Employee Benefits Department. In her new post, Lopez assists the Employee Benefits Department account manager with the daily service activities for each client’s benefit offerings. She is responsible for assisting with RFPs and the preparation of quotations for new and renewal coverage; preparing open enrollment material and ordering supplies from carriers; preparing spreadsheets, presentations and proposals for new and renewal business; developing packages of material for open enrollment meetings; and handling open enrollment meetings as requested. Prior to joining Cavignac & Associates, Lopez was the underwriting and customer support manager for Personable General Insurance Agency Inc., in San Diego, where she was employed for 10 years. Previous work experience includes having served as the internal marketing representative for Arrowhead General Insurance Agency, located in San Diego, where she serviced the company’s Texas office. _____________________ SDSU outfielder Chad Bible (Credit: GoAztecs) SDSU Student-Athlete to Ride in Tournament of Roses Parade San Diego State University redshirt junior outfielder Chad Bible will be one of 10 cancer survivors or patients to ride on the City of Hope float at the 129th Tournament of Roses Parade on New Year’s Day. The parade begins at 8 a.m. PST and will be broadcasted on several networks and stations, including ABC. This marks the 46th year that City of Hope will participate in the annual Tournament of Roses Parade. Bible will be joined by other City of Hope patients or former patients, all hoping to raise awareness about cancer.   The post Daily Business Report-Dec. 14, 2017 appeared first on San Diego Metro Magazine.

    San Diego Metro Magazine / 3 d. 10 h. 48 min. ago more
  • Morning Report: More Women Come Forward About La Jolla High TeacherMorning Report: More Women Come Forward About La Jolla High Teacher

    Photo by Jamie Scott Lytle Emily Mandel was a junior in advanced physics at La Jolla High School during the 2010-2011 school year when she said her teacher Martin Teachworth touched her inappropriately. When Mandel saw Ashly McGlone’s report last month about other students’ complaints about unwanted touching by Teachworth – claims Teachworth, who’s now retired, denies – she came forward to tell her story. So did one other former student. McGlone shares their accounts in her latest. Both students described their fears over reporting Teachworth’s behavior and said it’s likely the teacher’s unwanted touching went on for years. “As soon as I saw the article, I was like, ‘Gosh. This was more widespread than any of us realized,’” Mandel told McGlone. Though neither former student reported their concerns to school or district administrators, other female students McGlone talked to for her first story did. All of the students came away disappointed with the outcome and feeling like the school district didn’t do enough to protect them from Teachworth’s advances. Scams Grow in the Wake of California Wildfires California’s wildfires have left behind fertile grounds for the scams that inevitably grow in their wake. Past fires have led to the emergence of the not-so-professional professional – people pretending to be inspectors with official-sounding government entities and asking for things like fire victims’ social security or bank account numbers. The shady faux government worker is just one of the three scams VOSD’s Jesse Marx tells folks to watch out for in the wake of the latest wildfire. I Made it in San Diego: Unmasking a Luchador  Until October when he retired, Josue “Josh” Anival Salcido was Krazy Klown, a wrestler who fought with and against his twin brother in Mexican-style wrestling matches throughout Southern California and Mexico. I talked to the former Lucha Libre performer for the latest episode of I Made it in San Diego, Voice of San Diego’s podcast about the region’s businesses and the people behind them, and learned a lot about the many traditions that are the lifeblood of the sport. • CityBeat profiled Alan Lilienthal, the man behind the Voice of San Diego Podcast Network show Cura Caos, a podcast about movers and shakers from San Diego and Tijuana, Oceanside Mayor Resigns to Focus on Health Oceanside Mayor Jim Wood had a stroke in May. He was on leave until last Wednesday, when he returned to fend off a deadline to either hold a public meeting or be forced out of office. But his return made it clear that his health was still an issue, and this week, he officially announced his resignation. In the latest North County Report, Ruarri Serpa pulls together the latest developments and explains that the City Council has 60 days to replace the mayor. For more on Wood, read our 2014 profile of him when he ran to unseat County Supervisor Bill Horn. Also in our roundup of news from the north: the North County is no stranger to fire, a neverending water fight between Camp Pendleton and the Fallbrook Public Utility District finally ended and more. • The list of donors giving money to support the Flip the 49th! Neighbors in Action political committee that’s working to get Rep. Darrell Issa out of office is star-studded. More Fallout from City Council’s Vacation Rental Flop After yesterday’s marathon City Council meeting where nothing was decided about what to do with vacation rentals, the Union-Tribune’s editorial board has some harsh words for Councilman David Alvarez for backing off his support for one of the proposals and not supporting any of the others. They also hit Council President Myrtle Cole for failing to use her influential position to actually lead and Mayor Kevin Faulconer for not doing much of anything. According to the editorial, three of Faulconer’s aides said the mayor was going to “take a central role to meet with stakeholders and hash out a deal.” Historically, though, Faulconer has chosen to stay mum on where he stands on the vacation rental debate and many of the city’s most controversial issues, preferring instead to let the City Council try to resolve the highly contentious dilemma. In Other News • Ron Saathoff was one of the architects of the notorious pension deal 15 years ago that nearly bankrupted the city. Now he’s helping San Diego firefighters negotiate benefits, and some folks think the optics of that are strange. (Union-Tribune) • The new $555 million San Diego Superior Court building downtown was supposed to open in January. Now, after delays that pushed the opening back nearly a year, people are actually starting to move in this week. (10News) • On Wednesday, San Diego City Council members discussed their new committee appointments, and KPBS’s Andrew Bowen said the conversation was super awkward. Check out our recent podcast episode explaining those shifts in committee roles and why some member were upset by their new assignments. • The developer behind a new affordable housing project in Oceanside said his office was inundated with thousands of phone calls from people looking for affordable rent and asking for information about the project. (Union-Tribune) • The San Diego City Council voted Wednesday to join three lawsuits meant to nullify President Donald Trump’s decision to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program that helps people brought to the United States illegally when they were kids. (CBS8)

    Voice of San Diego / 3 d. 14 h. 20 min. ago more
  • I Made it in San Diego: Chasing the Lucha Libre DreamI Made it in San Diego: Chasing the Lucha Libre Dream

    Josue Anival Salcido has wrestled as Krazy Klown in Lucha Libre matches throughout Southern California and Mexico. / Photo by Kinsee Morlan When Josue “Josh” Anival Salcido entered his first professional wrestling ring in 2009, it was as a last-minute fill-in for a few performers who didn’t show up. His twin brother Jaime Salcido was by his side, and they tag-teamed in a Lucha Libre match. They had been training for that moment for more than two years, and even though they thought they weren’t quite ready, the fans disagreed. Their careers as Lucha Libre performers, Josh as Krazy Klown and Jaime as Rasta Lion, lurched forward. Sometimes the two wrestled on the same team, other times as rivals. On a new episode of I Made it in San Diego, Voice of San Diego’s podcast about the region’s businesses and the people behind them, I talk to Josh about wrestling in Lucha Libre matches across Southern California and Mexico, his recent retirement and his new venture as a promoter for a Lucha Libre business that puts on matches in the South Bay. Lucha Libre is more of an art form than a sport. It’s dripping with long-held traditions. Josh fell in love with those traditions – the colorful masks, the slick and high-flying maneuvers and especially the intense matches where wrestlers would wager their masks or even their own hair (losers have to submit to a haircut right there in the middle of the ring, and winners take the hair as a prize). Josh remembers seeing a Lucha Libre match for the first time as his dad watched it on their home TV in San Ysidro. He knew immediately that’s what he wanted to do with his life, he said. “I just got mesmerized and fell in love with Lucha Libre,” he said. “It’s like poetry in motion … everything flows and everything looks good and everything is like, wow.” But it wasn’t until he tried to overdose on cocaine and alcohol that he realized he had to finally go after it. Josh retired in October after a particularly bloody match. He said he makes more money now as a promoter than he did inside the ring, but that money was never his motivation. “I did it for the love and passion of the sport,” he said. Stream it now Subscribe to I Made it in San Diego on iTunes Get the RSS feed Listen to past episodes Subscribe to the VOSD Podcast Network via email

    Voice of San Diego / 4 d. 3 h. 22 min. ago more
  • North County Report: Oceanside Mayor Bows OutNorth County Report: Oceanside Mayor Bows Out

    Oceanside Mayor Jim Wood talks with supporters at a campaign event during his 2014 bid for county supervisor. / Photo by Sam Hodgson Facing a deadline to hold a public meeting or be forced out of office, Oceanside Mayor Jim Wood returned to the dais last Wednesday. The Union-Tribune reported that Wood appeared shaky, was difficult to understand and required assistance from the city clerk and city manager to actually carry out many of the functions needed to run the meeting. He was welcomed back by friends and political rivals, as the custom of small-town politics dictates. But this week, the city released a brief letter written by Wood to City Clerk Zack Beck, announcing his resignation. “My sincere hope was to continue my current term in office; however, I now need to focus on my health full-time,” Wood wrote. The Union-Tribune reports that Wood sent a second letter, this time to the City Council, recommending they appoint Beck or former City Manager Peter Weiss to serve as interim mayor. The City Council has 60 days to make an appointment, or the city will likely hold a special election in November 2018. State law requires that the special election occur on the next regularly scheduled election – in this case, the June primary – provided that day is at least 114 days away from the date of resignation. Wood’s resignation takes effect Jan. 1, at which point the Council will have 60 days to make an appointment. If the Council uses all 60 days to make a decision, the election would have to go to November. The Council has 41 days to make a decision on an appointment or election, if it wants to settle the matter in June. North County Is Enticing to Developers, but No Stranger to Fire As the latest figures from the Lilac Fire roll in – about 95 percent containment and over 100 homes destroyed – the disaster that struck our own little corner of paradise reminds us that fires happen, and they aren’t going away. While the cause of the fire remains under investigation, this corner of the county is no stranger to wildfire, as Voice’s Maya Srikrishnan writes. It sits in the wildland-urban interface, where large-scale destruction from wildfire occurs – and it’s exactly where the county’s developers want to build. In addition to the Lilac Fire, inland North County saw the Cocos Fire in 2014, the Witch Fire in 2007 and the Cedar Fire in 2003, which still remains among California’s worst fires. But places like Valley Center, Pala and the areas around San Marcos and Escondido have a lot of undeveloped land to offer developers. With leapfrog development – where large neighborhoods go up outside of existing urban areas – people bring even more fire-food to an area already filled with dry vegetation, along with their tendencies to trigger fires. The county and the city of Escondido will consider a number of such projects in the coming year, Srikrishnan writes. There’s the Lilac Hills project, which was defeated by voters last November, but which still lives in the planning process; Safari Highlands, outside Escondido; Newland Sierra, near Interstate 15 and Deer Springs Road; and Harmony Grove South, an expansion of the Harmony Grove development that is currently being built near Elfin Forest. Ry Rivard clears up the mystery around what “contained” means when talking about fires. The Union-Tribune spent a day sifting through the ashes with some residents of Bonsall. The Coast News writes about devastation and hope from residents at the Rancho Monserate Country Club, the mobile home park that was destroyed by the fire. Forty-six horses died during the Lilac Fire, and trainers struggled to free them at the San Luis Rey Downs Training Center. (Fox 5) Decades-Long Water Fight Settles Down Another decades-long water dispute wrapped up this week, this time between Camp Pendleton and the Fallbrook Public Utility District. The website Anza Valley Outlook first reported that litigation began 66 years ago, and 15 years later, the parties were directed to work together to seek a solution. The final proposal is to capture water from the Santa Margarita River and store it in the district’s 440 million-gallon reservoir west of Interstate 15, and in an aquifer on Camp Pendleton. The water will then be piped back to Fallbrook. The total amount of water Fallbrook will gain access to amounts to about 30 percent of the district’s water use. The Union-Tribune reported that a plan in the 1980s called for building a dam to contain Fallbrook’s share of the water, but that plan was abandoned by “environmental conflicts” amid the country’s broader realization that building dams is a pretty bad way to store water. The bill for the final water-sharing plan will cost the federal government $47 million, and Fallbrook will pay another $45 million to construct its own facilities to process the water. Also in the News A former staffer for Republicans in Congress and spokesman for Breitbart, originally from Escondido, said the party’s support for Roy Moore was the last straw to cause him to make the switch to the Democratic Party. (USA Today) North County Transit District Executive Director Matthew Tucker will get a raise, and a 7 percent bonus, despite falling ridership. (Union-Tribune) Westfield malls have been sold to a French investor for $15.7 billon. (KPBS) The number of deaths on railroad tracks in North County is nearly double what it was last year. (KPBS) While California burns, Congress plans to cut the tax write-off for disasters. Rep. Duncan Hunter voted for the tax plan, Rep. Darrell Issa did not. (Los Angeles Times)

    Voice of San Diego / 4 d. 3 h. 50 min. ago more
  • More Students Describe Unwanted Touching From La Jolla High TeacherMore Students Describe Unwanted Touching From La Jolla High Teacher

    Photo by Jamie Scott Lytle A larger picture of Martin Teachworth’s classroom behavior at La Jolla High School is emerging as more students share their experiences. Teachworth, a longtime physics teacher who retired in June, has denied engaging in “improper conduct with any student during my 38 years as a schoolteacher.” But it’s clear his actions affected female students taking his class for years. As Voice of San Diego reported last month, some students took their concerns about unwanted touching by Teachworth to the school administration, and came away frustrated that more wasn’t done. Two more former students of Teachworth’s have since come forward to say his behavior in the classroom made them uncomfortable, and that they felt at a loss as to how to respond. One said she didn’t confront Teachworth or tell the principal, but did tell her parents. Teachworth was “always kind of in my personal bubble. … He figured he could get away with it because he did for so long,” said Emily Mandel. Mandel, now 23, was a junior in advanced physics during the 2010-2011 school year when she felt Teachworth was too close, too often. “He would come up behind me and grab by my sides, upper hips and sides, and tickle me,” Mandel said. “Sometimes he would play it off like, ‘Oh, I’m so silly,’ but it was never asked for. I was too shy to say anything. … I know I felt incredibly powerless, because you are 16 years old in class.” Mandel said the impact of Teachworth’s actions lingered. “It definitely gave me horrendous anxiety. I would get really bad stomachaches and would run out of the class,” when it was over, she said. Though her shyness stopped her from confronting Teachworth or reporting him to the administration, she said he did something one day that upset her so much, she told her parents. “The time he touched my breast, we were doing soldering,” Mandel said. “He came up behind me and tried to play it off like it was an accident. … I knew it wasn’t.” But her parents “said it was probably an accident.” Mandel figured others would dismiss her concerns too, she said. When Voice of San Diego’s report about Teachworth was published, Mandel said she learned school and district officials were aware of Teachworth’s touching, and felt they didn’t do enough to make it stop. “As soon as I saw the article, I was like, ‘Gosh. This was more widespread than any of us realized,’” Mandel said. “There needed to be more action to get him out of the school if there were so many reports of him harming children.” Junyi Zheng, a 2014 La Jolla High graduate, took Teachworth’s advanced physics class her senior year and said the experience has “just kind of been there bothering me for a while.” “He was too touchy, not specifically with me but other classmates. … I would see things,” Zheng said. “To move us out of the way, he would grab us by the hips.” She said Teachworth occasionally used a spray bottle to spray her and other students in the face and chest if they were late to class. Comments he made were also off-putting. “He’d like compliment my friend on her top and it would be a really colorful top, or her chest was showing more, and she had a bigger chest than a lot of us,” Zheng said. “He would say things that other teachers wouldn’t say.” But future ambitions and college planning weighed heavily on their minds. Teachworth had control over their grade, and several students said they were fearful he would punish them academically if they told him to stop or reported him. For years, Teachworth was the only teacher on campus who taught advanced physics courses.  If students wanted out of the class, they’d have to transfer to a regular physics course, or another science course entirely. For seniors already admitted to a university, such a move could jeopardize their admission. At least one student said school officials told her as much after she reported that Teachworth grabbed her butt twice in succession in 2003. She transferred anyway. Zheng described similar fears over reporting Teachworth’s behavior. “Should I tell my parents? I know if I tell my parents, they’d freak out and then what would they do? Would they go to the school board, or just my principal or would I have to drop the class, and how would that affect my class schedule?” Zheng recalls thinking. “You know, obviously looking back, that would have been a trivial thing, but in the moment, that’s all you know as a high school student.” Zheng said she wishes the school held assemblies to tell students about what to do when teachers are inappropriate. Knowing who to report to could have made a difference. “It makes me sad that he’s probably acted this way towards hundreds of students,” Zheng said. Though Mandel and Zheng didn’t report their concerns to school or district administrators, other female students did, and came away disappointed with the outcome. They said the district failed to protect them and other students from Teachworth’s advances. San Diego Unified School District Superintendent Cindy Marten declined to discuss how La Jolla High student complaints about Teachworth were handled over the years. “The superintendent has nothing to add beyond what the district has provided to you on this matter,” spokeswoman Maureen Magee wrote in an email. The day Voice of San Diego’s first account of Teachworth’s behavior ran, San Diego Unified school board member John Lee Evans tweeted, “Sexual harassment not okay in government, not okay in entertainment or business. And not okay in schools!!” Evans did not respond to a call or email seeking an interview. Three women told Voice of San Diego that they voiced their concerns about touching by Teachworth to then-principal Dana Shelburne, but the school district claims to have no record of their complaints in the district office, school site or school police files. Records and interviews reveal Teachworth was investigated to some extent on at least four occasions: in 2003, 2013 and twice in 2016. San Diego Unified officials said the only time Teachworth was taken out of the classroom was for a week in 2016, while an anonymous student complaint about neck rubs by Teachworth was investigated. District emails show when the student couldn’t be located, the probe was dropped and Teachworth was welcomed back to class. Asked about Mandel and Zheng’s accounts, Teachworth wrote in an email that he has “nothing further to add” to his previous statement denying any improper conduct toward students.

    Voice of San Diego / 4 d. 7 h. 20 min. ago more
  • Expert advice from San Diego Criminal AttorneyExpert advice from San Diego Criminal Attorney

    By San Diego Criminal Attorney San Diego, like other major California cities, can be a wonderful place to live but also a dangerous place to live. Some 35,000 crimes, over 5,000 of them classified as violent crimes, occur in the city every single year. The constant threat of victimization, despite the city being the safest it has been in decades, puts people in fear and causes them to push for the strictest possible sentencing. But the unfortunate truth is, many innocent parties who are charged (or people who are overcharged) will also suffer the consequences of these tough sentencing guidelines. Where, then, do you turn to for help when arrested and accused of a crime in San Diego? What is the most reputable law firm in the city, where you can maximize your chances of a favorable outcome? The answer to such a question is bound to be seen as inherently “opinionated,” but we have solid reasons for featuring San Diego Criminal Attorney as “the go-to” law firm for San Diego criminal defense. An Award Winning Law Firm in Our Midst San Diego Criminal Attorney has won multiple awards for its high client satisfaction and its impressive record of victories (even in the toughest cases) across a wide spectrum of practice areas. They have been featured on a number of high-profile media outlets, including CNN, FOX, The Wall Street Journal, AVVO, and Super Lawyers. And this was not the means of creating their sterling reputation, but being selected out of a plethora of law firms for such special featuring is evidence of their already having built up that reputation. Practice areas covered by San Diego Criminal Attorney include (but are not limited to) drug crimes, DUI and other driving crimes, domestic violence, sex crimes, assault and battery, fraud and other “white collar” crimes, and theft crimes. And while all of these facets of our featured law firm are impressive, we may be able to exhibit the distinctiveness of San Diego Criminal Attorney even more potently by mentioned some things they are not. What San Diego Criminal Attorney IS NOT First of all, San Diego Criminal Attorney is not a “law mill.” In the legal world, this term is used by insiders to describe a firm that takes on more clients than they can adequately serve and then hires them out to other, less experienced lawyers. By contrast, San Diego Criminal Attorney always assigns you to a top-tier, fully trained attorney with deep experience in the relevant practice areas. Second, they are not a 9-to-5 operation. Good legal work simply doesn’t work that way. They therefore keep themselves available 24/7/365 to take your call for help (at 619-880-5474) and are always ready to arrange for you a face-to-face meeting in the office located at 750 B Street, 33rd Floor, #3337, San Diego, CA 92101. Third, this law firm is not new to San Diego’s local court processes or to the legal minutia of the California Penal Code or Vehicle Code. They boast decades of hands-on experience and have long-time familiarity with the communities they serve. Fourth and finally, San Diego Criminal Attorney is not an English-only, citizen-only operation. They can hold consultations in Spanish if necessary and can handle immigration and naturalization issues. To learn more about San Diego Criminal Attorney, feel free to visit sandiego-criminalattorney.com.

    San Diego Downtown News / 4 d. 8 h. 56 min. ago more
  • Expert advice from Los Angeles DUI LawyerExpert advice from Los Angeles DUI Lawyer

    By Los Angeles DUI Lawyer Alcohol slows reaction time and depresses the nervous system. This has a devastating effect on the brain’s ability to resolve issues and inhibits motor coordination. These factors are key elements in why a person should not be behind the wheel of any vehicle once they have started to drink. Receiving a DUI charge is no laughing matter and is treated very seriously by the courts in Los Angeles County. At Los Angeles DUI Lawyer, each attorney has built a reputation on being “no-nonsense” when it comes to defending their DUI cases. Their goal is to protect their client’s rights and ensure that they receive a fair shake when it comes to the charges that have been levied against them. Each case must be built on solid evidence. This is part of the reason that the attorneys at Los Angeles DUI Lawyer have gotten over 100 cases thrown out in one year’s time. They know the evidence that is needed to support a DUI charge and are adept at being able to refute its validity when it is weak or unreliable. Proving the innocence of their client is the ultimate goal. The attorneys have numerous resources at their disposal that allow them to pursue each case as aggressively as possible. They leave no stone unturned when it comes to building the strongest, most effective case with the facts they have. The fact is, DUI death are still on the rise which means law enforcement agencies are beginning to crack down even harder than before. In 2008, the number alcohol-related injuries was 4,832. In 2013, the number of actual fatalities attributed to alcohol was 1,699. Because of the ever-rising numbers, the state of California has put in place strict fines and penalties that increase with each repeat DUI charge. The goal is to prevent drunk drivers or those who are under the influence from getting behind the wheel of a vehicle. The attorneys at Los Angeles DUI Lawyer understand the frustration and confusion that accompanies a DUI or other alcohol-related arrest. Their knowledge and expertise allows them to treat each case with compassion. They never forget that their client is a person with a family and a career that relies on them for support. The attorneys will build the strongest case possible with the evidence that is available. Strategy is the name of the game in many cases and the attorneys understand that it takes skill to build a defense that is sound and reliable on every point. The attorneys at Los Angeles DUI Lawyer can provide you with the information you need if you have questions concerning your legal options. Contact the law firm through their website at losangeles-duilawyer.com or call their office at 424-281-3020. If you would prefer to speak to them in person, you can visit their office at 3460 Wilshire Boulevard #410F in Los Angeles. Contact Los Angeles DUI Lawyer today to receive the information you need to make an informed decision about your future.

    San Diego Downtown News / 4 d. 9 h. 1 min. ago more
  • Daily Business Report-Dec. 13, 2017Daily Business Report-Dec. 13, 2017

    San Marcos Square Heritage Core Value Fund Acquires San Marcos Square for $4.25 Million San Diego-based Heritage Core Value Fund LP has purchased San Marcos Square for $4.25 million. The seller was S&C San Marcos LLC. The 19,274-square-foot retail property is comprised of three buildings and sits on 37,897 square feet of land. The property, located at 156-190 S. Rancho Santa Fe Road in San Marcos,is anchored by US Bank and includes additional tenants such as Rossi’s Pizza, San Marcos Dental, CTP Computers, Crispy’s Donuts, Cole & Associates, and Adobe Lock & Safe. Prior to the sale, the same family owned San Marcos Square since its development in 1975. The new owner plans to improve the exterior facade, design new signage, and implement a signature leasing plan, which focuses on demographics and needs of the community. “This second acquisition in our Fund is perfectly aligned with our value-add strategy,” said Dan Leon, director of acquisitions for the Heritage Core Value Fund. “San Marcos Square is in a great location, has tenants that generate cash flow, and affords the opportunity to renovate and reposition the property to enhance the tenant mix.” Matt Hardy and Matt LoPiccolo represented the seller. _____________________ City Council Fails Yet Again to Enact Short-Term Rentals A divided City Council failed Tuesday to reach agreement on the long debated question of how to regulate short-term rentals, leaving in limbo an issue that has dogged elected leaders for nearly three years. Multiple proposals, some more permissive than others, were floated on the dais in hopes of reaching a consensus, but after more than four hours of debate and hours more of public testimony, the nine-member council could not secure five affirmative votes. The inability to act seemed to frustrate the council members as much as the community. “I’m very disappointed today. We’re like a dysfunctional family,” said Councilman Scott Sherman, who had favored a more permissive proposal originally crafted with three of his colleagues — Councilmen Mark Kersey, Chris Ward and David Alvarez. “ We’re back to where it always has been, the wild, wild West.” — San Diego Union Tribune Read more… _____________________ USD’s Undergraduate Business Program Ranked 3rd in State, in Top 50 Nationwide The University of San Diego School of Business undergraduate program is one of the top 50 program in the nation, according to the 2017 ranking by Poets&Quants for Undergrads, a leading news site for business education. The USD undergraduate program ranks 45th out of 82 schools on the list, the third-highest ranked school in California and the only school in San Diego to make the list. USD School of Business and competing schools represent the top 16 percent of accredited undergraduate business schools in the United States. USD’s program scored particularly well in career outcomes with 91 percent of undergraduates finding jobs within three months after graduation. The ranking also equally weighs admission standards and alumni satisfaction. USD School of Business’s accounting program also was recognized in December. The program was ranked 19 out of 607 programs nationwide by Collegefactual.com.  _____________________ San Diego Employers Association Hosts Employment Law Update San Diego Employers Association hosts the 38th annual Employment Law Update on Jan. 25, 2018. Presenting attorneys include Chris Olmsted, Lonny Zilberman, and Rich Paul. The event takes place from 8 a.m. to noon at Crowne Plaza Mission Valley, 2270 Hotel Circle North, San Diego. Tickets are available at the early bird rate of $150 for SDEA members and $175 for nonmembers, through Dec. 31. Tickets go up in price Jan. 1, 2018. To learn more and to purchase a ticket, visit www.sdeahr.org. _____________________ San Diego Team Wins $6.9 Million Grant to Establish Precise Network Clinical Center A team of physicians, scientists and biostatisticians in San Diego joined forces across institutions to successfully compete for a $6.9 million grant to establish one of only 10 PrecISE Network Clinical Centers nationwide. A collaboration between La Jolla Institute and UC San Diego School of Medicine, the center will connect patients, clinicians and researchers to develop personalized treatments, and find a cure for asthma. The PrecISE (short for Precision Interventions for Severe and/or Exacerbation Prone Asthma) Network is an initiative funded by the National Institutes of Health/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute to advance precision medicine for patients with severe and exacerbation-prone asthma. Read more… _____________________ General Atomics, Starburst Accelerator Host Aerospace Tech Showcase Event ExecutiveBiz General Atomics’ aeronautical systems business has collaborated with Starburst Accelerator to administer selection committee program for multiple aerospace startup firms to pitch various technology platforms. Ten aerospace startups presented technologies to industry representatives and potential investors during “The Future Is Now” event that took place Dec. 1 at GA-ASI’s headquarters in Poway, California, General Atomics said. “We hosted this event as a way to provide aerospace entrepreneurs with an audience of enthusiastic industry leaders who are interested in investing in new technology that will fill critical capability gaps in support of the warfighter,” said Linden Blue, GA-ASI CEO. The showcase also offered an opportunity for attendees to learn about new innovation ideas and potential applications of the ideas to business expansion initiatives. France-based Starburst Accelerator aims to help new aerospace defense and security companies secure seed funds from venture capital firms or business angels through the incubator’s quarterly selection committee programs. _____________________ Douglas Wilson Cos. rendering Douglas Wilson Cos. Approved for 218 New Entry-Level Homes in Spring Valley Douglas Wilson Cos. has received approval from the San Diego County Board of Supervisors for the addition of 218 new entry-level homes on a 52-acre parcel in the unincorporated area of Spring Valley. When DWC acquired the undeveloped site in 2014, it was approved for a 710-room destination golf resort and commercial office uses. The plan approved on Dec. 6, 2017 includes three town home styles, expected to be priced from the low $400,000s. Douglas P. Wilson, DWC chairman and CEO, noted that the plan evolved from 266 multi-family units to 218. “We believe this is one of the largest projects of its kind in San Diego County, where multi-family, for-sale homes will be available in the low $400,000s.” Twenty eight of the 52 acres will be placed in an open space preserve to protect Hansen’s Creek and sensitive plant and animal populations. “Over 54 percent of the property will be maintained by a nature conservancy in perpetuity as a result of our agreements with the community planning group, County planners and State and Federal Wildlife Agencies,” said Wilson. “ This has been a comprehensive effort to create a win-win for all stakeholders, including San Diegans looking for a reasonably priced new home.” DWC’s new plan includes solar energy installations and plumbing for grey-water. Future homeowners will not be encumbered by additional Mello Roos taxes. _____________________ Lake Ridge Pardee Homes to Unveil New Homes in Santee Pardee Homes on Saturday will celebrate the grand opening of the Weston community located just off of State Route 52 in Santee. On display will be 14 model homes open to the public for tours from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Weston’s four neighborhoods are Lake Ridge, Sandstone, Talus and Prism. All of the 415-homes will be installed with solar panels as well as Pardee’s signature Living Smart package, which includes cutting-edge technologies designed to reduce energy costs and provide comfort and control amenities for homeowners.   The post Daily Business Report-Dec. 13, 2017 appeared first on San Diego Metro Magazine.

    San Diego Metro Magazine / 4 d. 10 h. 40 min. ago more
  • “Santa Paws” welcomes pups“Santa Paws” welcomes pups

    By SDCNN Staff Westfield Mission Valley invites you to celebrate the holidays with your furry friends at “Santa Paws” on Dec. 12 from 6-9 p.m. Dogs may sit on Santa’s lap and pose for a free photo at his workshop, Mint Studio. Mint Studio ­— located between Bath & Body Works and AMC Theaters — offers holiday DIY activities and photo opportunities with Santa through Dec. 24. View and register for Mint Studio workshop events at bit.ly/2BHKyk5. (Photo courtesy of Allied Integrated Marketing) The post “Santa Paws” welcomes pups appeared first on Mission Valley News.

    Mission Valley News / 5 d. 4 h. 58 min. ago more
  • Daily Business Report-Dec. 12, 2017Daily Business Report-Dec. 12, 2017

     Aerial view of The Plaza Irvine Company’s The Plaza Wins Outstanding Building of the Year Award Irvine Company Office Properties’ six-building, 17-acre The Plaza has been awarded The Outstanding Building of the Year (TOBY) Award from the Building Owners and Managers Association of San Diego. Located in the heart of La Jolla UTC, the project was honored in the 500,000-1 million square-feet category for its industry-leading building management and operations, excellence in building standards, sustainability efforts, community impact and customer relations and retention. “We are honored to have received such prestigious recognition for The Plaza,” said Mike Bennett, senior vice president, Irvine Company Office Properties. “Our teams are passionate about delivering an unparalleled experience for our customers and workplace communities that set the standard for excellence in San Diego and across coastal California.” The Plaza features three towers and three campus-style office buildings with 825,000 square feet of workspace in a park-like setting. It also offers on and off-site amenities for businesses. The project includes two Irvine Company signature offerings: KINETIC, a state-of-the-art fitness center and wellness services provided by Scripps HealthExpress, and The Commons, an open-air workspace with complimentary Wi-Fi.  It also offers on-site dining at Rick Bayless’ Red O restaurant and Specialty’s Café, and is adjacent to the newly revitalized Westfield UTC. ___________________ Daymond John ABC’s “Shark Tank” Daymond John Coming to Rancho Bernardo North San Diego Business Chamber will feature Daymond John for lunch on Jan. 26. John is a self-made multimillionaire with over $6 billion in global products sales, a starring role in the ABC’s hit show “Shark Tank” and a New York Times bestselling author of “The Power of Broke” and “Shark.” John will discuss his latest book, “Rise and Grind,” an up-close look at the hard-charging routines and winning secrets of individuals who have risen to the challenges in their lives and grinded their way to the very tops of their fields. Along the way, he also reveals how grit and persistence both helped him overcome the obstacles he has faced in life and fueled his success. Tickets are available to the public and includes lunch and an autographed copy of Daymond John’s book. The chamber event will be held at Sony Electronics, 16535 Via Esprillo, San Diego. Check-in: 11:30 a.m. Presentation: noon to 1 p.m. Admission is $59 for North San Diego Business Chamber members, $79 for nonmembers and $500 for a reserved table of 7. Guests will receive a complimentary signed copy of “Rise and Grind.” Limited quantities available. Event will be livestreamed at https://www.facebook.com/NSDBusinessChamber/ ___________________ Nature paper coauthors, from left, Justin Milner, Bingfei Yu, Ananda Goldrath and Clara Toma. Scientists Identify Promising New Approach for Immune System Defense against Cancer By Mario Aguilera | UC San Diego Looking to bolster the body’s immune system in the fight against infection and cancer, researchers at the University of California San Diego and their colleagues have identified a promising new strategy to program the immune system to meet the pathogen or malignancy in the tissues where they first pose a threat. A multidisciplinary team led by Justin Milner, a postdoctoral researcher in molecular biologist Ananda Goldrath’s laboratory, uncovered a novel function for a protein known as “Runx3” that is key to the development of killer T cells—immune cells important for fighting infections and cancer. The researchers discovered similarities shared by T cells in infected tissues and tumors, and leveraged this finding to enhance killer T cell abundance in tumors, which was driven by Runx3. Their study is published in the Dec. 14 edition of the journal Nature. “At this time, we are seeing great promise in treating cancer stemming from approaches that exploit the immune system to target tumor cells and our work describes a new tool for directing the immune system into the right place where it can do its job,” said Goldrath, the chair of the Section of Molecular Biology in the Division of Biological Sciences. The protein Runx3 programs killer T cells to target infected tissues and tumors. Runx3 has been known for its contributions to immune cell development but the researchers found a new therapeutic role for it. Their research in mice demonstrated Runx3 could program killer T cells to locate to and persist in infected tissues or tumors, helping to eradicate infections or slow growth of malignancies. “We uncovered an unappreciated function for this molecule in setting up a frontline of defense in tissues throughout the body,” said Goldrath. “It’s really a repurposing of a protein used in development to regulate the functional properties of the immune system.” The researchers believe Runx3, if properly directed, could be combined with other approaches to help T cells recognize and destroy tumor cells and enhance vaccine efficacy. The collaborative project spearheaded with Matthew Pipkin at The Scripps Research Institute (Florida) included undergraduates, graduate students, postdoctoral researchers as well as long- standing collaborative efforts with Shane Crotty at the La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology and Wei Wang in UC San Diego’s Departments of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Cellular and Molecular Medicine. Other coauthors of the study included Clara Toma, Bingfei Yu, Kai Zhang, Kyla Omilusik, Anthony Phan, Dapeng Wang, Adam Getzler and Toan Nguyen. The research was supported by the UC San Diego Molecular Biology Cancer Fellowship, the U.S. National Institutes of Health (U19AI109976), the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (RB5-07012), the Kimmelman Family Foundation and the San Diego Center for Precision Immunotherapy. Read more… ___________________ Supervisors Waive Rebuilding Fees for Lilac Fire Victims County Supervisors on Monday adopted a resolution to waive permit fees for those who have lost their homes in the Lilac Fire. The resolution means fire victims who plan to rebuild their homes or other damaged structures will get a waiver of plan check fees for the rebuilding of structures damaged or destroyed in the unincorporated area, or other areas where County approvals are required. Property tax relief is also available. Residents with damaged property can get their property reassessed and the reduced value will remain in effect until the property is rebuilt or repaired. The county had seven days to ratify the local emergency, and supervisors did so during their meeting Monday. The action means the county can continue the local emergency, use multiple agencies to help fight the Lilac Fire and ask for disaster aid from the state and the federal government. As of Monday, the fire has burned 4,100 acres and destroyed 184 structures. The county opened a local assistance center for fire victims at the Vista branch library. The hours are 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. and a number of County departments and local agencies are on hand to help victims through the recovery and rebuilding process. ___________________ General Atomics Hosts High-Tech Aerospace Innovation Event General Atomics Aeronautical Systems Inc., in partnership with Starburst Accelerator, a global aerospace and aviation incubator, hosted a selection committee titled “The Future Is Now” at its headquarters in Poway, on Dec. 1. The showcase featured pitch-style presentations from 10 aerospace startups sharing technology and innovations to a cross-section of industry experts and potential investors. The event provided an opportunity to hear about new ideas being developed and consider how the ideas could impact business growth. “GA-ASI has embraced an entrepreneurial approach to its business throughout our 25-plus years in aviation and this event is a natural extension of our approach to innovation,” said Linden Blue, CEO. “We hosted this event as a way to provide aerospace entrepreneurs with an audience of enthusiastic industry leaders who are interested in investing in new technology that will fill critical capability gaps in support of the warfighter.” Starburst Accelerator hosts quarterly selection committee programs as part of its mission to provide access to seed funding from the top business angels and venture capital firms dedicated to aerospace, defense and security. As an added benefit, this event also attracts major aerospace industry resulting in a collaborative environment for the advancement of new technology. ___________________ City Council Approves Housing for Substance Abuse Victims The San Diego City Council on Monday gave the go-ahead for a 70-bed facility that will provide help for people whose substance abuse problems have led them to live on the streets. The S.M.A.R.T. (San Diego Misdemeanant At-Risk Track) House will create a safe, drug-free environment where people with substance abuse problems can get their lives back on track. It will operate from a rehabilitated Super 8 motel that the city purchased this summer. The motel, which has a history of low occupancy and a high rate crime, will be refurbished with new landscaping, lighting, and gating, and operate with round-the-clock staffing and security. City Attorney Mara W. Elliott, whose office launched the S.M.A.R.T. Program last year, said the innovative program provides its participants with tailored drug treatment programs, counseling, bridge housing, case management, and wrap-around services that allow them to succeed on their own once they graduate. ___________________ Jeffery Kelly Elected to National Academy of Inventors Jeffery Kelly Jeffery Kelly, co-chair of the Department of Molecular Medicine at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI), has been named a fellow of the esteemed National Academy of Inventors, the organization announced today. “My research group seeks to decode the basic principles of how cells generate, fold, traffic and degrade proteins, and from this information we have been fortunate enough to envision therapeutic strategies and discover drugs that slow the progression of neurodegenerative diseases and prolong life,” says Kelly. The honor recognizes Kelly’s contributions as an academic researcher, whose work has “demonstrated a prolific spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating outstanding inventions that have made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development, and welfare of society,” according to the NAI. ___________________ Personnel Announcements Juanita Brooks Inducted into Litigation Counsel of America Juanita Brooks Juanita Brooks, principal at Fish & Richardson, has been inducted into the Litigation Counsel of America (LCA) as a fellow. The LCA is a close-knit, peer-selected and aggressively diverse honorary society of 3,500 of the best trial lawyers in the country. Less than one-half of one percent of American lawyers, vigorously vetted for skills, expertise and service are invited to join this network of lawyers who effectively represent clients across North America and around the world. Brooks was elected and invited into the fellowship after being evaluated for effectiveness and accomplishment in litigation and trial work, along with ethical reputation. Brooks is a leading trial and appellate litigator, who specializes in intellectual property, product liability and mass tort litigation. She is nationally known for her storytelling, hard-hitting cross-examinations and ability to decipher complex technologies for judges and juries Often the only woman and minority in the courtroom, Brooks has spent her career dedicated to diversifying the legal profession. The first in her family to graduate from high school, Brooks graduated from San Diego State University at the age of 19 and Yale School of Law at the age of 22 before entering the legal arena. Brooks was the first Hispanic woman to establish a private criminal defense practice in San Diego and has remained a frequent volunteer, speaker and advocate for women and minorities for decades. ___________________ Aimee Hoyt Joins Illumina Inc. Aimee Hoyt Illumina Inc. has named Aimee Hoyt as senior vice president and chief people officer beginning Jan. 8, 2018. She will be responsible for leading all aspects of the company’s HR strategies, reporting to the CEO. Hoyt has held senior positions at some of the world’s best-known technology companies including Hewlett-Packard, Cisco and Sun Microsystems. Most recently, she was the chief human resources officer at Rackspace, a leading managed cloud computing company, in San Antonio, Texas. She led the HR team and was responsible for helping build, align and develop high-performing global teams. During her tenure, Rackspace was recognized as one of Fortune’s 100 Best Companies to Work For, Top 30 Best Places in Tech and Great Places to Work for Millennials. Hoyt earned a master’s in human resource development from the Rochester Institute of Technology.   The post Daily Business Report-Dec. 12, 2017 appeared first on San Diego Metro Magazine.

    San Diego Metro Magazine / 5 d. 10 h. 46 min. ago more
  • Daily Business Report-Dec. 11, 2017Daily Business Report-Dec. 11, 2017

    Credit: Salk Institute/Yolanda Leenders-Goulding Research: When Your Spinal Cord Takes Charge Salk scientists discover spinal cord neurons that inhibit distracting input to focus on task at hand We think of our brain as masterminding all of our actions, but a surprising amount of information related to movement gets processed by our spinal cord. Now, Salk Institute scientists have solved a longstanding mystery about how our spinal cord knows when to pay attention to certain pieces of information, and when to ignore it as distracting from the task at hand. Professor Martyn Goulding: ‘Your spinal cord is incredibly smart.’ (Credit: Salk Institute) The work, appearing in the journal Neuron on Dec. 7, reveals that specific neurons called RORbeta (RORβ) interneurons inhibit transmission of potentially disruptive sensory information during walking in order to promote a fluid gait. The research illustrates a high level of sophistication in spinal cord information processing. “This research provides a sense of how the nervous system deals with the different types of information that’s coming in to it, and how it uses that information in a way that’s relevant to what it’s actually doing at the time,” says Martin Goulding, a professor in Salk’s Molecular Neurobiology Laboratory. “Your spinal cord is incredibly smart.” When we are moving, motor circuits in the spinal cord are constantly being barraged by information from sensory receptors in the skin and muscles, telling these circuits what our limbs are doing or what the ground underfoot feels like. This information is critical for actions like walking or standing still. Often these actions are at odds with each other, so a big question in neuroscience has been how our spinal cord “gates” or traffics different kinds of sensory information that might cause conflicting actions, to ensure that each movement is performed properly. Goulding’s team discovered that a special set of “middle man” neurons (interneurons) inhibit conflicting sensory information that comes primarily from muscles to prevent it from triggering responses in motor neurons that would lead to conflicting actions. This type of inhibition is termed presynaptic inhibition, because it occurs before the signal is passed across the synaptic gap to neurons on the other side. The team was led to explore these neurons by earlier experiments by other researchers who had mutated the RORβ gene and found that mice with the mutation had an abnormal duck-like gait. But because RORβ, a regulatory protein known as a transcription factor, is expressed by cells in the brain and in different parts of the spinal cord, it wasn’t clear which location was responsible for the duck gait. The Goulding lab undertook a series of experiments to isolate the location of the defect using genetic and molecular strategies to disable the RORβ gene in various types of neurons and ask what happens. The duck gait only appeared when they inactivated RORβ inhibitory cells in the dorsal spinal cord. Cells in the dorsal spinal cord (the back) receive sensory information from the body and then pass it on to neurons in the ventral part of the spinal cord (the front) that generate coordinated movement. In mice that lacked functional RORβ interneurons, the motor neurons that cause their limbs to flex remained active, causing their gait to become duck-like and abnormal. This means that RORβ interneurons are gating—inhibiting—irrelevant sensory information that would interfere with the normal stepping pattern. When RORβ is present, each step is a smooth fluid motion, but when absent, the legs become excessively flexed (bent) and each step is awkward. In humans this would be akin to your knee continuing to stay bent for too long with each step. “I think what’s really exciting about this project is that we managed to isolate and describe this very local and very specific circuit, which is only active during stepping,” says Stephanie Koch, a Salk research associate and first author of the paper. Read more… _______________________ MQ-8C Fire Scout. (Photo by Northrop Grumman) Northrop Grumman-Built Fire Scout Helicopters Experience Pivotal Year Northrop Grumman Corporation’s autonomous Fire Scout helicopters, the MQ-8B and MQ-8C, continued to strengthen the combat capability and lethality of the U.S. Navy’s air and surface warfare communities throughout 2017, the company said in a new milestones report. “2017 has been a pivotal year for Fire Scout,” said Capt. Jeff Dodge, U.S. Navy Fire Scout program manager. “Today, operational squadrons are deployed and more are preparing to deploy to meet the expanding needs of the U.S. Navy. The fleet has only scratched the surface of Fire Scout’s true capabilities and the missions Fire Scout will perform. Fleet capability will only grow as the MQ-8C Fire Scout enters the operational force.” Read more… _______________________ San Diego Council Approves 2 New Members to Convention Center Board Carol Kim Elvin Lai The San Diego City Council has voted to approve the appointment of Carol Kim and Elvin Lai to the San Diego Convention Center Board of Directors. Carol Kim serves as political director for the San Diego County Building and Construction Trades Council and director of community engagement for its Family Housing Corporation. The daughter of Korean immigrant parents and a UCLA graduate, Kim began her career as a classroom teacher in an inner city school in Los Angeles. Her years as a teacher were followed by several more working in HIV prevention, where she served high-risk groups including active and recovering substance users, adolescents in the foster care and judicial systems, LGBTQ communities, as well as communities of color. The following eight years were spent as a Research Associate for an education research, development and service nonprofit. San Diego Native Elvin Lai is a fourth generation owner-operator of the 72-room Ocean Park Inn hotel in Pacific Beach since 2003. He is president of the San Diego County Hotel and Motel Association, board chair of the California Hotel and Lodging Association, and past board member of both the San Diego Tourism Marketing District and the San Diego Tourism Authority. He is currently working on HOTELbeat.com, Abnormal Company Beer and Wine, and a restaurant called The Cork and Craft @ Abnormal. _______________________ Partnership Creates New Master’s Program at San Diego State University San Diego State University’s L. Robert Payne School of Hospitality and Tourism Management is partnering with Meeting Professionals International to create a new graduate degree in meeting and event management. The program will be the first of its kind in the United States and will target mid- and senior-level professionals in the field of meeting and event management. Scheduled to launch in 2019, the master’s degree program will incorporate experiential learning, simulations and industry partner mentoring. Read more… _______________________ Three-dimensional rendering of dolphin echolocation click spectra recorded in the Gulf of Mexico. (Credit: Scripps Institution of Oceanography) Newly Discovered Algorithm May Help Scientists Monitor Wild Dolphin Populations Scientists have developed a new algorithm that can identify distinct click patterns among millions of clicks in recordings of wild dolphins, whose communication serves as a sentinel of ocean ecosystem health. This approach, presented in PLOS Computational Biology by Kaitlin Frasier of Scripps Institution of Oceanography and colleagues, could potentially help distinguish among dolphin species in the wild. Frasier and her colleagues build autonomous underwater acoustic sensors called HARPs (High-frequency Acoustic Recording Packages) that can record dolphins’ echolocation clicks in the wild for over a year at a time. These instruments serve as non-invasive tools for studying many aspects of dolphin populations, including how they are affected by hazards such as the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, natural resource development, and climate change. Read more… _______________________ General Atomics Awarded Army Contract for ARGOS Satellite System General Atomics Electromagnetic Systems has been awarded a Department of Defense Ordnance Technology Consortium  contract from the Army for an ARGOS satellite system. “Our team has demonstrated success in the rapid design, development, test, and launch of satellite systems like ARGOS,” said Nick Bucci, vice president for missile defense and space systems at General Atomics. “ARGOS will play an important role in delivering beyond the horizon assured communications for the Army Component and Combatant Commanders. A satellite-based system will provide assured communications for future warfighters whenever and wherever they need it.” _______________________ Chuck Matthews Receives 2017 Fran Aleshire Leadership Award Chuck Matthews Chuck Matthews, director of the North Coastal and North Inland Regions for the county of San Diego Health and Human Services Agency, has been honored with the Fran Aleshire Leadership Award for his outstanding leadership and regional involvement. The award was presented at the San Diego North Economic Development Council’s annual North County Business Breakfast on Dec. 6. Matthews has more than 25 years of experience in the planning, management and delivery of health and social services in the public and private sectors. He has worked for nearly two decades for HHSA, where he is responsible for directing the development and implementation of regional strategies, programs and activities to ensure family and community health needs are met for San Diego County residents. Under Matthews’ leadership, HHSA North County Regions has designated 98 organizations as official partners in Live Well San Diego, which is almost a third of the countywide total. Live Well San Diego promotes healthy, safe and thriving communities throughout the region. The post Daily Business Report-Dec. 11, 2017 appeared first on San Diego Metro Magazine.

    San Diego Metro Magazine / 6 d. 10 h. 45 min. ago more
  • Guide to Winter in San DiegoGuide to Winter in San Diego

    San Diego is notoriously known for having year round great weather and the winter time is no exception. Although it can sometimes be quite cold, there are days where the sun is shinning and the warmth tricks you into thinking it's summer time again. Be sure a pack a jacket for your next trip to San Diego during winter because the nights can get pretty cold if you are out and about. When traveling to San Diego during winter we suggest partaking in something festive, seeing the city, and lodging in the beautiful Hilton San Diego Resort and Spa located in Mission Beach. Celebrate the HolidaysIce skating at Sycuan's Fantasy on Ice rink - Located in the Horton Plaza area in downtown San Diego. While extremely fun, this is also a great way to support a good cause, as it benefits the Peckham Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders at Rady Children's Hospital, San Diego. Weather you are a excellent skater or predict some falls in your future, you are sure to have fun gliding across the ice. (Open until January 5th) San Diego Bay Parade of Lights - A San Diego tradition the Parade of Lights will commence again this year on Sunday, December 11, 2016 at 5:30pm. The Parade features contestants who have entered and decorated their boats with lights, figurines, and so much more. Over 80 boats will enter and decorate according to the new theme of the year, with this years theme being “Big Bay Toy Parade.” The parade will proceed from Shelter Island, the Embarcadero, Seaport Village, and Ferry Landing in Coronado. See the CityOld Town Trolley Tour - If you are looking for the perfect way to see the whole city, then look no further than the Old Town Trolley Tour. With 12 convenient stops throughout San Diego, you can hop on and off wherever you like. Along the route the trolley passes by over 100 iconic landmarks of San Diego so you can be rest assured that you wont miss out on anything. Where to StayHilton San Diego Resort and Spa - Bringing luxury to the beach, located in Mission Beach the Hilton San Diego Resort and Spa is located near all of the best places to visit in San Diego. This is a great place to bring the whole family! Even offering activities to keep the kids happy so that the adults can enjoy some time alone. There are also many family friendly package discounts so that the whole family can enjoy their trip in San Diego and save!  

    SanDiego.com / 7 d. 10 h. 38 min. ago more
  • New year, new developmentNew year, new development

    By Sara Butler | Editor Millennium Mission Valley slated to open in early 2018 After approximately two years of construction, Millennium Mission Valley is nearing completion. This high-density, mixed-use community – situated on 5.37 acres – is comprised of 291 apartment homes, 14 live-work units and 9,000 square feet of retail space. Fast-casual restaurant Shake Shack, the first retail occupant on the Millennium Mission Valley property, is expected to open this month. Apartment units to the left are currently finishing construction. (Photo by Connor McBride) The Dinerstein Companies is developing the property, and they enlisted the help of TCA Architects to design the space. Currently, the project is finishing construction and moving into the leasing phase, with an anticipated completion date of February 2018. The site, located in Mission Valley West, was formerly a Bob Baker auto dealership. It is situated between Camino de la Reina to its north, Camino del Arroyo to its east and the Witt Lincoln car dealership to its west. The south side of the building along Camino del Rio North faces Interstate 8. A side view of the Millennium Mission Valley apartment units located along Camino del Arroyo (Photo by Connor McBride) Millennium Mission Valley continues the booming development trend in the region, and their 291 apartment units address the community’s housing need. “In 2014, on average only 600 people both lived and worked in Mission Valley, while over 41,000 commuters came in each day, and 7,700 residents left. This is because there are many more jobs in Mission Valley than places to live,” according to a Mission Valley Community Plan Update (MVCPU) brochure. The residential aspect of this site will increase potential housing options for those who work in the Mission Valley commercial district. Additionally, the unique live-work spaces encourage residents to stay in the community for work. For residents who still have to commute to their jobs outside of the area, free shuttle van services will be available for easy access to public transportation in an effort to mitigate traffic and help the environment. According to the development’s website, the studio, one- and two-bedroom apartments are finished with quartz countertops, vinyl wood flooring, glass shaker cabinets, electronic apartment entry locks and other “luxury living with eco-friendly design” elements. Resident community amenities include a sky lounge, resort-style pool, sports bar, dog park, VIP longue, two-story fitness center and gourmet coffee bar. “The architecture is designed in contemporary style to attract the modern sophisticated San Diegan and is primarily organized around three beautifully landscaped courtyards,” Irwin Yau, principal at TCA Architects, said. “The retail awnings and storefronts along the ground level were designed to help to reduce the scale of the building along pedestrian frontages, while allowing for views into public areas of the building,” he continued. “Architectural elements anchor key corners while punched openings and cantilevered balconies provide relief and texture, [which] further articulates the architecture.” The current state of the development (Photo by Connor McBride) Artist’s rendering of the Millennium Mission Valley mixed-use project (Courtesy of TCA Architects) Although the full development won’t be complete until early next year, Shake Shack is expected open in December 2017. Shake Shack, a fast-casual restaurant famous for their hamburgers and milkshakes, is the first company to occupy the retail space. Shake Shack is located the northeast edge of the premises, situated on the corner of Camino del Arroyo and Camino de la Reina. No other businesses have yet been confirmed. Shake Shack in Millennium Mission Valley features an outdoor seating area. (Photo by Connor McBride) In addition to the retail establishments, the property features a public plaza that invites Mission Valley neighbors into the space. The plaza is located between the commercial buildings fronting Camino de la Reina. “Fundamental to the design was to create a connection of pedestrian access to and from the site,” Yau said. “The project’s ‘front door’ was purposely located adjacent to the project’s 4,000-square-foot public plaza to provide a vibrant, pedestrian-oriented atmosphere.” The intent of this open community space is, “to create vibrant pedestrian-friendly environment, co-mingling residents and visitors to the commercial and residential parts of the project,” Yau said. Apartments along Camino del Rio North, which faces Interstate 8 (Photo by Connor McBride) The property is conveniently situated near the community’s natural and business assets. Josh Vasbinder, West Coast partner for The Dinerstein Companies, explained that Dinerstein was attracted to Mission Valley because of “its central location in San Diego, proximity to the San Diego River, San Diego trolley, and retail and commercial [areas].” Rents will be determined with the February 2018 opening. The Dinerstein Companies are currently talking to individuals and businesses interested in renting residential or retail units. For more information, call 619-541-8742, email Info-MissionValley@themillennium.com, or visit bit.ly/2jGsyyq. To read our previous coverage of Millennium Mission Valley from 2015, visit bit.ly/2jGlSAm. — Sara Butler is the editor of Mission Valley News. Reach her at web@sdcnn.com. The post New year, new development appeared first on Mission Valley News.

    Mission Valley News / 9 d. 8 h. 16 min. ago more
  • Earworm alert: ‘Christmas on our Own’Earworm alert: ‘Christmas on our Own’

    By Margie M. Palmer Mission Valley-based singer releases catchy holiday hit When Mission Valley resident DC James decided to debut his music, he knew he’d have to go big or go home. His newly released song, “Christmas on our Own,” not only flips the script of traditional holiday music – it also gives the catchiness of Mariah Carey’s popular hit “All I Want for Christmas is You” a solid run for its money. “When most artists release a pop or pop-country debut they’ll release a breakup song or a party song, but not me,” James said, laughing. “I’m going to compete with Mariah because life isn’t hard enough.” Local singer-songwriter DC James will perform his song at San Diego Gay Men Chorus’ “Jingle” on Dec. 9 and 10 at the Balboa Theatre. (Courtesy Nicole Smith Photography) The Toronto native admits that while acting and writing music has been a lifelong passion, the vulnerability of putting his own stuff out to the world is new. “I’d been a songwriter and performer for most of my life, but I always sang other people’s songs,” he said. “When I was auditioning for Broadway or musical theater, I’d get far, but I think the problem was the believability factor because I couldn’t connect with the story. I realized very quickly that my dream was misguided.” James, who celebrated his 33rd birthday earlier this month, made a pact with himself on the day he turned 32: he would release his own music within a year. “Christmas on our Own” was born in mid-December 2016 – a few weeks after that decision was made. At the time he penned the lyrics, James and his husband had recently moved from Canada to San Diego. James wanted to be closer to Los Angeles to pursue his career, so the couple was debating long distance. When an opportunity for his husband to finish up schooling in San Diego arose, they pounced. DC James’ single “Christmas on our Own” is now available on iTunes and Spotify. (Courtesy Nicole Smith Photography) Although there was zero chance they’d head back to the cold to spend Christmas with their families, there was the unmistakable appeal of spending the holidays on their own. “It took me about two days to write it, and with the time I spent producing it, it took about a week in total,” he said. “I came up with the hook, or the catchiest part of the song, and I just couldn’t get it out of my head. I couldn’t afford a gift for my husband, so I got him a song.” The reception from his husband, and his family, was far beyond what he expected. “Everyone was telling me [the song] was so much better than they thought it would be,” he continued. “People didn’t know I was starting to take songwriting seriously.” After that, James pressed pause and left it be. While he felt the song would be great to pitch to production studios for use in television or holiday movies, he admittedly missed those deadlines. Toward the end of summer 2017, he realized his deadline for releasing music was fast approaching. “I had just finished doing a show with the San Diego Gay Men’s Chorus (SDGMC) and the next day, I was lying by the pool and realized the next show would be the holiday show,” he said. “I thought this would be a great platform to share my music because the song is cute, relatable and catchy.” James (foreground) on stage with the San Diego Gay Men’s Chorus for “Jingle” at Sycuan, Dec. 2. (Courtesy SDGMC) SDGMC Artistic Director, RC Haus, agreed. “The moment I heard his song, I knew I had to include it in our program,” Haus said. “With all the traditional holiday music we do, it is refreshing to have a new, pop-styled catchy holiday song. Many of the great holiday songs we all know and love were written by people far away, and frankly, long gone. “But here is a great new song written by someone who lives right in our city. I wouldn’t be surprised if some major artist picks this song up and records it in the future.” With the 100-strong SDGMC as backup, James will showcase “Christmas on our Own” as part of the chorus’ annual holiday show, “Jingle” on Dec. 9 and 10. The track was also released on iTunes, Spotify and other streaming services in early November. “I finally decided it was time,” he said. “Getting people to hear your music is the hardest part, but 100 percent of people who hear it say they love it. They’ve told me this is a great song that makes them feel good when they listen to it. “I guess what I hope people have as their greatest takeaway, is that I want them to enjoy it and download it. I hope people love the holiday song and that they hang on to see what’s next.” James will perform as part of the San Diego Gay Men’s Chorus in “Jingle,” at 8 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 9, and at 3 p.m. on Sunday, Dec. 10 at the historic Balboa Theatre, located at 868 Fourth Ave., Downtown. For tickets, visit sdgmc.org. —Margie M. Palmer is a freelance writer who has been racking up bylines for over a decade. Reach her at mmpst19@gmail.com. The post Earworm alert: ‘Christmas on our Own’ appeared first on Mission Valley News.

    Mission Valley News / 9 d. 8 h. 16 min. ago more
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  • Mission Valley News Holiday GuideMission Valley News Holiday Guide

    AR Workshop 1010 University Ave. Suite C211 San Diego 92103 619-701-6794 arworkshop.com/sandiego AR Workshop is a boutique DIY (do-it-yourself) studio that offers hands-on classes for creating custom and charming home decor from raw materials. Join an instructor-led workshop to make custom wood signs, framed signs, canvas pillows, lazy susans, centerpiece boxes, tote bags and more. AR Workshop will help you take your home decor to the next level and have fun while creating it.   Check out the workshop schedule and find a date where your preferred project is offered. You can come alone or invite friends and family to join you. When you book a workshop, you will choose a graphic design from our many options and enter your project information, so we can prepare the needed materials before you arrive. We provide all of the tools, materials, and step-by-step instructions you will need to complete your workshop. Sip your favorite drink and have fun letting your inner “craftinista” shine. Carmen Reed and State of Mind reverbnation.com/carmenreed As a mental health professional in the community — and a fellow musician — Dr. Carmen Reed has formed a band of excellent musicians to provide a relaxing blend of old jazz standards from the American songbook. The goal is to provide hours of distraction from the daily stresses of life and all of those difficulties and challenges that we all face from day to day. Music heals and has been demonstrated to relieve pain, reduce the sensation of distress, lower blood pressure, boost immunity, enhance intelligence, and improve memory — just to name a few of its healing powers. The band is called “State of Mind” and consists of Sticks McGee on drums, John Telles on saxophone, Jeff Blanco on bass, Aaron Reed on guitar, and Dr. Reed as bandleader and lead vocalist. State of Mind is currently performing each second and fourth Wednesday of every month at the restaurant/bar, Fast Times, located at 3065-A Clairemont Drive in San Diego. Fast Times is a family-friendly establishment with excellent food and a full bar, all at a reasonable price. Come down for a relaxing, enjoyable night and a pleasant state of mind. Kings Inn 1333 Hotel Circle South San Diego, CA 92108 619-297-2231 kingsinnsandiego.com Revel in an era when guest service was king in the lodgings close to the sun-splashed beaches of San Diego. If you’re hip to a smiling staff who is eager to serve you then check into the Kings Inn, a budget hotel in San Diego. Upon entering our newly-designed lobby, you’ll be warmly greeted at the registration desk by friendly staff eager to help you relax and enjoy your trip to San Diego. Guests at our hotel enjoy amenities like free parking and one of the largest pools in town. We also have two award-winning, budget-friendly restaurants onsite with kid’s menus that are a hit with families of all ages and sizes. For breakfast, come visit The Waffle Spot, home of the best waffle in town. And for dinner, visit The Amigo Spot and sip on one of our signature margaritas on our patio as you enjoy our weekend live entertainment. At the Kings Inn, we are more than a place to spend the night; we are friends helping you create fond memories. Our staff is comprised of men and women skilled in the art of customer service. Whether you need ideas on what to see, how to reach a destination, or want assistance with your room, then we are glad to be of service.   The post Mission Valley News Holiday Guide appeared first on Mission Valley News.

    Mission Valley News / 9 d. 8 h. 17 min. ago more
  • Guest editorial: GOP tax bills short-change middle classGuest editorial: GOP tax bills short-change middle class

    Rep. Susan A. Davis When considering any attempt to reform our tax code, the first question I ask myself is, “Will it help the middle class?” After carefully looking over the Republican tax bills proposed in the House and Senate, the only answer I can come to is, “No, these bills won’t help the middle class.” In fact, they will do just the opposite. Rep. Susan A. Davis The most glaring aspect of both of these proposals is how differently corporations and people are treated. Most notably is the fact that tax cuts for corporations are forever yet the cuts for the American people go away after just five years. Not only are the cuts for individuals temporary but those individuals will also lose a number of popular deductions. Currently, teachers who spend their own money on pencils, pens and paper for their students can deduct those costs. No more. The House bill ends that deduction. However, a corporation spending money on office supplies for its workers will still be able to deduct those costs. About one in three San Diego taxpayers take advantage of the state and local tax (SALT) deductions. The House bill limits the SALT deductible amount to $10,000 for property taxes. The Senate proposal eliminates the SALT deductions all together. College graduates paying off student loans can currently deduct the interest paid on their loan to lower their tax burden. The House ends that deduction, which will make it harder for people saddled with massive school loan debt to pay it off. Ending the school loan deduction would increase the cost to students attending college by $65 billion over the next decade. Ending the medical expense tax credit would not only hurt seniors but also veterans since many struggle with medical issues. Veterans will also be hit hard with the end of two other tax credits — the work opportunity tax credit and the disabled access tax credit. Between 2013 and 2015, about 300,000 veterans took advantage of the work opportunity tax credit. As you can imagine, I have been hearing from my constituents on the GOP/Trump tax bills. They are not happy. Todd in El Cajon says his family will lose $28,350 in deductions against taxable income. Todd is the sole provider for his wife and five children ages of 1 to 11.Sharon in Spring Valley counts on medical expense deductions to lower her tax liability. I heard from Walter, a resident of Hillcrest, who is worried he will inevitably pay more in taxes because he will lose the student loan interest deduction and will fall into a higher tax bracket. Finally, I have heard from a lot of my constituents who are worried about what this plan will do to the debt. I wish I could give them some words of encouragement. But the reality is — this plan would create a huge $1.5 trillion-dollar hole in our debt. That’s $1.5 trillion that we won’t be able to invest in our country. What does that mean? What could $1.5 trillion do for education? What could $1.5 trillion do for infrastructure? For veterans? For health care? For you and your family? The very same people in Washington who have long argued that we need to take the debt seriously, now believe we can simply ignore it so that their corporate friends can get a tax break. Such a reckless approach won’t grow our economy. And it won’t help most San Diegans. I am all for helping modernize our tax code. And our business leaders should be encouraged to invest more at home, instead of keeping their profits overseas. But it is simply wrong to give huge corporations giant tax breaks, while ordinary working families are forced to pay more. America has always been best when it has had a vibrant middle class — when prosperity was shared, rather than concentrated at the top. Instead of closed door negotiations, we could have found a bipartisan path to a simpler tax code while being fairer to the American people who want to keep more of their hard-earned dollars. We could have paired tax reform with ways to better grow the economy rather than the time-worn failure of trickle-down economics, which is a “trickle” for the many and “raining buckets” for the few. —Rep. Susan A. Davis represents Congressional District 53, which includes the San Diego communities of Old Town, Kensington, Mission Hills, University Heights, Hillcrest Bankers Hill, North Park, South Park, Talmadge and Normal Heights, as well as La Mesa, Lemon Grove, Spring Valley and parts of El Cajon and Chula Vista. The post Guest editorial: GOP tax bills short-change middle class appeared first on Mission Valley News.

    Mission Valley News / 9 d. 8 h. 18 min. ago more
  • Dining Out in San Diego: Dec. 8, 2017 – Jan. 11, 2018Dining Out in San Diego: Dec. 8, 2017 – Jan. 11, 2018

    By Frank Sabatini Jr. A second San Diego location of True Food Kitchen has opened in La Jolla’s University Town Center, which recently underwent a major makeover to its gardens, plaza areas and retail spaces. The restaurant, which has an established location in Fashion Valley Mall, took over 9,000 square feet of indoor-outdoor space for the new outlet. Eco-friendly design elements include herb-filled garden basins, hardwood floors and chairs made out of recycled soda bottles. True Food Kitchen has arrived to the remodeled UTC shopping mall. (Photo by Bradley Schweit Photograph) The menu features an array of seasonally driven dishes rooted in the principles of Dr. Andrew Weil’s anti-inflammatory diet. True Food currently has 21 locations in several U.S. states. 4303 La Jolla Village Drive, Suite 2100, 858-431-4384, truefoodkitchen.com. ______________________________________________________________ The relocated Ceviche House, which originally launched four years ago at local farmers markets and then opened as a brick-and-mortar eatery in North Park, is now up and running at its new home in Old Town. The space is larger and more stylish in comparison, and with indoor-outdoor seating and signature ceviches inspired from different regions of Mexico. La Paz ceviche with bigeye tuna and orange zest at Ceviche House (Photo by Frank Sabatini Jr.) Chef-partner Juan Carlos Recamier’s expanded menu features fresh oysters with mignonette sauce and several hot dishes such as grilled octopus and steamed or pan-seared local fish. 2415 San Diego Ave., Suite 109, 619-795-2438, cevichehousesd.com ______________________________________________________________ Farm-to-table advocate Trish Watlington is selling her long-established restaurant, The Red Door, along with her newer, adjoining venture, Bar by Red Door. Both are lauded for serving locally sourced produce (some from Watlington’s Mt. Helix garden) and sustainable proteins. The forthcoming owner is Luciano Cibellia, a native of Milan, Italy, and an accomplished chef who has cooked in kitchens across Europe and in New York City. He too eschews big distributors and uses only ingredients that can be traced. The sale is expected to close in February and we’re told that Cibellia will keep The Red Door name, at least until the community gets to know him. The businesses will stay open through the transition, after which Watlington plans on remaining active in the food community while continuing to support local growers through Farm-to-Fork Week, which is next scheduled for Jan. 14–21. 741 W. Washington St., 619-295-6000, thereddoorsd.com. ______________________________________________________________ Champagne expert Dustin Jones of Skurnik Wines will head up an informative tasting of French Champagne from 7 to 10 p.m., Dec. 22, at The Wine Lover in Hillcrest. Guests can drop in at any time during the indoor-outdoor event to sample four pours featuring three whites and one rosè, all hailing from within France’s Champagne province. The cost is $35 per person. 3968 Fifth Ave., 619-294-9200, thewineloversd.com. ______________________________________________________________ The recent closing of Spitz Mediterranean Street Food in Hillcrest will give way to Fifth Avenue Kitchen & Tap in the coming months. Described by the property brokerage firm, Location Matters, as “a fun bistro-style sports bar,” the project is the brainchild of buyer Ron Crilley, who also owns The Kraken in Cardiff and OC Tavern in San Clemente. The indoor-outdoor establishment will feature New Orleans-inspired cuisine. 3515 Fifth Ave. ______________________________________________________________ Matt Sieve of Madison on Park in University Heights has created a new food window for the neighborhood bar next door, Park & Rec. The service operates under the name Renegade and carries a retro ’80s vibe through nostalgic music and movie references as well as dishes such as assorted Tater Tots, shell pasta mac n’ cheese and various grilled sandwiches. The window is open from 5 to 10 p.m. daily and will eventually offer brunch. 4612 Park Blvd., 619-795-9700, parkandrecsd.com. Tater Tots topped with carnitas and nacho cheese at Renegade inside Park & Rec (Courtesy Katalyst Public Relations) ______________________________________________________________ This writer’s spouse recently discovered (and purchased online) what Bon Appètit magazine rated as “the best panettone in existence.” Coincidentally, so did local restaurateur Matteo Catteneo, who is carrying the tall-standing Italian sweet bread for the month of December at Buona Forchetta in South Park, as well as Officine Buona Forchetta in Liberty Station. Known as “Panettoni from Roy,” the cupcake-shaped loaves are made in the Bay Area by famed pastry chef Roy Shvartzapel, who has revolutionized the ubiquitous holiday confection with wild yeast, top-quality pistachios and dried fruits, pearl sugar and dough that requires 40 hours to cure and proof. The result is an unusually airy panettone that melts in your mouth and transcends commercial brands. A fabulous mail-order dessert by a renowned pastry chef is now available at two local Italian restaurants. (Photo by Frank Sabatini Jr.) Catteneo sells it at his restaurants for $15 a slice or $65 for a whole loaf, which weighs 2.2 lbs. Consumers can also purchase it online for $50 a loaf (plus delivery) at thisisfromroy.com. ______________________________________________________________ The annual tradition of turkey mole tacos and other holiday fare has returned to dining rooms throughout San Diego County at Bazaar Del Mundo Restaurants, including Casa Guadalajara in Old Town (4105 Taylor St.). The tamales, available through Jan. 1, are filled with roasted turkey as well as raisins, pecans and apples. They’re topped with rich mole sauce and sesame seeds. Get your turkey mole tamales in Old Town (Courtesy Bazaar del Mundo Restaurants) Other restaurants serving them are Casa de Pico (5500 Grossmont Center Drive, La Mesa), Casa de Bandini (1901 Calle Barcelona, Carlsbad), and Casa Sol y Mar (12865 El Camino Real, Del Mar). ______________________________________________________________ A new, casual spot for craft beer, creatively sauced chicken wings and other bar fare has opened near Windansea Beach in La Jolla. Nautilus Tavern replaces the La Jolla Tap and Grill with a refreshed interior, nearly 30 beers on tap and reasonably priced wines. The varied food menu includes marinated beef tips, “grown up” grilled cheese sandwiches, burgers, and wings in assorted flavors, such as maple-bacon-bourbon. 6830 La Jolla Blvd., 858-750-2056, nautilustavern.com. ______________________________________________________________ —Frank Sabatini Jr can be reached at fsabatini@san.rr.com. The post Dining Out in San Diego: Dec. 8, 2017 – Jan. 11, 2018 appeared first on Mission Valley News.

    Mission Valley News / 9 d. 8 h. 18 min. ago more
  • SDSU proposes Mission Valley expansionSDSU proposes Mission Valley expansion

    By Sara Butler | Editor University releases development details for stadium site On Nov. 29, San Diego State University (SDSU) held a press conference to offer the detailed plan that it is proposing for the San Diego County Credit Union (SDCCU) Stadium site, formerly Qualcomm Stadium. The university’s proposal – coined “SDSU Mission Valley” — is competing with the SoccerCity plan. SDSU has engaged JMI Realty and Carrier Johnson + Culture, a global design/architecture and strategy firm, to help them with the proposal. The process began in spring 2017. The SDCCU Stadium site (Courtesy Wikimedia Commons) Speakers at the press conference included SDSU Interim President Sally Roush, JMI Realty CEO John C. Kratze and Carrier Johnson + Culture’s design principal Gordon Carrier. Currently, the SDSU campus is situated on 288 acres, which is nearly built out. When the university acquired the land in 1931, the area was completely surrounded by open space. Now, Interstate 8 sits to the north, while developed neighborhoods extend east, west and south of the campus. Roush said the SDCCU Stadium site would allow the campus to go back to its open space roots, as well as accommodate future growth as a university. “Mission Valley represents a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to acquire approximate property where we can grow,” Roush said. “When SDSU has the opportunity to grow, the region is better served, both in the development of a diverse, highly educated workforce suited to meet San Diego’s growing needs, and the opportunities provided to all San Diegans by the way of inclusive economic stimulus.” In regard to the economic stimulus, Roush referenced a recent economic impact analysis. The report indicates that SDSU students and alumni generate $5.67 billion annually for the San Diego economy. Thus, the expansion would greatly benefit both the university and the county, according to Roush. Kratze outlined five guiding principles that were most important to SDSU for the development. These non-negotiable criteria served as guidelines for JMI Realty and Carrier Johnson + Culture throughout the planning process. The plan must accommodate future growth and expansion of SDSU campus. The design feel must replicate a college campus environment, such as space between buildings, open spaces, paseos and traffic. There must be no reliance on tax dollars. The plan has to be financed on a stand-alone basis, primarily achieved through public-private partnerships. The development must be a regional asset, including the open space, community parks and innovation hub for businesses. The process must be transparent, including press conferences, communicating with various stakeholders, and completing a California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) process. Carrier then walked the audience through the specifics of the site plan, which emphasizes “open space first.” “SDSU Mission Valley” will have 75 acres of open space, 8 acres of campus parks and green space, and 5 acres of paseos. In total, this amounts to an approximate total of 90 acres, which is 52 percent of the entire site area. The other half of the site will be dedicated to buildings, such as a multi-purpose, 35,000-seat stadium on the north edge of the property. The stadium is designed to accommodate SDSU Aztecs football, Major League Soccer, the Holiday Bowl and possibly a future NFL team. Directly east of the stadium will be a tailgate section that will serve as a shared park on non-event days. Academic campus buildings in the SDSU expansion will cover about 1.6 million square feet on the west side of the site. These buildings will be three to six stories in height with lots of space between them “to emphasize the idea of human scale, [and to ensure that] they’re not overpowering,” Carrier said. Concerns about cars on campus were addressed with subterranean parking, which will house approximately 5,000 vehicles. There will be 15 separate blocks of residential area, creating 4,500 units. The units — including town home, low-rise, mid-rise and select high-rise — will serve faculty, staff, and upper division and graduate students. In addition, retail will also be incorporated into the development. Carrier said it would be two-fold: “neighborhood retail” and “entertainment retail.” The focus would be on neighborhood retail — such as a local grocer, dry-cleaner, ice cream shop or small restaurant — to directly benefit the residential community. The entertainment retail would be a smaller component to serve as an asset for the stadium. “We’re not really trying to invite traffic from outside the area to come to retail,” Carrier said. Friends of SDSU commended the plan in a Nov. 29 press release. The organization of SDSU alumni, community and business leaders operates independently of the university and emphasized the environmental advantage “SDSU Mission Valley” has over the competing SoccerCity plan. “With more than 80 acres of open space, including a river park and hiking trails to restore this hidden gem and make it accessible to the public, and development plans that offer much lower density and traffic, the SDSU site plan is far superior environmentally to the SoccerCity plan,” the press release stated. Nick Stone, a FS Investors and SoccerCity representative, responded to the financial aspect of SDSU’s plan. “The major difference is that SoccerCity will be built without a dime of public funds in a legally binding initiative and lease with the city, while the SDSU West plan offers no binding commitments,” Stone said in a statement, according to The San Diego Union-Tribune. Representatives from JMI Realty and Carrier Johnson + Culture presented an initial version of SDSU’s plan at the Nov. 1 Mission Valley Planning Group meeting. This preliminary presentation focused on open space, hydrology and the San Diego River. To read our previous coverage of the plan, visit bit.ly/2AKE57G. — Sara Butler is the editor of Mission Valley News. Reach her at web@sdcnn.com. The post SDSU proposes Mission Valley expansion appeared first on Mission Valley News.

    Mission Valley News / 9 d. 8 h. 18 min. ago more
  • Healthy mix-upsHealthy mix-ups

    By Frank Sabatini Jr. The meal options are wholesome, the “sauce bar” is inviting, and many of the customers appear hale and hearty. Welcome of Elva’s Bowls & Wraps, a basic continuation of what used to be Crazy Bowls & Wraps before Marvin Fleschman and his wife, Elva Rodriguez, purchased the business nearly a year ago as “a hobby” to augment their retirement. He was in real estate and she catered banquets for hotels and country clubs in Los Angeles. Elva Rodriquez wants you to eat a healthy diet. (Photos by Frank Sabatini Jr.) “I bought what the former owner created,” said Fleschman, referring to a string of healthy fast-casual eateries the unnamed restaurateur ran before closing his San Diego locations and moving to the Midwest. Fleschman kept alive only the Mission Valley space and Rodriguez became something of a frontline ambassador to the re-branded business, per her headshots seen on the website and inside the restaurant, and “Elva” used in the new identity. “I always wanted my name in lights,” she quipped, while pointing out her banana-nut bread with raisins that she added to the menu. Also new are a few breakfast items, plus strawberry, watermelon and pear salads, year-round soups, and Halabah, which are semi-sweet Jewish candy bars made of crushed sesame seeds. They’re rich and tasty and jive to the eatery’s creed of healthy eating. Otherwise, the offerings of fresh produce, sustainable proteins and healthy grains used in the construction of numerous types of meal bowls and sandwich wraps remain intact. Customers can create their own by picking and choosing from the long list of ingredients. Or they can order from an established repertoire of bowls and wraps as we did, although you’re still faced with decisions. From the “power bowls” category we opted for “the fajita” comprising a garden’s worth of veggies along with cheddar, jalapeno-cilantro sauce and fresh lime. We were tasked, however, with choosing a size (small over large), a grain (noodles instead of quinoa or brown or jasmine rice) and a protein (beef tenderloin instead of wild-caught salmon, hormone-free chicken breast or tofu). The fajita bowlwith beef tenderloin and noodles The gamble we took mixing long noodles into a fajita concept turned out surprisingly well. They were a tasty magnet for the earthy juices exuded by all of the grilled veggies, not to mention the beefy juices that originated from the tenderloin. For the Thai wrap, which includes peanut sauce and commendably spicy coleslaw, we chose a tomato tortilla, quinoa and the salmon. We also decided to have the entire wrap lightly grilled, an option that staffers at the order counter rightfully recommended. A grilled Thai wrap with quinoa, salmon and spicy slaw The flavors were clean and invigorating. And psychologically, we cherished the notion of all nine essential amino acids rushing through our bodies from the quinoa along with beneficial omega-3 fat provided by the generous measures of flaky salmon. (Bring on that mischievous banana bread!) Another wrap, the Mediterranean, was a little saltier than I preferred due to feta cheese and briny kalamata olives acting in concert. For that, we chose a wheat tortilla, no grains, and grilled chicken. Chicken, feta and veggies in the Mediterranean wrap Tzatziki sauce came inside the wrap, but it was plain-tasting. So, I drizzled into the fold some of the sun-dried tomato ranch dressing that accompanied a lively, colorful Santa Fe salad we previously ordered. The Santa Fe salad From the complimentary sauce bar, you can jazz up your food or house-made tortilla chips with condiments such as Asian hiyashi, creamy Buffalo sauce, pico de gallo and jalapeno-cilantro salsa. There’s also fresh ginger, mint and oranges, plus velvety hummus, which cried for a little garlic or tahini on this particular day. Elva’s Bowls & Wraps will celebrate its one-year anniversary on Dec. 19 with soda fountain drinks of any size or flavor available for 50 cents each all day. Yes, sugar sneaks into the place in more ways than one, but nobody’s pointing fingers if you partake. — Frank Sabatini Jr. is the author of “Secret San Diego” (ECW Press), and began his local writing career more than two decades ago as a staffer for the former San Diego Tribune. You can reach him at fsabatini@san.rr.com. The post Healthy mix-ups appeared first on Mission Valley News.

    Mission Valley News / 9 d. 8 h. 18 min. ago more
  • Big plans on the horizon for Mission ValleyBig plans on the horizon for Mission Valley

    By Zach Millrood | Real Estate Update Although our community is seeing consistent declines in commercial real estate vacancy rates, Mission Valley remains one of the healthiest office markets in the county. This can be attributed in part to the stability of the region. The tenant mix in Mission Valley consists of primarily low-volatility organizations such as business services, real estate, government entities, education, medical systems and government contractors. Perhaps due to this stability and lack of innovative development, Mission Valley has been neglected for decades. There hasn’t been much excitement generated here in the past 15 years. However, several plans are set to change that, with the potential to positively impact the market for decades to come. Here is a look at some of the significant projects that are either underway or currently on the drawing board. AMP&RSAND The former home of The San Diego Union-Tribune is the planned site of AMP&RSAND, a modern, 330,000-square-foot campus stocked with amenities. The two 165,000-square-foot buildings on site include a repositioned five-story office tower (where reporters used to work) and an adjacent three-story building which formerly housed a printing press. A new interior design for the buildings will have an industrial loft feel, including exposed brick, concrete pillars, high ceilings and oversized windows. There are also plans for a 64,000-square-foot outdoor gathering space, an amphitheater for group functions and a central meeting area set under a large ficus tree planted by former U-T owner Helen Copley. Amenities will include a fitness studio with spa-quality locker rooms, concierge services, a café and a bike center. (Courtesy of CBRE Group) Former Qualcomm Stadium site There are dueling proposals regarding what to do with the site of the former Qualcomm Stadium (now called the San Diego County Credit Union Stadium) on Friars Road. The proposal for “SoccerCity,” a 168-acre site by FS Investors, calls for 4,800 residential units, 3.1 million square feet of office and retail space, 350 hotel rooms, 55 acres of green space and a 22,000-square-foot stadium built for a professional soccer team. It’s likely that voters will decide in 2018 on how this site will be developed. Backers of a competing plan, “SDSU West,” want to expand San Diego State University’s campus to the location with a mixed-used development that includes facilities for SDSU administrative buildings, classrooms and student housing; commercial, technology and office space; a river park with walking and biking paths or trails; retail space; hotels; and a football stadium large enough for SDSU’s football team, which could accommodate a professional football or soccer team. (For more information about the “SDSU West” plan, see our article on Page 2.) Civita This 230-acre, mixed-use, master-planned community is already flush with 4,780 units of residences and 60-plus acres of parks and open space. Still to come is a 480,000-square-foot retail center and 420,000 square feet of office campus. Riverwalk Golf Course If plans fall into place, by 2023 the 27-hole golf course will be replaced by a $2 billion Riverwalk project with a master-planned community of housing, offices, retail shopping and parkland. Currently, Riverwalk is still awaiting San Diego City Council approval. A rendering of what the Riverwalk clubhouse might look like next to the proposed river park. (Courtesy Riverwalk) Riverwalk could include 4,000 housing units in mid-rise buildings, 1 million square feet of office development on 20 acres located at the southeast corner of the site and 80 acres of a park with trails and recreational spaces. Some configuration of 18 holes of golf would also be revitalized. Additionally, a new trolley stop is envisioned for east of Via Las Cumbres. Mid-Coast Trolley Extension Speaking of trolley news, the Metropolitan Transit System is well underway on the Mid-Coast Trolley Extension that will add new tracks starting in Old Town and heading north to University City. Service is scheduled to begin in 2021. For the first time, the business and educational communities of Mission Valley, Downtown and University Town Center will be linked via usable public transportation. Zach Millrood The old fable notes that slow and steady wins the race. While Mission Valley has been a steady player for some time, the market is currently on its toes and poised to race forward with a number of exciting possibilities. —Zach Millrood is a senior vice president at real estate firm Hughes Marino, where he passionately dedicates himself to protecting his clients’ interests. Contact him at zach@hughesmarino.com or linkedin.com/in/zachmillrood. For more information, visit hughesmarino.com/san-diego. The post Big plans on the horizon for Mission Valley appeared first on Mission Valley News.

    Mission Valley News / 9 d. 8 h. 18 min. ago more
  • Daily Business Report-Dec. 8, 2017Daily Business Report-Dec. 8, 2017

    The ADI-Thermal UAV from Action Drone, a Chula Vista company that was one of the first businesses to use the testing site. (Photo credit: Action Drone Inc., copyright, all rights reserved) City of Chula Vista Opens its Unmanned Aerial System Testing Site for Commercial Businesses The city of Chula Vista is opening its Unmanned Aerial System (UAV) testing site to qualified FAA-compliant commercial businesses. The 375-acre site — located in the city’s University and Innovation District — is the only official, free and public UAV outdoor site in San Diego. It is situated next to an ecological preserve, adjacent to the Chula Vista Elite Athlete Training Center and less than four miles from the U.S./Mexico border. The land contains both flat areas and foothills offering a diverse array of terrain. “Prior to the site opening, local companies often traveled out of state to conduct drone testing,” said Sally Preston, chair of the South County Economic Development Council. “Having the site in Chula Vista provides a great resource for aerospace and defense industries within the region and aligns well with our Propel San Diego initiative to develop a resilient defense supply chain in the San Diego region.” The site was established last year to spur the development of UAV technologies in San Diego County and until recently, only a handful of companies were able to access the space on a regular basis to test, evaluate, and demonstrate their technology to potential customers. Action Drone, a Chula Vista-based company, was one of the first businesses to use the site. “The Drone Industry will change the landscape of many industrial operations,” said Darryl Anunciado, founder and CEO of Action Drone. “The fastest way for industries to adopt drone technology is when the communities of drone companies work together to create real solutions for industrial problems. The Drone cluster here in San Diego can achieve faster results because we have a common factor and that is to make San Diego the drone capital for industrial solutions.” Chula Vista recently submitted a proposal for Amazon’s HQ2, which included an option to locate on the site. There are also additional plans for the city of Chula Vista with the city of San Diego to pursue an FAA partnership to become an official drone testing city, instead of just a site. “The UAV test site is just one of the many things we’re doing to push the envelope of innovation,” said Chula Vista Mayor Mary Casillas Salas. “The city of Chula Vista is one of the leading smart cities in the nation and was recently selected by the U.S. Department of Transportation as one of 10 proving grounds for autonomous vehicles. By embracing technology, and continuing to invest in our future, we’re able create these opportunities for research and advancement.” Companies interested in using the test site with appropriate FAA certifications and entering into agreement with the city can log into www.AirMap.com to reserve airspace. _____________________ Sen. Toni Atkins with Gov. Jerry Brown (left) and Sen. Kevin de León. (Courtesy of Atkins’ office) San Diego’s Toni Atkins Poised to Become First Woman Leader of State Senate State Senate President Pro Tem Kevin De León has announced that the chamber is set to pick San Diego Sen. Toni Atkins as his successor, making her the first woman to hold the leadership position. In a statement on Twitter Thursday morning, De León, D-Los Angeles, said Atkins, D-San Diego, “will make history and be our Senate’s next President Pro Tempore. I have every confidence she will lead America’s most accomplished legislative chamber to even greater heights and build on our extraordinary progress.” In a statement from his office, De León said Democratic senators are “unified” in their support for Atkins. There will be a formal vote on leadership in early January before a transition next year when he will be forced from the Senate by term limits, he said. — San Diego Union-Tribune Read more… _____________________ San Diego convention (Courtesy of San Diego Convention Center Corp.) Medical Meetings Help Push Convention Center’s Regional Impact to $1.1 Billion Conventions hosted at the San Diego Convention Center during fiscal year 2017 generated $1.1 billion in regional impact, according to the San Diego Convention Center Corporation’s annual report. With 149 events taking place between July 1, 2016 and June 30, 2017, the Convention Center marked several records, including a record 21 medical conventions this fiscal year including BIO, Neuroscience 2017 and the American Society of Hematology. Six events out of the top 10 events that generated the highest hotel and sales tax revenues, which goes directly into the city of San Diego’s General Fund, were medical meetings. Medical events accounted for 22 percent of overall attendance and 49 percent of the convention center’s economic impact. These attendees spent a record amount while visiting the region, a total of $327.9 million. Other notable achievements: $673 million: Second highest spending amount by attendees visiting the convention center 844,382: Record hotel room nights booked in a fiscal year Second highest occupancy since 1989 LEED Gold Certification by the U.S. Green Building Council At 76 percent occupancy, the facility is operating much higher than the national average of 50 percent, according to the report. The practical maximum occupancy for any facility is 70 percent, which means at some point, business is turned away. _____________________ November Saw Seasonal Slump in Home Sales in San Diego Sales of existing homes slumped in November as the buying season cooled, according to housing statistics compiled from the Multiple Listing Service by the Greater San Diego Association of Realtors. Single-family home sales last month were down by 15 percent compared to October, and by just over 14 percent from November 2016. Condominium and townhome sales in November were down 19 percent from the previous month, and 18 percent from a year ago. As 2017 winds down, sales of existing homes are off by 3 percent compared to 2016. Prices continue to rise, with the median price of single-family homes exceeding $625,000 in November, a nearly 3 percent increase from October. The median price of attached properties (condos and townhomes) was $407,500, a slight increase from the previous month. Collectively, residential resale prices are up 12 percent since November 2016. Resale properties are closing escrow in an average of 30 days. “While we don’t expect a quick fix to our housing affordability and availability crises, we are more immediately concerned that the tax reform proposals moving through Washington may have a negative effect on homeownership,” said SDAR President Bob Kevane. “SDAR and its state and national Realtor associations are advocating to maintain the current law for mortgage interest deductions and capital gains exclusions.” In November, the ZIP codes in San Diego County with the most single-family home sales were: 92064 (Poway) with 51 92121 (El Cajon) with 47 92078 (San Marcos) with 46 92026 (Fallbrook) with 45 92065 (Ramona) with 42 The most expensive residential property sold in San Diego County in November was a gated estate in La Jolla Shores with a sweeping ocean view – 9,900 square feet, 8 bedrooms, 9 baths – built in 1999. The sale price was $7.83 million. Click here for a detailed look at the numbers. _____________________ Commission to Discuss Salaries for Mayor and Council at Dec. 14 Meeting The city of San Diego Salary Setting Commission will meet on Dec. 14 to discuss salaries for the mayor and members of the City Council, and is seeking public comment to assist in making a decision. The meeting will be at 3:30 p.m. in the Civil Service Commission room on the third floor of the Civic Center Plaza building at 1200 Third Ave., Downtown.  _____________________ Contract Talks Launched for Potential San Vicente Energy Storage Facility The San Diego County Water Authority’s Board of Directors on Thursday authorized negotiations with Tenaska Inc.-Diamond Generating Corp. Joint Venture to assess the potential for developing a major energy storage facility at San Vicente Reservoir near Lakeside. The project would leverage existing water and energy infrastructure to reduce upward pressure on water rates while expanding the potential for renewable energy use across the region. The Water Authority and its partner, the city of San Diego, are seeking to draft a Project Development Agreement by spring 2018 for consideration by their governing boards. In November, the agencies identified Tenaska-Diamond as the top choice among five groups of companies vying to develop an energy storage project based on its financial modeling, risk analysis, knowledge of the energy market, and revenue-sharing proposal. The Water Authority’s board on Thursday also authorized negotiations with Brookfield US Generation LLC in the event that negotiations with Tenaska-Diamond are unsuccessful. A primary goal of the potential energy project is to generate revenue for the agencies in exchange for the use of public land, water and other assets. The negotiations do not commit the Water Authority or the city of San Diego to developing the project, which would require an environmental review and additional approvals by the Water Authority’s board and the San Diego City Council.  _____________________ San Diego Hardware Celebrates 125th Year With a Party for the Public San Diego Hardware, one of the oldest family-owned businesses in San Diego, is celebrating its 125th birthday with a party for the public today and tomorrow. The event will commence with a ceremony, an official proclamation from the mayor’s office, a reveal of the identity of the mystery “Hardware Lady” model shown in the store’s original The ‘Hardware Lady’ advertisement, and a preview of the store’s new e-commerce websites. The public will be treated to food and anniversary specials and can enter to win prizes and gifts up to $1,500, as well as meet experts from the different hardware brands. Guests can also pose for photos with the “Hardware Lady,” a recreation of the original advertisement and look-alike model. San Diego Hardware was first incorporated on Dec. 8, 1892. The store is the oldest business in the city still owned by its founding family, one of the founding members of the Chamber of Commerce. The public events are  Friday, Dec. 8 and Saturday, Dec. 9 from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. at  5710 Kearny Villa Road in San Diego. _____________________ Personnel Announcements (W)right On Communications Hires Two and Promotes One (W)right On Communications Inc. has added Communications Strategist Sandra Wellhausen and Graphic Designer KeAsha Rogers while promoting Kara DeMent to Communications Strategist. Sandra Wellhausen Wellhausen is supporting nonprofit clients Radiant Health Centers of Orange County, Tri-City Hospital Foundation and New Haven Youth and Family Services of Vista as well as energy efficiency communications for the city of San Diego’s Environmental Services Department. Wellhausen brings 14 years of public relations experience and started her career with the San Diego Regional Chamber of Commerce and local Swedish American chamber. Fluent in four languages, Sandra holds a Bachelor of Arts in Communications degree (magna cum laude) from San Diego State University, and is recipient of the Communicator Award of Excellence; Bernay’s Award of Excellence; and the American Chamber of Commerce Executive Award. KeAsha Rogers Rogers brings (W)right On’s client partner brands and stories to life through her print, digital and multimedia design strategies. She has over eight years of brand identity, digital content strategy, SEO and analytics, and motion graphics experience with a background in and passion for cause-related projects. Most recently, she worked in-house for NPHS, a community development nonprofit that serves families in the Inland Empire, Los Angeles and San Diego with housing and financial services. She graduated magna cum laude with a Bachelor of Science in Visual Communications from Westwood College. She is a veteran who served in the U.S. Army Reserves including deployments to Bosnia. Kara DeMent DeMent supports the agency’s hospitality clients such as Tenaya Lodge at Yosemite, San Diego Tourism Marketing District and Visit Oceanside as well as its health care practice including WESTliving senior living communities and Tri-City Medical Center. She has over four years of experience and joined (W)right On in 2015 following her experience working in an agency environment as well as in-house for the Orlando Magic. She graduated from California State University, San Bernardino with a Bachelor of Arts in Communications with an emphasis in PR and mass communications. _____________________ Larry Goldenhersh Named President of Center for Sustainable Energy Larry Goldenhersh The board of directors for the nonprofit Center for Sustainable Energy (CSE) announce the appointment of Lawrence (Larry) E. Goldenhersh as the organization’s president. Goldenhersh, a San Diego software entrepreneur, environmental advocate and former CSE board member, succeeds current CSE President, Rear Adm. Len Hering (ret.), who has resigned after five years of service to the organization. Goldenhersh brings to CSE 35 years of experience in the sustainability and environmental sectors in both for- and nonprofit roles. Goldenhersh will serve as president through the completion of a national search for a successor president, which will be initiated by March 2018 and is expected to conclude by the end of 2018. In 1999, Goldenhersh founded Enviance Inc., an environmental technology company, and served as its president and CEO until the company’s sale in 2015. Under his leadership, Enviance pioneered the use of the Internet to provide environmental management software to industry and government. Enviance delivered a number of innovations including the first cloud-based system for greenhouse gas management and the first carbon “boot print” for the U.S. Army. Prior to founding Enviance, Goldenhersh was a partner at Irell & Manella, a Los Angeles law firm, where he specialized in commercial litigation, including environmental resource disputes. _____________________   The post Daily Business Report-Dec. 8, 2017 appeared first on San Diego Metro Magazine.

    San Diego Metro Magazine / 9 d. 10 h. 54 min. ago more
  • Tree lights the darknessTree lights the darkness

    First campus Christmas tree lighting offers a deeper message for this holiday season Tayler Reviere Verninas | Editor in Chief | The USD Vista Torero Program Board (TPB) kicked off its annual Winter Wonderland with the first Christmas Tree Lighting at the Paseo de Colachis overlook on Tuesday, Nov. 28. [...]

    The USD Vista / 10 d. 9 h. 5 min. ago
  • Sockers worth a second lookSockers worth a second look

    San Diego’s most accomplished professional sports team offers great value for local fans   Sunit Bhakta | Contributor | The USD Vista Soccer may not seem as big in the United States as it does in other countries around the world. However, it is among the fastest growing sports in [...]

    The USD Vista / 10 d. 9 h. 31 min. ago
  • Multi-talented Gryffin shinesMulti-talented Gryffin shines

    Gryffin’s musical talent proves to be instrumental for his set at The Observatory North Park Anderson Haigler | A&C Editor | The USD Vista As a genre, electronic dance music (EDM) often struggles with how to best present its music in concert. Artists of the genre are often plagued with [...]

    The USD Vista / 10 d. 9 h. 35 min. ago
  • Volleyball loses in second roundVolleyball loses in second round

    After toppling LSU to open tournament, Toreros’ season ends at hands of host Trojans   Noah Hilton | Sports Editor | The USD Vista In many ways, the 2017 season is going to be viewed as a successful one for the University of San Diego volleyball team. The Toreros ran [...]

    The USD Vista / 10 d. 9 h. 44 min. ago
  • Football falls in Fargo againFootball falls in Fargo again

    For the second year in a row, Toreros’ playoff run ended by FCS juggernaut North Dakota State   Eric Boose | Contributor | The USD Vista Last Saturday’s Football Championship Subdivision (FCS) playoff game featured a familiar opponent, and yielded a familiar result. For the second year in a row, [...]

    The USD Vista / 10 d. 9 h. 56 min. ago
  • Student art show for allStudent art show for all

    Students of all majors and artistic backgrounds display their art in the Humanities Center Anderson Haigler | A&C Editor | The USD Vista Last Thursday, USD students had the chance to showcase their artwork at the Humanities Center in Serra Hall. The event,  organized by the Humanities Center Student Board, gave [...]

    The USD Vista / 10 d. 10 h. 5 min. ago
  • Hoops stumbles vs. rival AztecsHoops stumbles vs. rival Aztecs

    Poor shooting plagues Toreros as team’s undefeated start to season ends in city championship   Noah Hilton | Sports Editor | The USD Vista Last Thursday night opened with a level of anticipation rarely seen around the Jenny Craig Pavilion. The two best college basketball teams in America’s Finest City [...]

    The USD Vista / 10 d. 10 h. 19 min. ago
  • Four fun holiday activities in SDFour fun holiday activities in SD

    From ice skating to plays, and Christmas lights, San Diego has plenty of options to celebrate the season Anderson Haigler | A&C Editor | The USD Vista While San Diego may lack real winter weather, the city has no shortage of fun Christmas activities for residents to take part in [...]

    The USD Vista / 10 d. 10 h. 34 min. ago
  • Daily Business Report-Dec. 7, 2017Daily Business Report-Dec. 7, 2017

    Exterior of Eighteen Ten State St. (Photos courtesy of mcmillim LLC) Corky McMillin’s Son and Grandson Debut Luxury Apartments in Little Italy Scott McMillin and Andy McMillin, son and grandson of home building icon Corky McMillin, are keeping the family tradition alive with the debut this week of Eighteen Ten State St., an eight-story, 99-unit luxury apartment building situated on one of the last remaining development sites in Little Italy. The property was designed with 42 individually customized floor plans, which range from studios, one or two bedroom units, as well as eight penthouse suites. Eighteen Ten State St. lobby The father and son team are principals of mcmillin LLC, carrying on the legacy of The Corky McMillin Companies, which since 1960 has built more than 30,000 homes and 16 mixed-use developments. Eighteen Ten State St. room “With 1810 State, we’re creating a more curated experience,” said Andy McMillin, CEO of mcmillin LLC. “We’re stepping outside of the box, rethinking spaces and rooms, and giving residents more of what they actually want. It’s also an opportunity to give younger buyers, who may have been timid of home ownership, the chance to enjoy residential benefits without a long-term commitment.” Tailored for modern living, the apartments’ upscale furnishings showcase floor-to-ceiling windows with nine-foot-high ceilings, private patios, chef-inspired kitchens, walk-in closets, as well as lavish master bath suits and soaking tubs. The hotel-inspired lobby acts as a reception, a co-op workspace, as well as a social community hub with private liquor and wine storage options available to residents. On the ground floor, an open air ‘Village Patio’ serves as a community area with outdoor lounge furniture by Restoration Hardware and landscaping. The sixth-story “Sky Spa” offers residents a private retreat with panoramic views, a custom shade structure, day beds, lounge seating, plus MP3 ports with built-in speakers. Eighteen Ten State St. Community Room Scott McMillin A rooftop “Horizon Lounge” provides indoor-outdoor entertaining and a kitchen stocked with appliances from Kitchenaid, Sub Zero and Bosh, plus craft beer on draught, a big-screen TV, two outdoor grills, an open-air fire feature and panoramic views of the bay and city skyline. In the future, mcmillin LLC will develop a boutique 79-room hotel property in Liberty Station, which will transform the last of the 100-year-old Naval Training Center barracks buildings into a specialty hotel complex. That project is expected to see completion in 2019. ___________________ Rendering shows Mid-Coast Trolley riders exiting the UTC station platform onto Regency Center’s proposed rooftop park that welcomes riders to their center. Circulate San Diego Awards MOVE Alliance Certification to Costa Verde Center Circulate San Diego announced that the proposed redevelopment of Costa Verde Center, directly adjacent to a planned Mid-Coast Trolley Station, has received their MOVE Alliance smart growth certification. The Costa Verde Center project is an enhancement of an existing shopping center, one of the few neighborhood/community-serving shopping centers in the University City. Regency Centers is planning a sustainable, infill, transit-oriented development with bicycle and pedestrian features in the Golden Triangle area. The project site is adjacent to the planned Mid-Coast Trolley line, which will extend along Genesee Avenue and connect to UC San Diego and Downtown. A new, elevated trolley station and platform are planned south of Esplanade Court above the center median of Genesee Avenue. Trolley service within the area is expected to be in operation in 2021. The project proposes 125,000 square feet of additional commercial and a 200-room, 125,000-square-foot community hotel. There has been no new neighborhood retail in this area since 1992. “The Costa Verde Center Revitalization Project is a leading example for how public transit construction can spur private investment with adjacent land uses,” said Colin Parent, interim executive director and policy counsel at Circulate San Diego. “Successful communities need a variety of uses, including housing, jobs, and retail for residents and workers.” The project will include a welcoming elevated pedestrian plaza across from the Mid-Coast Trolley Station, and incorporates various elevators and stairs to help transit riders shop in the center, and to access the bicycle and pedestrian networks within and adjacent to the center. ___________________ The 150-room Hyatt Place hotel Hyatt Place Hotel in Vista Sold The 150-room Hyatt Place hotel at 2645 South Melrose Drive in Vista has been sold to Brighton Management for an undisclosed price. The seller was an affiliate of Irvine-based CoreCapital, which purchased the hotel in 2014. Brighton Management will manage the hotel. The four-story hotel that opened in 2012 offers approximately 1,200 square feet of meeting space, and provides food and beverage service through its 24/7 Guest Kitchen, Gallery Market and Bakery Café. CBRE Hotels acted as exclusive agents for the sellers. ___________________ ViaSat Link Handheld Radio Gets NSA Certification ExecutiveBiz ViaSat’s handheld Link 16 radio has obtained the National Security Agency’s Type 1 security certification to process classified information. The Viasat Battlefield Awareness and Targeting System – Dismounted radio works to provide direct access to a line of sight tactical datalink network for aircraft, ships and ground forces, the company said. BATS-D is designed to facilitate digital communications between dismounted joint terminal attack controllers and close air support aircraft. NSA tested BATS-D’s interoperability with other Link 16 radios such as the Multifunctional Information Distribution System Joint Tactical Radio Systems and the KOR-24A small tactical terminal as part of the Type 1 certification process. Ken Peterman, president of Viasat’s government systems arm, said that BATS-D interoperated with the other Link 16 radios in the Cryptographic Modernization Initiative and legacy modes on the first attempt. ___________________ General Atomics’ Drones Used in Fight Against Islamic State Group ExecutiveGov U.S. military personnel and coalition partners used combat remotely piloted aircraft to counter the Islamic State militant organization in Raqqah, Syria, the U.S. Air Force reported. The aircrews flew combat RPAs such as General Atomics-built MQ-9 Reaper and MQ-1 Predator for at least 44,000 hours to get a view of the battlefield, locate the friendly forces and perform precision munition strikes through the “buddy lasing” tactic. “Primarily, we were doing things like close air support, tactical reconnaissance and overwatch of our allies as they fought to take back the city block by block,” said Lt. Col. Nicholas, a squadron commander assigned to Air Force’s 432nd Wing. “What our aircraft brought that was unique to the fight was persistence.” Nicholas also cited how the use of the drones in an urban environment provided aircrews visual contact in munition strikes. The U.S. and coalition forces liberated the city of Raqqa in October four months after they launched an effort to eliminate the militant organization’s strongholds in the city. ___________________  Elsa Cleland (Photo by Erik Jepsen/UC San Diego) 32 UC San Diego Professors Named Most Influential in Their Fields Thirty two faculty members at the University of California San Diego are among the world’s most influential researchers in their fields, based on their publications over the past decade. Click here for their names   ___________________  Assistant Professor Maximiliano D’Angelo (Credit: Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute) Sanford Burnham Prebys Researcher Receives American Cancer Society Grant , an assistant professor at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP), has received a four-year, $792,000 Research Scholar Grant from the American Cancer Society. D’Angelo, who has been at SBP since 2014, will use the grant to study how alterations in nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) contribute to the malignant transformation of blood cells and cancer. The American Cancer Society awards Research Scholar Grants for promising research projects that may lead to the elimination of cancer as a major health problem. Recipients must be in the first six years of an independent research career or faculty appointment. “Max is a well-deserving recipient of this prestigious award, says Kristina Vuori,  president of SBP. “He is an outstanding scientist making significant discoveries that may help shape the future of cancer therapies. ” ___________________  Personnel Announcements Zoixza (Zoey) Martin Joins Cavignac & Associates Zoixza (Zoey) Martin Cavignac & Associates has hired Zoixza (Zoey) Martin as an account administrator in the firm’s Commercial Department. Martin provides support and assistance to the department’s team members and ensures clients are well served. Her primary responsibilities include processing endorsements, certificates of insurance and new and renewal policies. She also handles billing and cancellation matters, reconciles audits, reviews contracts, and performs administrative follow-up and account manager tasks. Prior to joining Cavignac & Associates, Martin was an enrollment and matching specialist for Big Brothers Big Sisters of San Diego County, where she was employed for over five years Previous work experience includes serving as a case manager and bilingual outreach coordinator for the YMCA of San Diego Childcare Resource Service division. Martin is a graduate of San Diego State University, and holds a Bachelor of Science degree in anthropology, with a minor in psychology. ___________________  Colin Parent Named Executive Director and General Counsel for Circulate San Diego Colin Parent Colin Parent has been named executive director and general counsel for Circulate San Diego, a regional grassroots group formed through the merger of Move San Diego and WalkSanDiego. Parent joined Circulate San Diego in November 2014 after serving for a few years on the policy committee of MOVE San Diego. “In the five years that I’ve been involved with Circulate, we have made a lot of progress,” said Parent. “We merged Walk San Diego and MOVE San Diego to become the leading advocacy organization in the region on mobility and urbanism. We launched a policy research program that is driving conversations for transit, safety, and land use. We launched a Vision Zero campaign, with a commitment from the City of San Diego to end traffic fatalities.”   The post Daily Business Report-Dec. 7, 2017 appeared first on San Diego Metro Magazine.

    San Diego Metro Magazine / 10 d. 11 h. 32 min. ago more
  • Daily Business Report-Dec. 6 2017Daily Business Report-Dec. 6 2017

    A rendering of SoccerCity San Diego (Rendering courtesy of FS Investors via Voice of San Diego) SoccerCity Analysis is Bad News for the Project — and the City’s Climate Goals By Andrew Keatts |Voice of San Diego SoccerCity would generage more traffic than its developers promised, according to a study released last week. That’s bad news for the project’s political hopes, but might be even worse news for the city’s climate goals. If it is correct, it casts doubt on whether the city of San Diego can ever hit its ambitious goals to increase the share of people who commute without cars. The analysis from the San Diego Association of Governments projects SoccerCity will fall far short of the city’s goals to spur transit use and to persuade commuters to walk or bike to work. The city’s big idea is to nudge residents out of their cars and into trolleys, buses, bikes or sidewalks by building urban neighborhoods near jobs and transit stations. The idea is the backbone of the city’s plan for long-term growth and its Climate Action Plan. SoccerCity proposes just that sort of dense mix of housing, office and retail space on a major trolley stop in the middle of the city. If a dense proposal on a trolley stop in the middle of the city can’t even come close to hitting the city’s goals for how its residents will move around, what can? For their part, SoccerCity investors say the study is flawed. SANDAG leaders say they are not in the business of evaluating projects and their compliance with the city’s climate goals, and it’s possible another project on the site with a different makeup would score better. But the study raised alarm from environmentalists and other advocates of the city’s climate plan. Either SANDAG is standing in the way of the kind of growth they want to see, they said, or the agency is raising a red flag on a severe problem in the assumptions underlying the city’s hopes. City voters next year will decide the fate of SoccerCity, a proposal by private equity group FS Investors to build some 4,800 homes and office and retail space, along with a river park and new pro soccer stadium on the San Diego County Credit Union Stadium site. SANDAG last week announced SoccerCity will generate 97,000 car trips to or from the site on an average day, roughly 25 percent more than the developer’s estimate of 71,500 trips. More consequential to San Diego’s goals adopted two years ago in its Climate Action Plan is how few people the analysis claims will get around by anything other than a car. Just under 17 percent of people commuting to or from SoccerCity are going to take transit, walk or ride a bike, according to SANDAG’s analysis. The city, though, expects 50 percent of people living within a half-mile of a transit stop to commute by transit, walking or biking by 2035. It’s part of the legally binding Climate Action Plan. It raises difficult questions for local decision-makers. One is whether they can trust SANDAG’s analysis. If the answer is yes, then they may have to reconsider just how achievable the city’s transportation goals really are. SANDAG stands by its analysis – and says it can simultaneously be right, and that it’s still possible for the city to make good on its climate plan. Mayor Kevin Faulconer, who championed the climate plan, is responsible for ensuring city staff measures its progress, and who supports SoccerCity, declined to comment on what SANDAG’s analysis of the project said about the climate plan’s viability. __________________ Special Needs Adult Housing Project Scheduled to Break Ground in Poway Villa de Vida, an approved 54-unit residential project for adults with developmental disabilities, is scheduled to break ground midyear in Poway, and targeted to be completed as early as winter of 2019. With a majority of special needs adults currently under the care of aging parents, Villa de Vida was founded in response to the growing demand for permanent supportive housing. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates 1 in 68 children in the U.S. are diagnosed with autism. It is estimated that 71.5 percent of people with developmental disabilities currently receive residential care from family caregivers, of whom some 25 percent are over age 60, according to the Center for Healthcare Strategies Report. Read more… __________________ Air Force Selects Air Base as Preferred Site for Hosting General Atomics-Built Drones AUVSI The United States Air Force has chosen Tyndall Air Force Base in Florida as the preferred location for hosting a new MQ-9 Reaper Wing with 24 remotely piloted aircraft (RPA). The Reaper is manufactured by General Atomics in San Diego. The wing will feature an operations group with mission control elements, a launch and recovery capability, and a maintenance group. “We selected Tyndall Air Force Base because it was the best location to meet the unique requirements of the MQ-9 Reaper,” said Secretary of the Air Force Heather Wilson. Those requirements, according to Wilson, include fewer aircraft competing for air space, nearby training ranges, lower up-front costs and great weather. Based on current projections, Airmen are expected to begin arriving at the new location as early as 2020, with the first aircraft expected to arrive in 2022. Read more... __________________ SDSU and MPI Partner to Develop Meeting and Event Management Graduate Degree Meeting Professionals International and the L. Robert Payne School of Hospitality and Tourism Management at San Diego State University announced they will collaborate to create the first graduate-level degree program offered in the United States focused on meeting and event management for mid- and senior-level professionals. In addition, they plan to develop a related academic certificate program for non-traditional students. Scheduled to launch in 2019, the master’s degree program will incorporate experiential learning, simulations, and industry partner mentoring, and will be delivered online with meet-ups on the SDSU campus to accommodate work schedules of students. It will be taught by faculty who have worked in the meeting and event industry, and feature guest lecturers from the industry as well. After successful completion of the program, students will be awarded a master of science degree in meeting and event management from SDSU. Read more… __________________ Medical Marijuana Records Largest Spike in Revenues in November Medical Marijuana Inc., the first publicly traded cannabis company in the United States, generated the largest-ever revenue month in its history in November, the San Diego company reported. “We have experienced tremendous growth this year and breaking our sales record in November (pre-audit numbers) yet again only further illustrates the positive trajectory of the company’s overall sales,” said Medical Marijuana CEO Dr. Stuart Titus. “I am confident that we are on track for our best ever revenue-producing year and good momentum to carry forward into 2018.” The Company recently announced 2017 third-quarter financial results showing a gross revenue increase of over 200% with November 2017 being the third time the Company has broken their monthly sales record just this year. “The recent growth experienced by the portfolio of companies is so exciting and beyond expectations,” said Medical Marijuana, Inc. Chief Operating Officer, Blake Schroeder. “Revenue has grown multiple times over the past 18 months with no signs of slowing down anytime soon.” __________________ Personnel Announcements Michael Neil Joins Kidder Mathews Michael Neil Michael Neil has joined Kidder Mathews’ San Diego office as a first vice president where he will focus on the sale and leasing of office properties. Neil has been in the commercial real estate industry for over 18 years. Prior to joining Kidder Mathews, he was with Coldwell Banker Commercial in Glendale, Calif., where he was a top 10 producer.   The post Daily Business Report-Dec. 6 2017 appeared first on San Diego Metro Magazine.

    San Diego Metro Magazine / 11 d. 10 h. 41 min. ago more
  • Daily Business Report-Dec. 5, 2017Daily Business Report-Dec. 5, 2017

    The IDEA1 building during the last phase of construction. (Photo courtesy of I.D.E.A. Partners) Grand Party Set for Grand Opening of Landmark IDEA1 Community IDEA1, a new mixed-use community designed to provide the opportunity to live, work, collaborate and create in one place, will host its grand opening event on Thursday in the heart of the I.D.E.A. District Downtown. The 7 to 9 p.m. event at 895 Park Blvd. is open to the public and costs $10 with all proceeds going to Urban Discovery Academy, a free-public charter school serving Transitional Kindergarten through 8th grade students. The event is designed to showcase the unique design features and experiences of the project with food and drink tastings, special performances, live music, art installations and more. “We are thrilled to finally open this unique project to the public so that they can experience IDEA1 the way it is meant to be experienced,” said David Malmuth of I.D.E.A. Partners. Added Malmuth partner Pete Garcia, “The grand opening will be the perfect way to participate in the activated spaces including The Hub, penthouse units, exercise room, rooftop clubhouse, water tower spa, IDEA Box and more.” The IDEA1 Grand Opening will include: Food samples from Brian’s 24, BESHOCK Ramen, The Corner Drafthouse, Lola 55, Park & Rec, Renegade, Waypoint Public and Searsucker; two complimentary drinks including hand-crafted cocktails by Snake Oil Cocktail Company; beer from Half Door Brewing and Young Hickory; and a selection of red and white wine; three educational experiences in the “IDEA Box,” an accessible think space that also doubles as a 10’ x 17’ projection screen; chef demo; whiskey tasting and donuts on the rooftop amenity deck. Brittany Segal, a San Diego artist, will take over the largest penthouse for an artist showcase. Tours of IDEA1will be offered. With a total of 295 apartment homes, 5,000 square feet of restaurant space, and 7,700 square feet of creative office space on the street level and a variety of common areas, IDEA1 is designed to help grow a community of entrepreneurs and fuel change makers, visionaries and professionals, according to I.D.E.A. Partners. __________________ Don Cleveland, James McKernan and Joanne Chory Three UC San Diego Professors Named Recipients of 2018 Breakthrough Prize Two full-time University of California San Diego faculty members and a plant biologist at Salk Institute for Biological Studies are recipients of the 2018 Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences. The honorees are UC San Diego faculty members Don Cleveland, who studies fundamental cellular mechanisms in the search for new treatments for diseases like amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and James McKernan, a mathematician who investigates algebraic geometry and multivariate polynomials, along with Joanne Chory, a plant biologist at Salk Institute for Biological Studies and adjunct professor in the Division of Biological Sciences at UC San Diego. The Breakthrough Prize is a set of international awards bestowed in three categories. The awards were founded by Sergey Brin, Anne Wojcicki, Mark Zuckerberg, Priscilla Chan, Yuri Milner, Julia Milner, Jack Ma and Cathy Zhang. Each will receive a cash award of $3 million. Don Cleveland, chair of the Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine at UC San Diego School of Medicine, as well as a member of the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, San Diego, was awarded a 2018 prize in life sciences for his work “elucidating the molecular pathogenesis of a type of inherited ALS, including the role of glia in neurodegeneration, and for establishing antisense oligonucleotide therapy in animal models of ALS and Huntington’s disease.” James McKernan is a Professor Above Scale and Charles Lee Powell Endowed Chair in Mathematics II at UC San Diego. He is being awarded the 2018 Breakthrough Prize in mathematics “for transformational contributions to birational algebraic geometry, especially to the minimal model program in all dimensions.” Joanne Chory, a professor and director of the Plant Molecular and Cellular Biology Laboratory at Salk Institute and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator, was awarded a prize in life sciences “for discovering how plants optimize their growth, development, and cellular structure to transform sunlight into chemical energy.” Read more…  __________________ Riverdale Shopping Center Riverdale Shopping Center Sold for $10.1 Million The Riverdale Shopping Center, a neighborhood retail center in the Mission Gorge area of San Diego, has been sold for $10.1 million to San Diego-based Becker Properties LLC. The seller was McKinney Survivor’s Trust. Built in 1980, Riverdale Shopping Center is located at 10320-10370 Friars Road. The single-level CVS-anchored retail center was 100 percent leased at the time of sale and includes tenants Black Angus, and Armstrong Nursery. CBRE represented the seller.  __________________ San Diego Hardware Celebrates 125th Year With a Party for the Public The ‘Hardware Lady’ San Diego Hardware, one of the oldest family-owned businesses in San Diego, is celebrating its 125th birthday with a party for the public on Dec. 8 and 9. The event will commence with a ceremony, an official proclamation from the mayor’s office, a reveal of the identity of the mystery “Hardware Lady” model shown in the store’s original advertisement, and a preview of the store’s new e-commerce websites. The public will be treated to food and anniversary specials and can enter to win prizes and gifts up to $1,500, as well as meet experts from the different hardware brands. Guests can also pose for photos with the “Hardware Lady,” a recreation of the original advertisement and look-alike model. San Diego Hardware was first incorporated on Dec. 8, 1892. The store is the oldest business in the city still owned by its founding family, one of the founding members of the Chamber of Commerce. The public events are  Friday, Dec. 8 and Saturday, Dec. 9 from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. at  5710 Kearny Villa Road in San Diego.  __________________ Workmen on the Gilman Drive Bridge. (Courtesy of SANDAG) First Concrete Poured on New Span Over Interstate 5 The first concrete was poured Thursday evening on the Gilman Drive Bridge, an iconic new crossing that will soon gracefully span Interstate 5 just north of the La Jolla Village Drive interchange. The new bridge will provide a much-needed connection between Gilman Drive on UC San Diego’s west campus and Medical Center Drive on the east campus. The first concrete pour will form the distinctive arches of the bridge’s design. Rendering of the Gilman Drive Bridge. (Courtesy of SANDAG) The construction of this $20.6 million project is a joint effort between San SANDAG, UC San Diego, and the California Department of Transportation. It is funded through a combination of local and private funding sources, including approximately $15.3 million from TransNet, the regional half-cent sales tax for transportation administered by SANDAG. Concurrent with this project, SANDAG is designing and constructing the Mid-Coast Trolley project, an 11-mile extension of the San Diego Trolley Blue Line that will run north along I-5 from Old Town to UC San Diego and University City. The Gilman Drive Bridge will help ease traffic flow by allowing travelers to go from one side of campus to the other without using already congested roads such as La Jolla Village Drive and Genesee Avenue. Construction on the Gilman Drive Bridge is anticipated to be completed in 2019.  __________________ Personnel Announcements Stefanie Warren Reappointed to Regional Water Quality Control Board Stefanie Warren Dentons, the global law firm, announced that San Diego commercial litigation counsel Stefanie Warren has been reappointed to the San Diego Regional Water Quality Control Board by Gov. Jerry Brown, a position she has held since 2013. Warren’s practice focuses on complex environmental regulatory structures, federal and state government investigations, and resolution litigation in court and before administrative tribunals. Prior to joining Dentons, she served as a law clerk to the Honorable Irma E. Gonzalez of the US District Court for the Southern District of California. Warren earned her JD from Emory University School of Law, cum laude. She also holds a BA from Emory University, magna cum laude. The post Daily Business Report-Dec. 5, 2017 appeared first on San Diego Metro Magazine.

    San Diego Metro Magazine / 12 d. 10 h. 45 min. ago more
  • Daily Business Report-Dec. 4, 2017Daily Business Report-Dec. 4, 2017

    The littoral combat Ship USS Coronado during exercise CARAT in Thailand on June 3, 2017, before engaging in operations off the coast of Guam in August. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Deven Leigh Ellis) USS Coronado Returning Home Tuesday from 18-Month Deployment Littoral combat ship USS Coronado and the “Wildcards” of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron will return home to San Diego from an 18-month deployment on Tuesday. The helicopter squadron will fly off the ship earlier in the day, returning to their homeport of Naval Air Station North Island. Coronado participated in and conducted various operations during her deployment in the Navy 7th Fleet. Her crowning achievement was successfully launching a harpoon over-the-horizon missile utilizing the Northrop Grumman-built MQ-8B Fire Scout unmanned aerial vehicle as a targeting system off the coast of Guam during Pacific Griffin 2017, a bilateral exercise with the Republic of Singapore Navy to enhance the capabilities of both navies to ensure maritime security and stability. Coronado also conducted a coordinated patrol with the Philippine Navy to enhance both navies’ ability to respond to piracy and transnational criminal activity in the Sulu Sea. Coronado also worked alongside 16 other nations in 18 different exercises around the region.  _________________ Drs. Catriona Jamieson and Dan Kaufman State Stem Cell Agency Awards Grants to Researchers for New Leukemia Therapies The Independent Citizens Oversight Committee of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine unanimously approved two grants worth a total of almost $8 million to University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers investigating novel stem cell-based treatments for acute myeloid leukemia or AML. The first grant for $5.15 million was awarded to Dan Kaufman, professor of medicine in the Division of Regenerative Medicine, to advance clinical translation of natural killer cells derived from human embryonic stem cells into a standardized treatment for treating, and possibly curing, AML and other leukemias. The second grant for $2.7 million was awarded to Catriona Jamieson, deputy director of the Sanford Stem Cell Clinical Center and director of stem cell research at UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center, in collaboration with Michael Burkart, professor in the UC San Diego Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Leslie Crews, assistant professor in the Division of Regenerative Medicine at UC San Diego School of Medicine. The funding will support testing of a novel therapeutic splicing modulator approach targeting cancer stem cells in AML. Read more…  _________________ Broadcom Escalates Takeover Battle, Asks Qualcomm Shareholders to Replace Board Broadcom today escalated it’s $130 billion fight to take over Qualcomm, asking shareholders to replace the San Diego company’s board of directors. The company said it will seek the election of 11 new board members at Qualcomm’s next annual meeting on March 6. Qualcomm confirmed it had received the nomination of a slate of candidates, calling it a “blatant attempt to seize control of the Qualcomm board in order to advance Broadcom’s acquisition agenda.” Read more…   _________________ NASSCO Starts Construction on First of Two-Ship Containership Contracts General Dynamics NASSCO has started construction on a Kanaloa-class containership for Matson Navigation Company Inc. as part of a two-ship contract. The 870-foot-long, 3,500 TEU containership design provides the capability to transport containers, automobiles and rolling stock, including trailers. Representatives from NASSCO and Matson gathered in San Diego for a brief ceremony to cut the first pieces of steel, signifying the start of construction for the first of two vessels for Matson. Construction of the first ship is scheduled to be complete in 2019. A second Kanaloa-class containership for Matson will begin construction in 2018 with delivery in 2020. “We’re honored to advance the Matson fleet with two large, modern vessels reflecting the highest standards of design and energy efficiency,” said Kevin Graney, president of General Dynamics NASSCO. “The construction we began today, and the contracted work for several additional U.S. Navy ships, require additional manpower at our San Diego shipyard. NASSCO will soon begin hiring to continue our reputation of delivering high quality ships on schedule.” NASSCO partnered with Daewoo Ship Engineering Company to provide Matson with state-of-the-art ship design and shipbuilding technologies.   _________________ USD Institute for Peace and Justice to Hold Inaugural Event for Women Waging Peace Network The University of San Diego’s Kroc School’s Institute for Peace and Justice will hold a Dec. 6 inaugural event to celebrate the launch of the Women Waging Peace Network, now housed at the Kroc IPJ. Founded by U.S. Ambassador Swanee Hunt, the Women Waging Peace Network is a global network of more than 1,000 women peacemakers from conflict areas around the world. The Network was launched in 1999 to connect these women with each other and with policy shapers. Members of the Network, are leaders among women peacebuilders, many of whom are elected and appointed government officials, directors of non-governmental organizations and trailblazers within civil society, scholars and educators, business people, representatives of multilateral organizations, and journalists. Members of the Network will join Hunt in a dialogue on the most pressing issues related to women’s rights and peacebuilding across the world. The event is at 6 p.m. at the Joan B. Kroc School of Peace Studies Theatre.  _________________ Scientists Aim to Fight Climate Change With Super Plants Researchers at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in San Diego launched a new initiative to improve on the ability of plants to suck carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere and store it deep in the soil. They call it “Harnessing Plants.” “There are a lot of geoengineering efforts to come up with ways of pulling carbon dioxide out of the air,” said Joseph Noel, a chemical biologist at Salk who is working on the project. “Plants do this anyway, so why not try a biological solution as well.” Read more… _________________ U.S. Marine Teams Form Tactical Air Direction Center at Camp Pendleton ExecutiveGov Teams from the U.S. Marine Corps have formed a tactical air direction center located at Camp Pendleton. Established Oct. 28, the center was made to carry out majority of Marine tactical air command tasks; integrate air and ground systems; and serve as a location wherein maritime command centers and ships can access the Marine air command and control system, the Marine Corps said. The TADC was inaugurated as part of Exercise Dawn Blitz 2017 which aims to prepare Expeditionary Strike Group 3 and 1st Marine Expeditionary Brigade to engage in amphibious missions. The USS Essex was used to integrate with the Global Command and Control System to improve connectivity in support of the center. Aviation combat element commanders can use the TADC as a communications medium to conduct U.S. Navy and Marine joint operations with command and control assets. During the Dawn Blitz exercise, the center was used as a communications medium between MTACS-38 Marines and the Essex’s ACE commander. _________________ Personnel Announcements Brian McBee Receives ACHCA Certification Brian McBee Brian D. McBee of Tierrasanta, administrator of St. Paul’s McColl Nursing and Rehabilitation, has been awarded a professional certification by the American College of Health Care Administrators (ACHCA) for his leadership at St. Paul’s McColl Nursing and Rehabilitation. The ACHCA professional certification is an exam-based process that tests for advanced knowledge gained through experience and continuing education. The completed credential recognizes administrators as leaders in health care with dedication to high professional standards and best quality care. “I am honored to receive this recognition,” said McBee. “Working with seniors is not just a job for me and the St. Paul’s team; it’s a commitment to improving their quality of life.  Our nurses have passion, they focus on every single resident’s specific needs so they can rehabilitate and go home. That’s where they want to be. The ACHC certification has increased my professional knowledge so I can fill my role more effectively.” _________________ Jim Mosquera Joins General Atomics Jim Mosquera has joined General Atomics Electromagnetic Systems as vice president and chief technology officer. Mosquera will be responsible for achieving strategic technical, business and financial objectives in support of technology, platform, and next generation product development. He will lead the development and management of technology roadmaps that execute growth opportunities in the markets served by the company. Mosquera has held director and program management positions as a federal civilian and naval officer working for the U.S. Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program (Naval Reactors), a joint program of the Navy and Department of Energy responsible for the application and oversight of nuclear reactor power and propulsion for approximately 80 warships, 100 reactor plants, and other projects. As program manager of Advanced Technology Development, Mosquera worked with senior Navy and Department of Defense leadership to set priorities through the end of the 21st century, guiding science, technology, and research and development strategies focused on at-sea experimentation, undersea platforms, and manned and unmanned systems. _________________ Scripps Research Institute Welcomes Amalio Telenti Amalio Telenti The Scripps Research Institute announced the appointment of Amalio Telenti as professor in the Department of Integrative Structural and Computational Biology. Telenti will also serve as chief data scientist at the Scripps Translational Science Institute, providing leadership in developing and implementing large-scale analyses of medical, sensor, and genomic data. Telenti is a leading data scientist and genomic researcher whose research experience include human genomics, as well as infectious disease research. He has an extensive background in irecting scientific research and operations that spans academia and private sectors over three decades and multiple countries. Prior to joining TSRI, Telenti served as chief scientific officer at Human Longevity Inc. He also held faculty appointments at the University of Lausanne and University of Bern in Switzerland. As a clinician with over 25 years of experience, Telenti led the outpatient clinic at the University Hospital in Lausanne, specializing in infectious diseases and microbiology.   The post Daily Business Report-Dec. 4, 2017 appeared first on San Diego Metro Magazine.

    San Diego Metro Magazine / 13 d. 10 h. 39 min. ago more
  • Exactly where she needs to beExactly where she needs to be

    By Morgan M. Hurley | Editor Young distillery operator in East Village makes Forbes’ ‘30 Under 30’ In the last decade, San Diego has become increasingly known for its male-dominated craft beer culture, currently residing at No. 2 on Thrillist’s Best Beer Cities in America. Several local brewers have since expanded their ventures into the craft distillery world — offering their take on various spirit varietals — and at least one has migrated to spirits altogether. (left) Laura Johnson, owner of a new boutique distillery in East Village, stands in front of her custom still. (Courtesy You & Yours Distilling Co.); (right) You & Yours currently offers two craft spirits, Y & Y Vodka and Sunday Gin; the seasonal Winter Sunday Gin will be released Dec. 6. (Photo by Morgan M. Hurley) There are a number of stand-alone craft distilleries throughout San Diego County as well, but none is more intriguing than You & Yours Distilling Co., a boutique urban distillery that popped up in East Village at the corner of G and 15th streets in March. With a welcoming and expansive tasting room and clever, well-thought-out cocktail menu, the proof is in its three years of planning. Current offerings in its “flagship” line of spirits are Y & Y Vodka and Sunday Gin, with a seasonal Winter Sunday Gin to be unveiled in a soft release on Dec. 6. The founder and co-owner of You & Yours is 25-year-old Laura Johnson, a Texas native who after less than a year of operation has already landed herself a spot on Forbes’ coveted “30 Under 30” list for 2018, which was announced Nov. 14. Johnson arrived in America’s Finest City seven years ago by way of University of San Diego (USD), but becoming a San Diego resident was not her original intention. She had applied to the University of Southern California, which she was “dead-set on” attending, with USD as a back-up. While she liked the campus, USD’s small Catholic-based environment was “exactly the opposite” of what she had envisioned for herself, but when she didn’t get accepted to USC, she decided to enroll at USD and reapply; hoping to transfer to Los Angeles for her sophomore year. When that moment rolled around a year later, however, things had changed. “No. I’m exactly where I need to be,” Johnson said she told herself. “I love USD. I love San Diego. Everything happens for a reason.” How she got here Johnson’s journey into distilling is an interesting one and to say that she has a flair for what she is doing here in East Village is an understatement. Always drawn to the allure of cocktails and spirits rather than beer and wine as a precocious teenager, Johnson said looking back, it was a post-high school graduation trip to Cuba with her father and a behind-the-scenes tour of the Havana Club distillery that became the “catalyst” for the path she is on today. During her college years, she began to take in distilleries on every road trip and getaway she could, but wasn’t thinking about its place in her future. “It was something I knew that I loved, but I didn’t really know what it meant,” Johnson said. “I didn’t see it as a passion yet.” The tasting room at You & Yours Distillery Co. is warm, inviting, comfortable and expansive enough for large parties. (Photo by Morgan M. Hurley) After she graduated with a degree in international business and economics from USD in 2014, she traveled to Washington state for a one-week course on distilling, and it suddenly all became clear. For the next nine months, she said went through a “rabbit hole” of distillery education; a self-described “dog on a bone,” chewing up as much knowledge as she could. She took courses, workshops, master classes, distillery tours and apprenticeships, immersing herself into what she now knew had become her passion. “I had found something that really got me up in the morning,” she said. “I fell in love with distilling. The creativity side of it was just so intoxicating.” She returned to San Diego, knowing she wanted to get into the industry and eventually have her own concept, but had no idea what the timeline would be. “What I really wanted was more time on a still, actual production experience,” Johnson explained. “I felt like I had great theory and a great grasp of where the industry was, all the different kinds of components — like what it takes to open your own spot, packaging, going to market and distribution — I felt like I had really done my homework, but what I didn’t have was production experience.” Determined, she reached out to every distillery she could find online located up and down the coast. The response was dim, until one came from a member of the newly formed San Diego Distilleries Guild. Johnson showed up at the guild’s very first meeting and introduced herself; then she just kept coming back until her persistence started to pay off and she began to hone relationships. Unfortunately, the odds were against her. No one was taking this educated, motivated, steadfast and able young woman who wanted distillery production experience seriously. “‘Oh, you’re cute,’” Johnson said they told her, symbolically patting her on the head. “‘We have a position in the tasting room or the marketing department.’ It just wasn’t happening.” While many young women would have just accepted one of those positions, sheepishly acknowledging the industry’s patriarchal view of her role and seeing it as a step in the door with a possible promotion later on, Johnson wasn’t having it. She decided to do it herself. With a business plan already started, a little fundraising experience and myriad connections, she cut out the middle-man and did her own crowdsourcing. She pitched family, friends and the dozens of industry contacts she’d made over the past year and within a month, had the funding she needed. “It felt so good when the money came in,” she said. “Every time I felt that support, it reiterated to me that ‘yes, you can do this. Keep going.’” Johnson said it took approximately three years from the time she finished her business plan to the day she opened the doors of You & Yours — and 14 months of that was spent haggling over the lease. “East Village seemed like a great area; I kind of wanted a little bit of that gritty up-and-coming funk vibe … an industrial diamond-in-the-rough-hidden-gem kind of thing,” she said. The products “At the same time that I was falling in love with distilling, I was falling in love with gin,” Johnson said. “I knew I wanted gins to be our focus. That’s what gets my creative juices flowing the most.” Vodka was an obvious byproduct because, according to Johnson, “to make gin, you have to make vodka, as gin is essentially just a flavored vodka.” After trying a number of fermentable sugars — corn, potato and grape was her first blend — she realized the grapes alone offered everything she was looking for. Her spirits are 100 percent Northern California grape-based. She said American vodkas are traditionally corn-based, while French are wheat-based and others are potato-based. Ciroc is another popular vodka on the market that is grape-based. Johnson’s Sunday Gin is her “pride and joy.” “The best way to keep this whole venture authentic was to create something I wanted to drink,” she said. “I was looking for something bright and fresh and modern and juicy and citrus-forward, and that’s exactly what [Sunday Gin] is.” Johnson said the staff “affectionately refers to their Sunday Gin as a “gateway gin,” since many who first come in either don’t care to try gin or have tried it and have had what she calls a “gincident.” “I welcome you to come in and we will facilitate your ‘gintervention,’” she said, laughing. “It is a great entry point if you don’t like gin. If you do like gin you should not mix it with anything, just enjoy it.” Their cocktail program — executed by a five-person staff led by tasting room manager Tom Burnett — is unique in that each cocktail is created with ingredients that highlight the flavor notes of their craft spirits, not mask them or shift the focus to the other ingredients. “Our spirits are what we want to showcase and what we want you to taste,” she said. After spending some time at You & Yours, it is hard to believe Johnson is just 25. Though she is at times chatty and playful, she is also fiercely confident and affirming, with an absolute wealth of knowledge about the industry. It wasn’t surprising to learn that making Forbes’ list was a personal goal. Johnson has also had a hand in every aspect of her business, from raising the capital; choosing the location; designing her own custom still; curating the spirits; conceptualizing the cocktail menu; and designing and outfitting the tasting room. As such, Johnson has truly made You & Yours California’s first destination distillery, just as its website claims. For the curious, she said they do indeed plan to venture into other spirits down the road, but for now, she’s quite content with their offerings. “I don’t want people to think we are making gin because we are waiting on the whiskey to age,” Johnson said. “We are making gin because this is what we want to make. I never want anyone to think these spirits are an afterthought. This is who we are.” You & Yours Distillery Co. is located at 1495 G St. in East Village. Their operating hours ate Wednesdays through Fridays, 4–10 p.m., Saturdays and Sundays, noon-10 p.m. They offer workshops, distillery tours, pairing events and their expansive tasting room is available for holiday parties, office meetings or even private parties. On New Year’s Eve, they can only pour until 10 p.m., but she said it’s a great place to start your evening. To learn more, visit youandyours.com. — Morgan M. Hurley can be reached at morgan@sdcnn.com.  

    San Diego Downtown News / 16 d. 7 h. 15 min. ago more
  • San Diego Downtown News Holiday GuideSan Diego Downtown News Holiday Guide

    Mid Century Vintage Furnishings, Accessories and Gifts 3795 Park Blvd. 92103 619-295-4832 midcenturystore.com Mid Century is locally owned and located on Park Boulevard, just south of University Avenue. We are purveyors and curators of eclectic Mid-Century furniture, retro décor and funky, unique gifts. Find vintage lighting and lamps, decorative goods, wall artwork, and accent pieces from the 1950s, ’60s and ’70s, in our fun, friendly store. Discover modern design legacy furnishings, all in excellent condition, including ceramic collectables, stylish creations in glass, and furniture for every room, from side tables and sofas to dressers and dining chairs. All reasonably priced, well-made, and top quality. We sell and we buy, whether its individual items or entire estates — with attention to detail. Mid Century is open Tuesdays through Sundays, 11:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Find us on Instagram and Facebook. Visit us for your holiday gift shopping. Ron Stuart Men’s Clothing 2410 First Ave. 92101 619-232-8850 ronstuartmensclothing.com After being Downtown since 1981, Ron Stuart Men’s Clothing has moved to a new location in Bankers Hill. Proprietor Ron Ford has served the business community — especially those in the legal profession, providing suits, sport coats, and dress slacks, as well as high-scale sportswear — with Ron Stuart’s Men’s Clothing for 36 years. Ron has a large inventory of over 100 items in stock. He can also provide custom suits, coats and dress shirts. His tailor, Joseph LaFata, has worked with Ron for over 30 years. Ron’s main line of clothing is Jack Victor, which uses the fine fabrics from Italy. But he carries other quality sportswear lines, including Stone Rose, Raffi, Thomas Dean, Johnnie-O, Robert Barakett, 34 Heritage, Agave and many more. Check out Ron’s year-round promotions. Convenient parking – located at the Carriage House at 2410 First Ave. in Bankers Hill. Open Tuesday through Saturday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., or by appointment. San Diego Trading Co. 1680 India St. 92101 sandiegotradingcompany.com San Diego Trading is a leading provider of souvenir goods in the greater San Diego area. Established in 1995, we have since been a key player in the gift, souvenir and tourism market in the Southern California region. We have a strong commitment to our customers and have made it our goal to provide a great customer experience and some of the highest quality original garments in the market. We currently serve the retail market by operating several retail locations in the major tourist areas of San Diego County; our locations cater to visitors and local customers alike. Our product lines include San Diego apparel, California apparel, and local sports team paraphernalia. Our mission is to succeed in an environment where sales are achieved by exemplifying our core values; we strive to provide high quality and on-time delivery of the most original products to our customers while offering a great experience in our stores. The Old Globe Theatre 1363 Old Globe Way. 92101 619-234-5623 theoldglobe.org The Old Globe Theatre has been home to the most acclaimed national artists, designers, directors and playwrights in the theater industry. More than 20 productions produced at The Old Globe have gone on to play Broadway and off-Broadway, garnering a total of 13 Tony Awards and numerous nominations. In 1984, The Old Globe was the recipient of the Tony Award for outstanding regional theater, for its contribution to the development of the art form. These awards bring world attention, not only to The Old Globe, but also to San Diego’s rich cultural landscape. Located off of El Prado in Balboa Park –– between the San Diego Museum of Art and the Museum of Man — The Old Globe Theatre is proud to present its annual family musical, “Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas!” with performances between Nov. 4 and Dec 24. The show is described as a wonderful, whimsical musical, based upon the classic Dr. Seuss book. Back at The Old Globe for its 20th incredible year, this family-favorite features the songs “This Time of Year,” “Santa for a Day,” and “Fah Who Doraze,” the delightful carol from the popular animated version of “How the Grinch Stole Christmas!” Celebrate the holidays as The Old Globe Theatre is once again transformed into the snow-covered Whoville, right down to the last can of Whohash. For more information and tickets, visit our website. AR Workshop 1010 University Ave. Suite C211 San Diego 92103 619-701-6794 arworkshop.com/sandiego AR Workshop is a boutique DIY (do-it-yourself) studio that offers hands-on classes for creating custom and charming home decor from raw materials. Join an instructor-led workshop to make custom wood signs, framed signs, canvas pillows, lazy susans, centerpiece boxes, tote bags and more. AR Workshop will help you take your home decor to the next level and have fun while creating it. Check out the workshop schedule and find a date where your preferred project is offered. You can come alone or invite friends and family to join you. When you book a workshop, you will choose a graphic design from our many options and enter your project information, so we can prepare the needed materials before you arrive. We provide all of the tools, materials, and step-by-step instructions you will need to complete your workshop. Sip your favorite drink and have fun letting your inner “craftinista” shine. Carmen Reed and State of Mind reverbnation.com/carmenreed As a mental health professional in the community — and a fellow musician — Dr. Carmen Reed has formed a band of excellent musicians to provide a relaxing blend of old jazz standards from the American songbook. The goal is to provide hours of distraction from the daily stresses of life and all of those difficulties and challenges that we all face from day to day. Music heals and has been demonstrated to relieve pain, reduce the sensation of distress, lower blood pressure, boost immunity, enhance intelligence, and improve memory — just to name a few of its healing powers. The band is called “State of Mind” and consists of Sticks McGee on drums, John Telles on saxophone, Jeff Blanco on bass, Aaron Reed on guitar, and Dr. Reed as bandleader and lead vocalist. State of Mind is currently performing each second and fourth Wednesday of every month at the restaurant/bar, Fast Times, located at 3065-A Clairemont Drive in San Diego. Fast Times is a family-friendly establishment with excellent food and a full bar, all at a reasonable price. Come down for a relaxing, enjoyable night and a pleasant state of mind.

    San Diego Downtown News / 16 d. 7 h. 16 min. ago more
  • A look to the past to shape the futureA look to the past to shape the future

    By Dave Schwab New Chicano Park mural will honor the spirit of local indigenous people A new work of art by a native El Salvadoran muralist, with the help of local artists, will soon join the other iconic murals of Chicano Park; but this one will epitomize the cultural and historical spirit of indigenous people. The new mural will emerge in the spring of 2018, next to the Chicano Park Herb Garden, located at 2060 Logan Ave. in Barrio Logan. A new mural for Chicano Park Thanks to the cooperation of the Chicano Park Steering Committee (CPSC), the Environmental Health Coalition (EHC) and Barrio Logan residents participating in community brainstorming workshops, the mural-to-be will express the collective will of the people and the neighborhood. “What we’re trying to do here is create a community mural that has a long view, with elements designed by Mexican-American residents really thinking of this neighborhood before it became part of San Diego,” said Jorge Gonzalez, a Barrio Logan organizer and EHC member. “Existing Chicano Park murals remind us that we live in a place of cultural and historical significance. Keeping that in our hearts, the community feels ready to add another mural — one that represents a healthy chapter for Barrio Logan and our people who live here.” EHC is a grassroots group that since 1980, has been campaigning against the unjust consequences of toxic pollution, discriminatory land use and unsustainable energy policies. Of the 70 or so hand-painted murals already gracing Chicano Park, Gonzalez pointed out that none of them depict early Kumeyaay history. “This mural will do that for the first time,” he said, adding it will complement the park’s artistic and cultural mix. He further described it as being “very educational” and “a piece of history.” Initial discussions for a collective mural began at community meetings in the fall of 2016. EHC retained neighborhood artist Alicia Maria Siu and students from the Barrio Logan College Institute (BLCI) to collaborate and bring the project to life. At a series of local workshops, more than 70 neighbors contributed ideas to guide the unfolding of the mural concept. The community described the mural-to-be as an empowering memoir of past visionaries mixed with its vision for the future of the neighborhood. After more than a year of collaboration, the CPSC approved the mural’s design on Oct. 29. With this approval, the team of local artists can now begin blending the new concept with the unfinished, existing mural that currently resides on the wall. “We want a tall, proud and community-curated mural that inspires the next generation in Barrio Logan to continue the legacy of those that fought for a healthy neighborhood before us,” said Panchito Martinez, a Barrio Logan resident, BLCI student and mural participant. “Art has always been our community’s way of healing and it’s also our way to capture our community’s vision for the future.” Siu was chosen to do the new public art project because of her stylized impressionistic and thematic approaches to mural painting. “My art expresses the vitality, strength and tenacity of Indigenous peoples, all those who share the vision of a healthy Mother Earth,” Siu said. “With art, I offer visual affirmations of our inherent rights as caretakers of this earth. I offer visual remedies from attempted termination, war, displacement and the resulting traumas.” Noting she’s never been involved in painting a mural with a theme that has had so much public involvement, Siu noted the “skeleton of the imagery” for the new art project will come from “the prophetic story of the good snake and bad snake.” “The bad snake creates havoc and is a metaphor for climate change,” she said. “The snakes [will] tell an intergenerational story within the mural [about] passing traditional knowledge on to the next generation.” Siu said she selected the best elements from the ideas presented by Barrio Logan residents at each of the mural workshops. “The challenge for me as an artist is to incorporate most of what people said into the mural; to make sure that everything was included,” she said, adding that some of the suggestions that came out of the workshop were more literal, while others more symbolic in nature. Funding for the mural is being provided by the Barrio Logan Maintenance Assessment District; Barrio Logan College Institute; the city of San Diego’s City Council Community Projects, Programs, and Services; and the San Diego County Childhood Obesity Initiative. A sneak peek of the mural’s design will be unveiled by the artist to the Barrio Logan community on Wednesday, Dec. 6, from 5–7 p.m. in the second floor community room of the Estrella del Mercado Apartments, located at 1985 National Ave., near Chicano Park. For more information on the Chicano Park Steering Committee, visit chicano-park.com. To learn more about environmental justice in Barrio Logan visit environmentalhealth.org. — Dave Schwab can be reached at dschwabie@journalist.com.

    San Diego Downtown News / 16 d. 7 h. 17 min. ago more
  • Taking a loop in a TeslaTaking a loop in a Tesla

    By Morgan M. Hurley | Editor [Editor’s note: This is the first in a series as we follow the progress of this start-up.] I’m a daily user of public transportation, I make great use of the Lyft app on my phone and I take Amtrak north to Los Angeles on a regular basis. So when I recently became aware through Facebook of a new long-distance ride-sharing service made available to San Diegans called Tesloop, I was intrigued. “Ruby,” the red Tesla Model X, is one of two in Tesloop’s San Diego Fleet. (Photos by Morgan M. Hurley) I read that Tesloop could take me from San Diego to LAX for less money and much more convenience than a regional plane and that it could take me to destinations north over the upcoming holidays while I slept, relaxed or continued to work. What got me even more excited was that the Tesloop ride-share service was using Tesla vehicles, so I immediately reached out to find out more. If you don’t know what a Tesla is, or you’ve never heard of its founder, Elon Musk, you need to start paying closer attention. Teslas are the cars of the future, but they are here right now. Autonomous vehicles can navigate and drive themselves without human input. Tesla vehicles are semi-autonomous, meaning that while they still require a human at the wheel, they can perform certain functions on their own, like changing lanes, slowing down or accelerating in traffic and keeping cars around them a specific distance away. It is the direction we are going, for sure, and Tesla is one of the first automotive manufacturers to go full bore in that direction. They have three models: Model S (sedan), Model X (SUV) and the newly released Model 3 (a very small sedan). Teslas are all-wheel-drive and all-electric, and have a huge 17-inch LCD pad-style computer mounted on the dash; it literally updates just like your iPhone does. Their driving range is approximately 250 miles on one charge and they have a supercharger network that is quite impressive. I got my first ride in a Tesla about six months ago; Bob Nelson, former San Diego port commissioner and a member of our local LGBT community, gave me a ride home in his Model S. I was immediately enamored with the technology but it is well beyond my reach. Enter Tesloop. Founded two years ago in Los Angeles by 18-year-old Haydn Sonnad — yes, 18 — Tesloop does more than just give people rides between destinations; it gives Tesla or other sustainable vehicle enthusiasts an up-close-and-personal view of these incredible cars of the future. It is important to note that Tesloop’s only association with Tesla is that they buy and use their cars for their ride-sharing service. They currently have an eight-vehicle fleet of Model X vehicles, with more to come. Tesla’s website calls the Model X the “safest, quickest, most capable sport utility vehicle in history.” San Diego Tesloop currently has two Model X cars, which at the hands of their “pilots,” do four roundtrip routes to Los Angeles per day. Each vehicle has a total of six seats built in; however, only four are sold per trip. Obviously, the driver takes up one of those seats and an additional seat in the back is left down to accommodate luggage. Speaking of luggage, you can really only take something the size of a carry-on in addition to your personal bag, so plan accordingly. Due to the number of miles the cars rack up going back and forth between Los Angeles and San Diego, Tesloop is able to share valuable information with Tesla, like the vehicles’ interaction — with other cars and as well as their pilots — and data acquired about how the cars operate under various road conditions under such high mileage. As far as I’m concerned, it is a great marketing arrangement because once you get into one of these cars, you’re going to want one. Sonnad originally started Tesloop with a Los Angeles to Las Vegas route, which first began with friends and then friends of friends who wanted to travel back and forth to Vegas. That “loop” was put on hiatus in April 2017, but may eventually return. Current “loops” are San Diego to Orange County, San Diego to Los Angeles, and Los Angeles to Palm Springs. Future routes identified on their website as potential expansion cities and/or loops are Santa Barbara, Sacramento, San Francisco, Phoenix, Tuscon, Dallas, and San Diego to Palm Springs. Seats cost you $29–$79, and the price is based on day of week, time of day, seats in the car, proximity to holiday, etc., but you’ll not pay over $79. While this service isn’t yet point-to-point, the pick-up locations in San Diego are pretty convenient. I live in Point Loma and my pick up was Old Town. A “concierge” will contact you about an hour before your trip to make sure everything is engaged. Once you arrive at your “pick up” point, you are welcomed by the friendly “pilot,” who knows your name, will take your luggage and open the wing doors for you. Once inside the car, you slide into an extremely comfortable seat, and have access to the following: free WiFi, complimentary healthy snacks and drinks, customized streaming music, head rests/neck pillows, noise cancelling headphones, and USB charging cables. Unlike the many hassles that we encounter these days with plane travel, Tesloop “swoops” you up, plugs you in and lets you settle in for the ride. I took the route to Los Angeles and back in the front seat of “Ruby,” the red Model X in their San Diego fleet. My pick-up point was the Hilton Garden Inn in Old Town, then we picked up two other individual riders in La Jolla. Michael, our driver, spared no time in explaining the vehicle and its capabilities to us. He said his two interests are sustainable technologies and finance, and those meshed together so well here, he recently walked away from his job as a bank relationship manager to be a pilot for Tesloop. Once the other two riders were settled in, we all participated in a Skype call with the concierge, Myles, who welcomed us and gave us some safety information and guidelines. He mentioned the car’s five-star rating in every category, its eight surround cameras giving the vehicle 360-degree vision, thanked us for traveling green and let us know we were saving 150 pounds of carbon emission with our one-way trip. There is an emphasis in safety, but then these are the safest cars on the road. My ride to LA was a non-stop social experience, as there was so much to see and get involved in from the front seat, and our driver was very engaging. My return trip was an LAX pickup, and I had been reserved a middle seat this time, to experience that aspect of the ride. For this route, I was on my computer and using the noise-canceling headphones the entire time, which made it a completely different experience than the one where I was engaging with the driver and the riders most of the trip. Both trips were enjoyable, however, for different reasons. While they’ve only been in San Diego since the spring, but earlier this year, Tesloop was already given the Global Citizenship Award from the United Nations Association of San Diego, located in Balboa Park, for their work to combat climate change. There is so much more to tell about this company and experience, that I’ve decided to make this a series. If you are interested in taking your own Tesloop trip based on what I’ve told you so far, visit tesloop.com and get started planning your holiday travel. I can’t wait to try it again. — Morgan M. Hurley can be reached at morgan@sdcnn.com.

    San Diego Downtown News / 16 d. 7 h. 17 min. ago more
  • A rebirth in Bankers HillA rebirth in Bankers Hill

    Longtime Downtown shopkeeper continues his clothing business By Dave Fidlin Ron Ford thought the holiday season of 2016 would be his final one working in retail. But fate had other plans for Ford, a longtime business owner who has operated men’s clothier Ron Stuart in San Diego for the past three and a half decades. Ron Ford, proprietor of Ron Stuart Men’s Clothing, stands with suits inside his former shop, located at 225 W. A St. (Photo by SDCNN) A year ago, Ford was ushering in the holidays by holding a liquidation sale at his shop at 225 W. A St. It was the third location in 30 years for his venerable Downtown-based business. Ford cited a litany of reasons at the time for closing his doors, including changes in men’s fashion and the retail industry as a whole. He said he also wanted to slow down and enjoy retirement. As he was in the process of shuttering, however, a new opportunity arose — one the 77-year-old businessman said was too good to pass up. In February, after a very brief respite, Ford resurrected Ron Stuart Men’s Clothing — this time in a smaller space, at 2410 First Ave., in nearby Bankers Hill. “I’ve been blessed with good health and it’s three minutes from my house,” Ford said, pointing to one of the primary reasons he decided to continue on with his professional pursuits. Business, Ford said, is about 40 percent of what it was when he operated Downtown, which is a figure he is content with because of low overhead. “I’m probably just as profitable as I was before because I don’t have as much in the way of expenses,” Ford said. Ron Stuart’s newest location has a story unto itself. The deep-rooted old Victorian dwelling was once used as a two-story carriage house. The second story of the building, where the clothier is now located, was once purposed as a hayloft. Ford stands in front of his new shop, which is on the second floor of this Victorian home at 2410 First Ave., in Bankers Hill. (Photo by Hilda Ford) Almost serendipitously, the home was on the market around the time Ford was winding down operations at his A Street location. “When I first saw it, I thought to myself, ‘This is just a beautiful place,’” Ford said. A year ago, Ford bemoaned changes in menswear — shifts that meant fewer men were wearing traditional suits and more were dressing down in the professional workplace. “But menswear is evolving,” he said. “Things might be changing, but men are still going to wear clothes.” The mixed-use Bakers Hill property, which still serves as a residence on the first floor, perfectly suited what Ford said he envisioned for the future of Ron Stuart. His new business operates in a much smaller footprint than ever before. “It’s more of a showroom now,” Ford said of his tweaked business plan. “This space gives me the chance to offer more of a personal experience. It’s worked out very well.” Logistically, it is also within five blocks to a number of locales, including Balboa Park and his old perch Downtown. When asked how the customer reception has been at his new location, Ford said business has been steady and that word of mouth has been the primary driver of business in the past 10 months. “I don’t even have anything in my windows,” Ford mused, adding that he has to respect the historic integrity of the building. “I have to be very specific when I tell people how to get here.” In a way, Ford said the current scenario harkens back to his earliest days in business, when he co-ran Ron Stuart with his then-business partner, Stuart Schlesinger, in Los Angeles. “We didn’t have any signs back then either,” Ford said. “We even had a locked gate. But we made it work.” Ford and Schlesinger incorporated Ron Stuart into a business in 1974 in Los Angeles and opened a San Diego location seven years later. Eventually, Ford went solo with the business, though Schlesinger’s name has remained part of it ever since. Ron Stuart Men’s Clothing maintained a presence in both cities for more than a decade, though Ford said he made a decision to leave Los Angeles in 1992 — the same time as the riots took place in the heart of the city — and focus his time and energy on the San Diego market. Over the years, Ford said San Diego has always been a place where he has enjoyed running a business. “I’m very happy,” Ford said, as he looked back at how the past year has turned out. “I still meet with nice, loyal followers. It’s really a pleasure.” For more on Ron Stuart’s new location, visit his website, ronstuartmensclothing.com, or contact Ford at 619-232-8850 or r.ford40@yahoo.com. — Dave Fidlin is a freelance journalist with a special affinity for San Diego and its people. Contact him at dave.fidlin@thinkpost.net.

    San Diego Downtown News / 16 d. 7 h. 17 min. ago more
  • The mighty CubanoThe mighty Cubano

    By Frank Sabatini Jr. | Restaurant Review Like chicken emitting its aroma from a rotisserie, there’s something wildly intoxicating about the smell of pork, Swiss cheese, mustard and pickles, when layered between two elongated slices of fluffy baguette bread and put into a hot grill press. It’s the tangy scent that greeted us when stepping into Havana 1920, a second-floor restaurant in the Gaslamp Quarter belonging to a trilogy of eating and drinking establishments themed to the Roaring ’20s on the same plot of land (El Chingon alongside and Prohibition Liquor Bar underneath). An accurately constructed Cubano sandwich (Photo by Frank Sabatini Jr.) Our noses were hit by Cubano sandwiches in the making, one of many Cuban-inspired dishes you mustn’t leave here without trying. My best benchmark for the sandwich dates back to those I’ve consumed in Tampa, Florida’s Ybor City district, where some say the construct originated a century ago among Cuban immigrants. Others I’ve tried in San Diego restaurants, of which I’ll spare naming, have been disastrous. This was done right, starting with Cuban bread imported from a Miami bakery. The two layers of meat — ham and roasted pork — were of tender, tasty quality. The lightly brined dill pickles were sliced thin and the yellow mustard seeped gently into the melted Swiss. Diced ham dallied with béchamel sauce in a couple of croquetas representing Havana street food. They were like fondue balls. In the same appetizer bowl was a mushroom-spinach-cheese empanada boasting a buttery pastry shell, and a papa rellena de carne involving mashed potatoes, ground beef and bell peppers rolled into a sphere and fried to a golden crisp. All were rich and excellent, and the menu allows you to order them individually. Croquetas and other fried appetizers (Photo by Frank Sabatini Jr.) Leading to the rear bar stocked with numerous types of rum are displays of precious Cuban memorabilia such as society magazines from the 1920s, old Havana telephone directories and original mini Bacardi rum bottles. The bar stocks more than 100 different rums, many from Caribbean locales (Photo by Frank Sabatini Jr.) A playlist of Cuban music (until live music starts later in the evening) is played at a comfortable volume. And swift waiters donning guayabera shirts and slinging minty mojitos made with fresh-squeezed sugarcane adds a lively, cultural feel to the place. The goal of Havana 1920, launched a couple months ago by GBOD Hospitality Group, was to bring Hemingway’s Cuba back to life. But that’s perhaps a tall order in the absence of cigar smoking and tropical heat. The effort is nonetheless wonderfully sincere and aided gastronomically by chef Anthony Parras, who is of partial Cuban descent. His additional menu offerings include three different preparations of plantains, a sprightly Caribbean-style salad with grilled pineapple, and a few other sandwiches featuring one named after Cuban socialite Elena Ruz. That captures turkey, cream cheese and strawberries on a sweet Cuban roll. We were particularly lured by a pleasing appetizer of jumbo shrimp in garlic and white wine as well as two classic entrees: lechon asado (marinated pulled pork) and ropa vieja (shredded beef with peppers and onions in thick tomato sauce). Both of the main courses came with moist white rice and black beans cloaked in a savory non-spicy liquid. Ropa vieja (shredded beef) served with rice, beans and plantains (Photo by Frank Sabatini Jr.) The flavors of onions, cumin and black pepper emerged from the pork, which tasted similar to carnitas but herbier. The beef in comparison was much sweeter, due to the cooked-down tomato sauce and possibly some sherry in the recipe. Having never been to Cuba, I can’t vouch whether either dish comes close to the real deal. But we were smitten nonetheless by their moderate depth of flavor. We skipped dessert (flan, mango sorbet or guava-banana turnovers) in lieu of nursing our mojitos as well as a “Painkiller” made with Pusser’s British Navy Rum and ravishing house-made coconut cream infused with pineapple juice. With Cuban food in short supply locally, the restaurant gives consumers a slightly broader understanding of the nuances and intricacies behind this celebrated cuisine, not to mention a damn good Cubano sandwich. Despite the fleeting bars and restaurants that have breezed through this address and others around it over the past decade, I have a hunch Havana 1920 might show some longevity. Note: Live Cuban-Caribbean music is held seven nights a week, starting at 7 p.m., Sunday through Thursday, and at 8:30 p.m., Fridays and Saturdays. — Frank Sabatini Jr. is the author of “Secret San Diego” (ECW Press), and began his local writing career more than two decades ago as a staffer for the former San Diego Tribune. You can reach him at fsabatini@san.rr.com.

    San Diego Downtown News / 16 d. 7 h. 17 min. ago more
  • Guest Editorial: Making your donation count – 10 tips for holiday givingGuest Editorial: Making your donation count – 10 tips for holiday giving

    By Paul Downey The air is chilly. You’re humming holiday songs. You’re calculating how much vacation time you’ve accrued. The holiday season has arrived! Amid the festivities, it’s time to decide on end-of-year donations; but in today’s segmented world, with countless charities for every cause, how do you pick the right one? For starters, look for groups with strong leadership who operate by a mission that matches your passions or beliefs, and of course make sure your charity of choice is fiscally responsible, ethical and effective. How do you know if your charity of choice is effective? Ideally, 85 cents of every dollar raised should go directly to programs and services of the charitable organization. Review the organization’s administrative costs and make sure you’re comfortable with what they spend on operational expenses, salaries and fundraising. Here are 10 additional tips for smart holiday giving: DO Verify that the charity is legitimate. Identify the correct name of the charity; many scammers establish fake charities with names that sound similar to real organizations’ names. Consult the BBB Wise Giving Alliance, Charity Navigator and GuideStar. Also look for audits, annual reports and 990 tax forms on the charity’s website. Ask for a tour. A reputable charity will happily show you around and answer your questions. Sign up for updates. Email updates will inform donors how gifts were used and what outcomes were achieved with the donated funds. Protect your bank account and social security numbers. Charities don’t need this information to process your gift. Take immediate action if you suspect you’ve been affected by fraud. Call your bank and credit card companies and freeze your accounts. They’ll work with you to resolve your situation. DON’T Donate in response to a hard sell. Don’t respond to anyone who says you “must” donate today or offers to pick up a check. A reputable charity will accept a gift today, next week, next month or even next year, and won’t pressure you. Make an online donation using a public wireless network. Use a password-protected network and verify that the donation page is secure: look for “https” in the URL and trust seals on the page. Before entering any personal info, double-check that you’ve typed the URL correctly. If you click on an email link from a trusted sender, double-check that you’ve arrived at the organization’s real website. Use your debit card, send cash or wire funds. If fraud is committed against your credit card, you can dispute the charges. If fraud is committed against your debit card, the funds are much harder to retrieve. Give to “pop up” charities. Don’t respond to on-the-spot donation requests from people in front of stores, even if they tell you that you’re helping people affected by natural disasters or recent tragedies. If the cause piques your interest, do some research. If the charity is legitimate, you’ll be able to mail a check or donate securely online. Give any personal info over the phone or to door-to-door solicitors. Caller identification is easy for scammers to fake; even if they appear to be calling from a real charity, it’s not necessarily true. As with “pop up” charities, if the organization sounds like one you’d like to support, do some research first. You have a finite amount of hard-earned dollars that you can afford to donate and you want those dollars to make the greatest impact possible. Trust your instincts and don’t be afraid to ask for clarification on statistics, details on tangible impacts and client stories or testimonials. Even if privacy or anonymity must be maintained, a reputable charity will have anecdotes that are “safe” for sharing. Paul Downey is president and CEO of Serving Seniors. (Courtesy of Serving Seniors) Bottom line: you’re giving away your hard-earned money for something you believe in. You decide where and when it goes. Charities that are worth donating to respect and appreciate this and will respect and appreciate you. — Paul Downey is the president and CEO of Serving Seniors, a nonprofit agency dedicated for more than 45 years to increasing the quality of life for San Diego seniors living in poverty. Learn more at servingseniors.org.

    San Diego Downtown News / 16 d. 7 h. 18 min. ago more
  • Christmas Guide: 14 Things To Do In San DiegoChristmas Guide: 14 Things To Do In San Diego

    America's Finest City may be closely tied to a beach lifestyle, but that doesnt mean that winter is completely ignored! San Diego has plenty of holiday events going into the New Year - here's our top picks for a great time:Del Mar Fairgrounds presents Holiday Events (November 24 - January 1)The Holiday Events at the Del Mar Fairgrounds and Racetrack has become a favorite holiday tradition for Southern California families.  Visitors view the lighted and animated holiday creations from the comfort of their vehicle as they drive along a 1.5 mile route through the Fairgrounds, all while enjoying festive holiday music. Holly Jolly Holidays at LEGOLAND California (November 28 - December 31)The theme park transforms into a holiday wonderland during Holly Jolly Holidays, which features festive entertainment every weekend including nightly fireworks Dec. 26 through 30 and an enchanting holiday musical. All Holly Jolly Holidays activities are included in the price of LEGOLAND California admission. Holiday Open House and Toys for Tots by West Inn & Suites Village  (December 8)Festive holiday activities will include carolers, horse-drawn carriage rides, crafts and a photo opportunity with Santa. New this year is a hand-writing analyst to help determine your Christmas card personality style. Seasonal treats and spirits created by Chef Eugenio Martignago will be available for tastings at Bistro West and West Steak and Seafood. Jungle Bells at the San Diego Zoo (December 10 - January 1)Wintertime brings something special to the San Diego Zoo - a Jungle Bells celebration! During December, lighted sculptures of animals and storybook characters fill the grounds while guests are treated to holiday music and foods, crafts, games, and special presentations. It's the a great family outing to join in the spirit of the season while also learning about animals. Gaslamp Holiday Pet Parade at Hilton Park (December 11)Once a year, San Diego pets and owners are invited to dress up in their favorite costumes for a special promenade throughout the Gaslamp Quarter to celebrate the holiday season.  You can only imagine as downtown became filled with costumed pets & their handlers all vying for prizes and bragging rights including Best Costumed Duo, Cutest Critter, Best Pet Costume & Best of Show! The Parade originates and concludes at the Hilton Park adjacent to the Hilton San Diego Gaslamp Quarter at 4th Avenue and K Street. The Parade steps-off promptly at 3pm. Breakfast with Santa at San Diego Zoo Safari Park (December 17)Enjoy a buffet breakfast with views of the wildlife, an animal presentation, and a visit with Santa Claus, all at at the scenic Kilima Point in San Diego Zoo Safari Park. A Christmas Tabernacle at NTC Liberty Station (December 16, 17, 18)Set on 350,000 square foot station, A Christmas Tabernacle features a wide range of activities and entertainment for family members of all ages, including 100+ specialty-goods vendors, a food court, Christmas concerts and performances, a living nativity scene, interactive workshops, Santa’s Village, a themed Christmas tree area, and a fun zone complete with a real snow play area, games and attractions. Gary Hoey – Ho Ho Hoey Holiday Show at House of Blues (December 17)This is the second year that Gary has brought his brand of electric guitar holiday show to the House of Blues San Diego.  Gary Hoey is well known for being one of the best guitarists in the business. Mistletoe, Music and Mayhem! at North Coast Repertory Theatre (December 8-18)Five performers are the key to this  musical comedy adventure. A line-up of original comedy scenarios mixed with a bevy of holiday inspired songs that will melt your heart and tickle your funny bone.  An UnScripted Carol at North County Repertory Theatre (December 19 & 20)This show is where keen imaginations steeped in Dickens and Christmas work feverishly to create theatre on the spot. The pace is swift, and the performers are pushed to the peak of their abilities as they attempt to juggle character, plot and staging all at once. An UnScripted Carol is a holiday treat that is never, ever the same story twice and gives fans of A Christmas Carol a whole new way to celebrate the season. Sister's Christmas Catechism at North County Repertory Theatre (December 21-24)It's going to be one ho-ho-holy night as Sister tackles the question that's been puzzling historians through the ages: Whatever happened to the Magi's gold? CSI-goes-to-Bethlehem-in-Solana Beach as Sister delivers a sleigh load of side-splitting holiday laughs. Bring your camera to capture all the action. Christmas Eve Candlelight Dinner Cruise (December 24)Bring your loved ones together for a rare view of San Diego from the harbor, as the town sparkles with twinkling lights strung in the spirit of the holidays. Complimentary champagne will be served upon boarding and talented chefs will cook up a buffet feast fit for kings. On the menu will be colorful salads, seasonal farm-fresh vegetables, red potatoes with turkey gravy, oven roasted turkey roulades filled with traditional bread stuffing, hand-carved New York strip and a variety of decadent desserts. Passengers will enjoy live entertainment and breathtaking views of the harbor as they cruise along in the luxury and comfort of a signature Flagship luxury yacht. Make your Holiday Party a FIESTA at Café CoyoteCafé Coyote was recognized in September 2007 as the 2nd Certified Tequila House in the entire United States. Café Coyote achieved the honor by its commitment to Tequila Culture and by developing a highly educated, knowledgeable staff & Tequila Ambassador. 

    SanDiego.com / 17 d. 3 h. 19 min. ago more
  • Turkey Time in San DiegoTurkey Time in San Diego

    Let's talk turkey. Just because Thanksgiving bobs around every year doesn't necessarily mean you have to celebrate it the same way each year; under-cooking the turkey, overcooking the yams while keeping all your relatives from discussing politics. Now we don't want you to drop your Thanksgiving traditions cold turkey, nor we do want you getting your feathers in a bunch stressing about San Diego Thanksgiving plans, but we're stuffed with turkey day suggestions for you to gobble up this November in San Diego. Take a gander at these events, and the rest is gravy!Father Joe's Village Day 5K Walk/Run: You know you'll spend the evening loosening your belt and shielding your loved ones from bursting pant's buttons during San Diego Thanksgiving dinner, so why not spend your morning burning a few calories in preparation? Father Joe's Village Day 5K Walk/Run provides you with the perfect way to get your heart pumping while raising awareness for homelessness at the same time. On Thanksgiving morning meet at Balboa Park, lace up your running shoes and remember the meaning of the holiday as you give thanks and give back.Hornblower Thanksgiving Buffet Dinner Cruise: If the decision making process as to who's house this year's San Diego Thanksgiving dinner is being held at has led to childish games like "eenie meenie minie mo," then it might be time to book a Hornblower cruise. The cruise line removes all the stress of hosting Thanksgiving at your home as it invites you and your family aboard its 2.5 hour yacht tour around the San Diego Bay. No one will bicker over who gets to carve the turkey or who burned the biscuits because you will all be too busy taking in the sights, sipping on champagne and scarfing down the herb stuffing.Mother Goose Parade: What's good for the goose is good for the gander, and the Mother Goose Parade is no exception! Turkeys scoot over and make room for the Mother Goose Queen and Court at this annual parade that takes place every Sunday before Thanksgiving in El Cajon. The parade originally began in 1947 as a "gift to the children of East County," and it has since become the biggest parade in San Diego, but also the largest of its kind west of the Mississippi attracting an expected 400,000 spectators. Gather up your own goslings and waddle over to the parade to cheer for the floats, marching bands and performing artists and don't forget to keep an eye out for Santa Claus!San Diego Thanksgiving Dixieland Jazz Festival: This five day jazz festival will finally give you the opportunity to show off your turkey trot as it features a Ragtime Extravaganza! Even if your dance skills are more on par with a bobbing turkey than a graceful ballroom dancer, you'll still have a blast swing dancing and tapping your feet to the numerous talented jazz musicians and orchestras. Head over to the Town & Country Hotel and Convention Center between November 22 and 26, and be thankful for all that traditional, dixieland and swing jazz music!Hotel Del Coronado Thanksgiving Dinner: This Thanksgiving, dine at the grand Hotel Del Coronado where some of the most famous faces in history have made appearances. This historic seaside resort has welcomed royalty, presidents and Hollywood starlets, and now it's inviting you to celebrate Thanksgiving in its oceanfront ballroom and its elegant Crown Room. Gobble til you wobble at this dinner buffet with all-you-can-eat decadent selections from the slow roasted free range turkey, butternut squash bisque and cinnamon citrus cranberry sauce to the roasted garlic whipped mashed potatoes and brandied giblet gravy. Whether you decide to carve one of these events into your busy San Diego Thanksgiving schedule or you plan to stuff in an activity before your traditional turkey time at home, we hope you have a safe and happy Thanksgiving in San Diego!

    SanDiego.com / 46 d. 10 h. 31 min. ago more
  • 18th Annual Pet Day on the Bay -Towel & Blanket Drive18th Annual Pet Day on the Bay -Towel & Blanket Drive

    Enjoy a Pet Day on the Bay on April 28th! This is a great one hour narrated cruise around the bay with a snack bar with adult beverages, soft drinks with photos available for purchase. A portion of proceeds will benefit the Helen Woodward Animal Center. Your lovely pet cruises for FREE! So book your seat now! Start Event Date:  Saturday, April 28, 2018 Event Dates:  Saturday, April 28, 2018

    SanDiego.com / 61 d. 6 h. 40 min. ago more
  • Whale & Dolphin Adventures in Partnership with the San Diego Natural History MuseumWhale & Dolphin Adventures in Partnership with the San Diego Natural History Museum

    Are you ready for Winter Whale Watching?! Hornblower has partnered up with the San Diego Natural History Museum to bring you daily 3.5 hour long cruises with a live narration by our experienced captain and the on-board naturalist provided by the San Diego Natural History Museum. Enjoy our snack bar with hot food, souvenirs and a full bar! Book your seat today!  Start Event Date:  Saturday, December 9, 2017 Event Dates:  Saturday, December 9, 2017 to Sunday, April 22, 2018

    SanDiego.com / 61 d. 6 h. 51 min. ago more
  • New Year's Eve Celebration Cruises New Year's Eve Celebration Cruises

    What is the best way to ring in the New Year? Aboard one of Hornblower's finest yachts! Whether it's an all-out evening decadent dinner or a scrumptious brunch the next day, every New Year's cruises brings glitz, glam and hands-down best views in town. Book your seat now! Start Event Date:  Sunday, December 31, 2017 Event Dates:  Sunday, December 31, 2017 to Monday, January 1, 2018

    SanDiego.com / 61 d. 7 h. 5 min. ago more
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  • Shimbashi IzakayaShimbashi Izakaya

    Quick Facts about Shimbashi Izakaya:1. Offer an extensive tapas-style seasonal menu, fresh sushi and sashimi, a wide selection of sake and Japanese beer.2.  Locate on the Market Level (2F) at North West side of the Del Mar Plaza with sweeping views of the Pacific Ocean.3. Only Japanese restaurant in San Diego that offers Wagyu beef in steak. (We also offer it in sushi.) Ambiance: Warm and cozy Japanese tavern look and feel in the inside. Ocean view from our Patio is fantastic. A nice place to catch a glimpse of a California sunset. Why we dine:  Shimashi Izakaya is an authentic Japanese restaurant located in Del Mar, CA. Enjoy Izakaya-style menu for casual dining with friends, family and colleagues. This is the only Japanese restaurant in San Diego that offers Wagyu beef steak. The Local Scoop: At Shimbashi Izakaya all the chefs and servers are Japanese. We Recommend:- Extensive seasonal menu. Our “Today’s Recommendation” is prepared with ingredients available each day.- Omakase, Chef’s Choice, we recommend ordering this for people unfamiliar with Japanese cuisine or for those who are looking to try a new culinary choice. SHIMBASHI’s Omakase Course is prepared expertly by our experienced chefs using     only the freshest of seasonal ingredients.- Micro brewed Sake – as we care for the food quality, we have a good selection of micro brewed sake that you don’t see at other Japanese restaurant in San Diego.

    SanDiego.com / 66 d. 9 h. 27 min. ago more
  • Christmas Day Buffet CruiseChristmas Day Buffet Cruise

    Do Christmas right this year and take your family out on the water to enjoy a lavish Christmas buffet and an unbeatable view. Santa is expected to make an appearance this year and the photo booth ready to capture all the joy and wonder this holiday. Book your seats today! Start Event Date:  Monday, December 25, 2017 Event Dates:  Monday, December 25, 2017

    SanDiego.com / 72 d. 6 h. 57 min. ago more
  • Christmas Eve Dinner Buffet Cruise in San Diego Christmas Eve Dinner Buffet Cruise in San Diego

    Share an unforgettable Christmas Eve Dinner with your family and friends aboard our festively decorated yacht with spectacular carolers and a buffet brimming your all your holiday favorites. Book online today. Start Event Date:  Sunday, December 24, 2017 Event Dates:  Sunday, December 24, 2017

    SanDiego.com / 72 d. 7 h. 3 min. ago more
  • Parade of Lights Dinner CruisesParade of Lights Dinner Cruises

    Enjoy our 3-hour cruise, Parade of Lights Holiday Dinner Cruise, as we watch the decorated boats sail on the San Diego Bay. Book now! Start Event Date:  Sunday, December 10, 2017 Event Dates:  Sunday, December 10, 2017

    SanDiego.com / 72 d. 7 h. 11 min. ago